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EXECUTIVE SUMMERY

Financial sector reform in India has progressed rapidly on aspects like interest rate
deregulation, reduction in reserve requirements, prudential norms and supervision of risk.
Though the progress on the structural institutional aspects have been comparatively slower,
major changes required to take the Loans and Advances problem has gained importance.
Chandrapur based Shri Kanyka Sahakari Bank is Co-Operative bank in India, that has a
substantive history since 1989. The bank not only deals in retail banking providing utility
services to its customers but has also expanded its area of operation in multidimensional services
like merchant banking, agri business consultancy and e-banking. It recently registered a core
profit of Rs. 128 Lakhs in the financial year March08-March15. The report deals with a clear
understanding of the lending procedures followed by Shri Kanyka Sahakari Bank. It not only
explains the basic concepts and the terminologies used in the banking sector but also gives an
insight into the legal aspects and the paper work required for final sanction of a loan proposal.
Different types of advances, method of assigning credit limit and drawing power to individuals
and business units has been a part of the study during the internship period. The credit rating
methods applied by the banks to rate the credibility of the prospective clients, securities accepted
against lending and calculation of Equated Monthly Installments have also been discussed to
give an overview of the lending concept of the bank. The most important part of the study
includes case analysis of XYZ Infotech. This explains the significance of financial ratios and
credit rating of the client in a precise manner. The forecasting of pecuniary status of the
prospective borrower is shown by the study of balance sheets sand other financial details
furnished by the borrower and the bank.
Later, the report includes the final sanction of the loans, their regular monitoring and
conversion of accounts into standard or bad debts. The treatment of those Non Performing Assets
and the recovery of the same along with the legal procedure followed by the bank are discussed
in great detail.

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ORGANISATION PROFILE

INTRODUCTION TO BANKING SECTOR


A Bank is a financial institution licensed by a government. Its primary activities include
borrowing and lending money. Many other financial activities were allowed over time. For
example banks are important players in financial markets and offer financial services such as
investment funds. The level of government regulation of the banking industry varies widely, with
countries

TYPES OF BANKS
Banks' activities can be divided into:Retail banking, dealing directly with individuals and small businesses;
Business banking, providing services to mid-market business; corporate banking, directed at
large business entities;
Private banking, providing wealth management services to high net worth individuals and
families;
Investment banking, is relating to activities on the financial markets. Most banks are profitmaking, private enterprises. However, some are owned by government, or are non-profit
organizations.
Central banks are normally government-owned and charged with quasi-regulatory
responsibilities, such as supervising commercial banks, or controlling the cash interest rate. They
generally provide liquidity to the banking system and act as the lender of last resort in event of a
crisis.

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IMPORTANCE OF A BANK
SAFETY OF MONEY:
The money with the bank remains in safe custody there is always risk in keeping cash with
ones own self. It may be lost or stolen. Businessman likes to keep money with a bank to
avoid risks of money the customer need not keep large some of money.
IT CULTIVATES HABIT OF SAVING:
Banks cultivates the habit of saving in the Bank on the one hand are safe and on the other
earned interest for the depositor who prompted to safe and deposit money in their banks
accounts.
FINANCIAL HELP TO CUSTOMER:
Banks allows overdraft facilities to their customer so whenever a customer needs money he
can even withdraw more money then the balance in his account. Bank also grants loans and
credit facilities to their customers.
SAFE CUSTODY OF VALUABLE ARTICLES :
Valuable articles deals security etc. can also be deposited in the bank for safe custody. Safe
deposit vaults are provided by bank storing for these valuables.
OTHER INFORMATION:
By opening an account with a bank, the customers may also take advantages of various other
services providing by the banks, such a purchase and sale of securities, travelers cheque etc.

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BANKING IN INDIA
Without having sound and effective banking system India cannot have healthy economy.
The banking system of India should not only be hassle free but it should be able to meet new
challenges posed by the technology and any other external and internal factors. Banking in India
originated in the last decades of the 18th century. The oldest bank in existence in India is the
State Bank of India, a government-owned bank that traces its origins back to June 1806 and that
is the largest commercial bank in the country. Central banking is the responsibility of the Reserve
Bank of India, which in 1935 formally took over these responsibilities from the then Imperial
Bank of India, relegating it to commercial banking functions. After India's independence in 1947,
the Reserve Bank was nationalized and given broader powers. In 1969 the government
nationalized the 14 largest commercial banks; the government nationalized the six next largest in
1980.
Currently, India has 293 scheduled commercial banks (SCBs) - 27 public sector banks
(that is with the Government of India holding a stake), 30 private banks (these do not have
government stake; they may be publicly listed and traded on stock exchanges) and 40 foreign
banks.
The oldest bank in existence in India is the State Bank of India, which originated in the
Bank of Calcutta in June 1806, which almost immediately became the Bank of Bengal. This was
one of the three presidency banks, the other two being the Bank of Bombay and the Bank of
Madras, all three of which were established under charters from the British East India Company.
For many years the Presidency banks acted as quasi-central banks, as did their successors. The
three banks merged in 1925 to form the Imperial Bank of India, which, upon India's
independence, became the State Bank of India

STRUCTURE OF INDIAN BANKING


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RESERVE BANK OF
(RBI)

SCHEDULED BANKS IN

COMMERCIAL BANKS

COOPERATIVE BANKS

URBAN COOPERATIVES (52)


STATE COOPERATIVES (1

REGIONAL RURAL
PRIVATE
BANKSSECTOR
(196)PUBLIC
BANKS
SECTOR
(30) BANKS
FOREIGN
(27) BANKS (40)

NATONALIZED BANKS
SBI(19)
AND ASSOCIATE BANKS (8)
OLD
(22)

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NEW (8)

COOPERATIVE BANKING INTRODUCTION


Cooperative banking is retail and commercial banking organized on a cooperative basis.
Cooperative banking institutions take deposits and lend money in most parts of the world. The
Cooperative banks have a history of almost 100 years. The Cooperative banks are an important
constituent of the Indian Financial System, judged by the role assigned to them, the expectations
they are supposed to fulfill, their number, and the number of offices they operate. The
cooperative movement originated in the West, but the importance that such banks have assumed
in India is rarely paralleled anywhere else in the world. Their role in rural financing continues to
be important even today, and their business in the urban areas also has increased phenomenally
in recent years mainly due to the sharp increase in the number of primary cooperative banks.
While the cooperative banks in rural areas mainly finance agricultural based activities including
farming, cattle, milk, hatchery, personal finance etc. along with some small scale industries and
self-employment driven activities, the co-operative banks in urban areas mainly finance various
categories of people for self-employment, industries, small scale units, home finance, consumer
finance, personal finance, etc.

