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Home Digital Video Studio

Digital Video Home Studio


Krzysztof Orleanski
Institute for Telecommunication NTNU
and
MidgardmediaLab NTNU
Trondheim 14.01.2002

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Contents;
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1. Introduction
2. Criteria for Multimedia equipment at home
3. Fire Wire (IEEE1394 Standard) and why we chose it to Digital Video Home Studio
3.1.IEEE 1394 - Interface for the Digital Network
4.Digital Home Video Studio Net
4.1. Home or Small Office computer networks
4.2. Prototype of Multimedia Network build in Institute for Telecommunication
5. IEEE 1394 components used in Digital Video Home Studio
5.1. IEEE 1394 Cables
5.2. FireWire 3 Ports Repeater
5.3. IEEE 1394 interfaces tested in Digital Video Home Studio project
5.4. Digital Video Cameras
5.4.1. Sony DFW-VL500 Non-Compression Digital Interface
5.4.2. Sony Digital Camera with DV compression
5.5. Digital Video Recorder -interface between analog an digital worlds
5.5.1. Analog video facilities DV recorder
5.6. DV standard and why I chose it to Digital Home Video
6. Non-Linear Video Editing
6.1. DV & Fire wire Editing Workflow
6.2. Non-linear DV editing software tested for Digital Video Home Studio
6.3. Proffesionals non-linear video editors
6.3.1. Avid Xpress DV
6.3.2. Adobe Premiere 6.0
6.4. Consumers DV film editors
6.4.1. Digital Origin MotionDV and IntroDV
6.4.2. Microsoft Movie Maker
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6.4.3. MGI VideoWave


Works to continue

1.Introduction
Multimedia at home and school is being more and more popular.
Some of us who has VHS Camcorder and want produce (edit) own movie or only systemize existing videos has to use minimum
two conventional VHS recorders. This kind of linear editing is very time consuming and complicated and results could be not
very satisfied.
For some years ago high quality video film production was possible only in big professional studios. But during the last tree
years situation is changed. Digital cameras and high-speed computers together with non-linear editing programs are being
more popular not only for professionals producers but also at home.
Home production of video movies has to be easy non-expensive and robust. Lower cost, higher-quality video capture can be
accessible to everyone, not just professionals.
Some of us have already at home many of multimedia components such as: TV receivers, VHS recorders, PC and DVD players
or Digital Camcorders (fig 1.1)

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Fig.1.1. All these components can be connected and can work together with use of our Digital Home Video Studio solution

2.Criteria for Multimedia equipment at home


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Installation of multimedia software and hardware at home has to be easy.


Equipment has to be robust for users errors like wrong cable directions (bi-directional)
User interface has to be ease to learn and manuals have be easy written ( no shortcuts).
- Non-expensive software and hardware upgrading on different platforms such Mac,PC
- Good quality of final product such as; VHS video, CD, DVD or WEB presentations

We might consider at most part of equipment already exit at home or at school and should be used to Video Studio with no
significant costs and changing. Actually this equipment can have not enough processing and storage capacity for multimedia
purpose specially for editing of movies. Upgrading has to be cost-effective and relatively easy. We cant change processor speed
but we can expand hard discs and RAM capacity. Price of todays 7000-rpm 50GB disc is under 2000 NOK and is enough to
storage over 1 hour compressed video data. Relatively low costs RAM extension can significant change multimedia-processing
speed. It is recommended to use graphical card with composite TV input-output capability than we can use part of our PC display
as TV screen.
Some high schools through educational agreement with Apple Computers are equipment with Apple computers and these
computers should work together in our Home Studio with Microsoft Windows based PCs.
Equipment has to be robust for users errors. It can be possible that unqualified consumer can connect cables in wrong directions
so it means connections has to be bi-directional. This problem can be solved by use IEEE 1394 based connection interface that is
also compatible with different Operating systems like MacOS, Microsoft windows or Linux.

3. Fire Wire (IEEE1394 Standard) and why we chose it to Digital Video Home Studio
Fire Wire is one of the fastest peripheral standards ever developed. Transferring data at up to 400Mbps, Fire Wire delivers more
than 30 times the bandwidth of the popular USB peripheral standard. With its high data-transfer speed and hot plug-and-play
capability, Fire Wire is the interface of choice for todays digital audio and video devices, as well as external hard drives and
other high-speed peripherals.
Apple invented FireWire in the mid-90s and shepherded it to become the established cross-platform industry standard IEEE
1394. FireWire is a high-speed serial input/output technology for connecting digital devices such as digital camcorders and
cameras to desktop and portable computers. Widely adopted by digital peripheral companies such as Sony, Canon, JVC and
Kodak. Fire Wire has become the established industry standard for both consumers and professionals.
The FireWire advantage can be summed up in three words: speed, speed, and more speedat 400Mbps, it has more than 30
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times the bandwidth of USB, which makes it the perfect choice for high-speed storage and serious video capture. Here are some
other benefits;
-Supports up to 63 devices using cable lengths up to 14 feet
Hot-pluggableyou dont have to turn off a camera or another drive to connect or disconnect it, and you dont need to restart
your computer.
Fire Wire cables are snaps to connectyou dont need device IDs, jumpers, DIP-switches, screws, latches or terminators
such as SCSI or IDE standards.

3.1. IEEE 1394 - Interface for the Digital Network


Before we continue to describe network implementation of IEEE 1394 in our Digital Home Video Studio I want answer for some
basic questions.
What is IEEE 1394?
IEEE 1394 was conceived by Apple Computer and then developed within the IEEE 1394 Working Group. The IEEE 1394
standard is a scalable, flexible, easy to use, low-cost digital interface that will integrate the worlds of consumer electronics and
personal computers. The IEEE 1394 standard defines both a backplane physical layer and a point-to-point cable-connected
virtual bus implementations. The backplane version operates at 12.5, 25 or 50 Mbits/sec. The cable version supports data rates of
100, 200 and 400 Mbits/ sec. Both versions are compatible at the link layer and above. The Standard defines the media, topology,
and the protocol. The balance of this document will focus on the implementation and advantages of the cable version of this
interface

What is FireWire?
FireWire is Apple's implementation of IEEE 1394. FireWire is:

