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YOUR GLOBAL PARTNER In this issue: China’s agricultural challenges • Hulling of all major pulse

YOUR GLOBAL PARTNER

In this issue:

China’s agricultural challenges

• Hulling of all major pulse varieties

• Environmental impact of micronutrients

• Phytogenic feed additives

• Improving the health benefits of bread

ILDEX

Event review

the health benefits of bread • ILDEX Event review millingandgrain.com perendale.com November 2015 Volume 126
the health benefits of bread • ILDEX Event review millingandgrain.com perendale.com November 2015 Volume 126

millingandgrain.com

perendale.com

November 2015

Volume 126

Issue 11

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VOLUME 126 ISSUE 11 NOVEMBER 2015 Perendale Publishers Ltd 7 St George’s Terrace St James’

VOLUME 126 ISSUE 11

NOVEMBER 2015

Perendale Publishers Ltd 7 St George’s Terrace St James’ Square, Cheltenham, Glos, GL50 3PT, United Kingdom Tel: +44 1242 267700

Publisher Roger Gilbert rogerg@perendale.co.uk

International Marketing Team Darren Parris Tel: +44 1242 267707 darrenp@perendale.co.uk Tom Blacker Tel: +44 1242 267700 tomb@perendale.co.uk

Mark Cornwell Tel: +1 913 6422992 markc@perendale.com

Latin America Marketing Team Iván Marquetti Tel: +54 2352 427376 ivanm@perendale.co.uk

India Marketing Team Ritu Kala Tel: +91 93 15 883669 rituk@perendale.co.uk

Nigeria Marketing Team Nathan Nwosu Tel: +234 805 7781077 nathann@perendale.co.uk

Editorial Team Olivia Holden oliviah@perendale.co.uk

Peter Parker peterp@perendale.co.uk

Malachi Stone malachis@perendale.co.uk

Andrew Wilkinson andreww@perendale.co.uk

International Editor Professor Dr M Hikmet Boyacıo˘glu Tel: +90 532 4469232 hikmetb@perendale.co.uk

Design Manager James Taylor jamest@perendale.co.uk

Circulation & Events Manager Tuti Tan tutit@perendale.co.uk

Australia Correspondent Roy Palmer Tel: +61 419 528733 royp@perendale.co.uk

©Copyright 2015 Perendale Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior permission of the copyright owner. More information can be found at www.perendale.com Perendale Publishers Ltd also publish ‘The International Milling Directory’ and ‘The Global Miller’ news service

Grain & Feed Milling Technology magazine was rebranded to Milling and Grain in 2015Directory’ and ‘The Global Miller’ news service 54 Phytogenic feed additives Keeping pace with trends and

magazine was rebranded to Milling and Grain in 2015 54 Phytogenic feed additives Keeping pace with
54 Phytogenic feed additives Keeping pace with trends and challenges in pig production
54 Phytogenic feed
additives
Keeping pace with trends and
challenges in pig production

REGIONAL FOCUS

China

4

PRODUCT FOCUS

38

NEWS

6-34

CASE STUDY

66

FEATURES

40

Improving the health benefits of bread

44

Hulling of all major pulse varieties

48

Field-Suitable rapid test documented for rice fortification

50

Environmental impact of micronutrients in livestock

feeding

52

The effect of crude oil

price on animal feed prices

54

Phytogenic feed additives

STORAGE

58 Supplying flour and feed millers

FACES

94 People news from the global milling industry

EVENTS

76 Event listings, reviews and previews

TRAINING

37 Grain Elevator Managers Course

COLUMNS

8

Mildred Cookson

16

Tom Blacker

18

Christophe Pelletier

24

Chris Jackson

18 Christophe Pelletier 24 Chris Jackson 2 GUEST EDITOR Ruwan Berculo 68 MARKETS Suwei Jiang 92

2 GUEST EDITOR

Ruwan Berculo

Pelletier 24 Chris Jackson 2 GUEST EDITOR Ruwan Berculo 68 MARKETS Suwei Jiang 92 INTERVIEW Alistair

68 MARKETS

Suwei Jiang

Pelletier 24 Chris Jackson 2 GUEST EDITOR Ruwan Berculo 68 MARKETS Suwei Jiang 92 INTERVIEW Alistair

92 INTERVIEW

Alistair Lane

Guest

Editor

VIV moves into desert farming

Taking the lead for a joint success

into desert farming Taking the lead for a joint success It was about a year ago,
into desert farming Taking the lead for a joint success It was about a year ago,

It

was about a year ago,

confident we will make a kicking start and present

when I came to the conclusion that it was

the best trade show in the region for producers in poultry at first instance, as well as in milk and

time to start serving you in Middle East

fish. In just 8 months the exhibition has sold out. And all of our partners worldwide will contribute.

and Africa. Following

Thanks for your confidence!

a strong industry

outlook, you have kept on addressing me to present a poultry- focused international trade show. It had to be

Focusing climate control and animal health

The campaign is in full swing. Together with our partners, we’re visiting each country of significance in Middle East, Africa to create a buzz around VIV MEA 2016. Just recently I was in Saudi where colleague Niek and I visited the

directors of the six largest poultry integrations.

I asked them to indicate the key challenges for

poultry production in their country. Their answer was clear: “desert farming is all about climate control, biosecurity and disease management”. Luckily we did our homework, resulting in an impressive series of conferences and master classes focusing solutions to achieve optimal climate conditions and ways to prevent disease outbreaks.

You knocked on our door. And VIV is always at home to think along with you. All to serving you better, every time again. We took the lead. Thanks for your support in realising a joint success.

See you at VIV MEA 2016! In co-location with GFIA, preceding Gulfood.

I hope that you enjoy this edition of Milling and Grain.

Ruwan Berculo, Worldwide Project Manager VIV Worldwide

a centrally located platform within easy reach for quite a sizeable region. Does that sound like an easy task? No, it doesn’t.

You might remember me writing in Milling and Grain earlier about VIV’s efforts to serve you away from shows. Increasingly VIV wishes to link producers from Feed to Food through effective online tools and focused stand-alone conferences. Well, don’t worry; nothing stops us from moving in this direction. Just follow us from mid-2016 onwards; you’ll be surprised!

But before getting there, we’re moving into desert farming, starting with the first edition of VIV MEA. Scheduled in the agribusiness hot-spot Abu Dhabi, during February 15-17, we will present our traditional trade show concept. “Bring us a

platform following the likes of VIV Asia”, you clearly stated. Well, that we jointly developed over

a course of 25 years. Such achievements do take time and require a tremendous joint effort.

And as we did in the early 90s in Bangkok, VIV will again take the lead in establishing a third international hub. With your support I am

a third international hub. With your support I am Meet the Milling and Grain team The

Meet the Milling and Grain team The team are travelling across the globe to industry events.

The team are travelling across the globe to industry events. ISSN No: 2058-5101 Annual Subscription Rates
The team are travelling across the globe to industry events. ISSN No: 2058-5101 Annual Subscription Rates
The team are travelling across the globe to industry events. ISSN No: 2058-5101 Annual Subscription Rates
The team are travelling across the globe to industry events. ISSN No: 2058-5101 Annual Subscription Rates
The team are travelling across the globe to industry events. ISSN No: 2058-5101 Annual Subscription Rates

ISSN No: 2058-5101

Annual Subscription Rates Inside UK: UK£100 Outside: US$150/€133

More Information www.millingandgrain.com http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk

NEWS
NEWS

REGIONAL FOCUS

CHINA

FEATURE
FEATURE
NEWS REGIONAL FOCUS CHINA FEATURE Rice milling around the World: The early uses of waterpower In

Rice milling around the World: The early uses of waterpower

In the previous issue of Milling and Grain, I mentioned that the Mills Archive library holds a number of books, catalogues and images on rice production from all corners of the world. This article moves on from the early primitive methods that I illustrated last time, to examine the introduction of waterpower in rice milling. See the full story on page 8

CHINA STATS

3.18 Amount, in millions of tonnes,

of soybeans Chinese importers agreed this October to buy from the US, for about US$5.3 billion (yet to be finalised). China is now the largest soybean importer in the world.

1,000,000 Tonnage of rice China has agreed to buy from Thailand by the end of this year.

11.3 Percentage of China's land used for arable farming in 2011.

514.5 Millions of hectares used for

agriculture in 2011.

48.5 Millions of tonnes of pigs

produced in 2011.

Source: FAO

China’s agricultural challenges

Since reforms began some four decades ago, the world’s attention has been focused on China’s rapid economic growth. See the full story on page 68

rapid economic growth. See the full story on page 68 EVENT Meeting rising challenges through technology
EVENT Meeting rising challenges through technology & education CIMMYT wheat scientist Ravi Singh wins China’s
EVENT
Meeting rising challenges
through technology &
education
CIMMYT wheat
scientist Ravi
Singh wins China’s
Friendship Award
This month has seen me travelling
across the world, from China to
Indonesia via the US. I have been
privileged to see farming on an
industrial scale in China.
See the full story on page 24
NEWS
NEWS

Gains in China’s agricultural productivity over the past 30 years are due in large measure to smallholder farmers who have readily adopted innovative farming practices introduced by scientists. See the full story on page 28

4 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

A blog dedicated to milling industry professionals globally Milling innovations help food sector tap barley’s
A blog dedicated to milling industry professionals globally
A blog dedicated
to milling industry
professionals globally

Milling innovations help food sector tap barley’s health properties

http://bit.ly/1MS8hj6

COCERAL, FEDIOL and FEFAC welcome rejection by ENVI Committee of European Commission’s 'opt-out' proposal

http://bit.ly/1Rm4UQK

Bobby Frederick selected as new NGFA director of legislative affairs

http://bit.ly/1GgelAM

Benchmark tool for FEFAC soy sourcing guidelines now available

http://bit.ly/1QP8JxL

FFI Matters: First systematic review yields three recommendations for flour fortification programs

http://bit.ly/1W2E6Xc

Teaching efficiency in elevator operations

http://bit.ly/1MBQHva

efficiency in elevator operations http://bit.ly/1MBQHva G F M T gfmt.blogspot.com Milling NOV 15 News Tom

G

F

M

T

gfmt.blogspot.com

http://bit.ly/1MBQHva G F M T gfmt.blogspot.com Milling NOV 15 News Tom Blacker elected to the committee

Milling

NOV 15

News

Tom Blacker elected to the committee of the London and South East Milling Society

Tom Blacker elected to the committee of the London and South East Milling Society

the committee of the London and South East Milling Society M illing and Grain magazine is

M illing and Grain magazine is pleased to announce that Tom Blacker, Marketing Manager and Directories Co-ordinator, Perendale Publishers, was elected to the committee of the London and South East Milling

Society (LSEMS) at the Annual General Meeting that took place on October 13,

2015.

Tom joined Perendale Publishers, (Publishers of Milling and Grain Magazine, International Aquafeed Magazine and The International Milling Directory) in 2012. Since joining, Tom has overseen the The International Milling Directory (IMD) and is a key point of contact for many of the clients listed worldwide. He has been integral to changes made to the printed format of the directory and its subsequent growth. LSEMS is one of the country’s largest networking groups for millers and the milling industry. Commenting upon his recent appointment, he says:

“I am delighted to have been recognised by members of the society. I am very excited about what I will be able to contribute and what I will gain from being part of the committee.” Tom recently visited Jordans Mill with LSEMS, where he learnt about the historic mill and British milling heritage. He is a regular contributor to both magazines, and writes a monthly column, ‘The International Milling Directory’ in this magazine. We would like to offer Tom our sincere congratulations and wish him the very best in his future appointment with the society. Turn to page 16 to read his latest IMD column.

society. Turn to page 16 to read his latest IMD column. Want more industry news? Get

Want more industry news?

Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog gfmt.blogspot.com
Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog gfmt.blogspot.com

Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog

gfmt.blogspot.com

Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog gfmt.blogspot.com
news? Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog gfmt.blogspot.com 6 | November 2015 -

6 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Rice milling around the World:

The early uses of waterpower

Milling journals of the past at The Mills Archive

by Mildred Cookson, The Mills Archive, UK

The Mills Archive by Mildred Cookson, The Mills Archive, UK In the previous issue of Milling

In the previous issue of Milling and Grain, I mentioned that the Mills Archive library holds a number of books, catalogues and images on rice production from all corners of the world. This article moves on from the early primitive methods that I

illustrated last time, to examine the introduction of waterpower in rice milling. Next month

I will look at what our holdings show of the early stages of industrialisation of rice milling. Rice is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa (Asian

rice) or Oryza glaberrima (African rice). As a cereal grain,

it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large

part of the world’s human population, especially in Asia.

It is the agricultural commodity with the third-highest

worldwide production, after sugarcane and maize.

A good friend in Japan gave me samples which show rice in

its various states from fresh grains of rice with their husk on

to the finished, polished rice. I have tried, with the help of

our Archivist, to translate the writing on the packets. They are shown here to make the point that, as an educational institution, the Mills Archive tries to set its holdings into context. If anyone can help with a more detailed account, we would be happy to add it to our website (https:// millsarchive.org/explore/features-and-articles).

There are dozens of articles on rice milling in early editions

of The Miller (for example Volume 8, 1882, pages: 70,

352, 431, 526, 604 and 927). Most emphasise the large gulf between primitive Asian technology and modern European milling methods, without acknowledging the rapid development of the uses of waterpower well before their adoption in the West. Needham (Science and Civilisation

in China, 1965) points out that some modern western

historians of technology erroneously inform us that “the water-wheel certainly travelled east”. This would have been

a surprise to the Chinese at least by 20 CE when Huan Tan

wrote “Afterwards the power of animals - donkeys, mules, oxen and horses - was applied by means of machinery, and water-power too used for pounding, so that the benefit was increased a hundred-fold.”

Using the whole weight of the body treading on a tilt hammer increased its power by a factor of ten. Simple and progressive improvements using multiple hammers were an additional benefit of hydraulic power, easily introduced in the wet areas required for rice cultivation. The illustrations here are a small sample of those in our

Rice grains to polished rice
Rice grains to polished rice
Treading on a tilt hammer
Treading on a tilt hammer
Primitive rice hulling in China using water power
Primitive rice hulling in
China using water power

collections of more than two million records and serve to illustrate the wide date range we cover. As today’s photographs record tomorrow’s history we are keen to collect contemporary as well as historical material. For example, on one of my trips abroad I visited several traditional water-powered rice mills in Portugal. They

abroad I visited several traditional water-powered rice mills in Portugal. They 8 | November 2015 -

8 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Milling News

Japanese rice mill and waterwheel in 1980 Japanese rice mill engraving Primitive rice mill building
Japanese rice mill and
waterwheel in 1980
Japanese rice mill engraving
Primitive rice mill building
now in a Japanese museum
Interior of a rice mill Sobreiro,
Portugal 2004
Miller at work in a rice mill
Sallgueirinha, Portugal 2004
were milling both rice and other cereals with millstones.
The unusual thing about the rice milling process at
Sallgueirinha was that the lower or bedstone of the pair of
millstones was covered in cork around 20cms thick. The
rice entered the stones in the same way as grain, into the
eye (centre) via a hopper fixed above the stones. It came
out round the edge de husked. It was then passed through
another set of millstones to produce the rice flour.
In another mill the cork was placed on the lower stone
in wedge shaped strips, The motive power for all these
mills came from waterwheels, which in some cases were
horizontal, and turned the stones at around 80 or 90 rpm.
These articles only give a brief glimpse of the several
million records held by the Mills Archive Trust. If you
would like to know more please email me at mills@
millsarchive.org.
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Milling News

Milling News On 16 October 1945, 42 countries acted in Quebec, Canada, to create the Food
Milling News On 16 October 1945, 42 countries acted in Quebec, Canada, to create the Food

On 16 October 1945, 42 countries acted in Quebec, Canada, to create the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). In doing so they took another important step forward in man's perpetual struggle against hunger and malnutrition. For through the establishment of FAO they provided themselves, and the many other nations that were to enter the Organization, with a mechanism through which its Member Countries could deal with a set of problems that are of major concern to all countries and all people. So that, FAO was founded in 1943 at Hot Springs (USA) during the UN Conference on Food and Agriculture, and it was formally instituted during the First Session of the FAO Conference, held in Quebec, Canada, in 1945 – more information on FAO’s origin is available here. FAO celebrates World Food Day each year on 16 October, the day on which the Organization was founded in 1945.

At Milan Expo, senior UN officials call for social protection and fairer food systems

C elebrating World Food Day at the Milan Expo 2015, senior United Nations officials joined

leading figures in the global fight against hunger in an appeal to the international community to speed up efforts on eradicating hunger and improving the way food is produced and consumed. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Ertharin Cousin, Executive Director at World Food Programme (WFP), José Graziano da Silva, Director- General of Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and Kanayo F. Nwanze, President of International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) were among those present at the event being held as part of the UN’s contribution to the Milan Expo, as well as to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of FAO. Mr Ban stressed to those gathered at the event in Milan, Italy, that global leaders must act collectively on fulfilling the recently adopted

Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to achieve complete eradication of hunger in the next fifteen years. “Agenda 2030 is ambitious and achievable. It is integrated and universal. It recognises that poverty and hunger have complex and interconnected root causes. We made our promise. Now it is time for

10 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

action,” said the Secretary-General in his address. This year, World Food Day focuses on the theme ‘Social Protection- breaking the cycle of rural poverty.’ Mr Ban underscored that social protection is a tool to reach the most vulnerable as it prevents people from falling into extreme hardship and provides food and nutrition security. Mr Graziano da Silva echoed the UN chief and noted that social protection allows the hungry to “become empowered to escape hunger through their own efforts” leading to a more dignified and productive life. “India, Brazil and Ethiopia and other countries show us that increasing the power of the very poor to buy food offers an affordable key to hunger eradication. Industrialised countries did the same to end widespread hunger after World War II,” he added. For her part, Ms Cousin said: “Just imagine the night in 2030 when no child, woman or man goes to bed hungry. Starting now, each of us must stand up, get involved and do our part to make the changes so we reach Zero Hunger by 2030.” “Working together, we can all press for the changes that the world needs, including ending extreme poverty, supporting smallholder farmers and ensuring access to nutritious food all

year round for the most vulnerable people by investing in social protection programmes,” she declared. At the event, Mr Ban called for forming new partnerships and creating better ways of working. “We need all partners in this campaign – fashion experts and diplomats, rock stars and athletes, global world leaders and city mayors. Most of all, we need local communities,” he said. Seven decades ago, countries established the FAO with a ringing promise of ensuring humanity’s freedom from hunger. “Today we continue to aim for the Zero Hunger Challenge I launched three years ago to keep this promise to our world,” said Mr Ban. Mr Ban further reiterated that to achieve food security for all, the world must collectively start a movement, which will also assist in attaining greater health, economic development and social inclusion for individuals and societies. Success in achieving the world’s new sustainable development goals – and becoming the Zero Hunger Generation – ultimately depends on all people and not just governments, Mr Graziano da Silva said in offering praise for both the Charter of Milan and the EXPO fair’s food-centred theme.