DEFINITION
A cooperative bank is a financial entity which belongs to its members, who are at the same time
the owners and the customers of their bank.
ORIGIN OF COOPERATIVE BANKS IN INDIA
The origins of the cooperative banking movement in India can be traced to the close of
nineteenth century when, inspired by the success of the experiments related to the cooperative
movement in Britain and the cooperative credit movement in Germany, such societies were set
up in India. They are the primary financiers of agricultural activities, some small-scale industries
and self-employed workers. The Anyonya Cooperative Bank in India is considered to have been
the first cooperative bank in Asia.
Cooperative movement is quite well established in India. The first legislation on
cooperation was passed in 1904. In 1914 the Maclagen committee envisaged a three tier structure
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for cooperative banking viz. Primary Agricultural Credit Societies (PACs) at the grass root level,
Central Cooperative Banks (CCBs) at the district level and State Cooperative Banks (SCBs) at
state level or Apex Level. The first urban cooperative bank in India was formed nearly 100 years
back in Baroda.
In the beginning of 20th century, availability of credit in India, more particularly in rural
areas, was almost absent. Agricultural and related activities were starved of organized,
institutional credit. The rural folk had to depend entirely on the money lenders, who lent often at
usurious rates of interest.
The cooperative banks arrived in India in the beginning of 20th Century as an official
effort to create a new type of institution based on the principles of cooperative organization and
management, suitable for problems peculiar to Indian conditions. These banks were conceived as
substitutes for money lenders, to provide timely and adequate short-term and long-term
institutional credit at reasonable rates of interest. In the formative stage Cooperative Banks were
Urban Cooperative Societies run on community basis and their lending activities were restricted
to meeting the credit requirements of their members. The concept of Urban Co-operative Bank
was first spelt out by Mehta Bhansali Committee in 1939 which defined on Urban Cooperative
Bank. Provisions of Section 5 (CCV) of Banking Regulation Act, 1949 (as applicable to Cooperative Societies) defined an Urban Cooperative Bank as a Primary Co-operative Bank other
than a Primary Cooperative Society was made applicable in 1966.
FEATURES OF COOPERATIVE BANKS

Cooperative Banks are organised and managed on the principal of co-operation, self-help,
and mutual help. They function with the rule of "one member, one vote". Function on "no
profit, no loss" basis.

Cooperative banks, as a principle, do not pursue the goal of profit maximization.

Cooperative bank performs all the main banking functions of deposit mobilization,
supply of credit and provision of remittance facilities. Cooperative Banks provide limited
banking products and are functionally specialists in agriculture related products.
However, cooperative banks now provide housing loans also.

Cooperative bank do banking business mainly in the agriculture and rural sector.

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Cooperative banks are perhaps the first government sponsored, government-supported,


and government-subsidized financial agency in India. They get financial and other help
from the Reserve Bank of India NABARD, central government and state governments.

Cooperative Banks belong to the money market as well as to the capital market.

Primary agricultural credit societies provide short term and medium term loans.

Cooperative banks are financial intermediaries only partially. The sources of their funds
(resources) are:
(a) Central and state government,
(b) The Reserve Bank of India and NABARD,
(c) Other co-operative institutions,
(d) Ownership funds and,
(e) Deposits or debenture issues.

It is interesting to note that intra-sectoral flows of funds are much greater in cooperative
banking than in commercial banking. Inter-bank deposits, borrowings, and credit from a
significant part of assets and liabilities of cooperative banks. This means that intrasectoral competition is absent and intra-sectoral integration is high for cooperative bank.

Cooperative Banks are subject to CRR and liquidity requirements as other scheduled and
non-scheduled banks are. However, their requirements are less than commercial banks.

Since 1966 the lending and deposit rate of commercial banks have been directly regulated
by the Reserve Bank of India.

TYPES OF COOPERATIVE BANKS


1) STATE COOPERATIVE BANKS (SCBs)
State cooperative banks are a federation of central cooperative banks and act as a
watchdog of the cooperative banking structure in the state. Its funds are obtained from share
capital, deposits, loans and overdrafts from the Reserve Bank of India. State cooperative banks
lend money to central cooperative banks and primary societies and not directly to farmers.
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2) CENTRAL COOPERATIVE BANKS (CCBs)


Central cooperative banks are the federations of primary credit societies in a district and
are of two types those having a membership of primary societies only and those having a
membership of societies as well as individuals. The funds of the bank consist of share capital,
deposits, loans and overdrafts from state cooperative banks and joint stocks. These banks finance
member societies within the limits of the borrowing capacity of societies.
3) PRIMARY AGRICULTURAL CREDIT SOCIETIES (PACS)
Cooperatives have played a major role in the supply of finance to agricultural sector for
the development of land, irrigation system and for its mechanization. The agricultural
cooperative credit in Punjab is divided into two sectors mainly, one dealing with short and
medium-term credit and the other with the long-term credit. The long term credit is awarded
from the Punjab State Cooperative Land Mortgage Banks at the apex and the Primary
Cooperative Land Mortgage Banks at district/tehsil level.
4) PRIMARY COOPERATIVE BANKS (PCBs)
They are non-agricultural societies. These are of two types: Urban cooperative banks and
Salary earners societies. Development of PCBs is looked after by the RBI. The RBI and IDBI
offer them concessional refinance facility on a selected basis. They operate in urban and semiurban areas. They provide housing finance and loans and advances for various purposes such as
petty trade and industry.