A digital interface - no need to convert digital data into analog for better signal integrity
A physically small thin serial cable - replaces today's bulky and expensive interfaces
Easy to use - no need for terminators, device IDs, screws, or complicated set-ups
Hot plug gable - devices can be added and removed while the bus is active
Scalable - the Standard defines 100, 200, and 400 Mbps devices and can support the multiple speeds on a single bus
Flexible - the Standard supports freeform daisy chaining and branching for peer-to-peer implementations

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Fast, guaranteed bandwidth - the Standard supports guaranteed delivery of time critical data which enables smaller buffers
(lower cost)

FireWire supports two types of data transfer: asynchronous and isochronous. For traditional computer memory-mapped, load and
store applications, asynchronous transfer is appropriate and adequate. One of FireWire's key features is its support of isochronous
data channels. Isochronous data transfer provides guaranteed data transport at a pre-determined rate. This is especially important
for multimedia applications where uninterrupted transport of time-critical data and just-in-time delivery reduce the need for
costly buffering.
This leads to perhaps one of the most important uses of FireWire as the digital interface for consumer electronics and AV
peripherals. FireWire is a peer-to-peer interface. This allows dubbing from one camcorder to another without a computer. It also
allows multiple computers to share a given peripheral without any special support in the peripheral or the computers. FireWire
has become the digital interface of choice and its acceptance is growing.

Why another Bus?


Today when you "surf the web" for information and click on a "hot link" you must wait for the bit-mapped date to download.
Imagine, selecting an icon and almost immediately that image is on your screen. FireWire is one of the technologies that will
help make this future a reality.
Several key trends and requirements are emerging:

Consumer electronics and computers are converging.


There is a desire to keep data digital for as long as possible as a means to reduce system cost, complexity, and improve
signal integrity.
With the emergence of multimedia market, more and more data is video and audio. The ability to work with time sensitive
data is growing in importance.
Miniaturization is continuing. Small products are favoured for portability, convenience, and material usage resources.
Consumers are beginning to purchase computers the way they choose consumer electronics. Their criteria are: reliability,
convenience, and simplicity.
The need and desire for Peer-to-Peer computing is growing. The master-slave model is changing as computing becomes
distributed.

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FireWire meets these trends and requirements. FireWire provides a high performance, easy to use, real-time, interoperable
(industry standard), multimaster solution to meet the needs of not only today's markets but also tomorrow's.
Initially, FireWire will be the computer attachment of digital cameras and digital video applications. The Digital VCR
Conference (DVC) has accepted IEEE 1394 as the standard digital interface. The European Digital Video Broadcasters (DVB)
has endorsed IEEE 1394 as their digital television interface as well. The VESA (Video Experts Standards Association) is
evaluating IEEE 1394 for the digital home network media.
In the world of video editing, FireWire enabled cameras remove the need for costly analog video computer frame buffers to
capture digital video. FireWire will gradually improve upon existing interfaces such as SCSI. FireWire provides higher speed,
lower cost, and does more users friendly than most exist interfaces. SCSI products such as scanners, CD ROMs, disk drives, and
printers are already evaluating when they will move to FireWire.
FireWire has the bandwidth capacity to replace and consolidate most other peripheral connection communication methods in use
today. Hot plugging, power sourcing, and dynamic reconfiguration make FireWire a user-friendly alternative to todays
interconnects. These features will allow "plugging in" of computer peripherals as easily as plugging in a home appliance.
FireWire promises to revolutionize the transport of digital data for computers and for professional and consumer electronics
products. By providing an inexpensive, high-speed method of interconnecting digital devices, Fire Wire is truly the versatile I/O
connection. Its scalable architecture and flexible peer-to-peer topology make FireWire ideal for connecting audio, video, and
computer devices. Its isochronous support allows low cost implementations of multimedia interfaces. Every month more digital
electronics products are entering the market. These products will continue to evolve and FireWire will be evolving with them.
IEEE 1394 New Standards
In the future, IEEE 1394 may become the basis of home networking and a replacement for PCI and IDE buses in personal
computers. Currently there are several groups actively discussing extensions to IEEE 1394, including the IEEE 1394a and 1394b
working groups. SonyApple, Intel, IBM are taking an active role in these standards activities and is committed to creating a
broad spectrum of IEEE 1394-based products
What is 1394b, and when will it be available?
1394b is a significant enhancement to the basic 1394 specification that enables speed increases to 3.2 Gigabits/sec, supports
distances of 100 meters on UTP-5, plastic optical fiber and glass optical fiber and significantly reduces latency times by using
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arbitration pipelining. It is fully backwards compatible with the current 1394-1995 and 1394a specifications. 1394b is an
important step forward in increasing the performance and simplifying the implementation of 1394 on PC's, and, with its longhaul capabilities, makes 1394 the convergence bus between PC products, CE systems and home networking. The committee
completed its work and voted to send the final draft to sponsor ballot at its meeting in Rennes, France, in October 1999, and the
final spec is expected to be approved by the IEEE before the end of 2000. www.zayante.com/p1394b
Does the 1394 bus compete with USB?
Almost everyone who works with these various buses considers 1394 a complement to USB, since it offers much higher speeds
(up to 1.2 Gigabit) and is designed for isochronous and asynch video/audio/data transfer. While USB is ideal for computer
peripherals at speeds in the neighborhood of 12 Mbps, 1394 has a different mission. Many new PCs now include ports for both of
these standards.

Figure 3.1. IEEE 1394 Applications

Application of IEEE 1394 in Future Digital Home

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Figure 3.2. Digital Home


Network

4.Digital Home Video Studio Net


To our Digital Home Video project we build prototype of network based on IEEE 1394 standard.
To design of Digital Video Home Studio Net I considered two small computer network concepts; one based on
standard Microsoft Home (Small) Office Network and second FireNet from Unibrain. There are many benefits to
use Home Network based on FireNet from Unibrain against Microsoft Small Computer Network
4.1. Home or Small Office computer networks
Small Computer Network from
Microsoft setup

FireNet network setup

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1. Shut down computer


2. Open Case
3. Install network card
4. Install hub
5. Connect PCs with hub
6. Boot computer
7. Plug n play Hardware install
8. Configure protocols
9. Re-start computer