Milling News

Kellogg employees unite on World Food Day

I n a world of plenty, one in nine people still face hunger and food insecurity every day. Kellogg

Company employees are again rallying in support of World Food Day, a day of action against hunger established by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations noting that “ending hunger starts with us.” Kellogg efforts include providing breakfast to children and families who need it most, in communities where the company does business around the world. “We have an opportunity and an obligation as a global food company to do what we can to help our neighbours in need,” said John Bryant, Chairman and CEO, Kellogg

legacy of philanthropy begun by our founder, W.K. Kellogg, as we aspire to make a difference in the world through our brands and our foods.” In 2014, Kellogg employees from 30 countries donated nearly 130,000 pounds or more than 2 million servings of food – much of it Kellogg products – as part of World Food Day activities. Through the company’s Breakfasts for Better Days™ initiative, Kellogg plans to exceed these totals with this year’s activities. Kellogg launched its Breakfasts for Better Days signature cause in 2013, with a goal to provide one billion servings of cereal and snacks, more than half of which are breakfast, to children and families around the world by the end of 2016. Since then, Kellogg and its employees have volunteered at community food banks, supported school breakfast programs for thousands of children, and hosted food drives for hungry families around the

world. Through Breakfasts for Better Days, the company has donated more than 900 million servings of cereal and snacks to those in need. Also, in the US last year, Kellogg provided $1 million in grants to Action for Healthy Kids, the Food Research and Action Centre, and Share Our Strength, to help increase participation in school breakfast programs. In addition, the Breakfasts for Better Days Disaster Relief Centre delivered Kellogg foods to communities in Texas affected by widespread flooding. “It’s a startling fact that many people around the world start their day without the power of breakfast,” said Kris Charles, Vice President, Global Communications and Philanthropy, Kellogg Company. “That’s why, as the world’s leading breakfast company, we’re focused on hunger relief efforts to help families and children in our communities who need it most.”

Company. “On World Food Day, and every day, we seek to honour the

New film about insect protein for feed

A frican partners in Mali and Ghana from the EC-funded PROteINSECT project have

released a film demonstrating the potential of insect-based animal feed as a cost-effective, additional and novel protein source – and are keen to share their expertise with farmers across Africa as well as in Europe and worldwide. The film’s release is particularly timely following World Food Day, with global attention drawn to the persistent challenges of hunger, malnutrition and future food security for our planet. The PROteINSECT project, which is working in Europe, Africa and China to investigate the use of insects as an additional and novel protein source in animal feed (chicken, pigs and fish), is keen to share its expertise to help address the issue of food sustainability, for both small-scale farmers in Africa and meat producers worldwide.

Dr Marc Kenis, a PROteINSECT partner and entomologist at the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) appears in the

film. He says, “These feeding trials are a key stage in our search for a more sustainable source of protein than those currently in use. Insect flour offers huge potential as an added, economically-viable, ‘home- grown’ protein source for farmers who have traditionally relied upon fish meal and soy flour.” With 33 million farms in sub- Saharan Africa owned and worked by smallholders, PROteINSECT’s research represents an important step towards promoting self-sufficiency and providing opportunities for growth across the continent. Dr Sidi Traore, a poultry farmer from Bamako (Mali) who is featured in the film, says, “I think this is an extraordinary opportunity because currently it is very difficult to have a stable and affordable food production which can provide enough protein.” The ongoing search for additional, sustainable sources of protein is also on the agenda in Europe, where it is recognised that the protein deficit and our increased reliance on imported sources of protein need to be addressed. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) recently published its scientific opinion on the comparative risks of insects as a source of protein for food and feed. EFSA recognises that in parts of the world outside the EU such as Africa,

insect-based feed is an emerging agricultural practice, which could pave the way for the adoption of ‘novel feeds’ in European farming. An important consideration for African feed producers, however, will be potential restrictions placed on importing meat from animals reared on insect protein into Europe. The film also acknowledges that further safety testing is essential before such meat is widely available for human consumption. “This film makes a valuable contribution to the current discussion surrounding insect protein for animal feed,” says Dr Elaine Fitches, PROteINSECT project co-ordinator. “The video will raise awareness of our work and showcase our African partners’ expertise - potentially to

a wider audience than ever before

- whilst encouraging and informing

debate around the benefits and challenges of using insects to support sustainable farming methods across the world.” To support global meat and fish producers and to enlighten ongoing discussions resulting from the EFSA opinion, PROteINSECT will continue to publish its research findings from Europe, China and Africa on processing, production, quality, safety and consumer acceptance of insect protein for animal feed.

Milling News

Genetic makeup of thousands of rice varieties placed in global seed data pool

G lobally there is a need to

develop crop varieties that

are more productive, less

environmentally damaging and also shock tolerant. Genome sequences of more than 3,000 rice varieties have been placed with the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) by the world’s leading rice research institute in a move boosting plans to set up a global data exchange system for crop genetic resources. The Philippines-based International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and the Treaty (ITPGRFA) made the announcement at the 6th session of the Governing Body of the FAO- based 136-member nation plant treaty that is being held in Rome this week. Around the world governments and organisations are storing genetic material in seed banks, but without one single gateway to genetic resource data, it is very difficult for researchers and plant breeders to know what is held where and what genetic resources are contained in the seeds.

“The genetic information that IRRI is making available to us, and the public at large, is a hugely generous and significant show of support to our endeavours to make all relevant information on genetic resources on plant crops available for future food security” said Shakeel Bhatti, Secretary of the International Treaty. “To have so much information on rice, which after all is the basic food for half the world’s population, placed at the fingertips of everyone is a major step in securing food security for future generations,” he added. A genome sequence is like an inbuilt instruction book that tells living organisms how to grow and react to the environment. Each rice plant has about 400,000,000 “letters” in its genome sequence. With a burgeoning global population, and climate change causing more shocks to agricultural production such as drought, floods and pests, the need to develop crop varieties that are both more productive, less environmentally

damaging and also shock tolerant is crucial. The Rome meeting will discuss how to enhance the current multi-lateral system through the creation of one Global Information System on Plant Genetic Resources. This system containing information including on how to access genetic material and seed samples from existing gene banks would be developed and overseen by the Treaty’s host, FAO. “We can’t expect every programme, every gene bank in the world to re- design their databases to match some international standard; what we need is inter-operability, to create portals where everyone’s databases can talk to another. This is what the Global Information System on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture will be,” said Robert Zeigler, Director General of IRRI.

Feed use of former foodstuffs part of the solution to reduce food waste

O n 15 October the European

Commission organised a high

level conference at the EXPO

Milano, in contribution to the search of EU food waste reduction solutions. Former foodstuff processors, with EFFPA as the representative body at EU level, already prevent an estimated 3.5 million tonnes of food chain losses from going to waste by processing foodstuff no longer suitable for human consumption into

14 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

feed for food-producing animals. Former foodstuffs are removed from the human food consumption market, by food manufacturers, because of unintentional and often unavoidable production errors. Examples of former foodstuffs used in animal feed are broken biscuits and chocolates, surplus bread, incorrectly flavoured crisps and breakfast cereals. In addition surpluses resulting from seasonal festivities such as sports events, Easter and Christmas are used, after the food manufacturer has taken the options for food bank donation into account. Moreover, former foodstuffs must be in full compliance with EU feed safety requirements as well as the General Food Law’s demands as regards traceability to become eligible for feed use. EFFPA President Paul Featherstone:

“It may surprise people, but energy- rich former foodstuffs like biscuits,

chocolates and confectionary are highly valued resources in animal feed manufacturing. In fact, our end-product can be used as an alternative to cereal grains, thereby reducing the dependence on land-requiring raw materials, and thus the environmental footprint of foodstuffs of animal origin”. EFFPA calls on EU policy makers to clarify the regulatory framework for former foodstuff processors through the planned proposal on the circular economy, making it clear that former foodstuffs are by-products and by no means legal ‘wastes’. Paul Featherstone: “It is clear that the safe use of former foodstuffs in animal feed contributes to a more sustainable food chain and should unambiguously be encouraged. Our innovation- driven, non-subsidised industry could still double in production within the EU with the right regulatory guidance”.

Milling News

A Flour World Museum story No. 4
A Flour World Museum story No. 4

A Flour World Museum story

No. 4

Nicolaes van Bambeeck
Nicolaes van Bambeeck

Rembrandt’s Master Blend

Contrasting light and dark, composi- tions that develop layer by layer, an idiosyncratic scratching technique – Baroque painter Rembrandt was always one to experiment, even when it came to mixing paint. His recipe was refreshingly different, with oil, some lead, and as we now know, flour. This surprising discovery was made by Jana Sanyova, who investigates the secrets of the great masters at the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage in Brussels. Rembrandt’s portrait of Nicolaes van Bambeeck and his wife reveals his amazing repurposing of flour. Why he did it remains a mys- tery. Was he trying to achieve special effects through unusual paint blends? Or was it his notoriously precarious finances that drove him to look for low-cost alternatives? Whatever the reason, no one questions the power of Rembrandt’s innovations.

The Mühlenchemie FlourWorld Museum in Wittenburg is an expression of our company culture and the responsibility we feel towards the miller and his flour, as one of the most important staple foods. The museum is a journey through the millennia, illuminating the devel- opment and importance of flour. It is the only one of its kind in the world. www.flourworld.de

opment and importance of flour. It is the only one of its kind in the world.
opment and importance of flour. It is the only one of its kind in the world.

www.muehlenchemie.de

16 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

All go as seasons change Tom Blacker, International Milling Directory There is an autumnal feeling
All go as seasons change
Tom Blacker, International Milling Directory
There is an autumnal feeling in the air here at our UK
head office based in Cheltenham. The clocks are due
to change soon meaning the end of British summer
time, and the advent of a season of festivities. Whilst
we observe the change of seasons, we remain hard
at work preparing for the new International Milling
Directory 2015/16.
It is pleasing to say the directory is still growing: in
the past month there were eight new members. Our
readers have noted it and advertisers alike, that membership of the directory is a
great tool of self-promotion and advertising.
I
write this column as I find myself approaching a new personal professional
appointment having been recently elected as a new committee member at the
London and South East Milling society. I am also currently preparing for two
very important events in our calendar, IAOM MEA in Dubai and JTIC in Paris.
I hope to see a lot of business being carried out coupled with networking
resulting in positive outcomes for the industry. I am sure to also meet many more
users of the directory, particularly the visiting millers, as well as current member
companies.
I
always enjoy seeing new products and familiar faces at these events, joining in
both the informative and social sides on offer. There will be hard copy versions
of the directory distributed at both events, which is just part of our worldwide
distribution. After 24 years of the directory, it continues to be a useful resource at
these events.
I
am sure that the new print directory, which will be the 24th edition for 2015-
16 will be more popular than ever before, with many new changes including:
new members, new products, and new equipment guides, for example our new
colour sorter section, providing details about different models from different
manufacturers.
These products are key to what makes the directory unique, but it is good to be
reminded that value of the product lies in understanding their application in the
grain milling, storage and handling industries.
It is a busy time of preparation and planning. Whilst we remain focussed on the
present, we also look ahead to 2016 and what it will bring.
Tom Blacker
Directory Coordinator

Adisseo completes its NIR service with MyPNE, a unique access to business intelligence

A disseo and Adifo have joined forces to create MyPNE, as an extension to

PNE, Precise Nutrition Evaluation, web platform, offering a unique service to support data-driven decision-making. It allows an additional and optimal use of PNE, the Adisseo NIR service, giving instantaneously values of Apparent Metabolizable Energy, Total and Digestible Amino acids, Total and Phytic Phosphorus contents of a large range of raw materials. The digestible values are based on in vivo trials conducted at the Centre of Expertise and Research

in Nutrition, (CERN) Adisseo’s

nutritionists, formulators, purchasers and quality control managers an additional data-processing application to maximise the use of their feed ingredients and alert them to possible change so they can anticipate and make informed decisions. Furthermore, PNE has been recently completed with proximal values based on a huge number of samples of raw materials collected in all parts of the world: America, Europe, China, Asia. Thanks to equations calculated through the values of these regional samples, PNE gives the most precise and reliable predictions of the content of the raw materials: crude protein, fat,

of the content of the raw materials: crude protein, fat, experimental facilities located in Commentry, France.

experimental facilities located in Commentry, France. With MyPNE, feed companies can exploit their own raw materials nutrients data obtained thanks to PNE through various easy to use dashboards. Among others:

• Assess nutrients evolution over time via analysis of trends,

• Compare nutrients characteristics of raw materials on the basis of qualitative criteria (e.g. origins),

• Display nutrients correlations

• Display nutrients matrices and possibility of refining specific effects (e.g. suppliers) All processed results are available in interactive graphs and charts which can also be easily exported under various formats. It gives to

ash, crude fibre, dry matter, whatever their geographic origin. “With MyPNE’s extension, PNE service can be considered as a new staff member in a feed company, supporting different functions such as purchaser, nutritionist or quality control manager. This new service is

intended to all Adisseo’s customers using PNE” sums up Johnny

Haggiage, PNE Marketing Manager at Adisseo. The MyPNE project fits in our

philosophy to deliver innovative

solutions. Adisseo customers will gain insight in raw material quality, allowing them to master the variation and to increase accuracy in their feed formulation says Paul Smolders, Product Manager at Adifo.

Milling News

A Flour World Museum story
A Flour World Museum story

A Flour World Museum story

No. 5

 
 

The bran puker as patron saint

A

weird expression, open mouth,

mysterious powers - the bran puker. These wooden masks decorated the

bolting mills used to sift flour starting

in

the 1500s. The flour passed through

the fine mesh of the bolting cloth into the box, while the remaining

bran trickled out of the mouth of this creepy-looking man. And creepy was part of the plan – in addition to disgorging bran, the puker was also intended to fend off evil spirits. It was thought that bran pukers had magical powers that helped ensure good flour quality. As sifting technology changed around 1850 the masks fell out of use, but the 17th century bran puker

of

the Lindigt mill in Saxony is still

in existence. It inspired artist Yves Rasch to make a special replica for the FlourWorld Museum in Wittenburg, where it wishes visitors good luck.

The Mühlenchemie FlourWorld Museum in Wittenburg is an expression of our company culture and the responsibility we feel towards the miller and his flour, as one of the most important staple foods. The museum is a journey through the millennia, illuminating the devel- opment and importance of flour. It is the only one of its kind in the world. www.flourworld.de

 
 
importance of flour. It is the only one of its kind in the world. www.flourworld.de  
 

www.muehlenchemie.de

Milling News

The Pelletier Column

A couple of billion reasons why Africa is a

priority for the future

by Christophe Pelletier

is a priority for the future by Christophe Pelletier As every year, we had World Food

As every year, we had World Food Day, which is always a good opportunity to reflect of how to improve food security. Last month, I was speaking at the Animal Science Conference in Minnesota. My topic was “Hunger for protein”. In the presentation, I insisted on the fact that during the 21st

century, Africa is the continent that will have the strongest population growth is Africa. It is expected to count three billion more people than today. That is a lot of mouths to feed. When it comes to food, big numbers are ahead. Here are just two simple examples. By 2100, a cup of milk

a week for each of the four billion Africans will require

about five million cows producing 10,000 kg yearly. Similarly, one egg a week will require 600 millions hens in

production. Between now and the end of the century, eight countries will account to over half of the world’s population increase, with six of these countries being on the African continent. These eight countries are Nigeria, India, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Niger, Uganda, Ethiopia and the USA. Nigeria is expected to pass the population of the USA before mid-century to become the third most populated country. Other countries such as Tanzania and Uganda are going have to cope with a very strong population increase.

The priority for Africa is clear: improve food security. Many rural communities are poor and can hardly subsist. African agriculture has not followed the pace of other regions in terms of productivity and yields, but the flip side of Africa having lagged in agricultural development is that

it has huge potential to increase its food production, and

fast. It must do so, period. At the beginning of the current decade, the FAO estimated the area of unexploited arable land in Africa to be roughly the size of continental USA. By increasing acreage in production and getting higher yields, there is plenty of room to increase production volumes to sufficient levels. Food production is the not the only problem. To solve hunger, these countries must eliminate poverty. To have enough money, one needs a decent paying job. Employment is really where the battle will be won or lost. Between now and the end of the century, Africa will have to create more than 600 million new jobs. As most of the population will be living in cities, another

18 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

challenging goal is to build the urban centres of the future and the necessary infrastructure to move the goods and the people. Such megacities will also need to be food secure. Urban planning will need to take food distribution and food production into account. Education, health care, construction, infrastructure, jobs, food and agriculture… This sounds like building an entire continent doesn’t it? And that is exactly what it is. Expect Africa to be a huge construction site! Challenges are many, but so are opportunities and long-term benefits. It will take money to make it happen, and a lot of it. There is plenty of that, though, as Central Banks have showed us since 2008. If there has ever been a need for Keynesian economics, the Africa of the coming decades is it! Not only the money would allow projects to happen, but also it will create the many jobs that will be required to build all that is needed. The challenge for Africans is to have and to provide the training required to qualify for the jobs come. To rise from its current situation, Africa needs a Marshall plan of its own, just like Europe did after WWII. It also must convince the rest of the world that it will put the money at work. And that is where the second crucial component of success – or failure – resides: leadership. Africa needs strong visionary leadership with integrity that will not only make things happen, but also will keep the energies focused on a long-term effort. Another eighty-five years to complete it all before the end of the century will not be too many. Africa will have to bring forward a new generation of leaders. Africa is diverse. The challenges will vary per country and so will the quality of the leadership. Africa is a young continent and its youth can be its best asset. The new generation of young professionals in food and agriculture is bright, smart, well educated, highly motivated and keen to succeed. Encouraging investors will require fighting corruption, starting with a leadership by example. Endeavours may be risky, but they have the potential to be quite rewarding for those who will dare and have the patience to wait to reap the fruits. As for anything else anywhere else, there will be success stories and some failures, but that is the way the world goes.