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DIFFICULTIES FACED BY COOPERATIVE


BANKS IN RURAL AREAS
1) Slow progress: The progress of co-operative banks is not up to the expectation and is slow
when comparing other type of banks because of many restrictions on their operations.
2) Limited scope of investment: The main objective of co-operative banks is to provide credit
facilities to the poor people i.e., to small and marginal farmers and other weaker sections. They
were originally having limited scope to invest their surplus funds freely.
3) Delay in decision making: The co-operative banks directly or indirectly by various agencies
i.e., NABARD, RBI. Thus it takes long time to take decision on some important issues. This, in
turn affects the progress of co-operative banks.
4) Lack of training facilities: Generally the staff of co-operative banks is urban oriented and
they may not know the problems and conditions of rural areas. Lack of training facility
concerning these areas also affects the growth of co-operative banks.
5) Poor recovery rate: The recovery performance of the co-operative banks is not up to the
mark. the reason for poor recovery of loans and mounting overdue are; inadequate supervision
and follow up action to assess the end use of credit by co-operative banks due to inadequate staff
in banks, poor Identification of beneficiaries, inadequate generation of output and income by the
beneficiaries, poor marketing facilities.
6) Lack of local participation: Rural co-operative banks have not received sufficient local
participation. The cooperative banks have been thrust upon the rural people from above without
involving local people in its operation and management. In this connection, it is suggested that
knowledgeable persons in the rural areas need be associated with the management of cooperative banks.
7) Lack of co-ordination: There is lack of proper co-ordination between co-operative banks and
other institutional financing agencies like commercial banks and RRBs. Also, there is inadequate
co-ordination between co-operative banks and other developmental agencies operating in rural
areas. This has hampered the progress of co-operative banks.
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8) Poor development of rural areas: In spite of several efforts made during the course o
development plans to promote the development of rural areas, it has not taken place in a
significant way. The areas, at present lack economic infra- structures like; facilities of marketing
storage and distribution of inputs. Besides, social infrastructure like; schools, medical facilities.
As a result, co-operative banks find it extremely difficult to operate in such areas.

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Bank Profile
History:
Shri Kanyaka Nagari Sahakari Bank Ltd., was founded by a great visionary Dr. Vijay Sambashiv
Ainchwar on 17th October, 1989. The first Chairman was Dr. Vijay Sambashiv Ainchwar, and
first vice- chairman was Dr. Prafulla Tumakampant Bhaskarwar. These were the people with
profound and and enduring ideals, faith, vision, optimism and entrepreneurial skills. The bank
was registered under Maharashrta State Co-Operative Societies Act , 1960 on 29th
November,1982. Vide registration no. CHD/BNK/147 and license no. UBD/MAH/998P ON
17TH July, 1989 and is governed by the Banking Regulation Act 1949(A.A.C.S) sec (CCV). The
bank also registered against the provision of ISO 9001:2014 on 20th June, 2010. The Registered
Office of the bank is situated at 1st Floor, Raghuwanshi Complex, Behind City High School,
Bazar ward, Chandrapur - 442 402, Tal- & District Chandrapur. Its area of operation is confined
to Chandrapur District & adjoining District Wardha, Nagpur, Gadchiroli & Bhandara.
The Bank has 6 branches - Main Branch -Chandrapur, S.P. College Extn Counter, Chandrapur.
Civil
line,
Chandrapur,
Mul,
Bhadrawati,
Gondpipri,
Sitabuldi
Nagpur.
Shri Kanyaka Nagri Sahakari Bank Ltd. always try to offer innovative customer services and
schemes. Latest technology Used to provide Quality services to the Customers Satisfaction.
Our Vision Statement Is Not a Prediction of What will happen In The Future; It Is Not Also Wish
list Of Desirable, But Unattainable Goals. Our Vision Is To Evolve Into A Strong, Sound And
Competitive Cooperative Banking Mall, Providing Integrated Services To Its Customers And
Members From All Segments, Leveraging On Advanced Technology And Trained Human
Resources, Adopting The Best Accounting And Ethical Practices And Fulfilling Social
Responsibilities Towards The Common People. The Customer Is The Center Point Of Our
Business Strategy; If We Lose Touch With Him/her Then We Lose Everything.

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Vision
A Vision is not a project report or a plan target. It is an articulation of desired
end results in broader terms
DR. A P J ABDUL KALAM

Mission
Where vision is of one year, cultivate flowers where vision is of ten years,
cultivate trees,and where vision is eternity, cultivate people.

Shri Kanyaka Nagari Sahakari Bank Ltd., was founded by a great visionary Dr. Vijay Sambashiv
Ainchwar on 17th October, 1989. The first Chairman was Dr. Vijay Sambashiv Ainchwar, and
first vice- chairman was Dr. Prafulla Tumakampant Bhaskarwar. These were the people with
profound and and enduring ideals, faith, vision, optimism and entrepreneurial skills. The bank
was registered under Maharashrta State Co-Operative Societies Act , 1960 on 29th
November,1982. Vide registration no. CHD/BNK/147 and license no. UBD/MAH/998P ON
17TH July, 1989 and is governed by the Banking Regulation Act 1949(A.A.C.S) sec (CCV). The
bank also registered against the provision of ISO 9001:2014 on 20th June, 2010. The Registered
Office of the bank is situated at 1st Floor, Raghuwanshi Complex, Behind City High School,
Bazar ward, Chandrapur - 442 402, Tal- & District Chandrapur. Its area of operation is confined
to Chandrapur District & adjoining District Wardha, Nagpur, Gadchiroli & Bhandara.
The Bank has 6 branches - Main Branch -Chandrapur, S.P. College Extn Counter, Chandrapur.
Civil

line,

Chandrapur,

Mul,

Bhadrawati,

Gondpipri,

Sitabuldi

Nagpur.

Shri Kanyaka Nagri Sahakari Bank Ltd. always try to offer innovative customer services and
schemes. Latest technology Used to provide Quality services to the Customers Satisfaction.

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PRODUCT PROFILE

(1) Kanyaka Housing Loan Scheme


A shelter which you can call your own has been eluding you so far? Not anymore. With the
Kanyaka Housing Loan Scheme, almost anyone can now fulfill his long cherished dream of
owning a house or a flat of his/ her choice at most attractive terms.
Eligibility:
Any individual aged 21 years or above having regular income.
Purpose:

Purchase of land, purchase or construction of house/ flat.

Purchase of up to 35 years old house/ flat.

Renovation/ extension/ repair/ furnishing of house/ flat.

Taking over of existing Housing Loan form other Bank/ Financial Institution.

The loan is now extended to those cases also where flats are being constructed by
promoters/ developers where immediate mortgage of the property may not be possible.
Quantum of loan:
Quantum of loan depends on the cost of house/flat, applications age, income, repayment
capacity etc
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(2) Kanyaka Car Loan Scheme


Shri Kanyaka Nagri Sahakari Bank joins Hands with Maruti Udyog Ltd. For Financing Purchase
of Maruti Cars
Purpose:
Purchase of any Maruti Brand Car from authorized Maruti Dealer.
Eligibility :

Any individual with gross income of Rs.10,000/- and minimum net income of
Rs.5,000/- per month.