1. Install FireNet s/w


2. Configure protocols
3. Re-start computer
4. Plug Firewire cable

No new interface to learn


FireNet uses the existing, familiar interfaces on Windows and Macintosh platforms in such a way that users who
are already familiar with the environment proceed as if nothing has changed. Supports all of the built-in
networking capabilities on both Mac's and PC's. Users can share files, printers, scanners, hard disk drives, and use
the network security system and any other supported network facilities.
High performance - Low cost
Running at 400Mbps FireWireNet provides an up to four times performance improvement over 100BaseT fast
Ethernet. With FireNet, users do NOT have to purchase, install, and configure network cards (as long as they have
a firewire port available) in their workstations. As a result they end up saving time and money. Further, no hubs of
any sort are necessary.
Broad support
Undoubtedly, Firewire (IEEE-1394, i.Link) is the serial link of the future. Major manufacturers like Apple, Sony,
Compaq, Gateway, Dell, HP, etc. have already built in a firewire port in their consumer or PC products. It is
estimated that by the year 2001 more than 70,000,000 units of PC and peripheral units will adopt the firewire
technology.
Connectivity
To extend the network topology, I suggest using a FireWire repeaters which are available in three port
configurations. Studio Net will connect up to 63 nodes together, in a tree topology spread over 25 m.
Firenet can coexist with Ethernet
Studio Net can be installed in an existing Ethernet infrastructure without a problem.
Simply install the FireNet software in a server which has both an Ethernet adapter and a 1394 port and which will
play the role of the bridging device that will connect the two segments of the LAN, thus creating a single logical
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network. The IEEE 1394 segment can be used for high speed/load connections without affecting the Ethernet
segment speed.

Simplicity
FireNet is an ideal network for laptop to desktop connections. The user can easily plug the PC laptop (or
PowerBook) into the network, simply connecting it into any available Firewire port. With no special operations,
instant updates, and file sharing from any computer in the network become available
Capabilities
FireNet does NOT use hubs, or routers. It does not require complicated cabling, and does not require complex
installations. On the firewire bus you may also connect any IEEE-1394 multimedia devices (such as DV cameras,
firewire hard disk drives, IEEE-1394 enabled scanners, etc.) without affecting the stability of the network, and
operate them directly from any workstation on the network bus
OS Support FireNet is a full Ethernet emulation network and works seamlessly with all existing Ethernetcompatible software and hardware. FireNet supports all of the standard Ethernet protocols, including IPX/SPX,
NetBEUI, TCP/IP, and AppleTalk. FireNet is a cross-platform networking solution, meaning that it supports both
Windows and Macintosh OS, operating smoothly regardless of the platform(s) in use. Of course, mixed (PC and
MAC) etworks are fully supported:
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4.2. Prototype of Multimedia Network build in Instititute for Telecommunication

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Fig.4.2.Prototype of Digital Home Video Net builds in MultimediaLab in Institute of Telecommunication


NTNU

Fig.4.1.Scheme of Digital Home Video


Studio Net builds in Multimedia Lab Institute of Telecommunication NTNU

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a) All components

b) without DV recorder

Fig 4.3 Graphical Control Interface of Digital Home Video Network


0.IEEE 1394 camera , 1.Server PC 500Mhz (with IEEE1394 interface card) 2..FireWire repeater, 3.FireWire
repeater, 4.DV recorder, 5.Mac G4 (with build-in IEEE1394 interface)All hardware and software components of
Digital Video Home Network was evaluated. Results of evaluation are shown under

5. IEEE 1394 components used in Digital Video Home Studio


5.1.IEEE 1394 Cables
To make high-speed serial interfaces easy to use, the IEEE 1394 standard adopts an extremely simple cable with a
flexible structure. Using this cable, the wide connectors and multi-conductor cables that are now standard in
personal computer interfaces are no longer required (Figures 3.1 and 3.2).

4-pin Cable
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6-pin Cable
Figures 5.1 & 5.2 IEEE 1394 Connector Styles

Data transfers handled by a shielded double twisted pair cable that is driven by low-amplitude differential signals
(Figure 5.4). During data transfer, a clock signal is generated automatically by converting the data into two
signals: the data itself and a strobe signal that supplements the data (Figure 5.4). This eliminates the need for the
high-speed phase lock loop (PLL) circuits required by other interfaces at both the transmit and receive sides of
the communications channel. As a result, systems can be constructed inexpensively. In addition, since the
interface includes a power line in the cable, power can be supplied directly to low-power devices.

Figure5.3. 6-pin Cable Configuration

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Figure 5.4. DS-Link Coding Scheme


5.2.FireWire 3 Ports Repeater
In our project distance between server and clients such as PC or cameras was over10 m and required some
repeaters to regenerate signals. We used datafab repeater, which also can be used as Fire wire Hubs. Totally we
got up to 30 m.

Fig.5.5.Fire Wire repeater from Datafab


FW-R3
Add 3 IEEE 1394 Ports (6-pin) to your computer
Plug & play, and no software drivers needed
Re-settable overcurrent protection max. 1.5A for each 1394 port
Allow multiple repeaters' connection for extra distance (up to 236 feet)
High speed transfer rate up to 400Mbps
Specifications
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Description: FireWire 3 Ports Repeater


Bus Interface: Three ports IEEE-1394 interface (6pin connector)
Transfer Rate: 100, 200 and 400Mbps
Power Supply: Auto switch power from FireWire bus power or external DC power
DC adapter power input: DC 12V, 2A
(DC current limit depend on devices request)
DC Jack Dimension: 2mm
5.3. IEEE 1394 interfaces tested in Digital Video Home Studio project
In my project I tested two main type IEEE 1394 interfaces; Lynx and OHCI industrial standards.
Lynx / OHCI what are the differences and how do I choose?