Christophe Pelletier is a food and agriculture strategist and futurist from Canada. He works internationally. He has published two books on feeding the world’s growing population. His blog is called “The Food Futurist”.

Milling innovations help food sector tap barley’s health properties

B arley, which is especially high in the healthy fibre component beta-glucan, has been linked to

a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Increasing consumer awareness of these benefits has driven demand for more barley-based products however manufacturers have found it difficult to preserve beta-glucan in the grain during traditional milling procedures. The EU-funded Barley Boost project, completed at the end of October 2015, sought to address this challenge by analysing the market potential of health- promoting products and optimising milling technology to create products with high beta-glucan content that would be attractive to consumers. A monitoring tool together with new milling

techniques have been developed in order to identify and isolate beta-glucan and create innovative new products that retain as much nutrition as possible. “A key objective has been to increase profitability in various parts of the industry, while at the same time

developing health-promoting products that consumers will actually want to buy”, explains project coordinator Sveinung Grimsby from Nofima, Norway. “New online methods for measuring fibre content in milling fractions will be used together with milling and fractionation equipment that has been put together in a new combination.” Grimsby describes the work carried out by the Barley Boost team as a pioneering ‘technology push’ project. “There are probably not that many consumers asking for fibre-enriched barley products with EFSA-approved health claims attached to them,” he suggests. “However, we still believe consumers will ask for it, though they don’t know it yet. Very few of us asked for an iPad ten years ago either. There are not that many real radical innovations entering the food market today and Barley Boost has aimed to challenge this.” Consumers certainly stand to benefit from eating more barley. While the average consumption of fibre is 17

Milling News

grams a day we should be eating between 25 and 35 grams, and EFSA has confirmed a number of barley- related health claims. Between three and four grams of beta-glucan a day can help reduce cholesterol in the blood. There is also plenty of barley available. Some 52 million tonnes of the grain is produced in the EU every year but only 0.6 percent is used for food; most is used for animal feed and for producing alcohol. A total of nine partners from seven European countries participated in the project. Special emphasis was placed on research that benefits small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), and it is hoped that the innovations developed will lead to health-promoting products that consumers will want to buy. Such work has been painstaking. ‘Here is an example of how time consuming this R&D work has been,’ says Grimsby. ‘One young girl working at INRA in Montpellier dissected – by hand – one gram of barley fractions during most of 2014. This had to be done in order to calibrate the online equipment. She did have a nice “Spotify-play-list” running to cheer her up though.’

“Spotify-play-list” running to cheer her up though.’ One of these samples has optimum gluten quality. The

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and ensures your success. Brabender ® GmbH & Co.KG · www.brabender.com Milling and Grain - November
He takes the reader on a journey through time and countries, outlining how we provided

He takes the reader on a journey through time and countries, outlining how we provided food in the past to present day policies that have direct implications on the way we produce and price our food for many who have borderline nutrition. He provides insight into how famines occur – which often are not the result of failed crops alone, but simply exacerbated by the inappropriate responses by governments to perceived food crises. There are lessons for all in the recounting of these disasters. He talks personally and passionately about Norman Borlaug, the Nobel Peace Prize winner, who with a small group of researchers brought about dramatic crop yield increases that staved off starvations in many densely populated countries. He visits Reverend Thomas Malthus’s resting place in Bath, UK to better understand the man who recognised in 1803 that humans, despite their science, culture and reason, are ultimately bound by natural law. In other words, humans “are locked in a never-ending two- step between our numbers and the sustenance we can wrest from six inches of topsoil.” He looks at the Punjab and the plight of farmers who benefited spectacularly from Norman Borlaug’s developments; yet now find their production systems under threat. His book, and subsequent research takes him to China, Latin America and Africa. He analyses the food price crisis of 2007 and comments on the food industry’s attempt to double food production by highlighting the five-point, ‘silver buckshot’ approach of Jon Foley, who heads the Institute of the Environment at

Milling News

The End of Plenty - A Review

by Roger Gilbert, Publisher, Milling and Grain magazine

I n 1989 I was researching reasons why our compound feed industry needed a strong global

voice. I was secretary general of the International Feed Industry Federation and I had heard whispers that the world’s food demand might treble in the 21st Century to keep pace with population growth, but little additional information was available. I spent time checking through the US Bureau of Statistics website and came across population projections that showed global population would peak at 9.5 billion by 2050 before plateauing to end the century at slightly more than 10 billion. It was obvious to me then that this

was a vital piece of information, that a 50 percent increase in our population would occur in little more than 50 years. It may still become a ticking time bomb in terms of global food security for the industry responsible for producing much of the protein consumers want. That moment of clarity, and I have done much in the intervening period to promote what has now become a well-known cliché of ‘ feeding 9.5 billion people by 2050’ was largely on my mind when I received a review copy of ‘The End of Plenty’ from US publishers W.W. Norton and Company.

The race to feed a crowded world

There is a limited number of individuals on the planet today who have managed to visit the countries and regions producing our foodstuffs in the volumes needed to feed the world’s growing population and to those places where the supply of adequate food is insufficient to prevent deprivation and starvation. Agronomist and journalist Joel K Bourne Jr has done both. He has also taken the knowledge and experiences he has acquired and questioned many leading researchers in the field of food production as to how we managed to maintain food

supplies for our existing population (with only some 850 million still going hungry – 50 years ago one in three lived in hunger) and what the likely consequences are for our future if we continue applying the farming and political policies, that while staving off food shortfalls over the past forty years, might not best serve us in the run up to 2050 and beyond. Therefore, in my humble opinion, we should listen and learn from Joel Bourne and his contemporaries, consider their research, open our minds to their experiences and listen to their anecdotes before forming our own opinions and responses. Throughout such a well-written and clearly articulated book, it is hard to find fault. Its content is completely captivating and many chapters are worth a second read. Joel K. Bourne, an agronomist, compiled ‘The End of Plenty – The race to feed a crowded world’, over 10 years while working on assignment for National Geographic magazine in the area of natural resource issues. He makes it clear there is no ‘silver bullet’ to solving the conundrum of population versus food supply that faces us but does point out ways we might improve our prospects. While he admits that the book is ‘more a synthesis of the work of others’ than a creation of his own and accordingly goes on to thank those that provided greatest help, the book certainly boasts an impressive array of scientific specialists and others. Without his ‘hands-on’ experiences and easy story-telling, many of the underlying messages would not have connected with the reader. He puts human faces to those producing our food and also those who are faced with food scarcity. I appreciate the manner in which this book has been pieced together in an easy-to-read and understand way that clearly outlines where we are in terms of world food production, how we got here, and what our options might be for the future.

22 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Milling News

Norman Borlaug’s University of Minnesota. Jon Foley says: 1) stop farmland expansion especially in the tropical rain forests; 2) use existing agronomy to close yield gaps in Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe; 3) reallocate critical inputs from places where they are overused to places where they are scarce; 4) shift our diets away from meat and wean our cars off biofuels and 5) reduce the amount of food that is discarded, spoiled or eaten by pests which amounts to a third of global agricultural production. Eliminating waste from farm to fork could make 50 percent more food available to the planet. “Providing food and nutrition for nine billion people without compromising the global environment will be one of the greatest challenges our civilisation have ever faced,” Joel Bourne quotes Foley. Bourne goes into some detail to suggest how each of these ‘buckshot’ points have been tried and why they are failing. He attacks the meat industry by suggesting that meat eaters in developed countries should

halve their meat and dairy intake and should replace those calories with fruit and vegetables. In the UK, he shows that this would reduce greenhouse gases by almost 20 percent and save more than 40,000 diet-related diseases each year. If all developed countries adopted this strategy, plus recycled animal and crop waste and used bio-energy crops more efficiently, University of Exeter researchers calculate that we could feed 9.3 billion people by 2050 and more importantly cut some 25ppm of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and possibly keep us from crossing the two-degree climate tipping point.

Final thoughts

points made, including the Blue Revolution, the USSR, a ‘blooming desert’ and ‘magic seeds’ to
points made, including the Blue
Revolution, the USSR, a ‘blooming
desert’ and ‘magic seeds’ to name but
a few.
His wide-ranging and diverse
coverage of this extremely important
topic follows no chronological
order and does not consider his
subject from one perspective, which
is refreshing. As a throw-away
criticism, I might argue he over-
promotes organic production and falls
down in recognising the significant
contribution, in my view, livestock
makes to our overall global food
production system, both in developed
and developing countries.
However, this is one man’s view
based on extensive research in terms
of visits, experiences and interviews
and is well sourced with footnotes and
references.
It’s an essential read for all of us
involved in food production and who
recognise the responsibility we carry
in bringing about a food production
system that eliminates starvation
while providing our total population
with nutritious, safe and affordable
foodstuffs. A food production system
fit for purpose.
Die and roll re-working machines
www.oj-hojtryk.dk
Phone: +45 75 14 22 55
Fax: +45 82 28 91 41
mail: info@oj-hojtryk.dk
O&J Højtryk A/S
Ørnevej 1, DK-6705
Esbjerg Ø
CVR.: 73 66 86 11

Joel Bourne not only looks at the rapidly growing, poverty- stricken countries but almost as an afterthought, reviews countries that have achieved success in bringing down their birth rates, and outlines how that has been achieved by quoting researchers and reporting individual country experiences. There is too much in this book to mention all the best or significant

There is too much in this book to mention all the best or significant Milling and

Milling News

Meeting rising challenges through technology & education

by Chris Jackson, Export Manager UK TAG

& education by Chris Jackson, Export Manager UK TAG This month has seen me travelling across

This month has seen me travelling across the world, from China to Indonesia via the US. I have been privileged to see

farming on an industrial scale in China using the most up to date technologies available, and at the same, time witnessing subsistence farming. Indeed, it is a story of two extremes. In the USA, farming is still a major source of income and a very important part of their export economy supplying meat, beef and pork as well as soya been and maize. The cereal exports from the US, Australia and Brazil are key to counties such as China who have to rely on imports of raw materials for their own domestic meat industries as they do not have the climate or the land mass to produce all of their own raw materials. From the USA, I travelled to an exhibition in Jakarta, Indonesia. This is another country of extremes where poultry are the major source of animal protein and where there are super efficient large-scale producers of meat fish and vegetables. Like China, Jakarta is a very large rural community dependent entirely on their small farms for their livelihoods. The Government is actively encouraging these small farmers to co-operate and to produce more by changing their farming systems for instance by encouraging them to keep five instead of two cows and to use their land differently to feed the extra animals. By developing co-operatives at village level, marketing of milk is much improved and allows for better utilisation and the

production of milk based products for distribution in to the large cities. However, getting the produce to the market is still a major challenge in all of these rapidly expanding countries. Storage can be a major problem where adequate facilities simply do not exist and crops deteriorate before they can be consumed by livestock or delivered to market. These challenges can be met by the use of technology and education, it is in these areas that governments both in the western world, and locally, should play a major role in improving the skills needed to better utilise products and ensure that they reach consumers in a wholesome and safe state. As the world population is forecast to increase, agriculture has to be profitable and the industry aims have to be at the farm gate to reduce their input costs, improve health status, whilst reducing its environmental impact giving a higher return on capital. Post gate, the aims have to give a higher market potential, improving product quality with reduced variability and reducing waste. Our global population is growing fast. It is estimated that to meet demand, cereal production must increase by 50 percent from 2000 to 2030, and livestock production must increase by 85 percent from 2000 to 2030. To date, agriculture has been successful in feeding the world. As the densely populated counties increase their incomes, their people will demand more animal based protein in their diets. From a declining suitable land mass, genetics, science and technology will be increasingly adapted to allow farmers worldwide to increase their outputs.

to allow farmers worldwide to increase their outputs. @AgrictecExports 24 | November 2015 - Milling and

@AgrictecExports

24 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

COMPANY UPDATES Cultura Technologies has acquired CORE IBS Limited, a leading provider of application software
COMPANY
UPDATES
Cultura Technologies has
acquired CORE IBS Limited, a
leading provider of application
software for Agribusiness and other
trading industries, headquartered in
Mitchelstown, Ireland. Joe Walsh,
CEO of CORE IBS will work
with Cultura leadership through
the transition period. He will then
retire. Cultura Technologies LLC
is an Agribusiness subsidiary of
Constellation Software, Inc (CSI),
headquartered in Toronto, Ontario,
Canada.
Evonik Industries has started the
planning stage for the
construction of an additional world-
scale plant complex in Singapore.
The facility, which will produce
the amino acid DLmethionine
for animal nutrition, will have
an annual production capacity
of 150,000 metric tons and is
expected to start operations in
2019. It still requires authorisation
from the Evonik committees. The
construction of the plant complex is
planned next to the existing Evonik
methionine plant on Jurong Island
in Singapore.
Fiera Milano, the traditional
venue of Ipack-Ima since its very
first edition, has now also acquired
its ownership. It has also acquired
the shows that now flank the
event: Meat-Tech, Dairytech and
Fruit Innovation. No changes
will be made to the organising
secretariat, which will continue
to support the exhibition with its
well-established professionalism.
The only exception is CEO Guido
Corbella, who was replaced by
Domenico Lunghi. Mr Lunghi
benefits from a long experience in
the exhibition business, particularly
in trade shows; he is also the head
of Tuttofood, Fiera Milano’s B2B
event for the food industry – one
of the main users of processing and
packaging technology.

Milling News

CIMMYT wheat scientist Ravi Singh wins China’s Friendship Award

G ains in China’s agricultural productivity over the past 30 years are due in large measure

to smallholder farmers who have readily adopted innovative farming

practices introduced by scientists, said

a top wheat breeder during a speech

at the country’s annual Friendship Awards. Ravi Singh, a chief wheat breeder and distinguished scientist at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), was among 50 foreigners from 21 countries working in China, who received the prestigious award in Beijing last month in recognition of their contributions to China’s

development. “China is now the largest wheat producer in the world and continues to increase production and productivity while reducing the amount of land sown with wheat by about 20 percent – it’s

a remarkable success

story,” Singh said. “I commend and salute the Chinese government for rigorously supporting agricultural research and development, and more importantly farmers, with transformative policies that were crucial to achieve goals.” Singh’s key contributions to China’s agricultural development over the past 30 years involve sharing improved germplasm, knowledge about rust-disease resistance genetics and leading various types of training, including mentoring post-doctoral PhD graduates as part of an

projections that the current population of 7.3 billion will increase 33 percent to 9.7 billion by 2050 “I feel deeply grateful and satisfied with the remarkable progress China has made in enhancing food productivity and incomes of millions of women and men small-scale farmers who embraced innovations and responded to the crucial responsibility of enhancing food production,” he added. Currently, the country consumes almost 117 million tons of wheat a year and produces about 130 million tons of wheat a year, according to the Wheat Atlas. China, home to 1.4 billion people, is the most populated country in the world and represents 19 percent of the world’s population, the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs reports. Several CIMMYT scientists have received the China Friendship Award, including the 2014 World Food Prize laureate Sanjaya Rajaram, with whom Singh initiated his career at CIMMYT. Additionally, Hans Braun, head of CIMMYT’s Global Wheat Program and the CGIAR Research Program on Wheat, noted agronomist Thomas Lumpkin, CIMMYT’s director general from 2008 to 2015, and scientists Surindar Vasal, Jose Luis Araus and Ken Sayre have been honored with the Friendship Award in previous years. Vasal was jointly awarded the World Food Prize with Eva Villegas in 2000. “The Chinese government and people will never forget the positive contribution that foreign experts have made to China’s development and progress,” said the country’s Vice Premier Ma Kai at the 2015 Friendship Award ceremony. Singh has also received three provincial friendship awards from China.

agreement between CIMMYT and the Chinese government. The Friendship Award, first established to recognise experts from the Soviet Bloc in the 1950s, abolished in the 1950s during the Cold War and reintroduced in the 1990s, is China’s highest award for foreign experts who have made outstanding contributions to the country’s economic and social progress. Since its reinstatement, 1,449 Friendship Awards have been conferred, according to the Xinhua news agency. “The new generation of well-trained Chinese scientists with access to modern laboratories and field facilities are well equipped to find innovative solutions to the challenge of feeding an ever-increasing global population,” Singh said, referring to U.N.

global population,” Singh said, referring to U.N. Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on
global population,” Singh said, referring to U.N. Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on
global population,” Singh said, referring to U.N. Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on

Want more industry news?

Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog gfmt.blogspot.com

Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog

gfmt.blogspot.com

Want more industry news? Get daily news updates on the Global Miller blog gfmt.blogspot.com

28 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Nothing escapes Romer Labs.