To be eligible the applicant will be required to get minimum score as per structured
scoring Model of SKSB.

Quantum of Loan :
Max. Rs.6 lack.
Margin: 10%
Security:

In case of salaried person: Nil, if employer ensures repayment.

In case of professional & Self-employed person :

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To be secured by personal guarantee of 1 to 2 persons having adequate worth, otherwise at least


60% of loan amount to be covered by liquid security in the form of Term Deposits, NSCs, KVPs,
LIPs (SV), and Relief Bonds etc

Eligibility Criteria
For purchase of new car as well as old car

Your Savings/ Current Deposit/ Term Deposit A/c holder with the Bank and fulfill the following
criteria

A minimum net income (take home salary for salaried person) of Rs 5,000/- per month.

In respect of working couple, net income of the spouse is considered for the purpose of
computing net income and monthly installments, provided the spouse joins as coborrower and monthly installment may be realized from the salaries of either of them. In
case of salaried person, the applicant should be in regular service for at least 2 years.
Professional and self-employed persons who are at least 2 years in their profession.

Quantum of Loan:

In case of individuals
Maximum amount of loan is 12.00 lacs in case of new car and Rs. 6.00 lacs in case of old
car.

Margin:

New Car:- 10%

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Old Car:- 30% of the valuation amount in case of old car

Processing Charge: 0.50%

(3) Kanyaka Personal Loan Scheme for Salaried Persons


Daughters marriage, major surgical operation, repairing of old house, passage money for sons
education abroad or any other social pecuniary liability. You can now heave a sigh of relief. Our
Personal loan Scheme has been designed just to meet such eventualities.
Eligibility:

If you are a salaried person, with permanent service for at least 3 years, you may apply
for the loan.

Quantum of Loan:

The maximum amount of loan shall be Rs 3 lac or 40 months' net salary, whichever is
less.

Period of Loan:

The loan is to be repaid within a period not exceeding 36 months.

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(4) Kanyaka Personal Loan Scheme for Pensioners


As a senior citizen of the society, you command a special respect from Shri Kanyaka Nagri
Sahakari Bank. The Bank is offering you a loan scheme for assisting you to meet your various
family and personal needs after retirement.
The salient features of the Revised Scheme are as under:
Objective:
To extend term loan to you to meet your family and personal expenses.
Eligibility:
If you are a pensioner of Central and State Governments, Central and State Governments'
Undertakings, Defense Services, reputed Companies, Educational Institutions (Universities,
Institutes, Schools and Colleges) and drawing pension from the Branches of the Kanyaka Bank,
you are eligible for loan under the Scheme from the Branch, where your pension is paid.
Age of the Borrower:
Your age at the time of availing loan should be such that the entire loan is repaid before your
attaining seventy five years of age.
Quantum of Loan:
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A maximum of Rs 2 lakhs subject to 12 months' gross pension.


Margin: Nil
Processing Charge: 1%
Disbursement of Loan:
The loan shall be disbursed through your Savings Bank A/c other than the account in which your
pension is credited every month. If you are not having any other Savings Bank A/c with the
branch, you may open a Savings A/c with the Branch jointly with another member of your
family, preferably with family pensioner for the purpose of availing of the loan under the
Scheme.

(5) Kanyaka Housing Loan for Pensioners


Shri Kanyaka Nagari Sahakari Bank Ltd takes care of your Housing and related requirements at
post retirement stage. You will also find us your companion in securing Shelter in any Old-Age
Home. Salient features of the Scheme are given below
Eligibility :
1. All pensioners of Central and State Governments, Central and State Governments
Undertakings, Defense Services, reputed Companies, Educational Institutions
(Universities, Institutes, Schools and Colleges) including pensioners (VR and VRS) of
Kanyaka Bank.

2. YourMonthlyNetPensionshouldbeMinimumofRs.5,000/-

3. Your age at the time of availing the loan must be 70 years

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4. You must be physically fit and mentally alert to execute the documents. Person(s) in
paralytic condition or bed-ridden is/are not eligible for the loan
Purpose :

Renovation/extension/repair/furnishing of self-occupied house/ flat.

Purchase/construction of new house/ flat.

Purchase of old house/ flat not old over 35 years from the date of completion of
construction.

Securing shelter in any Old-Age Home

Quantum of Loan:
Max. Rs. 2 lac provided total deduction including EMI of the loan must not exceed 40% of your
net monthly pension. If your spouse joins as co-borrower and if he/ she is also pensioner drawing
pension from the branch, pension of both of you shall be considered for determining the quantum
of loan within the overall ceiling.
Repayment Period:
Entire loan has to be liquidated before your attaining 75 years of age. The age of the 1st
pensioner or from whose income (also pensioner), the major recovery of loan will be made, shall
be the deciding factor for the period of loan (subject to maximum repayment period of 10 years).
However, where loan is extended for getting shelter in Old -Age Home total repayment period
must not exceed 10 years (120 EMI).

(6) Kanyaka Cash Rental

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Shri Kanyaka Nagari Sahakari Bank Ltd has come out with a loan scheme against future rent
receivables for the owners of house properties who have leased out or rented the same to bank,
insurance company, multinationals, company of good market standing, reputation and financial
position, financial institutions, financially sound public sector undertakings, Government of
India offices.
The Salient features of the loan scheme are indicated below:

Eligibility
If you are an individual (single or joint) or firm or a company owning house, flat or godown and
letting or leasing it out to bank, insurance company, multinational company, company of good
market standing, reputation and sound financial position, financial institution, financial sound
PSU of Govt. of India (not individuals) and you are interested to take loan against future rentals
you may apply for the loan.
Quantum of Loan calculation
Max. Rs. 10 Lakh where EMI should not exceed 80% of post tax monthly rent / lease rent
receivable (85% when our bank is tenant) & 80% valueof property t o be mortgaged.
Repayment
The loan is to be repaid within the unexpired period of lease/ tenancy or 8 years whichever is
lower.
Security

Mortgage of the unencumbered property and/ or

LIP/ KVP/ Relief Bond/ Bank's Term Deposit etc.

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Assignment of future rent receivables.

