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To Study the Impact of Corporate Community Involvement on the Employee Outcomes

[Your official name]


[Degree Title], [university], 20XX
Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfilment
of the Requirements for the Degree of
[Name of program]
[Name of University]
[last month of quarter you plan to graduate] 20XX

Proposal B

Table of Contents
1.

Introduction of the Study..........................................................................................................1

2.

Company Background: Intel UK..............................................................................................2

3.

Research Aim...........................................................................................................................2

4.

Objectives of Research.............................................................................................................3

5.

Problem Statement...................................................................................................................3

6.

Research Questions..................................................................................................................4

7.

Rationale of the Study..............................................................................................................4

8.

Significance of the Study.........................................................................................................5

9.

Literature Review.....................................................................................................................6
9.1.

Background.......................................................................................................................6

9.2.

Corporate Community Involvement.................................................................................7

9.3.

Corporate Social Responsibility........................................................................................8

10.

Research Methodology.........................................................................................................9

References......................................................................................................................................11
Appendix........................................................................................................................................18
Questionnaire.............................................................................................................................18

Proposal B

Proposal
1. Introduction of the Study
The term Corporate Community Involvement (CCI, hereafter), is defined as a practice
through which successful organisations give back to the society and allocate a certain portion of
their resources towards its betterment (Lakin & Scheubel, 2010). Gestures of a corporation,
which are primarily led by a feeling of commitment towards communities and the general
welfare of society, are considered as corporations community involvement. While it may not
have a profit-oriented side to it, this is one aspect of corporate functions that are purely led by
morals and values. Examples of CCI includes charity and donations, employees helping out the
society members with community projects, companies sponsoring events for the societal welfare
and communal betterment (Liu, Eng & Ko, 2013).
One word, which is now regarded as a synonym for Corporate Community Involvement,
is Philanthropy and over time, multiple philanthropists have emerged from the corporate world,
giving back to the society and making the world a better place to live in (Kolk & Pinkse, 2010).
Philanthropy, much like CSR initiatives taken by organisations, is the concept of loving and
caring for humankind and giving back to the society in appropriate ways, which would help
communities develop and someday produce more philanthropists who could serve humanity in
similar ways. Taking a marketing perspective, CSR activities have given organisations a platform
through which to raise their social profile along with their goodwill, as well (Kolk & Pinkse,
2010). These corporate community activities are now considered part of a firms differentiation
strategy, and organisations are trying to position themselves as socially responsible firms in the
minds of their existing and potential customers.

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Within an organisation, corporate community involvement is a value addition in many


aspects, such as superior performance of an organisation, social investment, human resource
management competencies and others (Kolk & Pinkse, 2010). The production of an organisation
is associated with employee performance, as is also known as employee productivity, and
outlines the overall commitment that an employee shows towards their work and towards the
attainment of organisation goals. Many researchers have highlighted the link between employees
of an organisation and the Corporate Community Involvement as a key element for growth in
respective organisations.

2. Company Background: Intel UK


Intel started operations in 1968 from Mountain View, California USA and gradually went
on to become worlds largest and highest valued semiconductor chip makers (www.intel.com).
Intel Corporation is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Santa
Clara, California. Intel is one of the worlds largest and highest valued semiconductor chip
makers, based on revenue (www.intel.com). Intel is ranked as the 12th best global brand in a
research conducted in 2014 and the 15th best global green brand in a similar study conducted
(www.intel.com).

3. Research Aim
The aim of this research is to evaluate the impact of Corporate Community Involvement
on employee outcomes, particularly discussing the case of Intel, UK.

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4. Objectives of Research
To ensure that the research has a high credibility and reliability, the correlation between
the research objectives and the subsequent findings of the research is important. The key
objectives of this study are identified as follows:

To study the significance of corporate community involvement for the firms


To evaluate the impact of corporate community involvement on the employee outcomes
To investigate the impact of corporate community involvement on the employee

performance of Intel UK.


To investigate successful Corporate Community Involvement strategies in order to

improve employee performance.


To provide recommendations to the company regarding Corporate Community
Involvement strategies and how it may increase employee performance.

5. Problem Statement
The problem addressed in this research is associated with impact of Corporate
Community Involvement on employee outcome. Corporate Community Involvement (CCI)
basically refers to how engaged an organisation is, with the society and community as a whole. It
is the moral obligation of large multinational companies to provide social welfare to their
customers and also for the society in which their customers reside. For an organisation, there are
multiple stakeholders, entities, which may affect the operations of the business or may be
affected by the operations of the organisation. One such stakeholder is the community from
where the organisations generate its resources. Thus community engagement is a crucial part of
the long term strategic goals of any organisation.
Besides CCI another major criteria for the organisation to focus on is the employee
outcome or the employee performance. Ask any marketing manager and they shall say that the

Proposal B

backbone of the entire organisation is its workforce. For an organisation to achieve its desired
goals, high productivity levels of the workforce is essential. To ensure high productivity levels
among the employee, relevant motivating techniques need to be adopted by the organisation
(Holzman, 2014).