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GmbH Technopark 1, 3430 Tulln, Austria Tel: +43 2272 61533 10 Email: office-europe@romerlabs.com www.romerlabs.com
GmbH Technopark 1, 3430 Tulln, Austria Tel: +43 2272 61533 10 Email: office-europe@romerlabs.com www.romerlabs.com
GmbH Technopark 1, 3430 Tulln, Austria Tel: +43 2272 61533 10 Email: office-europe@romerlabs.com www.romerlabs.com

Milling News

Above: Nigel Pinard - Module 3 Below: Mark Drake - Module 2 Liz Howes -
Above: Nigel Pinard - Module 3 Below: Mark Drake - Module 2 Liz Howes -

Above: Nigel Pinard - Module 3

Below: Mark Drake - Module 2

Above: Nigel Pinard - Module 3 Below: Mark Drake - Module 2 Liz Howes - Module
Above: Nigel Pinard - Module 3 Below: Mark Drake - Module 2 Liz Howes - Module

Liz Howes - Module 6

Nicky Lithgow - Module 5

Mark Drake - Module 2 Liz Howes - Module 6 Nicky Lithgow - Module 5 Cathy
Mark Drake - Module 2 Liz Howes - Module 6 Nicky Lithgow - Module 5 Cathy

Cathy Bunn - Module 7

Stephan Halleran - Module 4

Mark Drake - Module 2 Liz Howes - Module 6 Nicky Lithgow - Module 5 Cathy

PR campaigns such as ‘We Heart Bread’, which made coverage in the national press, co-operation with the Federation of Bakers, and much more. In addition, there is a trend for more transparency amongst its members in regards to public relations. In the past year, some members opened up their mils to BBC film crews for major television programmes about food production to dispel myths about flour and bread, and to also drive closer engagements with the public and regulators. There were also four promotional videos created by nabim, which have been successful in promoting itself. nabim has been hosting Food Standards Agency and the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (formerly the Home Grown Cereals Authority). Mr Lee also commented on nabim’s desires for future achievements. There is much more work to do for standards of grain storage, developing and utilising IT- based systems for milling courses and in updating the Craft Skills Certificate to engage millers further. These are sound ideas of developing nabim’s business and educational services to the milling industries with ambition and with many benefits for the industry. nabim executive meetings have taken place in all parts of the country, not just at its London base. There have also been four open meetings, which proved successful. More than ever before, nabim needs the support of its members and contributions from all stakeholders in the milling industries to develop its success for future years. It is heading in the right direction to do that and will continue to be an important bastion of the milling industry.

London and South East Milling Society Annual General Meeting

T he London and South East

Milling Society held their 69th

meeting in London on Tuesday

13th October. Over 50 attendees from across the British feed and flour milling industry travelled to the event. David Ferns provided a positive review of the annual accounts. Gary Lancaster, Sales Manager at Muntons Ingredients and Society President spoke about successful events this year and the value of members’ ongoing support. There will be a new programme of planned meetings and events with a summer technical tour to the Alsace region of France. President, Gary Lancaster, Treasurer David Ferns and

Secretary, Graham Bruce were all re- elected for the upcoming year. The committee was then re-elected en-bloc: Mr Tony Evers, Mr Stephen Greatbatch (Jas Bowmans Ltd), Mr

Nick Hinton (Peter Marsh Sacks), Ms Janet Keeble (Allied Mills), Mr Paul Messenger (Heygates), Mr Kassem Nameh (Satake), Mr Peter Payne, Ms Fiona Stone (Allied Mills), Mr Mike Tandy (Jas Bowmans Ltd), Mr Glynn Williams (FWP Matthews) with two new additions from Milling and Grain magazine (Tom Blacker) and another from Allinson Flour Mills. Outstanding achievers in their field of each Correspondence Course module received prizes in the meeting. The winners for each module were:

Module 1: Nicky Lithgow, Carrs Module 2: Mark Drake, Heygates Module 3: Nigel Pinard, Heygates Module 4: Stephen Halleran, ADM Module 5: Nicky Lithgow, Carrs Module 6: Elizabeth Anne Howes, Heygates Module 7: Cathy Bunn, Marriages Cathy Bunn also won the nabim Silver Medal for the highest average marks of all nabim Correspondence Course modules. Robin Lee, President of nabim, spoke of his pride in these courses and the continuation and tradition in training excellence which nabim provides. nabim Correspondence Courses are open to all and more information can be found online at nabimtraining.com and www.nabim.org.uk/training/correspondence-courses. Robin Lee, President of nabim, then gave a presentation to the assembled audience. Robin spoke about the past year for nabim. nabim is one of the milling industry’s oldest associations and represents nearly the entire industry in the

British Isles. This year nabim has been a part of successful public

30 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Celebrating the 90th anniversary of Mühlenchemie •  Flour improvement •  Flour standardization

Celebrating the 90th anniversary of Mühlenchemie

•  Flour improvement
•  Flour improvement

•  Flour standardization

•  Fortification with vitamins and minerals

•  Flour analysis

•  Applications services

•  Metering equipment for micro-ingredients

Mühlenchemie – we never sleep.

As the international market leader in flour im­ provement and flour fortification, Mühlenchemie operates in over 100 countries worldwide. Our branches in Germany, Singapore, Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Russia and Poland advise our customers on the spot and collaborate closely with our own laboratories and trial bakeries, of which we have several around the globe. So when the staff of our facility in Wujiang, near Shanghai, make their way home at the end of the day, work has already started in Mexico City – and of course no­one turns the light off before an individual solution has been found for each of our customers.

German Quality made by Mühlenchemie.

each of our customers. German Quality made by Mühlenchemie. A member of the Stern­Wywiol Gruppe info@muehlenchemie.de

A member of the Stern­Wywiol Gruppe

info@muehlenchemie.de

www.muehlenchemie.de

Milling News

American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) develops new custom guide

A n ISO 22000 compliant food safety management system is vital for operations that store, handle, or process grain foods.

Setting up such a system for the grains industry, however, can be challenging. General ISO 22000 food safety guidelines do not always translate well for grains and the costs of misinterpreting these guidelines can be high when auditors visit. A new solution from the AACC International Food Safety, Quality & Regulatory Committee addresses these issues in the User’s Guide to ISO 22000 Food Safety Management System for the Grain Handling, Processing, Milling, and Baking Industries. This new custom guide was developed by AACC International, the premier association of cereal and grain science professionals and includes licensed content from the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). This 84-page document is a how-to guide for developing

and implementing ISO 22000 food safety standards specifically for any business that handles or processes bulk grains or ingredients. It includes the complete ISO 22000 standard, plus colour-coded sections that impart valuable knowledge, experience, and advice from experts in the grain handling, processing, milling, and baking industries. The colour-coded sections are easy to follow and appear

throughout this tailored document to help organisations learn:

• Food safety guideline interpretations applied to the grains industry

• Best application practices for grain handling and processing environments

• Key advice for dealing with third-party audits and auditors “This guide significantly reduces the cost of compliance through the sharing of knowledge and best practices,” said Charles Hurburgh, Professor of Ag and Biosystems Engineering at Iowa State University and member of the AACCI Food Safety, Quality and Regulatory Committee. “Compliance brings operations in line with Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) and Food Safety Modernisation Act (FSMA) rules. Plus, it allows for better organisation, consistent safety and product quality standards, and the generation of vital documentation that’s increasingly necessary for a world supply chain environment,” Mr Hurburgh said.

Research underway at Auburn to control AI in poultry feeds

P athogen control specialist Anitox ® has confirmed that studies are underway, jointly

funded by the US Poultry and Egg Association, designed to offer critical data in the battle against Avian Influenza (AI). “The project is being run by Dr Haroldo Toro, Professor of Avian Diseases in the Department of Pathobiology at Auburn University, USA,” explains Anitox President and CEO Rick Phillips, himself a poultry veterinarian. “We’re looking at multiple

technologies to identify the best way to deliver residual protection of feed and feed ingredients. Signs are good; we already have substantive data to confirm that the core technology in Termin-8 ® is highly effective against the virus in the laboratory. The Auburn project is a substantial

piece of the jigsaw, with trials designed to provide conditions that will offer maximum efficacy and residual protection in feed.” Vice President of Research Programs at the US Poultry and Egg Association, Dr John Glisson, underlined the urgency surrounding the project. “The US egg industry has already been severely hit, and with winter migration now underway, we’re doing everything we can to protect birds and businesses. Strict biosecurity is the most fundamental feature of successful control of avian influenza. It will be the key to eradicating this virus.” Feed is considered as a potential vector for AI, with an increasing number of producers in the US and European layer and breeder sectors treating feed to ensure it is virus-free at point of consumption. As well as airborne transmission, the virus, which is carried by migratory birds and flies, has the potential to transfer via faecal material to feed ingredients and finished feeds. Results from the Auburn study are expected within weeks, with both parties committed to prompt publication.

32 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Lallemand reinforces its presence in Germany

such an important market as Germany".

L allemand Animal Nutrition is strengthening its sales- and management human resources

in Germany to better support its direct business activities. As of October 1st, 2015, Dr. Christian Scheidemann has joined the team as Country Business Manager to manage and drive Lallemand Animal Nutrition direct business in Germany. Agriculture engineer by education, Christian Scheidemann got many years of successful sales and business management experience in the feed additives sector, in particular in yeast fermentation products, organic trace elements or silage additives. After graduation where his main topic has been on feed preservation and dairy nutrition, Dr. Scheidemann managed the Landesarbeitskreis Fütterung Baden- Württemberg e.V. He did his PhD thesis in dairy nutrition and was appointed as Scientific Assistant at the Institute of Animal Nutrition at Hohenheim University. Dr Yannig Le Treut, General Manager

for Lallemand Animal Nutrition declared:

“I am very excited about getting additional resources to serve and support

Milling News

FAO and France urge including agriculture in global climate change debate

A ll countries should strive to ensure an ambitious agreement to tackle climate

change, putting food security and agriculture at the centre of debates on the issue, say FAO Director General José Graziano da Silva and French Minister for Agriculture, Stéphane Le Foll, warning that failure to do so would unravel recent progress made in combating world hunger. Graziano da Silva and Le Foll made their appeals at a side event of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), which is meeting in Rome this week. They both urged countries to find an agreement on how to combat climate change ahead of the

30 November-11 December United Nations climate change conference, COP21, in Paris. The FAO Director-General hailed the international community’s recent adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes the eradication of hunger and extreme poverty. However, he stressed that to achieve these goals requires a “paradigm shift” towards agriculture and food systems that are more productive and inclusive, and more adapted to climate change. “We can end extreme poverty and hunger by 2030. We know what works and we have the tools for it,

but we know climate change threatens to derail our efforts. It is already impacting on food security and making hunger eradication even more difficult,”Graziano da Silva said. “We believe that agriculture in the broad sense - including forestry, fisheries and aquaculture - can and must play a central role in addressing climate change, particularly in adapting its impacts, such as water scarcity, soil salinity or increasing pests and diseases of plants and animals,” he added. For his part, Le Foll said that every man and woman on the planet would bear the consequences “if the world’s leaders cannot find agreement on tangible and concrete objectives” to curb global warming. Noting that agriculture is often viewed as a problem due to its role in greenhouse-gas emissions, Le Foll called for the need to make progress with techniques that “allow us to be more economical and consume less energy. “ “But anyone who looks at agriculture cannot just sit back and sort out the problem with scientific measures, because the technology must be combined with the social aspect,” Le Foll said, adding: “We need to revise our agriculture model to adapt to each ecosystem, we need a revolution that is going to use natural mechanisms to benefit production.”

Climate change hits the poor the hardest

Graziano da Silva noted how the world’s poorest and most vulnerable - some 80 percent of whom live in rural areas - are the hardest hit by the negative impacts of global warming including droughts and floods.

While these populations like family farmers, pastoralists, fisher folks and community foresters are highly dependent on natural resources and are the first to suffer due to weather related shocks, “they are the least responsible for climate change and cannot be expected to bear the costs of adaptation to climate change,” Graziano da Silva said. He called for more targeted policies and investments to adapt agriculture to the impacts of climate change, including reducing deforestation and overfishing, improving soil fertility and achieving lower emissions. FAO is ready to assist countries through it activities such as agroecology, climate smart agriculture, Integrated Coastal Management, Sustainable Land Management and Forest Landscape Restoration, the Director-General said. Also speaking at the CFS side-event, which was jointly organized by FAO, France and Morocco, was Mohammed El Guerrouj, General Director of Morocco’s Agency for Agricultural Development (ADA) who briefed participants on lessons learned by his country’s experience with its Green Morocco Plan. Other speakers included UN Special Rapporteur for the Right to Food, Hilal Elver, who stressed the humanitarian aspects of climate change mitigation and adaption, and Lapodini Atouga, Commissioner of Agriculture, Environment and Water Resources of the Economic Community of West African States who underscored the regional body’s commitment to address the challenges of food security and climate change.

Global Industries’ Divisions honored for achievements in health and safety

G lobal Industries, Inc.

announced that two of their

divisions were honored with

awards at the recently held annual conference of the Great Plains Safety and Health Organisation. MFS/York/Stormor was named as a silver award winner during the event. This is the seventh consecutive year they have received this prestigious award, which is given to recognise outstanding records of company safety and innovative techniques and methods

34 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

developed to support and encourage safety and health in the workplace. Additionally, Nebraska Engineering Company (NECO) was named a bronze award winner for their continued efforts and improvements in creating a safe work environment for their employees. “Global Industries places a lot of emphasis on the well-being of our employees, and is truly committed to being an industry leader when it comes to promoting healthy lifestyles and offering the safest

work environment possible,” explains Global Vice President of Manufacturing Chief Davidson. “The fact that we’re consistently recognised for these efforts demonstrates we’re on the right path, and is one of the reasons why Global employees tend to stay Global employees for many years.” Great Plains Safety and Health is members-based organisation that provides training and educational opportunities in workplace safety, loss control management and regulatory compliance programs to businesses and individuals throughout the Midwest.

Mill

Training

Grain elevator managers or those involved in grain storage that

are interested in learning more efficient practices should consider attending the Grain Elevator Managers course at Kansas State University’s IGP Institute Conference Centre from January 4-8,

2016.

Kansas State University’s IGP Institute to hold semi-annual Grain Elevator Managers Course in January 2016

“The purpose of this course is to supply grain-management information that is not available elsewhere to help grain managers properly understand how to avoid errors and become more efficient,” says Carl Reed, IGP Institute grain storage specialist. “Much of that information was developed through scientific investigation and we invite guest speakers to teach the non-science subjects such as personnel management and grain- handling equipment.” Included in the course will be presentations from Reed and other professionals with classroom discussions and workshops. Topics to be covered include grain quality characteristics and grading, air properties relating to aeration, operations costs, equipment and fumigation plans. Reed says the course will be especially beneficial to new managers. Manager of United farmers Co-op in Brownton, Minnesota and former course participant, Tony Martens, found this course especially helpful regarding aeration practices. “I now have a better understanding of how air moves moisture through the bin,” Martens says. “We will definitely be able to aerate grain more efficiently now and that is a big expense for us.”

Carl Reed, course coordinator and IGP Institute grain storage specialist emeritus, explains aeration principles and
Carl Reed, course coordinator and
IGP Institute grain storage specialist
emeritus, explains aeration principles
and hardware during the Grain Elevator
Managers course.

The IGP Institute faculty and staff recognise the significance of interacting and building relationships with industry professionals and encourage the networking opportunities that are available through the IGP Institute courses. “The greatest benefit is an appreciation of the importance of system and documentation in grain management. I hope they learn this from the formal presentations and from interaction with grain managers from other companies with other cultures,” Reed says. To register for this course or to view other training opportunities with IGP, visit the IGP Institute website at www.ksu.edu/igp. This is just one example of the trainings offered through IGP. In addition to feed manufacturing and grain management, the IGP Institute offers courses in the areas of flour milling and grain processing, and grain marketing and risk management.

Participants in the Grain Elevator Managers course work through a grain conditioning monitoring assignment.
Participants in the Grain
Elevator Managers course work
through a grain conditioning
monitoring assignment.

SpeedMaster™

Speed Switch Sensor & System Testing Device

The SpeedMaster™ with Pulse Pilot is the only device that provides independent, real time, and complete verification of an entire speed monitoring system to ensure that alarms and shutdowns are working as expected.

The SpeedMaster™ operates in two modes; input mode provides the device with the machine’s actual running speed, and output mode allows the device to test the speed switch at set underspeed trip points for real time verification of the monitoring system’s alarm and shutdown functions. There is no need to remove the sensor from the machine shaft or change any system connections in order to use the SpeedMaster™. Maintenance and safety personnel can now quickly, easily and accurately test speed switches during periodic inspection schedules, and help the facility fully comply with insurance audits and OSHA 29 CFR 1910.272.

PRODUCT FOCUS

NOVEMBER 2015 In every edition of Milling and Grain, we take a look at the products that will be saving you time and money in the milling process.

www.go4b.co.uk

Multi-function Grain Analyser

There is a need in the milling process to maintain continuous management over and monitoring of grain during mixing and tampering processes. Ocrim’s new MGC allows for online reading of dry wheat, online readings for tempered wheat and online reading for protein.

This approach, which is called ‘VisNIR,’ opens a new world for online management in the milling industry.

The system features:

• First and second dampening with fully automated management loop

• Blending based on protein managed by a fully automated loop

• First and second dampening historically H 2 O data collection

• Wheat protein historical data collection

The whole process can be accessed and operated remotely via the internet to enhance customer satisfaction.

www.ocrim.com

IN OUR NEXT ISSUE See the full write up of the Ocrim Multi-function Grain Analyser

the full write up of the Ocrim Multi-function Grain Analyser HPLC or LC-MS/MS testing Many analysts

HPLC or LC-MS/MS testing

Many analysts are turning towards Mycotoxin testing methods that have the ability to detect more than one toxin in a single HPLC or LC-MS/MS run, but testing for combinations of different mycotoxins in a single sample can present real problems.

One flexible and cost effective approach to multi-toxin analysis is the coupling two immunoaffinity columns in tandem that can result in clean extracts containing only the target mycotoxins, eliminating the need for matrix matched calibration entirely.

The advantage of the tandem method was demonstrated in an article published in Journal of Chromatography, Vol 1400, 26th June 2015, Pages 91-97 using R-Biopharm Rhône’s columns for DZT MS-PREP ® and AOF MS-PREP ® with samples of rye flour, maize, breakfast cereal and wholemeal bread.