Margin
20% of the amount of rent receivables or 20% of the value of the house property or on accrued/
surrender value of other securities.
Processing Charge: 1%

(7) Kanyaka Demand Loan Scheme


Shri Kanyaka Nagari Sahakari Bank Ltd introduces a unique loan scheme against your savings in
the form of NSCs/ KVPs/ Life Insurance Policies (Surrender Value). You can avail up to 100% of
the face value of your savings instruments or even more than that in case of NSCs/ KVPs. The
salient features of the scheme are as under:
Eligibility:
Any individual having investment in the form of LIP (Surrender Value)/ NSC/ KVP to cover the
loan amount in his/ her name and be introduced to the bank.
Purpose:
For meeting all types of personal expenses.
Demand loan - Quantum of loan:
a) Against LICI Policy -- 90% of Surrender Value

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b) Against NSCs/ KVPs /Relief Bond etc

(8) Kanyaka Education Loan Scheme


We are now at your doorstep to support your pursuit for excellence. Our Educational Loan
Scheme has been designed to meet your expenses for higher studies in India and abroad.
If you are an Indian National and secured an admission to any of the following academic/
professional/ technical courses through Entrance Test/ Selection process in a Board/ Institution/
University.

Courses Eligible for Study in India:

Graduation Courses: B.A., B.Com, B.Sc., etc.

Post Graduation Courses: Masters and Ph.D.

Professional Courses: Engineering, Medical, Agriculture, Veterinary, Law, Dental,


Management, Computer, etc.

Computer Certificate Courses of reputed Institutes accredited to Dept. of Electronics or


Institutes affiliated to University.

Courses like ICWA, CA, CFA, etc.

Courses conducted by IIM, IIT, IISC, XLRI, NIFT, etc.

Courses offered in India by reputed foreign Universities.

Evening Courses of approved Institutes.

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Other Courses leading to Diploma/ Degree, etc. conducted by Colleges/ Universities


approves by UGC/ Govt./ AICTE/ AIBMS/ ICMS, etc.

Courses Eligible for Study Abroad:

Graduation : For job-oriented professional/ technical courses offered by reputed


Universities.

Post Graduation: MCA, MBA, MS, etc.

Courses conducted by CIMA - London, CPA in USA etc.

Quantum of Loan:
1. For study in India: Max. Rs. 10 lack.
2. For study abroad: Max. Rs. 20 lacks
Other Rules:
Expenses covered by the Loan :
i.

Fees payable to College/ School/ Hostel.

ii.

Examination/ Library/ Laboratory Fee.

iii.

Purchase of Books/ Equipments/ Instruments/ Uniforms.

iv.

Caution Deposit/ Building Fund/ Refundable Deposit supported by Institution Bills/


Receipts.

v.
vi.

Travel Expenses/ Passage Money for studies abroad.


Purchase of Computers: Essential for completion of the Course.

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vii.

Any other expenses required to complete the Course like study tours, project work, thesis,
etc.

Repayment of Loan:
The loan is to be repaid in 5 to 7 years after commencement of repayment. The
repayment will commence after a moratorium/ repayment holiday which is Course period
plus 2 years or 6 months after getting job whichever is earlier.
Life Insurance Coverage:
To ensure security to student's and borrower's life and against their loan liability and
additional loan component for payment of one-time premium for such insurance coverage
may be sanctioned by bank on request from the customer.

(9) Kanyaka Mortgage Loan Scheme


Objectives:
Providing loan against mortgage of property to the owner of the property. The property may be
House/ Flat or any other commercial property but not agricultural land of any other vacant land.
Purpose:
The loan is meant for general purpose of the borrower to meet any personal/ business
requirement except speculations.

Eligibility:
Any individual in the age bracket of 21-65 years having property to be mortgaged and income to
repay the loan. Company, Partnership firm, Co-operative Society and Trust are, however, not
eligible of the loan. Third party property also cannot be mortgaged for taking a loan.

25 | P a g e

Quantum of loan:
Term Loan - Maximum Rs.15.00 Lac & OD facility - Max Rs.25.00 lac subject to
1. 24-times of monthly net income.
2. 50% of the value of property.
Total monthly deduction including proposed EMI / Intt on OD should not exceed 50% of the gross
monthly income of the borrower

OUTLINE OF PROBLEM

1. To understand the terms and conditions of various loan schemes provided.


26 | P a g e

2. To study and evaluate the performance of each loan scheme.


3. To study about the respondent and their varying interest.
4. .To makes suggestion based on findings.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

This refers to the method of data description. Descriptive research includes surveys and fact
findings enquire of different kinds. The major purpose of descriptive research is description of

27 | P a g e

the state of affair as it exists at present. In business research we quite often use the term export
facto research for descriptive research studies.
The main characteristics of this method is that the researcher has no control over the variable, he
can only report what has happened or what is happening. The method of research utilised in
descriptive research are survey methods of all kinds including comparative and correlation
methods.

DATA COLLECTION TOOLS:


Data mainly collected from both primary and secondary sources.
1. PRIMARY DATA: Primary data are freshly gathered for a specific purpose or for
a specific research project. Primary data was collected by way of discussion with
company officials. Mainly with bank manager. It has collected through the interim
schedule, discussion and by interacting with the officials of the organization or the
respondents.

2.

SECONDARY DATA: Secondary data that were collected through published


materials like pamphlets, company books and from the official website that is
http://www.kanyakabank.in/history

TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES:


Information has to be collected on the basis of the questionnaire distributed to the borrowers

28 | P a g e

Internet/ prominent search engines have been used for collecting the Data, market watch is also
used to some extent for interpretation analysis.

All data collected are carefully classified, tabulated for the purpose of research and interpreted
on the basis of charts and tables.

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION


Table:1

Table showing total advances from the year 2012 2015

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Year

Amount ( in Lakhs)

Percentage (%)

2012 - 2013

22,156.11

25.95

2013 - 2014

27,868.11

32.62

2014 - 2015

35,393.55

41.43

Total

85,417.77

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it can be analysed that in the year 2012 2013 the total no. of advances
was 22,156.11 Lakh with a 25.95%; in 2013 2014 the total no. of advances was 27,868.11
Lakh 32.62% and in the year 2014 2015 the amount is 35,393.55 with 41.43%.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above pie- chart it can be inferred that in the year 2013 2014 showed the
maximum advances.

Table 2 : Table showing outstanding amount of loan for the years 2012 - 2015.
(a) Housing finance
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Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 2013

1,418.57

31.80

2013 2014

1,453.67

32.50

2014 2015

1,591.42

35.70

Total

4463.66

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analysed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount
outstanding was 1,418.57 Lakh with 31.80%. In the year 2013 2014 the amount was 1,453.67
Lakh with 32.50 % and in the year 2014 2015 it was 1,591.42 Lakh with 35.70%.