6. Research Questions
The purpose of research questions is to set a direction of the research towards the
fulfilment of research objectives.

How does Corporate Community Involvement influence the employee outcome?


What is the effect of Corporate Community Involvement on employee outcome in

information technology sector?


What is the effect of Corporate Community Involvement on employee outcome in case of

Intel UK?
What are the successful Corporate Community Involvement strategies and how do they

improve employee outcome in the UK IT market?


How can marketers improve employee outcome by enhancing Corporate Community
Involvement Strategies?

7. Rationale of the Study


This study indicates the research interest of the author in the subject of Corporate
Community Involvement, and its effect on the employees performance and productivity along
with highlighting multiple options through which employees of an organisation participate in
these activities while improving their performances, as well.
The research study will attemptto establish a link between the perceived benefits of
corporate community involvement on employee motivation and productivity and the overall

Proposal B

performance of the organisation. In the particular case of Intel UK, this study will help to
discover the specific features of a company with respect to its corporate community involvement
activities and the resultant impact on the employees performance.

8. Significance of the Study


Many firms in the technology industry, such as IBM, have initiated various campaigns
where they plan on imparting knowledge on young students. IBM recently asked its employees
to teach high school students in developing countries and to encourage them to venture into the
information and technology industry. Apart from educating the young high school students, the
employees job was to groom the students into better human beings and to impart on them the
benefits of leading a righteous life.
This research will also have future implications and the findings could be applied to
relevant industries where organisations are looking for corporate community involvement
strategies to boost their corporate social responsibility profile and also make use of the
community engagement activities to boost the morale of the employees and their subsequent
productivity levels. One of the primary focuses of this research study will be to find out how
employees belonging to the information and technology industry can give back to the community
and through various community engagement campaigns impart relevant knowledge on the young
generation of today, who shall tomorrow do the same with their younger generation.
9. Literature Review
9.1.

Background
Organisational growth depends on the decisions made by its corporate decision makers.

Historically, the decision makers are more concerned about profitability than other issues.

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Corporations have to build a relationship with communities without concerning about the
profitability (Kolk, & Pinkse, 2010). Businesses, large or small, local or global, have an impact
on a certain community that is the corporations influence area. Considering the influence of
companies in the community, a relationship has to be built, which in return achieves a better
social outcome. Companies and communities are mutually interdependent on each other; both
have expectations and need support from respectively (Misener & Mason, 2010).
The concept of interaction with the local community is associated with the development
of community involvement in a number of Western countries in 1970-80s (Uyan-Atay, 2010).
However, perhaps the initiative in this matter did not belong to businesses and public authorities.
For example, in 1977 the US Congress passed the documents requiring US banks to invest in
areas in which they operate. According to Lakin & Scheubel (2010), the government allocated
each bank sponsored land and attached it to the local government agencies to observe the
implementation of the programs. After such precedents, corporate sector apparently decided that
it is economical to take the initiative in their hands, especially given the fact that it is able to
benefit the business as well (Lakin & Scheubel, 2010). Due to the higher profiles, these
organisations were forced by the increased public interest, to improve their social involvement.
Furthermore, the scale of the social impact of businesses increased with globalisation.

9.2.

Corporate Community Involvement


According to CAF (2007), corporate community involvement is an approach in which an

organisation shares its resources with the communities that it influences upon (as cited in Uyan
Atay, 2014). Company ensure support for all community aspect possible, from donations to
community projects, volunteering and sponsorships, cause-related marketing etc. Prior to the

Proposal B

engaging in the community, organisations that are working for community involvement need to
consider their impact on local institutions.
To determine the mode of interaction with the local community and the main points of
contact between the interests of business, it is necessary to establish an on-going dialogue with
the community and local authorities (Liu, Eng & Ko, 2013). However, participation in the local
community may not be directly related to the company's core business (Vallaster, Lindgreen &
Maon, 2012). Typically, in such cases, charity and social investments may include:

participation in the development of local infrastructure, providing vital services and

opportunities for the inhabitants of the community, or small business development;


educational and scholarship programs aimed at enhancing the level of education of the

population;
charitable programs;
programs aimed at improving the environmental situation in the region (Vallaster,
Lindgreen & Maon, 2012).
Corporate community involvement has a few benefits on the other hand. The corporations

adopt these strategies whenever they need to support an important cause (Lakin & Schebel,
2010).

9.3.

Corporate Social Responsibility


Businesses are developed and maintained to make profitable outcomes for investors.