MFS Adjustable Conveyor Support System

MFS/York/Stormor, a division of Global Industries, recently released an adjustable conveyor support system for their Brownie catwalks that has been specifically designed to accommodate York conveyors as well as conveyors from most other manufacturers.

Made from galvanised materials, the supports are adjustable from eight-inches to 60-inches, and can accommodate up to a five- degree incline. Installation is quick and easy. The support system bolts to the catwalk using a series of U-bolts, and the conveyor then clamps to the supports. No drilling is required.

The support are specifically engineered to carry the full loaded weight of the conveyor, as well as for the wind loads for the area in which it’s installed so that the load is properly distributed to the catwalk cross members.

www.globalindinc.com

www.r-biopharm.com
www.r-biopharm.com

38 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

SPECIAL FOCUS

MPAS Seginus from Bühler: Direct drive instead of belts, polyurethane replaces wood Highest level of food safety, flexible installation and use, minimum amount of space, maximum throughput and 100% wood-free: Bühler presents the new MPAS Seginus – a systematic development of its plansifter family. Bühler has expanded its plansifter series with a top-performer, the MPAS Seginus. The Seginus sifts and sorts grist and flour-type products in wheat, rye, corn and durum wheat mills. In addition, it sorts coarsely- ground product or free-flowing granulate reliably. With its new drive system, the Seginus is a true innovation with many options for use: as the little brother of the square plansifter Sirius MPAK or as a replacement for the small plansifters MPAR and MPAQ in existing plants or for use in new plants in the control sifting.

Innovative drive concept The new plansifter from Bühler stands out with its compactness and enormous capacity. It needs about 30 percent less floor space than comparable plansifters because it barely takes up one square meter. The secret to this is its compact design: The new type of beltless drive is integrated into the sifter floor. Instead of a conventional motor, it has an unbalanced mass fitted with magnets that generates the desired rotation of the plansifter. This drive creates a sifter acceleration of up to three times the gravitation acceleration. The motor speed can be progressively selected from 180 to 260 rotations per minute which optimizes the sifter movement and makes a broad range of applications possible. Compared to its predecessor, the MPAR, the Seginus MPAS-114

FOCUS
FOCUS

MPAS Seginus from Bühler

provides a throughput capacity of up to 20 percent more thanks to its compact design and its sieving surface of 5.6m2 (14 sifting frames per stack).

Closed system The elimination of the external motor allows a closed and compact design construction with a sanitary design. The sifting section is generously insulated which prevents condensation and increases food safety. This same goal is pursued by the standard use of low-wear NOVAPUR sieve frames made of high-end plastic (polyurethane) with welded stainless steel inserts. There are no washers, brackets, screws or rivets inside of Seginus. In addition, the form has rounded corners which effectively minimizes undesired product residues.

Flexible in all directions The Seginus MPAS plansifter stands out because of its compact design and optimal space utilization which allows it to be integrated into any production environment or process chain. The Seginus is equipped with the Bühler Nokvapur sieve frames, like the square plansifter Sirius MPAK, and provides optimal flexibility through a large variety of frames. The drive system with variable motor speed allows it to also be adjusted to all possible uses. The plansifter Seginus is intended to be used for control sifting and classifying in small capacities as a supplement to the ‘larger’ square plansifter Sirius MPAK. It is available in two sizes: MPAS-114 with up to 14 sieves, and MPAS-122 with up to 22 sieves. While the MPAS-144 is a standing version, the Seginus MPAS-122 will be suspended from a stand or a building ceiling.

will be suspended from a stand or a building ceiling. www.buhlergroup.com # 11 Milling and Grain

www.buhlergroup.com

# 11

F
F

Improving the health benefits of bread

by Peter Shewry, Distinguished Research Fellow, Department of Plant Biology and Crop Science, Rothamsted Research, UK

The development of roller milling in the 19th Century made white bread affordable to all social classes for the first time, leading to a love affair with white bread, which remains in many countries to the present day.

B ecause bread has long been the staple food in temperate countries, this led to massive changes in diet, with coarse wholemeal or brown breads being almost completely replaced by white products in the UK by 1880. Although the science of nutrition was then in its infancy, concerns were nevertheless expressed about the

impact of this change in diet on the nutrition and health of the population. Foremost among the critics of white bread in the UK were May Yates and Thomas Allinson. Allinson qualified as a doctor in 1879 and established a practice in London. He believed that diet was crucial for health, and particularly advocated the consumption of stone ground wholemeal wheat. He was frequently in dispute with orthodox medicine and was “struck off” (disqualified from practicing) in 1892, having been found guilty of “infamous conduct” (self- promotion). In the same year he purchased a stone mill and established a milling and baking company that continues to produce wholemeal bread to the present day. By contrast, May West was not trained as a scientist but became convinced of the benefits of wholemeal bread during a visit to Sicily. She founded the Bread Reform League in 1880 and spent 40 years campaigning for the use of high extraction (about 85 percent) flours. The late 19th Century also saw the introduction

40 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

of improved “patent” breads, the most well known being “Hovis” which is enriched in wheat germ. Despite the compulsory production of high extraction and wholemeal breads in the UK during the two World Wars, white bread has remained the favourite for much of the British population, and in many other countries. Although those who promoted improved breads in the 19th Century recognised the importance of fibre and protein, the health benefits were not soundly established until the early 20th Century, with the discovery of vitamins and the recognition that these are depleted when the bran and germ are removed to produce white flour. Since then, many studies have been reported positive relationships between flour extraction rate and the contents of “beneficial” components in flour, including B vitamins, Vitamin E, minerals, fibre and “bioactive” phytochemicals, with the differences in concentrations of these components between wholemeal and white flour exceeding ten-fold in some cases.

Wholegrain and health

Recent interest in the relationship between wheat and health has been stimulated by the wholegrain movement, which can be dated from the approval granted by the US Food and Drugs Administration in 1999 that “Diets rich in whole grain foods and other plant foods and low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, may help reduce the risk of heart disease and certain cancers." This has stimulated interest from both industry and academics and the establishment of bodies to promote wholegrain consumption, such as the Whole Grains Council, Grains for Health Foundation and Healthgrain Forum. The role of vitamins and minerals in health is well established but recent attention has focussed on dietary fibre. There is strong scientific evidence that increased consumption of cereal fibre,

pericarp and testa

pericarp and testa starchy endosperm Aleurone germ
pericarp and testa starchy endosperm Aleurone germ
pericarp and testa starchy endosperm Aleurone germ

starchy

endosperm

Aleurone

pericarp and testa starchy endosperm Aleurone germ

germ

particularly in wholegrain, results in reduced risk of a range of chronic diseases including type two diabetes, stroke and some types of cancer (notably colorectal). The scientific evidence for the role of dietary fibre and other cereal carbohydrates in health has been reviewed in detail in a recent report from the

UK Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition. Although, the roles and benefits of “bioactive” phytochemicals remain to be established, few would dispute that increasing flour extraction rate could have a significant impact on the health of consumers.

Wheat grain structure and milling

In botanical terms the wheat grain is a single-seeded fruit, called a caryopsis. It consists of three main parts, which have different functions and compositions. The central part of the grain is the endosperm, which accounts for about 90 percent of the total grain. This is essentially a storage tissue, being packed with starch and protein, which are digested to support the growth of the seedling during germination. However, the outer layer of endosperm cells differ from the others, being rich in dietary fibre, protein, oil, B vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals. These outer aleurone cells account for about 6.5 percent of the grain. The embryo is relatively small, accounting for about 3 percent of the total grain, and develops into the seedling on germination. It is similar in composition to the aleurone, except for a lower proportion of dietary fibre. Outside of the embryo and endosperm are the seed coat (testa) and the fruit coat (pericarp)) which provide protection to the grain (see figure). These outer layers are very rich in fibre and associated phenolic acids but not in other beneficial components. Conventional milling has been developed to separate the starch-rich cells of the central endosperm (called the starchy endosperm) from the outer layers, aleurone and germ, which are together recovered as bran. The process is remarkably effective, with the yield of white flour approaching 80 percent of the total grain. However, as flour yield approaches and exceeds 80 percent there is increasing

F
F
However, as flour yield approaches and exceeds 80 percent there is increasing F Milling and Grain
F
F
F “contamination” with bran tissues, particularly with the aleurone, which adheres tightly to the outer starch-rich

“contamination” with bran tissues, particularly with the aleurone, which adheres tightly to the outer starch-rich cells (figure). Hence, the concentrations of beneficial components increase significantly as extraction rate rises.

Challenges to increasing flour extraction rate for bread making

Increasing the flour extraction rate poses challenges for food processing and for the consumer acceptability of the products. Increasing the content of bran in bread-making flour reduces the acceptability to consumers accustomed to consuming white bread, due to the grittiness associated with bran particles and to the colour and flavour (more wheaty and bitter with an aftertaste) associated with the presence of proanthocyanidin pigments in the testa of the “red” grained types of wheat which are largely used for bread making. In theory, the latter problem is easy to eliminate as “white” grained wheats are available which lack the pigment and associated flavour. However, white wheats are highly susceptible to “pre-harvest sprouting” when subjected to cool and wet conditions at harvest, leading to loss of value as sprouted grain cannot be used for food processing. Hence, white wheats are not widely cultivated and the grain is too expensive to be used except for premium products. It has not been possible to separate the red colour from the resistance to sprouting by conventional plant breeding but work in progress on understanding the precise relationships between the two seemingly unrelated phenomena might allow the use of modern molecular tools to produce white wheats that are also resistant to sprouting. It should also be noted that higher intrinsic processing quality is required for producing wholemeal and high extraction breads than for white bread. This is because processing quality is mainly determined by the gluten proteins, which are located exclusively

in the white flour. These proteins are therefore diluted by about 25 percent in wholemeal, and to a correspondingly lesser extent in high extraction flours. It is therefore necessary to use grain of higher protein content and/or protein quality, or to supplement low protein flour with “vital gluten” produced by the industrial separation of starch and gluten from flour.

New approaches to producing enhanced flours

Two recent multinational projects supported by the European Union have focused on developing new technologies to improve the quality and acceptability of whole grain and high extraction rate bread. One option, which was explored, is to eliminate the more unpalatable fibre-rich outer layers of the bran while retaining the inner bran, which includes the nutrient-rich aleurone layer. This cannot be achieved by simple abrasion (debranning) of whole grain because of the oval shape and the presence of a crease. The Health grain programme (2005-2010) therefore developed a process in which the grain was pearled twice, initially to remove the outer bran (approx three percent dry wt) and then the inner bran (up to 15 percent original dry wt). The first fraction was discarded while the second fraction, which was enriched in the aleurone layer, retained. Although the pearling removed most of the bran some remained in the crease region. The debranned grain was therefore milled and sieved using conventional procedures and the white flour recombined with an appropriate proportion of the second pearling fraction to give “Healthflour” which was enriched in beneficial components and had improved processing properties and higher acceptability. Alternative approaches in the same project were to mechanically separate the aleurone layer using different types of mills to produce “aleurone powder” as an ingredient, and to finely grind the bran (micronisation) prior to fractionation by electrostatic separation. Miconisation also has the advantage that it increases the bioavailability of minerals, vitamins and phytochemicals. Following on from Health Grain, the Healthbread project (2012-2014) developed a range of concentrates from aleurone and wholegrain, which were successfully used by commercial partners using either long fermentation or sough dough systems. There is no doubt that such new approaches can be used to produce bread which combines increased health benefits with good consumer acceptability. However, they will inevitably increase the cost of production, and current options are also more applicable to the low volume production of artisan breads than high volume factory production. Hence, their impact on the health of the whole population may be limited and cheaper and more widely applicable solutions should continue to be sought.

and cheaper and more widely applicable solutions should continue to be sought. 42 | November 2015
42 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain
42 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain
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Hulling of all major pulse varieties

Bühler launches pioneering CE and ATEX compliant PULSROLL™ purpose-designed for hulling of all major pulse varieties

T he Bühler Group, a global leader in pulse processing solutions, has launched its PULSROLL™ huller to support processors in their quest to produce innovative pulse products and tap into the burgeoning market for tasty and nutritious food alternatives in which nutrient-rich pulses play a leading role. With its new fully CE and

ATEX compliant PULSROLL™ huller, Bühler has introduced a dedicated pulse hulling solution that removes the hull from multiple pulses, efficiently, hygienically and cost effectively allowing worldwide pulse processors to capitalise on the compelling value-added opportunities emerging in this industry. There is a growing recognition of the exciting potential that pulses hold for the creation of a wider range of food products and that is driving demand for further processed pulse-based products. Not only are pulses gluten-free and high in protein, they represent an excellent substitute for meat. Flours made from the

44 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

grinding of pulses, such as chickpeas and peas, are increasingly finding their way into conventional foods such as pasta, tortillas and noodles, while ready-to-eat snacks are also benefiting from novel pulse developments that boost their health appeal. This dynamic trend is set to expand yet further during 2016, which the United Nations has proclaimed as ‘International Year of Pulses’; and this places even greater pressure on pulse processors to provide fully processed and added value pulse products to meet market demand. “In the past, particularly in North America, pulse processing was restricted to just cleaning and then exporting. Now, pulse processors globally are looking to adopt complete hulling and grinding operations, in order to access the increasingly desirable nutrients from the pulses, and extract greater value,” explains Surojit Basu, Global Product Manager at Bühler. “Up until now, rice and grain technologies has been commonly employed for pulse hulling and has been insufficient to meet the quality and quantity requirements of modern, large scale EU and US processors.”

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underscored through the clever use of rubber seals between these stones, which prevent dead zones that could otherwise cause the capture of residual product. This special design feature reduces the potential for microbial contamination, product accumulation or product cross-contamination during changeover, allowing for easier cleaning of the machine and the more rapid and efficient switch from one product to another. “Among other technical developments within the PULSROLL™, its long life emery grinding stones that typically allow the processing of a minimum of 10,000 tonnes before a change. This is significantly higher than the industry average and reduces downtime and maintenance requirements, and their associated costs,” said Surojit Basu, who confirmed that the robust new and exclusive pulse huller has been created with wear-resistance, ease of use, hygiene and quality defining every element. “An innovative sieve assembly ensures the milling surface is maintained throughout the life of the stones, whilst a strong structural design prolongs the overall life of the machine, and provides the ultimate in product quality time after time.” Bühler offers both individual equipment solutions and complete processing plants for the processing of pulses, and has over 200 cleaning and SORTEX plants and more than 40 complete plants in operation worldwide. With the introduction of the PULSROLL™, Bühler continues to build on its commitment to global pulse processors by providing them with technology dedicated to handling multiple pulses in the one machine. This supports today’s modern pulse processors in their bid to fulfil on the growing demand for further processed pulse products with the greatest of consistency, efficiency, quality and yield.

the greatest of consistency, efficiency, quality and yield. Bühler has responded to this industry challenge with

Bühler has responded to this industry challenge with its all- new PULSROLL™, which offers pulse hullers a breakthrough technology and, uniquely, allows multiple varieties of pulses to be handled perfectly on the one machine, achieving consistently uniform dehulling at the highest of throughputs. Critically, the hygienically-designed PULSROLL™ provides pulse processors with the vital CE and ATEX certification they require to operate safely in today’s increasingly regulated and highly automated industry. Dedicated to the processing of all major pulses from dry yellow and green peas, to pigeon peas, chickpeas, mung beans and lentils; and drawing on just 15 horsepower - half the power consumption of an average huller - to fulfil on an industry-leading capacity of four tonnes per hour, the PULSROLL™ offers not just all-in-one pulse hulling but also offers processors dramatic savings in energy and therefore significantly reduced production costs. Pulses are fed by gravity, through the pulse huller, into its milling chamber, where they are subjected to the frictional forces created between several grinding stones and sieves in order to separate the hull from the valuable pulse within. By fine tuning the ‘gap’ between the sieves and grinding stones, processors using the new PULSROLL™ can now easily adjust the ‘grind’ to suit different incoming product. Crucially, the inclination, dictating the flow of the product inside the hulling chamber, can also be altered quickly and easily to accommodate different pulses. Pivotal to the successful operation of the PULSROLL™ is its machine crafted sectionalised emery grinding stones. These come in varying grit sizes to fulfil the requirements of the specific pulse to be hulled, to ensure optimal hulling performance, with minimal broken product. Hygiene is

46 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

to ensure optimal hulling performance, with minimal broken product. Hygiene is 46 | November 2015 -
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Field-Suitable rapid test documented for rice fortification

by Sarah Zimmermann, Food Fortification Initiative

T wo rapid qualitative procedures to detect iron-fortified rice kernels have been validated and documented for use in non-laboratory settings. For example, customs inspectors can use either of these procedures to test rice imports without holding cargo while waiting for lab results. Regulatory monitoring personnel can also use these techniques

with domestically produced fortified rice. The newly documented procedures are simple tools that can be used regardless of how the fortified rice kernels are produced. They do not require complicated equipment or precise measurements. The chemicals can be stored safely and used without the need for hazardous waste disposal systems. Companies that produce fortified rice kernels have used a rapid, qualitative procedure for internal quality control and quality assurance for some time. However these testing techniques were often developed for the company’s specific product or were not intended for non-laboratory settings. From these existing methods, the Food Fortification Initiative

(FFI) identified two procedures that are suitable for non-laboratory settings. Both rely on chemical reactions with iron to change the color of the iron-fortified kernels. FFI successfully used one procedure in a regulatory monitoring training workshop in the Solomon Islands in August 2015 and demonstrated it during the Global Summit on Food Fortification in September 2015. The field-use versions of both procedures take less than five minutes. Costs and safety considerations are equitable

for both. One uses diluted hydrochloric acid and potassium thiocyanate and turns iron-fortified kernels red. The other uses diluted hydrochloric acid and potassium fericyanide or ferrocyanide and turns iron- fortified kernels dark blue. In countries where flour

is also fortified, FFI recommends using the rice procedure that results in dark red kernels. This test uses the same chemicals that are used for a qualitative test for fortified wheat flour. If a country requires fortification of both wheat flour and rice, then the regulatory monitoring staff will be able to use the same chemicals. For the research, FFI received fortified rice kernels from five producers. These kernels were blended with unfortified rice produced in the United States to create fortified rice. The two tests that were found suitable for field use were successful with fortified kernels made via hot extrusion, warm extrusion, and coating. Fortified rice is a blend of fortified and unfortified kernels. The blend ratio is usually one fortified kernel per 100 or 200 unfortified kernels. Rice can also be fortified by dusting a vitamin and mineral powder on all of the milled rice. However, the nutrients are easily washed off, and dusting is not recommended in countries where people usually wash rice before cooking. Another consideration in this research was cost. The procedures do not require special equipment, so the main cost is purchasing the required chemicals. The supply of hydrochloric acid and potassium thiocyanate for this project cost US$ 433 and amounted to US$ 0.02 per test. FFI also evaluated the procedures for safety and simplicity. Researchers scored each potential procedure for the safety of the required chemicals, ease of obtaining the chemicals, and the amount of expertise required to conduct the procedures. Hydrochloric acid, usually a dangerous chemical, is used in both

The two newly documented rapid procedures for rice fortification depend on a chemical reaction with
The two newly documented rapid procedures for rice fortification depend on a chemical
reaction with iron in fortified kernels. One procedure makes the fortified kernels dark red;
the other makes the fortified kernels dark blue.