Now produces two different host PCI adapters for use with an IEEE-1394 bus. Both are capable of 400Mbps speed and have full
1394 capability, but they are, nevertheless, quite different. As you may know, the typical IEEE-1394 interface consists of two
integrated circuits (as well as a number of passives to support them): the PHY or Physical Layer chip, and the LINK or
transaction layer chip. While there has been considerable standardization in PHYs over the last few years, LINKs with very
different philosophies continue to be manufactured.
The Fireboard400 described under is based on the TI TSB12LV21b LynxB LINK while the Fireboard400-OHCI Open Host
Controller Interface is based on the TI TSB12LV23/26 OHCI LINK.
To simplify, the OHCI is easier to program, does more automatically, and is supported as a standard LINK by Microsoft under
W98SE and W2000 (but not under WinNT).
The LynxB is far more flexible and is capable of greater total throughput. It is supported by Unibrain under WinNT, W95, W98,
W98SE and W2000. It is however; more difficult to program and is not supported with integrated drivers by Microsoft
-

Radius inc. PCI (OHCI ) card with Digital Origin software (http://www.radius.com)
Unibrain Fire Board 400(Lynx) with Unibrain software (http://www.unibrain.com/)
Datafab AppoloPort (OHCI) PCI-FW-PLUS (http://www.datafab.com)
Sony I Link (4 wires Fire ire)(http://www.sony.com/vaio)

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Fig.5.6. Radius IEEE PCI card was one of the first produced card to
use both in PC and
Mac

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FireBoard400

400 Mbps IEEE-1394 (firewire, i-Link) PCI Host


Adapter Board

Features
Physical Layer
Supports Provisions of IEEE-1394 Standard and the
1394a-2000 Supplement for High Performance Serial
Bus.
Provides Three Fully Compliant Cable Ports at 100/200/400
Megabits per Second.
Cable Ports Monitor Line Conditions for Active Connection to
Remote Node.
25.576 MHz Crystal Oscillator and PLL Provide
Transmit/Receive Data at 100/200/400 Megabits per Second, and
Link-Layer Controller Clock at 50 MHz. Node Power-Class
Information Signaling for System Power Management.
Cable Power Presence Monitoring.
Link Layer and PCI Interface
Performs the Function of aIl IEEE-1394 Cycle Master.
Supports IEEE-1394 Transfer Rates of 100, 200 and 400
Megabits per Second.
Provides PCI Bus Master Function for Supporting DMA
Operations.
Compliant with PCI Specification 2.1.
Supports Distributed DMA Transfers between 1394 and Local
Bus RAM, ROM, AUX, or Zoomed Video
Extension Headers for the Local Bus
Autoboot mode capability that allows data-moving systems to be
designed to oerate on the PCI bus without the need for a host CPU.
Extension Capabilities
FireBoard 400 can be extended in functionality and operability.
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This can be achieved combining the Autoboot mode capability and


the Extension Headers of the Local Bus. You can design your
custom system based on the PCILynx local bus as a biggy-back
board attached to the FireBoard 400.

PCI-FW (FireWire Expansion Card)


PCI-FW
OHCI(Open Host Controller Interface) compliant IEEE 1394 Board
Plug and Play
Support Serial Bus Data Rates up to 400Mbits/sec.
Support MAC (VIA chipset only), Windows 98, Windows ME, and Windows 2000 or
later
Peer to Peer communication structure
Specifications
Description: IEEE-1394 Add-on Card
Data Transfer Rate: 100, 200, and 400 Mbps (IEEE 1394)
Bus Interface: 32-bit PCI bus mastering (PCI local bus 2.1)
Connectors: Provide 3 ports IEEE 1394 connector 6pin

Fig .5.7 Datafab Fire Wire controller


5.4. Conclusions from testing of IEEE 1394 interfaces
Radius PCI IEEE OHCI card worked only with dedicated software drivers from Digital Origin and costs more than 2500 NOK.
This card can works with MacOS9.0.
Unibrain FireBoard 400 Lynx was very complicated to install and needed software from Unibrain. Price which includes
professionals cameras drivers was over 4500 NOK
Datafab OHCI-based Fire Wire card which costs under 600 NKR was most flexible amount all tested cards and compatible
with the most public domain software tested in our project an a will recommend to use it in our project.
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5.4. DIGITAL VIDEO CAMERAS


In Digital Video Studio project we have tested two different types of IEEE cameras;
1.Digital Cameras with no data compression
2.Cameras with DV compression
5.4.1. Sony DFW-VL500 with Non-Compression Digital Interface

A high quality non-compressed video sequence takes a lot of capacity and to use it at Home Video applications can be rather
expensive. But in research with digital images and compression algorithms at Universities can be very useful.

Non-compressed video camera Sony DFWVL500 technical notes


DFWVL500
IEEE1394 Progressive Scan Colour Camera, WFINE, 12X zoom
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Description:

Model Number: DFWVL500


Model Name: IEEE1394 Prog. Scan
Colour Camera, WFINE, 12X zoom

The DFW-V500 camera incorporates a 1/3"


Progressive Scan Wfine CCD and the IEEE1394-1995 interface. The camera outputs 400
Mbps for capturing high-quality YUV 4:2:2
progressive scan format motion video or still
images via the IEEE-1394-1995 digital serial
bus to any 1394-1995 compliant computer or
peripheral. It also features a four-pin
connector dedicated to the asynchronous
trigger operation, offering sub-microsecond
accuracy of operation for precise capture of
random, fast-moving objects. The DFWVL500 features an integral 12x zoom lens
with motorized zoom, iris and focus.

IEEE 1394
External Trigger
Wfine CCD(Primary Color Filter, Progressive Scan, Square Pixels)
VGA (640 x 480), Non-Compressed YUV(4:2:2) Digital Output
30 fps Full Motion Picture
Aluminum Diecasting Chassis

400 Mbps, High Speed Data Transfers


Supplied 6pin Cable with Latch Connector

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5.4.2. Digital Camera with DV compression used in Home Digital Video Studio