Business investors around the globe are concerned about their profit. According to Ma (2011),
corporate social responsibility, commonly known as corporate responsibility, corporate
citizenship, responsible business, sustainable business and corporate sustainability, is a widely
researched and discussed area that deals with the additional functions that are beneficial for
society or the community in which the business operates. It is the relationship between the

Proposal B

community and the company and the extent to which corporations are responsible and go beyond
the pursuit of their monetary profits and compliance with the law. Various conceptualisations of
corporate social responsibility exist that are partially different or overlap sometimes with each
other, but a single and a certain definition is yet to be acknowledged (Bauman & Skitka, 2012).
As stated by Dahlsurd (2008), researchers around the world have studied the concept of
corporate social responsibility (CSR), meticulously. The term CSR has been defined several
times. Initially CSR was considered to be the firms responsibility to go beyond their boundaries;
i.e. ethical or legal. Henceforth, early stage of CSR concept will be called as social compulsion
(as cited in Bravo, Matute & Pina, 2012).
Corporate responsibility is a long lasting commitment by business managers to conduct
an ethically accepted behaviour, contribute to economic development and improve the quality of
life of the employees, their families and the community. During the 90s, CSR activities were
considered as the firms response to stakeholders pressure (Liu, Eng & Ko, 2013).
The past several decades have faced a dramatic change in the amount of resources
companies put towards CSR. In 1953, a revolution came and CSR began again with a new wave.
In New Jersey Supreme Court, restrictions were lifted from corporate philanthropy and clearly
permitted CSR. Companies took advantage of this legislation and adopted the change. They
worked through the apparent shift of societys expectations for businesses. Large companies and
corporations started to develop programs for philanthropy and launched codes of ethics, at the
end of 80s. According to Bauman & Skitka (2012), 80% of Fortune 500 companies addressed
the multiple aspects of CSR on their websites. However, it is still an ambiguity for decision
makers and practitioners on how CSR would become beneficial for both corporation and the
community at large (Vallaster, Lindgreen & Maon, 2012).

Proposal B

10. Research Methodology


The approach of positivism is usually centred on experimental and quantitative inquiry,
measurements and observations. Therefore, the positivist philosophy will be utilised in this study
since the research aim is to find the correlation between corporate community involvement and
its subsequent effect on employee outcomes, through the formulation and testing of hypotheses.
The rationale for choosing positivist philosophy is that the researcher will use the concept of
hypothesis in examining the relationship between the two variables i.e. Community involvement
and Employee outcome.
For the current research, the quantitative methodology will be used. The rationale behind
selecting a quantitative approach is that it will allow the author to inspect more than one variable;
in this case, corporate community involvement and employee outcomes, and their correlation.
Furthermore, the use of quantitative research will allowthe author to generalise the findings and
increase the reliability of the overall study. The data collection will bedone through survey
research, specifically by a questionnaire, which is a type of primary research instrument.
There are three basic types of research: explanatory, descriptive and exploratory
(Creswell, 2012; Saunders et al. 2012; Kumar, 2010). For this research study, explanatory
research will beused. The rationale for choosing explanatory research is to discover ideas and
insights regarding the influence of corporate community involvement on employee outcomes.
This studywill use theoretical idea and establishing and testing hypotheses; therefore,
explanatory research is appropriate here.
For this research the author will use convenient sampling technique, which will allow the
author to gather the data effectively keeping in mind the limitations that the author faces.

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10

Battaglia (2008) points out that convenience sampling is time-saving, cost-effective, easier, and
accessible. However, since the samples are chosen as per convenience, they are not the true
representation of the population in general. In this research, the target population will be the
employees working for Intel in UK.

Proposal B
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Appendix

Questionnaire
Impact of Corporate Community Involvement on the Employee Outcomes
Gender
Male
Female

Educational Background
High School
College
Bachelors
Masters
Other

DEMOGRAPHICS
Age
15-25
26-35
36-45
Above 45
Year of Service
1-2
3-6
7-10
More than 10 years

VARIABLE 1: CORPORATE COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

No.

Questions
Intel is an
Environmentally
conscious company?
Corporate Community
Involvement helped in
enhancing reputation
of Intel
Corporate Community
Involvement helped in
improving relations
with suppliers,
institutions, donors,
community of Intel
Corporate Community
Involvement helps
Intels business to
grow

Strongly
Disagree

Disagree

Neutral

Agree

Strongly
Agree

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18

Being socially
responsible can be a
source of opportunity,
innovation and
competitive
advantage- much more
than a cost, a
constraint or a
charitable deed.
Being involved in
community can
improve economic
performance of Intel
(costs reduction, sales
increase)

VARIABLE 2: EMPLOYEE OUTCOMES

No.

Questions

Strongly
Disagree

Disagree

Neutral

Employees Motivation

Employees feel
motivated working for
better performance in
organisation that is
involved in
Community Services.
Employees Engagement

Employees engage in
working for a
company that has a
good reputation for
Community
Involvement.

Agree

Strongly
Agree

Proposal B

Employees Retention
Corporate Community
Involvement helped in
increasing the
retention of Intel
employees
9

Employees Commitment

10

There is emotional
commitment of
employees with
company that is
involved in
Community Services.
Employees Performance

11

Corporate Community
Involvement helped in
strengthening the
employee performance
of Intel
Employees Satisfaction

12

I believe Corporate
Community
Involvement leads to
enhanced employee
satisfaction

19