48 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

the red and blue assays, but only in a very diluted form. Those rapid tests do not provide an analysis of the amount of iron or identify the type of iron in the fortified kernel. They also do not indicate whether other nutrients are in the fortified kernels. In a strong regulatory monitoring system, fortified rice samples are periodically sent to external laboratories for comprehensive analysis to ensure that the product complies with the country’s fortification standard. Yet rapid tests are an important part of a country’s grain fortification monitoring system. When used consistently, they will provide an early indicator of problems that may need to be corrected. This helps ensure that rice fortification has the expected health impact. Grains are most commonly fortified with iron to prevent debilitating anemia from iron deficiency. They are also regularly fortified with folic acid to prevent severe neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida. Rice fortification is considered economically feasible in countries where people consume at least 100 grams of rice per person per day. It is most easily implemented in modern mills with a production capacity of at least five metric tons an hour. If commercial distribution systems for rice in a country are too small-scale, rice can also be fortified in other large distribution channels, such as government programs. One reason that fortification is successful is that it does not require consumers to change their behavior. The foods they already enjoy eating are simply more nutritious. On the other hand, successful fortification programs require behavior changes by the monitoring staff responsible for ensuring food processors follow national regulations. They need to apply quality control measures routinely, analyze results, and correct problems. This field-suitable rapid procedure for rice fortification

Becky Tsang, center, Food Fortification Initiative Technical Officer for Asia, demonstrated one of the newly

Becky Tsang, center, Food Fortification Initiative Technical Officer for Asia, demonstrated one of the newly documented rapid tests for fortified rice kernels at a Global Summit on Food Fortification in Tanzania in September 2015.

is a new tool to help them be successful. To stay informed about developments, join the rice fortification resource-sharing platform by sending an e-mail to Becky Tsang, FFI Technical Officer for Asia, at becky.tsang@ffinetwork.org. Funding was provided by the Australia Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) in Solomon Islands as part of its support for wheat flour and rice fortification there. Acknowledgements: Research Products and Wright Enrichment provided the chemicals and laboratory space for conducting the research. Jeff Gwirtz from JAG Services consulted with FFI on this work.

Gwirtz from JAG Services consulted with FFI on this work. F R-Biopharm Rhône Ltd. EASI-EXTRACT® CITRININ
F
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R-Biopharm Rhône Ltd. EASI-EXTRACT® CITRININ Immunoaffinity column clean-up prior to HPLC or LC - MS/MS,
R-Biopharm Rhône Ltd.
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Immunoaffinity column clean-up prior to HPLC or LC - MS/MS, Art. No. P126 / P26B
F Environmental impact of micronutrients in livestock feeding by Jake Piel, Sustainability Manager, Novus
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Environmental
impact of
micronutrients in
livestock feeding
by Jake Piel, Sustainability Manager,
Novus International

Agricultural production systems are adapting

operations to meet the increasing demand for

wholesome and affordable food. Attention has

focused on the long-term impact on ecosystems

of both crop and animal production. With

reference to animal agriculture, concerns have

been expressed about the concentration of

minerals in manure and its subsequent effect on

soil mineral content and phytotoxicity.

about the concentration of minerals in manure and its subsequent effect on soil mineral content and

T he US Environmental Protection

Agency has placed some metals such

as copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc

(Zn) on their list of priority pollutants,

as they are considered among the most

toxic elements in the environment when

improperly managed. Trace minerals

cannot be degraded through chemical

or biological processes, and therefore

remain in the soil for long periods of time. The benefits of supplementing copper, zinc and manganese in

animal feed are critical to animal health and wellbeing, as well as overall production and performance improvements. For example, pork producers supplement diets with copper for enteric benefits.

A swine study has shown injected copper could result in a 19.8

percent increase in weight gain and 16.9 percent improvement

in feed conversion. These benefits, along with 9.4 percent

improvement in loin muscle weight relative to live body weight,

underscore the role of available copper in grow/finish pigs. An

important trace mineral for red blood cell health, reproduction and immune function, copper is also a metal co-factor for an enzyme responsible for collagen development and is critical for strengthening tendons, bones, skin and intestines. In addition, without adequate available zinc in poultry diets, young birds may not receive the maximum protective benefit of a vaccination program. Zinc deficient birds are more susceptible to diseases, resulting in increased mortality, poor efficiency and ultimately, economic loss for the producer. Deficiencies can lead to structural defects, as well as compromised growth performance. Because zinc, as well as copper, has low natural bioavailability and absorption in the animal, it must be supplemented to realize the animal’s full performance potential. Many studies have identified both copper and zinc, when used at elevated levels, can have a significant effect on the environment through excretion into the manure. Traditionally, supplemental copper has been offered in inorganic forms as copper sulfate (CuSO4) or tribasic copper chloride (TBCC). Depending on the source of minerals fed, as little as 20 percent of the inorganic copper may actually be utilised by the animal, with the remaining 80 percent excreted in the manure. Producers routinely over-supplement inorganic mineral salts, believing this is the best way to get the maximum benefit of a mineral program. However, this over supplementation does not necessarily optimise animal performance, and in fact the majority of these minerals will be excreted in the faeces. In broilers, for example, it can be calculated that 75 percent of the dietary zinc is wasted in this way. Over time, these minerals can accumulate in the soil and can affect plant growth, crop production and ecosystem integrity. The over exposure of some minerals to plants can reduce photosynthesis, brown the root tips, inhibit growth and ultimately cause death. The microbial population in the soil is also affected by minerals contamination when accumulation has occurred.

50 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Mineral pollution of water resources is also a problem in many world areas. This is typically due to heavy industrialisation and urbanisation; however, leaching of minerals from the soil into water reservoirs often occurs, as well as the transport of soil due to heavy rains and runoff. The aquatic environment is highly susceptible to the effects of mineral toxicity as these organisms are in close and constant contact with soluble minerals over an extended period of time. Currently, there are limited regulations for mineral pollution in many areas. In fact, a recent report indicating poor soil environment conditions has ignited talks in China, so much so that, “the State will strengthen its regulatory role and set up a lifelong accountability mechanism for soil contamination; tighten the supervision and inspection on the performances of heavy polluters; and strictly control the misuse and abuse of agricultural inputs during the agricultural production activities.” In Europe, KRAV standards limit the highest average applications of copper and zinc over five years of products applied to the soil including feed, feed minerals and medicines to 500 and 700 g/ha/yr., respectively (KRAV 2006). Much emphasis has been placed on strategies for reducing the amount of copper and zinc excreted in this region. Recently, the maximum permitted levels of trace minerals supplemented to swine diets are 170 mg/kg DM for the growing phase and 25 mg/kg DM for the fattening stage (Lopez-Alonso 2012). It is important for both animal producers and legislative authorities to have proper dialogue to encourage positive outcomes in terms of animal wellbeing and good environmental stewardship. Reducing the mineral load in the surrounding environment is a component of sustainable agriculture. The single most effective

measure is the reduction in trace mineral levels supplemented in the feed. Furthermore, this can be done while increasing the minerals available for metabolic uptake. It is known that mineral elements bound to an organic ligand are more stable in the gut, as the cation does not interact with the other antagonistic components during digestion. As a result, these organic trace minerals (OTMs) are delivered to the site of absorption, thus increasing their bioavailability to the tissues. In 2014, 117 million pigs were produced in the United States. Potentially, more than 2 million pounds of copper excreted in the environment could have been avoided with the use of MINTREX® Cu from Novus. A recommended lifetime loading limit for copper in soil is 77 pounds of copper per acre. Using this recommendation, and supplementing with MINTREX Cu, means that 27,000 fewer acres are required to manage this mineral load. This is relatively small if we consider that half of the pigs produced in the world, about 476 million, are in China. If all pig feed in China was supplemented with MINTREX Cu, as opposed to inorganic trace minerals, the result is a savings of 982 million pounds of copper excreted to the environment as waste. Using the same US copper loading rates, this is equivalent to almost 13 million acres. As the global population approaches nine billion by 2050, food production capacities must increase to accommodate the nutritional needs of more people. Technological advances in agriculture and livestock production, as well as sustainable practices, are critical to achieving this goal. The reduction of environmental pollution by minerals is one area in which significant improvements can be made through supplementing healthy diets with a more bioavailable mineral solution. References available on request

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F With the EU predominantly using rapeseed oil as a feedstock, by 2010 over a third

With the EU predominantly using rapeseed oil as a feedstock, by 2010 over a third of all rapeseed oil in the world was being used as biofuels. As a result, this has had a “profound impact on prices and demand”.

The effect of the increasing demand for meat per capita

Rising per capita meat consumption has been increasingly met through the production of animals with high protein diets which has created much higher demand for soybean-meal over maize.” Mr McGill showed how the production of meat has increasingly come from poultry and pigs rather than cattle. The reason for this, he argued, is their lower basal metabolism, which allows them to convert feed into meat more efficiently, and faster rate of breeding. As these species also consume greater volumes of higher protein feed, this has added to the demand for oil crops rather than cereals. This increased demand for protein feed has had a huge impact on demand for soybeans. Soybeans were described as the “gold standard” for animal feed, “containing the highest protein, the best amino acid profile, the best palatability.” As a result, since 1950 the soymeal price, as a percentage compared to the price of maize, has increased as the market has signaled that it needs more soybeans to feed pigs and poultry. He also added that demand for soybean meal “remains healthy as meat consumption continues to rise. Future growth in the consumption of poultry, aquaculture and pigs will continue to create a large demand for soybeans.” He concluded by reiterating the belief that we are currently at “the tail-end of a series of remarkable transformations” in the vegetable oil markets, as pressure for biofuels were the cause of the great commodity cycle of the last decade. The legacy of this period is to leave the vegetable oil price linked to the crude oil price. The weak crude oil price therefore underpins the recent weak vegetable oil prices. Slight optimism was offered regarding the future of vegetable oil prices. Low prices have led to lower fertiliser application on oil palm, which should reduce in palm oil output. In addition, low rapeseed and sunflower prices have also reduced production, all of which should help to support prices over the next year.

of which should help to support prices over the next year. The effect of crude oil

The effect of crude oil price on animal feed prices

by Andrew Wilkinson, Staff Writer, Milling and Grain Magazine

Andrew Wilkinson, Staff Writer, Milling and Grain Magazine I n his address to the 2015 Agriculture

I n his address to the 2015 Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) Conference, Julian McGill from LMC International discussed the importance of biofuels policy as being integral to understanding the high prices in agricultural commodity markets of the past decade. Prior to 2002, the harvested area under cereal grains had been steadily declining. With per capita

consumption of maize and wheat remaining relatively flat, yield growth was more than sufficient to meet the increase in demand. This freed up the area that was taken by oil crops, for which per capita demand was growing at a faster rate as vegetable oil and meat consumption increased with higher incomes. In aggregate, the world did not have to increase harvested area. However, since 2002, both the area under oilseeds and grains has increased, placing additional strain upon the global harvested area, and ushering in the commodity cycle from which we are just emerging.

Effects of US ethanol policy since 2002

Mr McGill argued that the crucial change came with the introduction of US biofuels policy. From 2002 the share of maize used as ethanol increased consistently, and by 2010, 15 percent of global maize was used as a bio-fuel. At that point around 40 percent of US maize was being transformed into ethanol and blended with petrol. This large increase in non-food use of maize created huge volumes of additional demand for cereal crops. With yield growth no longer sufficient to meet demand growth, the area under cereal crops had to increase. The reversal in the area under cereals, in turn, put new pressure on the global agricultural system. “Farmers across the globe were now under pressure to meet growth both in food demand and non-food demand.” The implications of increased biofuel demand on the vegetable oil markets was then discussed. While the US focused on maize based ethanol, in the EU, mandates were created based primarily on encouraging the use of vegetable oil based biodiesel. As a result, from about 2005 the share of vegetable oil used as biofuels increased very quickly, reaching 15 percent by 2014.

52 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

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F Keeping pace with trends and challenges in pig production by Ester Vinyeta, Species Leader Swine
F Keeping pace with trends and challenges in pig production by Ester Vinyeta, Species Leader Swine

Keeping pace with trends and challenges in pig production

by Ester Vinyeta, Species Leader Swine and Kostas Syriopoulos, Customer Technical Service Swine, Delacon Biotechnik GmbH

A s the global population and its prosperity are steadily on the rise, the animal protein demand will further increase in the near future. Pig meat is the most consumed meat worldwide among the others, closely followed by poultry. Last year it comprised 38 percent (or 118 Mt) of the total meat

consumption whereas poultry meat accounted for 35 percent (or 110 Mt). Though this growing demand is challenged – on the one hand by consumer’s awareness for safe food and on the other hand by sustainable and efficient swine production. At the same time, production costs should be kept as low as possible whilst controlling the high risk of developing drug resistant bacteria for humans due to the use of in-feed antibiotics, as antimicrobial growth promoters (AGP) or as disease treatment. Over the last decades, many feed additives have been developed and evaluated, within which phytogenic (plant derived) substances have attracted much attention.

Feed additives of natural origin

Plants have been used for many centuries in human culinary and medicine as flavor enhancer, preservatives and for their healing properties. Phytogenic feed additives (PFAs), also referred to as “Phytogenics”, contain various natural active substances, such as essential oils, pungent and bitter substances, tannins and saponins that are solely derived from herbs, spices and other plants. As such, PFAs are promising ingredients in a natural strategy to face today´s challenges in livestock production. At the same time, consumers recognise and accept them as safe alternative to

54 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

widely used, therapeutic or prophylactic, medicines applied in animal production. Natural PFAs contain many active substances, which distinguish them among the other nature-identical products available on the market. These blends of leading and secondary active components, in combination of mixtures of more than one plant based ingredient, have proven effectiveness in animal nutrition. Especially for swine, single PFAs and/or mixtures of them have been reported to improve piglet´s feed conversion ratio (FCR) by 1-4 percent. Effects in fatteners are even bigger.

Fresta ® F – the gold-standard in the feed-industry

To date only one pure plant-derived feed additive has received the zootechnical registration by the European Union, and this is Delacon's product for piglets, Fresta ® F. A mixture of selected essential oils in combination with dried herbs and spices, has

Graph 1: Performance improvement with the use of phytogenic feed additives in piglets (Fresta® F,

Graph 1: Performance improvement with the use of phytogenic feed additives in piglets (Fresta® F, Delacon) and fatteners (Aromex® Pro, Delacon). [Feed intake (FI), Average Daily Gain (ADG) and Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR)]

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Picture 1: In vitro digestive tract simulation of dissolving the microencapsulated essential oils. Pictures under

Picture 1: In vitro digestive tract simulation of dissolving the microencapsulated essential oils. Pictures under electronic microscope.

shown consistent improvement of piglet daily gain, feed intake, and FCR compared to the control animals (Graph 1). A novel microencapsulation technology ensures the stability and high recovery of the volatile essential oils. It prevents losses during product storage and feed processing, where high temperatures are used for e.g. conditioning and pelleting. They can pass through the aggressive low pH of the stomach intactly and release the active components where needed: in the small intestine, where the microcapsules are digested (picture 1). By microencapsulation, the strong and intense flavor of some substances is masked, guaranteeing high acceptance from young animals. Fresta ® F is considered as the scientific ‘gold standard’ in the feed industry, because it has passed through the strict approval processes that require considerable expertise, experience, planning and investment. The commercial advantage

of such products to users is the confidence that they have passed a stringent, independent assessment of quality, safety and efficacy and will deliver consistent performance in commercial farms.

Palatability and feed intake

Feed intake is a common problem for weaning piglets. The abrupt separation of the piglet from their mother and the change from a liquid/animal based diet (milk) to a solid/plant origin feed during weaning results in a sudden drop of feed intake and consequently health issues (post weaning diarrhea) followed by impaired growth. Various essential oils, aromatics herbs and spices have been used successfully to enhance the sensorial stimulation of piglet diets. They are used to improve feed palatability in order to increase feed intake and thus, overcome the negative consequences while increasing piglet’s performance.

thus, overcome the negative consequences while increasing piglet’s performance. Milling and Grain - November 2015 |
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Graph 2: Ammonia reduction with the use of a phytogenic feed additive (Aromex® Pro, Delacon)

Graph 2: Ammonia reduction with the use of a phytogenic feed additive (Aromex® Pro, Delacon) in dirty (trial 1) and cleaned (trial 2) slurry channels.