DIGITAL VIDEO RECORDING: Offering up to 520 lines of horizontal resolution, 3X color bandwidth, and lower
signal-to-noise ratio, to provide stunning video performance."
MEGAPIXEL CCD DV HANDYCAM CAMCORDER (1/4"- 1070K PIXELS): 1/4" CCD with 1,070,000 pixels
provides stunning detail and clarity, with exceptional video and still image performance.
520 LINES OF HORIZONTAL VIDEO RESOLUTION: Advanced HAD Megapixel CCD technology, combined with
Carl Zeiss T* optics provide outstanding video performance with up to 520 horizontal lines of resolution.
DIGITAL STILL MEMORY MODE WITH MEMORY STICK MEDIA: Capture digital still images at 1152 x 864
or 640 x 480 resolution, directly onto Memory Stick media for easy transfer to PC's for email, printing, or sharing with
other compatible Memory Stick devices.
HIGH QUALITY MEGAPIXEL 1152 X 864 STILL IMAGE RESOLUTION: Large, detailed Megapixel quality still
image resolution provides unprecedented detail and exceptional quality that is ideal for printing or internet applications.
MPEG MOVIE MODE: Capture video and audio directly to Memory Stick media. Shoot an MPEG Movie "on
location" or select up to 60 seconds from your recorded video tape. The Video Email mode is ideal resolution for sharing
video (160 x 112) and Presentation mode increases the resolution to 320 x 240.
ADVANCED HADTM CCD TECHNOLOGY: Enhanced CCD design allows more light to reach the imager which
reduces video noise to improve signal-to-noise ratio by up to 6db (2x better than a standard CCD). Particularly effective
when shooting in dark situations.
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY CARL ZEISSTM VARIO-SONNAR T* LENS: Carl Zeiss T* lens have an advanced
optical multi-layer coating offering less glare and flare with increased contrast. This results in vivid image brilliance, true-to-

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life colour saturation, and perfect renditions of subtle tones.


10X OPTICAL/120X PRECISION DIGITAL ZOOM: Sony's optical zoom brings the action close up from far away. In
addition, precision digital zoom interpolation technology means that extreme digital zooming is cleaner, with less distortion
than previous types of digital zoom.
2.5" PRECISION SWIVELSCREENTM LCD DISPLAY (200K PIXELS): Provides excellent viewing clarity with
improved resolution. The 200,000 pixel LCD display makes images sharp and detailed during playback or when monitoring
recording.
PRECISION COLOR VIEWFINDER (180K PIXELS): Increased pixel count provides more detail and clarity of video
subjects.
STAMINA POWER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 8 HOURS (USING OPTIONAL NP-FM91): The Sony DCRPC110 will record for up to 8 hours or playback for up to 10 hours (with LCD screen off) on a single charge with the
optional NP-FM91 battery.
INFOLITHIUM BATTERY WITH ACCUPOWERTM METER SYSTEM: Rechargeable Lithium-Ion batteries mean
no "memory effect." Sony's exclusive AccuPowerTM meter displays the battery time remaining in minutes, in the
viewfinder or LCD screen.
SUPER STEADYSHOT PICTURE STABILIZATION: Eliminates high frequency shake and vibration without
compromising picture quality. Super SteadyShot uses motion sensors and a HyperPrecision CCD imager that does not
change or degrade the video like some other systems.
SUPER NIGHTSHOTTM 0 LUX RECORDING: Capture video even when shooting in total darkness (0 Lux) using the
built-in infrared system up to ten feet away. The Super NightShot mode automatically adjusts the shutter speed to
increase picture brightness and clarity.
SUPER LASERLINKTM WIRELESS TRANSMISSION SYSTEM: Allows the user to transmit audio and video, via
infrared, from the camcorder to the optional IFT-R20 LaserLink receiver, at a distance of up to 26 feet. The Super
LaserLink system eliminates the need for video cables or adaptors for true worry-free playback.
i.LINKTM (IEEE 1394) DV INTERFACE: Allows high speed bi-directional digital communication between any two
devices equipped with a IEEE 1394 interface, including camcorders, digital VTRs, capture cards, and PCs.
PROGRESSIVE SHUTTER SYSTEM: Mechanical shutter system that provides Progressive Scan performance while
utilizing an interlace scanning system. Digital still images will be sharp and clear with excellent definition.
ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERSION AND PASS-THROUGH: Convert and/or record any analog NTSC video
source to digital video via the DCR-PC110's analog inputs. Analog NTSC video can also be passed through the DCRPC110 directly to a PC via the I.LINK interface in real-time for easy PC editing of your analog footage.

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5.5. Digital Video Recorder -interface between analog an digital worlds


The HR-DVS1U is a unique all-in-one video solution combining miniDV and Super Hi-Fi Stereo in one VCR. . The MiniDV deck allows
direct playback of cassettes you've recorded on a MiniDV camcorder without any cables to connect. One easy solution!

HR-DVS1U

Mini DV Format &High Resolution Super VHS and VHS


Super VHS ET Recording
Pro-Cision 19 micron width EP Heads
DigiPure Technology w/ TBC and 4MB Frame Memory
PCM Digital Audio (DV) and Hi-Fi VHS Stereo with MTS Decoder
VCR Plus+ with "Cable Eye" Cable Box Controller
Jog/Shuttle on Remote
Insert Editing with Flying Erase Head

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Audio Dubbing
DA4 (Double Azimuth) Head Helical Scan System
Auto Index and Index Search
Digital AV Tracking
Plug & Play
Auto SP-EP Timer Recording
Active Video Calibration
Multi-Brand TV/DBS Compatible Remote with Jog / Shuttle
Express Programming
S-video Input on Front / Back Panel
Two S-Video Output on Back Panel
Rear AV Inputs, Gold Plated Front Inputs
DV Playback Component Video Output, Two A/V Outputs
181 Channel Tuner
1Year /12 Event Timer (6 event each for DV & S-VHS/VHS)
Multi Lingual Colour on Screen Menu
Shipping Weight 16.5 lbs.
Width: 17 1/4"
Height: 5"
Depth: 15"

5.5.1. Analog video facilities DV recorder


DV VHS recorder plays in our project a role of interface between old analog formats and new digital (DV) world. There are
four most important analog IN/OUT connections.

Component Video
Divides the video signal into three elements: luminance, which represents brightness in the image, and separate red and blue
signals (expressed as either Y R-Y B-Y or Y Pb Pr). Component video is superior to both composite and S-video the image,
and separate red and blue signals (expressed as either Y R-Y B-Y or Y Pb Pr). Component video is superior to both
composite and S-video because it provides improved color purity, superior color detail, and reduces NTSC artifacts. This is
a three-connector output from a video source (such as a DVD player), or input on a Television. Each signal is supplied on a
separate colored RCA cable for easy connection.

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S-Video
S-Video keeps luminance (Y) (black and white) and chrominance (C) (color) signals separate to take full advantage of high
resolution sources like: DBS satellite, DVD & S-VHS. Better than a composite video connection, not as good as
component.

S-Video Out
S-Video keeps luminance (Y) (black and white) and chrominance (C) (color) signals separate to take full advantage of high
resolution sources like: DBS satellite, DVD & S-VHS. Better than a composite video connection, not as good as
component.