INTERPRETATION:
From the above pie- chart it can be inferred that there is continuous growth every year in the
housing finance segment. There is a noticeable growth in the home loan segment which is very
profitable to the bank for their further financial improvement.

Table 3 ; Table showing outstanding amount of loan for the years 2012 - 2015.
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(b) Car loans

Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 2013

70.18

23.62

2013 2014

80.07

26.96

2014 2015

146.81

49.42

Total

297.06

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analyzed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount
outstanding was 70.18 Lakh with 23.62% . In the year 2013 2014 the amount was 80.02 Lakh
which shows 26.96% and in the year 2014 2015 the amount was 146.81 Lakh with 49.42%.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above graph it can be inferred that in the year 2014 2015 there is a substantial
growth in the car loans as against all previous years.

Table 3. Table showing outstanding loan for the year 2012 2015.
(c) Personal loan
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Year

Amount( in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 2013

384.46

28.31

2013 2014

425.11

31.32

2014 2015

548.24

40.37

Total

1357.81

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analyzed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount was
384.46 Lakh which shows 28.31%. In the year 2013 2014 the amount was 425.11 Lakh which
shows 31.32% and in the year 2014 2015 the amount was 548.24

Lakh which shows the

percentage of 40.37.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above mentioned graph it can be interpreted that there is a substantial growth every
year in the personal loans.

Table 5 :Table showing outstanding loan for the years 2012 - 2015.
(d) Educational loan
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Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 2013

224.99

26.88

2013 2014

276.84

33.09

2014 - 2015

335.07

40.03

Total

836.9

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analysed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount
outstanding is 224.99 Lakh with 26.88%. In the year 2013 2014 the outstanding amount is
276.84 Lakh with 33.09% and in the year 2014 2015 the outstanding amount is 335.07 Lakh
with 40.03%.

INTERPRETATION:
From the above graph it is seen that there is a constant growth in the education loan of SKSB.
There is a noticeable growth in the education loan segment which is very profitable to the bank
for their further financial improvement

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Table 6 : Table showing outstanding loans to retail sector for the year 2012 2015
Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 - 2013

3,469.72

30.28

2013 - 2014

3,727.22

32.54

2014 - 2015

4,260.36

37.18

Total

11,457.3

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analyzed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount was
3,469.72 Lakh with 30.28%. In the year 2013 2014 the amount was 3,727.22 Lakh with
32.54% and in the year 2014 2015 the amount was 4,260.36 Lakh with 37.18% .
INTERPRETATION:
From the above graph it can be inferred that there is a moderate growth in the loans of the retail
sector from 2012 - 2015.The maximum growth is in the year 2014 2015.

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Table 7 : Table showing outstanding loans to corporate sector for the year
2012 2015.
Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 - 2013

13,032.09

26.05

2013 - 2014

15,661.44

31.29

2014 - 2015

21,349.41

42.66

Total

50,042.94

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analysed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount was
13,032.09 Lakh which shows a percentage of 26.05. In the year 2013 2014 the amount
was15,661.44 in Lakh which shows the percentage of 31.29 and in the year 2014 2015 the
amount was 21,349.41 in Lakh which shows the percentage of 42.66.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above pie-chart it is inferred that there is constant growth in the outstanding loans in
corporate sector.
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Table 8 : Table showing outstanding loans to others which includes priority


sector for the year 2012 - 2015.
Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 2013

6,138.64

24.53

2013 2014

8,763.02

35.03

2014 2015

10,118.47

40.44

Total

25,020.14

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analyzed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount was
6,138.64 Lakh with 24.53%. In the year 2013 2014 the amount was 8,763.02 Lakh with
35.03% and in the year 2014 2015 the amount was 10,118.47 Lakh with 40.44%.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above graph it can be inferred that there is a noticeable growth in the outstanding loan
by others which includes priority sector which is highly beneficial to the bank.

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Table 9 : Table showing total outstanding loans to business sector for the year
2012 - 2015.
Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 - 2013

22,640.45

26.16

2013 - 2014

28,151.68

32.55

2014 - 2015

35,728.24

41.29

Total

86,520.37

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analysed that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount
outstanding was 22,640.45 Lakh which shows a percentage of 26.16. In the year 2013 2014 the
amount was 28,151.68 Lakh which shows the percentage of 32.55 and in the year 2014 2015
amount was 35,728.24 Lakh which shows the percentage of 41.29.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above graph it is inferred that there is a substantial growth in the outstanding loan in
business sector which concludes that it is highly advantageous to the bank for their further
financial improvement.
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Table 10 : Table showing total outstanding retail advances for the year 2012 2013
Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 - 2013

3,469.72

30.28

2013 - 2014

3,727.22

32.53

2014 - 2015

4,260.36

37.19

Total

11,457.3

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is concluded that when we compare the year 2012 2013 the amount
outstanding was 3,469.72 Lakh with 30.28%. In the year 2013 2014 the outstanding amount
was 3,727.22

Lakh with 32.53% and in the year 2014 2015 the

amount is 4,260.36 Lakh

with 37.19%.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above graph it can be inferred that there is a sequential growth year wise which is
highly beneficial to the Shri Kanyaka Nagari Sahakari Bank.
39 | P a g e

Table 11: Table showing term loans for the years 2012 -2015
Year

Amount (in Lakh)

Percentage (%)

2012 - 2013

13,983.65

30.28

2013 - 2014

19,200.56

32.53

2014 - 2015

25,991.64

37.19

Total

59,175.85

100

ANALYSIS:
From the table it can be analysed that in the year 2012 2013 the amount is 13,983.65 Lakh with
a percentage of 30.28. In the year 2013 2014 the amount is 19,200.56 Lakh with a percentage
of 32.53 and in the year 2014 2015 the amount is 25,991.64 Lakh with a percentage of 37.19.

INTERPRETATION:
It can be inferred that there is continuous growth in the term loans provided by the bank
wherein the maximum growth is seen in the year 2014 2015.
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Table 12 : Table showing educational qualification of the loan borrowers

Particulars

Number of respondent

Percentage (%)

PUC

28

28

Graduate

54

54

Post- graduate

18

18

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above mentioned table it can be analyzed that 28% have done PUC, 54% are graduate
and 18% are post-graduate.

INTERPRETATION:

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From the above graph it can be inferred that maximum no. of respondents are graduate where as
minimum no. of respondent are post-graduate.

Table 13: Table showing break up of respondent--- age wise.