Increased enzymatic activity in the intestinal tract

Pancreatic digestive enzymes, protease, lipase and amylase, are essential for breaking down feed components. Their secretion rate and activity are critical factors for the better and more complete nutrient absorption. PFAs have shown clear positive effects on production and activity of pancreatic enzymes and bile secretion in the digestive tract. Thus, the improved rate of digestion of the feed resulted in higher nutritional value and enhanced animal performance (mainly FCR).

Antioxidant effects are essential for health promoting effects of PFA

Oxidation is a natural process in cells and the final products are free radicals. Certain antioxidant mechanisms have the ability to detoxify these components. During pig’s lifetime, various stressful conditions like weaning, feed change, poor ventilation, overstocking, heat stress and transport increase oxidation processes and thus, the production of free radicals. Overproduction and accumulation of free radicals cause protein and lipid oxidation as well as DNA cell damage. Many aromatic plants and/or their essential oils have been studied for their antioxidant activity. The main active components of those

56 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

plants are the phenolic rings, which have the ability to incorporate the free radicals into their aromatic rings and that way, clear the body. In addition, many non-phenolic components of those plants have antioxidant properties by helping the “internal” antioxidant mechanism. They enhance gene expression for the antioxidant enzyme production. The antioxidant effect is not only limited to animal level but also affects the shelflife of pork meat.

Reducing bacterial pathogenicity

The gut ecosystem is composed of various different, beneficial and harmful, bacterial species. The right balance towards the beneficial ones ensures animal health and enhanced performance. Essential oils from herbs and spices have been tested against harmful bacteria and some of them were able to show strong properties against microbial pathogenicity. Although, the level used to prove the bacteriostatic properties were very high and nearly economically infeasible to use them in swine feed for that purpose. In recent years, the reduction, respectively inhibition of bacterial pathogenicity has gained a lot of attention. Studies have shown that essential oils in much lower concentration than the bacteriostatic are able to inhibit bacterial toxin production. Also, mucilage type substances prevent bacterial adhesion to the intestinal wall. In both cases harmful bacteria are present indeed, but their virulence factors, like toxin production and attachment factors, are inhibited.

Emission reduction of noxious gases

Animal production is responsible for a large amount of noxious gas production, especially ammonia. Plant components such as saponins, have shown to reduce considerably ammonia production from swine units (graph 2). This benefit is not only for the good of the environment, but also improves air quality in the barns, which again improves animal welfare and working conditions for the employees.

Conclusion

Be it for reasons of flavouring, preserving, or healing – plants

have always played an important role in humans. Over the last years, plant derived additives have successfully found their way also into animal nutrition – and justifiably so! Phytogenic feed

additives have

shown many beneficial effects in swine nutrition, such as improved palatability and feed intake, increased enzymatic activity and digestibility, antioxidant effects, reduction of bacterial pathogenicity, as well as emission reduction. Relating to the proven beneficial characteristics, phytogenic feed additives are foreseen to have the potential to become a new generation of substances, respectively additives for innovative pig nutrition and welfare and thus, being able to contribute to a profitable production - perhaps soon a crucial tool for keeping pace with upcoming trends and challenges in pig farming.

a profitable production - perhaps soon a crucial tool for keeping pace with upcoming trends and

STORAGE

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STORAGE F A feature from Supplying flour and feed millers The largest co-operative exports over 10

A feature from

Supplying flour and feed millers

The largest co-operative exports over 10 million tonnes of wheat annually

by Roger Gilbert, Milling and Grain magazine

W estern Australia has four strategically located ports with some 15.8 million tonnes of shipping capacity to move its grain production from the region onto world markets. That was the starting

point for an update on ‘The Australian Wheat Export Market’ provided in a keynote address by Matthew Griffiths of the Australian CBH Group to delegates gathered in Jakarta for the 6th Annual South East Asia District Conference and Expo hosted by the International Association of Operative Millers (IAOM) in early October. Outlining the strength of the Australian grain growing industry, and in particular the integrated supply chain in Western Australia where his company – Australia’s largest grain exporter - has significant operations, he highlighted the 20 million tonne storage capacity, supported by 195 grain receiving sites in Western Australia and the continuous investment being made in world- class infrastructure to protect grain destined for milling in export countries. CHB’s customers are flour, feed millers and food processors with wheat grown by 4500 members producing over 10 million tonnes annually on average, making it the largest co-operative in Australia and possibly the world. The company markets more than half of all grains produced in

Western Australia and is the country’s largest exporter loading over 10 million tonnes per year and chartering a further two million tonnes. The total export for marketing year 2014-15 reached 14.08 million tonnes with 8.4 percent (or 60 percent of the total) coming from Western Australia. South Australia exported four million tonnes (or 28 percent of the total) while Victoria and New South Wales contributed 750,000 tonnes and 830,000 tonnes respectively leaving Queensland exporting just 100,000

tonnes and 830,000 tonnes respectively leaving Queensland exporting just 100,000 58 | November 2015 - Milling

58 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

F tonnes. The last three regions being seriously affected by drought conditions and below average
F
tonnes. The last three regions being seriously affected by drought
conditions and below average production.
Mr Griffiths reported that the year was characterised by higher
prevalence of hard wheat as opposed to lower protein grades out
of South Australia and Western Australia.
“Typically hard wheat makes up 20 percent of Western
Australian production. In 2014-15 hard wheat production was
approximately 34 percent in Western Australia”.
The primary destinations for Australian wheat include
Indonesia, China and Vietnam, he added.
Exports further afield showed a year-on-year reduction in the
Middle Eastern regions that included Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq.
He highlighted several factors impacting long-term agreements
such as major change to the environment in which marketers
operate; a minimum of 10 million tonnes allocated to marketers
in a take-or-pay arrangement; a residual six million tonnes
allocated to marketers not participating in LTA on a first in
first serve basis (take-or-pay component is refunded if another
marketer utilizes the dropped capacity in the same shipping zone
in the same year); take-or-pay premiums range between Aus$5 to
Aus$9 depending on the shipment month and premiums consists
of a long term capacity deposit of Aus$4.
El Nino
One factor impacting production, which should not be
overlooked, is that of the El Nino, he told delegates. El Nino
occurs when ocean temperatures in the Central and Eastern
Pacific Ocean become substantially warmer than average causing
a shift in prevailing trade winds.
Data from the late 1990s to present show three out of six El
Nino years have produced significantly reduced yields in wheat
(1994-95, 2002-03 and 2006-07)
Whilst rainfall in July and August have helped crops
substantially the bureau is maintaining its El Nino forecast
indicating that the El Nino will be the strongest since 1997-98.
“There is a higher potential for a dry finish which could trim
current production forecasts if dry weather prevails, then we are
likely to see higher protein and higher screenings from crops.”
He predicts that total Western Australia wheat production
will reach nine million tonnes compared to the outcome for the
2014-15 year of 8.5 million tonnes and based on a five-year
average of 7.5 million tonnes. Overall, Australia is likely to
produce some 24.2 million tonnes compared with 23 million
tonnes in 2014-15 and based on a five year rolling average of 25
million tonnes.
There is strength in numbers.
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having their dedicated subsidiaries work for you, as well.
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Corporate Project Services – specialists in complete project planning and food safety requirements;
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STORAGE

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F
Set high on a hill, deep in the Burundi countryside is the Minolacs flour mill.
Set high on a hill, deep in the
Burundi countryside is the
Minolacs flour mill. The customer
needed to guarantee that they
were supplying flour of the highest
quality to this remote part of the
country
Storage project

Bentall Rowlands complete new project in Burundi

Set high on a hill, deep in the Burundi countryside is the Minolacs flour mill. The customer needed to guarantee that they were supplying flour of the highest quality to this remote part of the country. The company worked very closely with Buhler to ensure that this project was delivered on time and to budget. All elements of the project, which included the silos, catwalks, machinery tower, sweeps, discharge augers and aeration systems, were supplied. The grain storage project is split into two sections. The main flat bottom silos and the day bin hopper bottom silos. The flat bottom silos are 17 metre diameter by 10 rings with a unit storage

capacity of 2,300 tonnes of wheat. The hopper bottom silos are 4 metre diameter by 10 rings each holding 135 tonnes of wheat. The hopper silos were designed specifically for this project and have a gate clearance of 3 metres, which is to allow for a metering system attached to the cone outlet. As well as their standard catwalk system, Bentall Rowlands manufactured the machinery tower. The tower is a three metre square tower, 21 metres tall, with two main floors for access to the top catwalk systems as well as support and access to the cleaner and elevator head.

Storage News

Sukup Recognised by ABI Legends in Manufacturing

Sukup Manufacturing Co. of Sheffield, Iowa was honored with

a Legends in Iowa Manufacturing award by Elevate Iowa, a

program of the Iowa Association of Business and Industry. Eugene Sukup, founder of Sukup Manufacturing Co., was presented the Legends in Iowa Manufacturing award, which recognized outstanding leaders in manufacturing at an awards dinner held recently. Sukup was co-winner with Drew Vogel of Vogel Paints in the 300+ employees category. More than 50 years ago, Eugene Sukup developed a stirring machine to improve in-bin drying of shelled corn. Since that time, the company has grown to be the largest family-owned, full-line manufacturer of grain drying, storage and handling equipment. The company holds more than 80 patents, many of which are held by Eugene himself. Sukup Manufacturing Co. maintains its

primary manufacturing facilities in Sheffield, Iowa, where the company was started in 1963. “As one of Iowa’s largest industries, manufacturing contributes $31 billion annually to the state’s economy,” ABI President Make Ralston said. “It’s an honor to recognize the founders and leaders of these amazing Iowa companies, and to thank them for the outstanding contributions they make to our state.” “We are very honored to receive this award,” said Sukup Manufacturing Co. President Charles Sukup, “Manufacturing is the engine that drives our state and national economy, so it has always been our goal to minimize outsourcing and manufacture as much of our products as is practical. It is wonderful to see our diligence pay off and be recognized for our company’s contributions to the Iowa economy.”

BinMaster Heavy Duty Capacitance Probe for High Temperatures

The new BinMaster HD probe is a heavy duty, stainless steel probe that can be attached to either the PROCAP I or PROCAP

II capacitance probes. This rugged probe comes in a standard 8”

length and features a PRO-Shield to guard against false readings

Like all BinMaster capacitance probes, the heavy-duty (HD) probe offers fail-safe operation and “Quick-Set” calibration.

BinMaster capacitance probes provide interference-free operation

– working far below the RF level of nine KHz at just six KHz

from material buildup on the probe. The wide diameter of the

(260°C), making it appropriate for challenging applications such

– and will not interfere with two-way radios or other equipment

probe increases the surface area for maximum sensitivity and performance. It is suitable for use in temperatures up to 500°F

operating in the radio spectrum. The PROCAP I and PROCAP II capacitance probes feature a triple-thread, screw-off cover that allows easy access to internal components and an FDA-recognised

as

fly ash or clinker. Because the probe is solid and 1” in diameter,

powder coat finish. The housing also has dual conduit entries to

it

is resistant to bending and extremely durable. It can be used

simplify wiring and installation. A dual time delay feature allows

for low or high level detection in heavy materials such as coal, aggregates, grains, or other materials with a high bulk density.

the user to set flexible time delays up to 30 seconds for covered and uncovered conditions.

60 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

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Industry profile

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Industry profile F DuPont Maria Brandt joined DuPont in 2008 as Global Product Manager for Bakery

DuPont

Maria Brandt joined DuPont in 2008 as Global Product Manager for Bakery Enzymes. She is responsible for managing the product portfolio and new product development. Prior to joining DuPont she worked at Royal Unibrew and was responsible for their trade marketing in the hotel and restaurant industry, managing key brands and the larger clients. Maria holds a Masters degree in business and marketing from the Southern University of Denmark in Odense, Denmark. DuPont work with millers, improver houses, and industrial bakeries. Globally, they are a leading player in enzymes with significant investment in food, but also animal nutrition, personal care, detergents and biofuels.

animal nutrition, personal care, detergents and biofuels. What role do enzymes play in the baking process?

What role do enzymes play in the baking process?

Enzymes are naturally present in flour, yeast, and several other common raw materials used in bakery products and have been used for thousands of years.

Commercial industrial enzymes were introduced 35 years ago as a way to get the benefits of enzymes in a controlled and safe way. Enzymes play an important role in the vast majority of baked goods to achieve the wanted performance in both dough and bread, for example, higher volume, better dough handling and improved softness.

Bakery enzymes such as amylases help modify starch during the baking process. Slowing starch retrogradation, they ensure bread stays soft and retains its original freshness for longer, thereby reducing food waste, energy consumption and carbon footprint. Enzymes used in cakes and muffins enhance softness, moisture and reduce crumbling, helping improve taste perception and convenience in the on-the-go market.

Using enzymes such as proteases and xylanases in products like biscuits and crackers also provides a number of benefits during production; the use of these enzymes can improve the dough handling and make sure the final product has the right shape. Other baked goods that can benefit in similar ways to bread are buns and rolls, bagels, thins, pretzels, English muffins, and tortillas.

What are the latest innovations regarding enzymes at DuPont for food and bakery applications?

In 2014, we launched a new cellulase, DuPont™ Danisco ® POWERBake ® 9000, especially for wholegrain, oat and rye bread applications. We noted consumers’ growing interest in healthier high grain content breads Enzymes can help give whole grain bread a higher volume, lighter texture or crumb structure, resulting in a better eating experience.

This year we are commercialising new enzymes under the name DuPont™ Danisco ® POWERMill™, especially for wheat milling customers. These enzymes help improve wheat processing efficiency by enhancing flour extraction, reducing wheat conditioning time and reducing energy consumption.

62 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

energy consumption. 62 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain Consumer scrutiny of product labels and

Consumer scrutiny of product labels and product quality is ever increasing coupled with shops such as Whole Foods stocking ‘clean label’ products only. What does this mean for the market and how can enzymes assist in the elimination of certain additives?

Enzymes are processing aids, not ingredients. Current labelling legislation does not require them to be listed on product labels because they are either not active in the finished product and/or they have already performed the action they were intended to perform. Enzymes often perform different tasks from emulsifiers and in most cases actively work with additives to provide a given effect in the finished product. The confusion arises when enzymes are presented as being equal to, or in some cases alternatives to, additives - this leads to the misconception that enzymes are additives.

Can you tell us about the current product range of enzymes offered by DuPont and their applications?

DuPont has a very strong baking enzymes portfolio in all main categories: alpha-amylases for flour, softeners and strengtheners. We focus on finding solutions to meet the specific needs of each application. For example, the DuPont™ Danisco ® POWERFresh ® product range for bread and buns; POWERSoft ® Cake product range for cakes and POWERFlex ® product range for tortillas and flat bread. Furthermore, we have introduced the POWERBake ® and the

GRINDAMYL range for improved dough handling, volume and better crumb structure. We do not believe that one solution fits all and continuously optimise and launch new products.

Products that tend to benefit the most are those that require fresh keeping and in particular those that also have a specific volume requirement. Most traditional pan breads are expected to be soft and light in texture and are now also expected to stay fresh for up to three weeks. Anti-staling enzymes such as the PowerFresh ® line from DuPont can help keep baked goods retain original freshness for extended periods and the PowerBake ® line can be used to improve volume and dough handling properties.

The growth of whole grain varieties has also contributed to an escalating use of enzymes to counter technical challenges. What do you predict the future of enzymes and their applications will be?

The challenge for the whole grain varieties is that the baked good very easily becomes dense and heavy and thus has a lower eating quality. Enzymes can help in giving the whole grain bread a higher volume, lighter texture or crumb structure so eating bread with whole grain becomes a becomes a delicious experience.

What percentage of the enzyme market does the DuPont division represent?

We work with millers, improver houses, and industrial bakeries. Globally, we are a leading player in enzymes with significant investment in food, but also animal nutrition, personal care, detergents and biofuels. In the food and beverage enzyme space we have strength in bakery, brewing and non- alcoholic beverages (sugars).

Is there a link between enzymes and their role in preventing bread waste?

Bread waste happens several places in the value chain. The first place is in production where bread is made. Ends can be cut off for toast bread or bread not in the right shape often gets thrown away. Some industrial bakeries are looking to turn the bread into slurry to be reused in production, and here enzymes can help. Enzymes can help break down bread faster and thus make it easier to use more of the bread waste back into the production.

The second place bread waste occurs is at the supermarket or at home when bread gets stale and is thrown away. As an example, 30 percent of bread products are wasted in the UK alone. This represents more than 320 000 tons of bread discarded each year because it has lost its freshness. By adding our emulsifiers and enzymes, we can keep bread fresher up to seven days longer. This diverted energy savings is equivalent to taking 42 000 cars off the roads each year.

Starch, which makes up approximately 70 percent of flour, is regarded as the main flour component involved in staling. After baking, the gelatinized starch in bread tends to re- associate or, to use another term, retrograde. Functional ingredients that limit retrogradation are instrumental in improving crumb softness. Bakery enzymes such as amylases help modify starch during the baking process. Slowing starch retrogradation, they ensure bread stays soft for longer than bread made without enzymes.

Gluten-free products suffer from staling issues similar to traditional baked goods and use of anti-staling enzymes can be a good tool to reduce staling in these also. In DuPont we continue to look for ways to develop our broad portfolio of enzymes in new application areas, so we’re also working with different flour types like rice or cassava, both for emerging markets but also to support gluten-free recipes.

What do you see as the future for enzymes?

Aside from their specificity, enzymes often offer other benefits that stretch beyond the product itself. Enzymes can often replace substances or processes that may present safety or environmental issues, help reduce salt and sugar content

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EXCELLENCE IN YEAST – EXCELLENT FOR PIGS y • n a M m a r
EXCELLENCE IN YEAST –
EXCELLENT FOR PIGS
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Leiber brewers’ yeast products
Excellent for:
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Cell regeneration

Immune system

Fertility/Performance

Digestion

Prebiotic effect

Coat/hooves/claws

Leiber GmbH

Leiber GmbH

Hafenstraße 24

49565 Bramsche

Germany

Tel. +49 (0)5461 9303-0 Fax +49 (0)5461 9303-29

www.leibergmbh.de

info@leibergmbh.de

24 49565 Bramsche Germany Tel. +49 (0)5461 9303-0 Fax +49 (0)5461 9303-29 www.leibergmbh.de info@leibergmbh.de

Industry profile

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of foods, and enhance nutritional value. Enzymes are very specific and will work under mild reaction conditions, allowing selective reactions in the presence of sensitive substances. Today, enzymes are already used in a variety of foods from beer, dairy, oils and fats, meats and, of course, bakery products. However, innovative new applications and solutions are continuously being found together with food producers to help meet the needs of the growing population.