Component Video Output


Divides the video signal into three elements: luminance, which represents brightness in the image, and separate red and blue
signals (expressed as either Y R-Y B-Y or Y Pb Pr). Component video is superior to both composite and S-video because it
provides improved color purity, superior color detail, and reduces NTSC artifacts. This is a three-connector output from a
video source (such as a DVD player), or input on a Television. Each signal is supplied on a separate colored RCA cable for
easy connection.

5.6. DV standard and why I chose it to Digital Home Video


The preferred way with DV is to dispense with the external cabling and headaches altogether and use device control implemented
via Fire Wire. DV over Fire wire carries video, audio and device control signals, all through the same medium. No extra cables.
All that's needed is the proper drivers. Their implementation may be different across the boards. For a long time, there was no
real device control standard specified in DV, so manufacturers could (and did) pretty much roll their own protocols.
High quality: With analog video, noise can enter at any point of the path. And usually, once noise has entered, noise will stay.
There's tape noise. The cable that routes the video to the capture card can pick up noise. The capture card usually picks up a lot of
noise, because it sits in a very noisy environment: In the computer. Going back out to tape adds noise yet again.
Noise doesn't just degrade the picture; it also degrades the compression process. Because a codec treats noise as information, it
dutifully stores the noise. Which results in high data rates. Those of use who survived the years of analog video on the computer
got used to thinking that anything better than 5 Megabytes/second or less than 4-x compression is good. This is true in most of
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the cases, but not all. Those of us lucky enough to own very high quality equipment quickly realized: A very clean video signal
actually lends itself better to compression. It can compress more; it can tolerate a lower data rate and still look better. Why?
Because it was free of noise in the first place. By compressing the video at the point of origin (in the camcorder, behind the lens),
DV avoids noise altogether.
High performance: Analog video usually compresses at a varying rate. If the content is complicated, the data rate goes up.
Owners of Adobe Premiere can actually watch this process by using a feature called Movie Analysis. It usually shows spikes in
the data rate during complicated scenes, such as transitions. These spikes can lead to data stalls on playback. The video zips
along nicely, suddenly a spike comes down the pike, spike exceeds the bandwidth of the computer and bang playback hangs.
DV uses a steady rate of around 3.7 Megabyte/second. This is a no-brainer for a moderately fast system with a decent hard drive.
There are no spikes in the data stream, ergo any bumps in the road to good playback.
Low cost: A good capture board can be an expensive thing, and some of use have amassed quite a collection over the years. As
new ones emerge, driver support for the old ones dries up. Will it ever end? Yes: Let's forget about capture boards altogether.
With DV, capture and compression happens right behind the lens..

6. Non-Linear Video Editing


DV Editing: Finally, real digital video all the way. With analog video, video had to enter and exit the computer in analog. But
the computer is digital. Actually, to the computer, working with analog video is an act against nature.
For a long time, the computer resisted against processing analog video. The computer sabotaged capturing video by dropping
frames at undue times. After capture was solved with heavy hardware, the computer resorted to random work stoppages during
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playback. Some people actually claim that analog capture boards employ sophisticated pressure sensors, which interrupt
playback when a tight deadline is sensed. We've learned to live with that. But we don't need to anymore. Because with DV, video
editing finally is digital end-to-end. The computer likes that.
Things you'll need.
(You probably already have most of them.)
You need a DV camcorder or DVCR equipped with Firewire (IEEE 1394). All DV machines sold by Sony and other vendors
have the Firewire connector, many DV machines sold by other vendors don't (although many are entering the market as we
write.).
You need a Firewire interface board. Ever since Sony released their first DV machines in late 1995, people have clamoured for
these boards. Now, they are finally here. Adaptec/DPS, Fast, miro, Matrox, Radius have announced or are already shipping
boards which allow your DV camcorder or DVCR to connect to your computer via Fire Wire.
You need a non-linear editing application such as Adobe Premiere Avid Express. Many boards, such as the, come with a
version of Premiere. Some boards come with a light or "LE" version (which you can later upgrade), some like the Spark come
with a full version.
You need a suitably powered computer with lots of hard drive space. Keep in mind: DV creates 3.6 to 3.7 Megabytes of data
per second. One minute, 222 Megabytes. 10 Minutes: 2.2 Gigabytes. A 90 minute, feature-length movie would fill 20 Gigabytes
of hard drive space in final edited form. Also keep in mind that currently shipping Firewire solutions (or rather the drivers that
come with them) don't allow to "Print to DV" from the Premiere timeline. Allow sufficient space for a target file for the "Make
Movie" process. This is likely to change with future drivers, changes to the operating system or the editing application.
Your drive needs to be fast enough to cope with the steady stream of 3.7 Megabytes per second You should be fine with a
good SCSI drive that spins at 7200 rpm. Stay away from IDE drives. They put a heavy load on the CPU. With DV, the CPU must
be able to do some processing during data transfers.
Now, let's go over the editing process step-by-step

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6.1. DV & Fire wire Editing Workflow