Age in years

No. of respondent

Percentage (%)

20 30

45

45

30 40

29

29

40 50

18

18

Above 50

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is seen that in there are 45 respondent in the age group of 20 30, 29
respondents fall in the age group of 30 40, 18 respondent in the age group of 40 50 and 8
respondent above the age group of 50.

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Interpretation: From the above graph it can be inferred that the majority group of respondents
belongs to the age group of 20 30 followed by the age group of 30 40. The least no. of
respondents belongs to the age group above 50.

Table 14 :Table showing break up of respondent--- gender wise.

Gender

No. of respondent

Percentage (%)

Male

88

88

Female

12

12

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it is analysed that 88 respondent are males whereas only 12 respondents are
females which shows the maximum no. of respondent were males.

Interpretation:
From the above graph it is inferred that that the maximum no. of respondent are males and
female participation is less.
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Table 15 :Table showing break up of respondent --- occupation wise.


Occupation

No. of respondent

Percentage (%)

Government

35

35

Professional

15

15

Private

24

24

Business

26

26

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it can be analysed that 35 of the respondents are government employees, 15
are professional, and 24 are in private and 26 belongs to the business.
Interpretation:
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From the above graph it can be inferred that bank major customer on the basis of occupation are
government employees. Table 16 : Table showing break up of respondent ---

income wise.
Income (Rs.)

No. of respondent

Percentage (%)

Less than 50,000

20

20

50,000 1,00,000

28

28

1,00,000 1,50,000

48

48

Above 1,50,000

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above mentioned table it can be concluded that there are 20 respondents income is less
than 50,000 ; 28 respondents falls in the income group of 50,000 1,00,000 ; 48 respondents in
the income group of 1,00,000 1,50,0000 and 4 respondents falls in the income group above
1,50,000.
Interpretation:
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It can be inferred that majority no. of respondent belongs to income group of 1,00,000
1,50,000 and the least is below 1,50,000.

Table 17 :Table showing source of awareness


Source

No. of respondent

Percentage (%)

SKSB employees

45

45

Magazine

35

35

Friends and television

12

13

Newspaper

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it can be analysed that source of awareness of 45 respondents was through
SKSB employees, 35 was through magazine; 12 was through friends and television and 8 was
through newspaper, 12 was through friends and television through
INTERPRETATION:

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It can be inferred that majority of the respondent came to know about the bank through SKSB
employees followed by magazines, Friends and television and finally the least came to know
through newspaper.

Table 18 :Table showing EMI paid by the borrower.


Amount

No. of respondent

Percentage (%)

Below 5,000

20

20

5,000 10,000

43

43

10,000 15,000

30

30

15,000 20,000

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table it can be analysed that below 5,000, 20 respondent paid EMI in between
5,000
10, 000, 43 in between 10,000 15,000, 30 paid EMI and the least EMI was paid in
between 15,000 20,000.
INTERPRETATION:
47 | P a g e

It can be inferred from the pie- chart that the majority no. of respondent who borrowed EMI is in
between 5,000 10,000 and the least EMI paid by the borrower is in between 15,000 20,000.

Table 19 :Table showing loan amount borrowed by respondent.


Amount ( Rs.)

No. of respondent

Percentage (%)

Below 5,00,000

30

30

5,00,000 10,00,000

45

45

10,00,000 15,00,000

20

20

15,00,000 20,00,00

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
It can be analyzed from the above mentioned table that that there were 30 respondents who
borrowed amount of loan below 5,00,000 ; 45 between 5,00,000 10,00,000 ; 20 between
10,00,000 to 15,00,000 and there were only 5 respondents who borrowed above 15,00,000.
20, 00,000
48 | P a g e

INTERPRETATION:
From the above graph it can be interpreted that the maximum no. of amount borrowed by
respondent is in between 5,00,000 10,00,000 whereas the least of amount borrowed by
respondent is in between 15,00,000 20,00,000.

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Table 20 ; Table showing satisfactory level of respondents with loan.


Satisfaction
level

No. of
respondent

Percentage
(%)

Extremely satisfied

15

15

Satisfied

53

53

Moderate

25

25

Unsatisfied

Total

100

100

ANALYSIS:
From the above table an attempt was made to understand whether respondent feels that the
products offered by the bank were extremely satisfied, satisfied, moderate or unsatisfied.
INTERPRETATION:
It can be inferred from the pie-chart that that the maximum no. of respondent were satisfied
where least no. of respondent were unsatisfied.
50 | P a g e

ACTIVITY CHART

Week

Activity

1.

Introduction to Bank, Observation


Of Finance process, Discussion of prospective topics.

2.

Discussion of SIP, Finalization of SIP topic, Started collection of theoretical


background.

3.

Preparation of questionnaires, discussion with Bank employees regarding


questionnaires, checking theoretical background.

4.

Discussion with employees, checking internet websites of Bank and others for
theoretical background & literature review.

5.

Collection of all secondary data i.e. annual report, company information etc.

6.

Started typing for final copy of project, prepare graphs charts, Discussion with
financial manager official about result of data analysis.

7.

Forwarded mails for correction & recommendation to both ends.


(organization guide, faculty guide)

8.

Final graph prepare approval from organization guide, submitted to


organization, changes were made according to faculty guide & submitted
project.

51 | P a g e

KEY LEARNING

1. 45% of the loans taking customers are in between the age of 20 30 while another 29%
of customers are in between the age 30 40. 18% of the customers belong to the 40 50
age categories while 8% are above the age of 50.
2. 88% of the loan takers are male while only 12% are female.
3. 35% of loan taking customer are working at the government sector, 15% professional,
24% private and 26% customers are engaged in his / her own business.
4. It can be observed that majority of customers are under the income group of 1,00,000
1,50,000 which is 48% followed by the income group of Rs. 50,000 1,00,000, at 28%.
The group earning less than Rs. 50,000 owns 20% and at last the income group of Rs.
1,50,000 and above owns 4%.
5. 45% of respondent are made aware about loan by Shri Kanyka Bank employee while
35% are made aware by magazine. 13% and 7% of customer are made aware of bank by
newspapers and friends.
6. Majority of the EMI was paid by the borrower in between 5,000 10,000 and least EMI
was paid by borrowed in between 20,000 30,000.
7. 30% of customer of SKSB banks are taking loans below 5,00,000, While 45% are taking
between 5,00,00 10,00,000 , 20% are taking between 10,00,000 15,00,000 by 22%
and only 5% borrowed in between 15,00,000 20,00,000.
8. 53% of the customers are satisfied with the loan amount while 25% are moderately
satisfied and 15% are extremely satisfied but 7% are unsatisfied.
9. It is also found that there is an impressive continuous growth in vehicle loan, education
loan and personal loans which is remarkably outstanding for the bank.
10. Home loan segment has a better increasing trend in coming years since it has a high rate
of demand in the current market.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE ORGAISATION

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1. I helped to bank in various bank activities.