DuPont has food research centres around the world where application scientists work in close collaboration with our customers to find new and better ways to solve food and nutrition challenges and create sustainable solutions essential to a better, safer, and healthier life.

At our largest R&D facility for food ingredients in Brabrand, Denmark, our scientists are constantly examining how ingredients act and interact in food systems. State-of-the art application laboratories are equipped with the latest analytical and pilot plant equipment that are customized for developing innovative solutions for bakery, dairy and ice- cream, beverages, meat, and many other industry areas.

$10 billion to research and development, and the introduction of 4 000 new products by the end of 2020. The work centers on developing innovations that will produce more food, enhance nutritional value, improve agriculture sustainability, boost food safety, extend food freshness and reduce waste.

• Engaging and Educating Youth - By the end of 2020, DuPont will facilitate two million engagements with young people around the world to transfer the knowledge of sustainable food and agriculture and the impact it will have on a growing population.

• Improving Rural Communities - DuPont will work to improve the livelihoods of at least three million farmers and their rural communities through targeted collaborations and investments that strengthen agricultural systems and make food more available, nutritious and culturally appropriate. This is in addition to the work already being done by DuPont to enhance the lives of hundreds of millions of farmers through our normal business practices.

As a part of our commitment to food security, DuPont commissioned the development of The Global Food Security Index, a comprehensive measurement tool that addresses the need for specific metrics to illustrate what food security looks like at the local level - country by country and globally. The Index is a catalysing stakeholder collaboration to develop solutions for pressing issues such as food affordability, availability, nutritional quality and safety. Not only does it provide an objective, worldwide perspective on food security, but also it gives course for action. We encourage everyone to explore the interactive online tool to explore the drivers of food security in 107 countries.

to explore the drivers of food security in 107 countries. DuPont are sponsors of the American

DuPont are sponsors of the American pavilion at the World EXPO currently being held in Milan. How are DuPont actively engaged in ensuring enough food for a growing population?

Food security is at the heart of our priorities. Across the globe, DuPont businesses - DuPont Pioneer, Crop Protection, Nutrition and Health, Packaging and Industrial Polymers, and Industrial Biosciences - are addressing food security with science-based innovations. We are building collaborations with businesses, NGO’s and governments, and working with local farmers and food producers.

In the spirit of “what gets measured gets done,” we announced in 2012, corporate goals

In the spirit of “what gets measured gets done,” we announced in 2012, corporate goals to enhance global food security that would be realized by the end of 2020:

Innovating to Feed the World - DuPont committed

IAOM Mideast and Africa District conference DuPont will be present at the IAOM Mideast and Africa on the 3 November at 10:00 am, with the conference “Wheat Processing Enzymes for Enhanced Milling Efficiency”, presented by Andrew John Flounders, Senior Application Specialist, DuPont Nutrition and Health.

Milling Efficiency”, presented by Andrew John Flounders, Senior Application Specialist, DuPont Nutrition and Health.
GLOBALG.A.P. IFA STANDARD VERSION 5 NOW ONLINE JOIN US!
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China Seafood & Fisheries Expo 4-6 November, Qingdao, China Booth No. E2-1130

www.globalgap.org/events

Expo 4-6 November, Qingdao, China Booth No. E2-1130 www.globalgap.org/events 64 | November 2015 - Milling and

64 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

F CASE STUDY
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CASE STUDY

CASE STUDY

Nidera forges ahead with Mercedes Benz fleet An international trading company, Nidera is active at
Nidera forges ahead
with Mercedes Benz
fleet
An international trading company,
Nidera is active at every stage of
the grain supply chain, originating
all types of arable crops from
farmers and marketing and
distributing them to consumers
throughout the UK.

T he grain, seed and fertiliser merchant is now benefiting from increased fuel efficiency after commissioning its first Mercedes-Benz tractor units to be equipped with the manufacturer’s groundbreaking Predictive Powertrain Control system. Their introduction has opened the way for the Ipswich-based operator to stand

down its last three non-Mercedes-Benz trucks, so that by the end of 2015 every one of its 40 vehicles will wear a three-pointed star. Supplied by East Anglia Dealer Orwell Truck and Van, the five new trucks are all Actros 2445 models with wind-cheating

StreamSpace cabs and small-wheeled (17.5in) mid-lift axles, which offer a weight saving of some 300 kg compared to the standard version with 22.5in wheels. The lighter mid-lift axles are contributing to improved economy when the vehicles run empty, as well as increasing payload capacity. However, Tim Capey, Operations Director at Nidera, believes the main reason for the impressive early mpg performance of the new vehicles is its adoption of Predictive Powertrain Control (PPC), and the associated driver training delivered by Orwell Truck andi think Van’s designated ‘Fuel Saver’ Lee Betts. PPC is a clever cruise control that works in conjunction with the Mercedes PowerShift 3 automated transmission and employs three- dimensional GPS mapping to read three kilometres of topography

Pulling together: Nidera’s Transport Manager Tom Poutney, right, with Paul Simpson of Orwell Truck &
Pulling together: Nidera’s Transport Manager Tom
Poutney, right, with Paul Simpson of Orwell Truck & Van

66 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

Transport Manager Tom Poutney, right, with Paul Simpson of Orwell Truck & Van 66 | November
ahead. It responds by controlling gear changes, speed and braking to maximise fuel efficiency. Mercedes-Benz

ahead. It responds by controlling gear changes, speed and braking to maximise fuel efficiency. Mercedes-Benz says the system, which is particularly effective in hilly terrain, can cut fuel costs by up to 5 percent, though some operators have reported significantly higher savings. “It is difficult to make precise comparisons given the different routes and the varying ages of our vehicles,” explained Tim Capey. “However, it’s fair to say that in terms of fuel returns the early indications from these new PPC-equipped vehicles are very positive. “This is partly down to the technology but also to the excellent coaching provided to our drivers by Orwell’s Lee Betts – in one case, the result has been an improvement of as much as 0.6 mpg, which is very encouraging.” Nidera’s latest trucks are powered by state-of-the-art 330 kW (449 hp) straight-six engines and, like its other Actros, are also fitted with Mercedes-Benz FleetBoard telematics systems.

CASE STUDY F
CASE STUDY
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FleetBoard analyses driver performance against a range of criteria, including over revving, harsh braking, idling, speeding and ‘green band’ driving, and highlights areas in which improvements can be made. Nidera has been forging ahead strongly after two years of good harvests and high yields. Its tractor units pull bulk-tipping trailers and make nationwide deliveries of cereals, oilseeds and pulses to customers in the food, feed and bio-energy industries. The company purchased its first Mercedes-Benz trucks in 2000 and since then Orwell Truck and Van has steadily increased its share of the fleet. The vehicles are serviced in the Dealer’s Ipswich, Colchester and Newmarket workshops under seven-year Mercedes- Benz Repair and Maintenance Contracts. Mr Capey added, “Fuel efficiency is certainly important but we focus on all elements of the ‘whole life cost’ calculation. Reliability and residual values are also key and so, too, is our very close working relationship with our supplier. Orwell Truck and Van understands and meets the requirements of our business – we make full use of its overnight servicing capability and if we have an issue, as you always will from time to time, we know who to contact to get it quickly sorted.” Paul Simpson, Truck Sales Manager at Orwell Truck and Van, said, “Given the nature of the work and the fact that Nidera’s trucks spend a relatively high proportion of their time on A and B roads, it’s pleasing to see the positive effect that Predictive Powertrain Control is having on their fuel efficiency. “This brilliant system, which can also now be retrofitted to vehicles that are already on the road, offers operators the chance to enhance their environmental profiles by reducing their carbon footprints, while at the same time improving their bottom lines.”

their carbon footprints, while at the same time improving their bottom lines.” Milling and Grain -
their carbon footprints, while at the same time improving their bottom lines.” Milling and Grain -
China’s agricultural challenges Suwei Jiang, PwC Partner, China Business Group and Richard Ferguson, Agriculture Advisor

China’s agricultural challenges

China’s agricultural challenges Suwei Jiang, PwC Partner, China Business Group and Richard Ferguson, Agriculture Advisor
China’s agricultural challenges Suwei Jiang, PwC Partner, China Business Group and Richard Ferguson, Agriculture Advisor

Suwei Jiang, PwC Partner, China Business Group and Richard Ferguson, Agriculture Advisor to PwC

China’s rapid economic growth

Since reforms began some four decades ago, the world’s attention has been focused on China’s rapid economic growth. However, until recently, little attention outside China has been devoted to understanding the agricultural industry that has effectively fuelled the workforce that has underpinned the country’s economic miracle of recent decades. Still, less has been devoted to the increasingly urgent question of how the country will meet its future nutritional needs. Produced jointly by PwC China Business Group and Agribusiness team, this two-part report highlights the importance of this topic and the most significant of the challenges and opportunities presented by China’s evolving agricultural and nutritional needs. We will carry a second report in our December edition to cover constraints, the government and agricultural sector. Milling and Grain wish to thank PwC and the authors in particular for sharing their report with our readers.

"Increasing meat consumption has manifested itself in China losing its near self-sufficiency in soybeans – a key feedstock"

China’s agricultural challenges – roads to be travelled

The average Chinese eats some 57kg of meat a year, an increase of 11kg from 2003 when some 46kg per person was consumed. If Chinese meat consumption mirrors other developed Chinese societies over time, we can assume Taiwan’s current 74kg consumption is a realistic long-term extrapolation. To satisfy this increased consumption, China will require an additional 94 million tonnes of corn and soybeans for feedstock. In turn, this will require an additional 15 million hectares of agricultural land – an area the size of England and Wales – which China simply does not have. Increasing meat consumption has manifested itself in China losing its near self-sufficiency in soybeans – a key feedstock. While it was barely self-sufficient in the 1970s and 1980s, from the late 1990s, Chinese imports of soybeans have steadily increased and now represent 87 percent of consumption.

increased and now represent 87 percent of consumption. Corn – the other major feedstock – is

Corn – the other major feedstock – is at the beginning of a trajectory, which will likely prove similar to the experience of soybeans. China now imports a small quantity of corn compared to the past when it was self- sufficient. Simultaneously, wheat and rice – the main food crops for human consumption – are just self-sufficient. These demand pressures have been augmented by supply-side constraints such as diminished farmland, polluted rivers, depleted aquifers, overuse of fertilisers, unclear ownership of farmland and an archaic legal code. Fixing these takes time, capital and effort, which is why the Chinese government is tackling these challenges with a broad range of measures. Recent policy schemes include the liberalisation of leasing activity, the promotion of large-scale mechanised farms, tackling land and water pollution

68 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

and the restructuring of agricultural subsidies. As agriculture modernises, companies, which through technology can

and the restructuring of agricultural subsidies. As agriculture modernises, companies, which through technology can transform yields, enhance output or allocate resources more efficiently, will make significant gains. So too will companies that can deliver secure, safe and sustainable sources of food. Global firms that can provide services such as digital mapping, soil analysis, precision farming, waste management, traceability and so on will find substantial opportunities. Self-sufficiency is no longer a practical policy goal for China. The government appears to recognise with its priorities shifting towards high-value crops, such as fruits and vegetables, and a focus on quality and food safety. Simultaneously, China is venturing overseas to bolster its food security though investments in foreign farmland and the acquisition of companies across the broader food value chain. This is where the global impact of China’s increasing food needs will be felt most acutely. Already, numerous countries have erected barriers to foreign ownership of farmland as a response

Soybean yields for major producers (2014/15) 3.5 3.2 3.0 3.0 2.8 2.7 2.7 2.6 2.5
Soybean yields for major producers (2014/15)
3.5
3.2
3.0
3.0
2.8
2.7
2.7
2.6
2.5
2.0
2.0
1.8
1.4
1.5
1.0
1.0
0.5
0.0
United
Brazil
Argentina
Uruguay
Canada
Paraguay
Ukraine
China
Russia
India
States
tonnes/hectare

Source: USDA

to land purchase by countries such as China. In some cases this already extends to the acquisition of food companies. However, these acquisition trends, driven by domestic policy imperatives, are likely to continue.

Roads to be travelled It has become increasingly apparent that a more affluent and more urbanised China is experiencing a dramatic increase in the consumption of food – specifically meat – and this too will have a global impact. How we came to this point is not a simple, straightforward story of growing affluence. To understand the nuance, we need to look in detail at how Chinese food consumption has changed over recent decades. While most analysis approach this issue from a national level, a complete picture only emerges by considering three factors: – 1) the change in per capita calories consumed and its composition 2) consumption patterns of specific commodity groups per capita, and 3) the overall demand and supply of commodities at national level. Taking all three together provides clear insights into Chinese food consumption patterns and offers indicators for the future.

Consumption In 1971, the average Chinese consumed just about 60 percent of that of the average American or Briton. Chinese consumption levels were also lower than that of its neighbours Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. Part of the reason for this was that China

70 | November 2015 - Milling and Grain

had suffered greatly under the Great Leap Forward and the horrors of the Cultural Revolution had reached a peak. However, following the liberalisation process in 1978, China caught up rapidly with the rest of the world. By 2011, the average Chinese was consuming more calories per day than the average Malaysian, Thai, Indonesian, Filipino, Vietnamese and even Japanese. More importantly, calorie consumption was fast approaching the levels of South Korea, the UK and the US. At first glance, it appears obvious that growth in Chinese per capita consumption has slowed down. An easy conclusion, which could be drawn, is that since it is close to the levels of developed countries, future growth is likely to be muted. However, considering total calories consumed alone distorts the picture. Compared to the US and the UK, Chinese vegetal-derived

Consumption (kcal/

ca

pita/day)

Vegetal calories

1971

1981

1991

2001

2011

China

1,738

2,002

2,128

2,296

2,383

Indonesia

1,904

2,238

2,242

2,299

2,536

Malaysia

2,244

2,336

2,134

2,297

2,336

South Korea

1,944

2,061

2,136

1,953

1,974

Thailand

2,007

1,995

1,978

2,284

2,410

Philippines

1,581

1,980

1,925

2,020

2,218

Vietnam

1,829

1,880

1,690

2,004

2,129

UK

2,014

1,965

2,175

2,395

2,425

US

2,056

2,258

2,544

2,697

2,644

Japan

2,284

2,211

2,316

2,287

2,166

Source: FAO

Consumption (kcal/capita/day)

 

Animal calories

1971

1981

1991

2001

2011

China

125

177

317

523

691

Indonesia

60

77

115

126

177

Malaysia

284

411

516

525

519

South Korea

153

235

233

143

128

Thailand

188

203

267

294

347

Philippines

256

241

290

354

390

Vietnam

128

124

166

294

574

UK

1,231

1,126

1,035

1,007

989

US

996

961

978

1,012

995

Japan

445

539

618

603

553

Source: FAO

Changing consumption patterns in China (kg/pa)

 
 

1990

2012

Net

Grain to

Net

 

change

meat

increase

 

conversion

in grain

ratio

use

Urban per capita consumption of

 

Grain

130.7

78.8

(52.0)

(52.0)

Pork

18.5

21.2

2.8

4.0

11.1

Beef and mutton

3.3

3.7

0.5

7.0

3.2

Poultry

3.4

10.8

7.3

2.0

14.7

Net change in urban per capita demand for grain

 

(23.1)

Rural per capita consumption of

 

Grain

262.1

164.3

(97.8)

(97.8)

Pork

10.5

14.4

3.9

4.0

15.4

Beef and mutton

0.8

2.0

1.2

7.0

8.1

Poultry

1.3

4.5

3.2

2.0

6.5

Net change in rural per capita demand for grain

 

(67.8)

Source: NBSC, PwC

Consumption (kcal/capita/day)

 

Total calories

1971

1981

1991

2001

2011

China

1,863

2,178

2,444

2,819

3,074

Indonesia

1,964

2,315

2,356

2,424

2,713

Malaysia

2,527

2,747

2,650

2,822

2,855

South Korea

2,899

2,970

2,950

3,080

3,329

Thailand

2,194

2,198

2,245

2,578

2,757

Philippines

1,837

2,221

2,214

2,374

2,608

Vietnam

1,957

2,004

1,856

2,298

2,703

UK

3,245

3,091

3,210

3,402

3,414

US

3,052

3,218

3,522

3,709

3,639

Japan

2,729

2,750

2,934

2,890

2,719

Source: FAO

calories in 2011 are just marginally behind, while animal- derived calories are still 30 percent

calories in 2011 are just marginally behind, while animal- derived calories are still 30 percent lower. This implies that in the future, growth in vegetal consumption is likely to be muted, but growth in animal protein will likely remain strong. In other words, the overall Chinese food consumption picture will remain a globally prominent theme in the years ahead – at least with respect to animal products. Breaking down the consumption statistics further, there has been a change in Chinese per capita calorie contribution from different commodities over the past five decades. The most obvious observations are the decline in calorie contribution from cereals – from approximately two-thirds in 1971 to less than half in 2011, and the increase in calorie contribution from animal products from seven percent to 22 percent over the same period. Since consumption of animal products implies the indirect consumption of cereals, the net change in cereal demand is not clear from this. To answer that question we need to look at consumption in kilograms. In 2003, the average Chinese consumed around 46kg of meat pa, of which about 71 percent was pork. By 2013, FAPRI estimated that this had increased to approximately 57kg, a 23 percent increase in a decade. At the same time, the average American’s meat consumption was estimated to be almost double that of the Chinese. However, it could be justifiably argued that the American number reflects excessive levels of consumption and that China is unlikely to ever reach