Step 1: Compression in camera. As video is being shot, it is compressed and converted to digital form in the camcorder. What
used to be "video" now sits on a digital tape. This digital tape can be played in a digital tape drive, such as the one in your
camcorder, in a DVCR, or in a standalone unit.
Step 2: A transfer DV data, not video, is transferred electronically via the Fire Wire to the computer's hard disk. This not a
capture process it's a file copy process. A driver camouflaged as a regular capture driver, or by a standalone utility can handle
the copy process. This is specific to the individual implementation of the driver for the various DV/Fire Wire boards, and it can
also change as matter progress. The hard drive has to be fast enough to cope with the 3.7 Mbytes/sec data rate (plus some
overhead). Theoretically, it is possible to stop the tape and restart if and when the hard drives can't cope with the data rate, but
this is an involved process and may not be implemented in early versions of DV drivers.
Step 3: You want it wrapped? During the copy process, the DV data is "wrapped" into a file format commonly understood by
computers, in this case either AVI for Video for Windows or QuickTime for the Mac. Both file formats allow for "installable
compressors," also known as codecs. AVI for instance can work with a multitude of installable compressors, such as Indeo,
Cinepack, VDO, etc. to name just a few. The compressed DV data is treated like data produced by just another installable
compressor. As a matter of fact, there is a DV compressor/decompressor (codec) installed on your system. But during the file
copy process, this codec is not needed. Ill cover that later in more detail.
Step 4: After the copy process has been finished, the DV data is sitting on your hard drive, wrapped into a file format any
standard editing application can process. Note: The actual DV data has not changed. It hasn't been touched by a codec, it hasn't
been recompressed, changed or altered.
Step 5: DV Editing. To edit your clips, you use any standard editing application that can work with industry standard file
formats, such as the Adobe Premiere , Avid X-pressDV, Microsoft Movie Maker or MGI Video Wave. I'll cover that later in
more detail.
Step 6: During editing with a program like Premiere, your DV AVI or QuickTime movie will behave just like any other video
clips you used before.
Step 7: When, and only where Premiere adds filters or transitions, Premiere needs the DV data in uncompressed form. For this,
Premiere will call the installed DV codec. Premiere will hand it compressed frames retrieved from the AVI or QT file. Premiere
receives uncompressed RGB bitmaps back from the codec. Premiere then blends, filters, combines, warps or alters these frames
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according to the specified transition. When done, Premiere hands the finished RGB bitmap to the installed DV codec. The codec
compresses the bitmap to DV AVI or QT and hands it back to Premiere. Premiere then stores it in the target file. The installed
DV codec can be implemented in hardware or in software. Read more about this interesting issue here.
Step 8: Clips without filters or transitions are not being touched by the codec and simply copied to the target file. If you would
have a project, which consists only of hard cuts, the codec wouldn't be called for editing at all.
Step 9: Here we go again. After all edits have been finished, the resulting file must be copied from the computer to the DV
device via Fire Wire. During this copying process, the AVI or QT wrapper is removed; data specific to the receiving device is
adjusted or restored. This is usually done "on the fly" as data is sent to the DV device. Some boards may need additional post
processing. The copy process usually is handled by a standalone utility, or by a Premiere "Print to DV" plug in.
Step 10: You are done! On your hard drive sits DV video, most of it as pristine as you've shot it. No generation loss. You've
reached the holy grail of video editing. Right on your computer.

6.2. Non-linear DV editing software tested for Digital Video Home Studio
Todays software marked for video film editing is dominated of two groups of software: professional high quality relatively
expensive programs and freeware programs. In these two groups I choose some basic criteria for using in Home Digital Video
Studio.
1.Installation has to be easy and robust
2.It has tolerated some inexperience users (no data experts).
3.Software has to be compatible with different operating systems such MS Windows,
MacOS or Linux.
4. Programs has to have user friendly interface
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5. System requirements -no expensive hardware required


6. DV editing results (export files- film sequences) and input (import files- capture sequences) has to be compatible with most
existing formats.
6.3.Proffesionals non-linear video editors
6.3.1.Avid Xpress DV

.
Fig 6.1. Avid Xpress DV software is also available in Avid Xpress DV PowerPack, adding a powerful suite of high-value
software and features:

Avid ePublisher Companion Edition for Web pages synchronized to video

Pinnacle Commotion (full version) for compositing, rotoscoping, and paint

Knoll LightFactory AVX for lighting and lens flare effects

Sonic Solutions DVDit! SE for enhanced DVD creation

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Avid Image Stabilization for correcting shaky camera work

DV Filmmaker 's Toolkit

Avid FilmScribe option for editing film-originated projects

Script-based editing for mapping shots to, and editing from, a script

Dupe detection flags re-used shots

AutoSync video and audio

Film-style effects
Digital Distribution

One-step export to Web video via integrated Cleaner EZ program from Terran Interactive (Cleaner 5 sold separately)

Export to MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 formats

RealMedia, Windows Media/ASF, QuickTime via Cleaner EZ

Import/export OMF/JFIF files

WMV, AVI

DV25 digital video

VideoDV25 (DV and MiniDV), NTSC/PAL formats

4 video tracks (nestable for unlimited tracks)

Integrated EDL support, 18 formats

Batch digitizing

Industry-standard DV In/Out (IEEE 1394) camera/deck support and control

Supports RS-422 deck control


Audio

8-track audio editing with real-time mixing

Real-time EQ template with 3-band EQ advanced user setting option

Real-time rubberband gain adjustments

32 kHz, 44.1 kHz, and 48 kHz sampling rate

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Real-time sample rate conversion

Adjustable audio input/output levels

Volume control and pan between channels by clip or track

Waveform display in timeline

Downsample to 22 kHz and 11 kHz for multimedia CD development

Digital audio extraction from CD-ROM

Audio punch-in tool for adding voice on the fly

Includes over 20 AudioSuite plug-ins, many more available


Editing

Mappable keyboard and command palette

Single-track transitions

Snap-to transitions

Splice, overwrite, extract, lift and split edits

Sync-lock/sync-break detection

Precise timecode editing

User protection with AutoSave and 32 levels of undo/redo

Pop-up source monitors, match frame, sift, consolidate, collapse

Unlimited clip sizes

Built-in logging

Avid graphical user interface


Effects

Fit-to-fill motion effects button

Overwrite and keep effect

Includes Boris FX LTD for additional 2D/3D effects

Over 80 transitions including dissolves, wipes, peels, pushes, spins, and more

Motion effects, colour effects

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Matte, chrome, and lama keys

Flips, flops, and resizes

Picture-in-picture

Key frame effects

AVX plug-in support


Graphics +Titling

Integrated, anti-aliased titling tool

Includes Boris Graffiti LTD for enhanced titling

Hardware-independent software codec


Interoperability

Project-compatible with Media Composer, Symphony, and Avid Xpress systems

Avid Unity MediaNet is supported by a selected Avid Xpress DV v1.5 configuration and is planned for future releases

System requirements
Pentium 4 at all available processor speeds, 256 MB RDRAM, 20 GB or larger IDE internal drive, Matrox G450 graphics card,
CD-ROM drive, Microsoft Windows 2000 with Service Pack 1 or 2. Additional media storage recommended, such as optional
IDE or Ultra2/Ultra3 drive or FireWire drive
High quality JPEG frames based Avid software need high capacity and high speed computers. Before installation of Avid
software it was necessary to run Avid quality test which denied installation on quite good non-expensive standard PC, s used to
Digital Home Video project.