2. Help to customer to understand the various banking products and loan schemes.
3. Customer support in various forms i.e. Documentation required for loan, Documents
required for account opening.
4. Organize the campaigns for mass awareness of the customer.
2. Periodic review with the current bank customer.
3. Organize the customer satisfaction survey.

Human beings are no more constraint to the basic necessities in their lives. Their
needs have diversified through the ages placing an increase demand on resources. The economic
boom in the country has wide open the new challenges and opportunities to the people. This has
necessitated timely and easy availability of funds to meet the requirements of institutions and
individuals in meeting their goals. Thus to keep up with the pace of this increasing demand, the
banking industry have come forward with the credit portfolio to provide funds on relatively
easier terms and conditions. Today, banks are committed towards providing more and more
number of people with finance with a view to make their lives better.
The ever increasing demands of the customers have forced the banking sectors to
emerge with new retail products bearing new unique features in them. The competition among
the banks cannot be neglected. They have been supplying loans for the purpose of purchase of
vehicles, pursue of higher education, or to meet their other personal requirements.
The banking industry is witnessing a boom at present boosted by the increasing
demand for retail loan products. The demand has arisen as a result of genuine individual needs.
From an overall view point demand for retail loans is ever rising and the same would be reflected
on the demand for funds. Hence the profitability of this particular industry is expected to take a
positive track in the future ahead.

SUGGESTIONS
53 | P a g e

1. The banks variety of loans and advances are unlimited but they are not communicated
well enough to customers. Hence, it is suggested to make additional efforts to provide
information to the customers about the range of loans and advances
2. Attractive and competitive interest rates should be adopted since it is the main factor
considered for taking loans by the customers.
3. Since all the banks are providing loans with the same features. It is recommended that
bank should offer some unique features to its products to acquire strong identity and can
be easily distinguished.
4. Service level provided by the bank should be more efficient and effective for the
customer. The customers are very keen on the service provided by the bank. They would
rate it as one of the important factor while selecting the loans.
5. The bank should adopt attractive and competitive rate of interest in order to induce
customers to take personal loans and to attain more shares from its competitors. This is
also one of the critical factors for selecting the loans.
6. Increase in short- term lending such as cash credits, Overdraft and Loans repayable on
demand is most favorable to bank to earn short- term gain and maintain liquidity.
7. A suggestion is made to the bank to expand the business globally and offer more and
more services to the people abroad.
8. Bank should follow guidelines towards priority sector and get benefits out of it.
9. Offer best customer services, lending on profitable ventures, diversifying the business to
cope with the competition.
10. Bank should use latest technologies in banking activities.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

a. Books:
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i. Kainth Gursharan Singh(1996), Dynamics of Cooperatives in Maharashtra; Indian


Cooperative Review, Vol. XXXVII, No.1,pp. 38-52
ii. Kothari C.R.(2013), Research Methodology; revised second edition; pages 7176, 84-85, 100-102
iii. A Hand Book of Banking by N. S. Toor
iv. Ramman Finance management

b. Web Pages:
i. http://www.kanyakabank.in/history.html#
ii. http://www.kanyakabank.in/old_about_us.html
iii. http://www.kanyakabank.in/vision_mission.html
iv. http://www.kanyakabank.in/services.html
vi. http://www.nabard.org/citizen.asp

QUESTIONNAIRE
Dear sir / madam

55 | P a g e

I am a student of Institute of Business Management and research, under Pune University. I need
your kind co-operation regarding the following information, which will be used only for my
academic purpose. It will be considered as highly confidential.

MODEL QUESTIONS FOR CUSTOMERS

1. Personal details of customer


Name:__________________________

Address:_________________________

Gender
Age

1. Male

a) 20 - 30
b) 30 40
c) 40 50
d) 50 -60
e) 50 and above

Qualification
a) Graduate
b) Post graduate
c) Others

2) Occupation
a) Government
b) Professional
c)

Private

d)

Business

56 | P a g e

2. Female

3) Annual income

4)

a)

Below Rs. 50,000

b)

Rs. 50,000 Rs. 1,00,000

c)

Rs. 1,00,000 Rs. 1,50,000

d)

Rs. 1,50,000 and above

Accounts in other bank


a) Yes
b)

5)

No

Is this is the first time you borrowing the loan?


a) Yes
b) No

6)

For what purpose have you borrowed the loan?


a) Housing finance
b) Car loan
c)

Educational loan

d)

Personal loan

7) What is the combined annual income of your family?


a)

Below Rs. 50,000

b)

Rs. 50,000 Rs. 1,00,000

c)

Rs. 1,00,000 Rs. 1,50,000

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d)

8)

Rs. 1,50,000 and above

How many times did you approach the bank to get the loan?
a) One
b) Two
c) Three
d) Four

9)

How much loan amount borrowed by you from U.B.I?


a)

Below 5,00,000

b)

Rs. 5,00,000 Rs. 10,00,000

c)

Rs. 10,00,000 Rs. 15,00,000

d)

Rs. 15,00,000 Rs. 20,00,000

10)

What is the monthly EMI paid by you?


a)

Below 5,000

b)

Rs.5,000 Rs.10,000

c)

Rs.20,000 Rs.30,000

d)

Rs.30,000 and above

11) How many years have you taken the loan for?
a)

0 - 3 years

b)

3 6 years

c)

6 10 years

d)

10 years and above

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12) Did you face any problems for borrowing loan?


a) Yes
b)

No

13) What are the sources that make you aware of SKSB loan schemes?
a)

Newspaper

b)

Magazine

c)

Friends and television

d)

SKSB or other bank employee

14) Are you satisfied with your decision to take loan from SKSB?
a)

Extremely satisfied

b)

Satisfied

c)

Moderate

d)

Unsatisfied

16) Rate your level of satisfaction in a scale of 1 10


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------17) What do you think about interest rates?
a)

Extreme High

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b) High
c)

Low

d)

O. k.

18) What do you think about SKSB bank service?


a) Very good
b) Good
c)

O.k.

d)

Bad

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