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Fig 6.2.1. Results of quality test before installation Avid software.


The same computer worked excellent with Adobe Premiere 6.0 software.

6.3.2. Adobe Premiere 6.0

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Fig.6.2.2.User interface for Adobe Premiere 6.0


DV functionality

Adobe Premiere 6.0 provides direct support for IEEE 1394 (Fire Wire/ I. Link) on both Windows and Mac OS. Using only the
DV port on your hard drive, an IEEE 1394 connection, and your DV camcorder, you get perfect digital video in premiere every
time. Premiere offers built-in support for all types of DV devices, ranging from consumer to professional. By simply connecting
a DV device to the IEEE 1394 port on a Windows or Macintosh computer, you can capture DV clips and begin editing right
away. On a computer with an IEEE 1394 port, there's no need to install additional hardware such as a video capture card. Just
select the appropriate DV device manufacturer and model in the Device Control dialog box, and Adobe Premiere assigns the
video input settings appropriate to that device, making the video capture process more precise.
DV capture

Settings tab, you can view and edit video capture settings, change the capture location, and set device control preferences. Using
the Logging tab, you can quickly log video clips, set In and Out points, name clips and reels, effortlessly batch-capture multiple
logged video clips, and add comments about each clip. The Movie Capture window in Adobe Premiere now includes a
Settings tab and a Logging tab. Using theWeb export plug-ins for one-step Web output
Adobe Premiere 6.0 includes three plug-ins (automatically installed) for exporting an individual clip, a segment of the Timeline,
or the entire program to a Web-optimised file format. When you have finished editing your video program, select one of the
following Web export options: Save for Web, Advanced Real Media Export, or Windows Media Export (Windows only).
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Choosing one of these options opens the respective plug-in dialog box, in which you can specify your exported file format
information.
The Save for Web menu command exports the Timeline directly into a special version of Terran Interactive's Media Cleaner
software, customized especially for Premiere.
With Advanced Windows Media Export, you can take advantage of a wide range of formatting options for the most precise
output control in the Windows Media format.
Hardware compatibility
Capture and output of video in Adobe Premiere 6.0 requires either an Adobe-certified third-party capture card or an IEEE 1394
interface (FireWire or iLink) compatible with either DirectX (Windows) or QuickTime (Mac OS).
For a third-party capture card to be deemed Adobe-certified, Adobe Premiere Quality Engineering must test and approve the card
for use with a specific version of Premiere using specific versions of driver software created by the card manufacturer.
Because built-in DV support in Premiere 6.0 is implemented through DirectX or QuickTime, Premiere requires either a
Microsoft DirectX-compatible or Apple QuickTime-compatible IEEE 1394 interface. An IEEE 1394 interface is built-in to many
computers and is also available separately as an add-on card such as Pinnacle DC1000 or.
System requirements
Windows
Intel Pentium II processor (300MHz or faster)
Microsoft Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows 2000, Windows
Millennium, Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 6
64 MB of RAM (128 MB or more recommended)
85 MB of available hard-disk space required for installation (40 MB for application)
256-color video display adapter
Additional requirements for DV:
Intel Pentium III 500MHz or faster (Pentium III 700 MHz recommended)
Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows Millennium, or Windows 2000
128MB RAM (256 MB or more recommended)
Dedicated large capacity 7200RPM UDMA 66 IDE or SCSI hard disk or disk array
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Microsoft certified OHCI IEEE-1394 interface


Conclusion for professionals video editing programs
Professionals non-linear video-editing programs mentioned above are expensive
16000 NOK , for Avid and 6000 NOK for Adobe Premiere6.0.
To install these programs we need expensive upgrading of existing hardware
User interface is rather complicated and needed some experience with professional film production.
Most of professionals Video Editing programs require quite expensive (over 10.000NKR) Real Time Editing Cards such as :
Pinnacle Systems DV1000, DV500 .
6.4. Consumers DV film editors

A lot of high quality freeware and shareware DV video editing programs we can copy directly from Internet and some full
versions programs come together with IEEE 1394 controllers or video cards.
I tested four of this kind of program using the same criteria as before.
6.4.1.Digital Origin MotionDV and IntroDV
This program was including in software package to the one of the first IEEE 1394 interface produced of radius The same version
is available for MacOS and all Windows platforms.

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Fig6.4.1. MotoDV Express user interface


MotoDV Express is the newest IEEE 1394 FireWire interface card from Digital Origin. In a single PCI slot, MotoDV Express
provides three IEEE 1394a ports, each capable of moving data in and out of your Windows 98 computer at up to 400 Mbps. Plugn-Play installation is a breeze, and the hot-pluggable ports are easy and convenient to use. MotoDV Express brings the power of
FireWire
Maximum connectivity, maximum flexibility
MotoDV Express complies with the Open Host Controller Interface (OHCI) specification. OHCI compatibility gives you the
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power to connect to a wide range of new FireWire peripherals, including disk drives, scanners, printers, and more. Of course,
MotoDV Express is also ideal for connecting PCs to the latest digital video (DV and Digital8) camcorders from Canon, JVC,
Panasonic and Sony.
Minimum System Requirements for MotoDV Express
Requirements for FireWire:

Pentium 233 MHz or faster computer with available PCI slot


Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
32 MB RAM
CD-ROM drive
Attached devices must comply with IEEE 1394-1995 and/or 1394a standards

Required Configuration for Digital Video


Pentium II 400 MHz or faster computer with available PCI slot
Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
Hard drive capable of sustaining at least 5 MB per second
64 MB RAM and 32-bit graphics capability
CD-ROM drive and sound card
DV camcorder with IEEE 1394 port
6.4.2. Microsoft Movie Maker

Microsoft Movie Maker is a part of Windows ME and Windows XP operating systems and is easiest to learn of all tested

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video-editing programs.
Fig 6.3.2 User-friendly interface of Microsoft Video Maker.
This interface principle is similar to many other consumer products tested in our Diigital Video Home project. How easy is
to use this programs we explain under.

The workspace for editing runs along the bottom of your screen, below the collections area and the monitor. This is where
you create and edit your project, which can later be saved as a movie. The workspace has two different views: the
storyboard view and the timeline view. Both are used in editing. The storyboard view lets you sequence your clips, while
the timeline view lets you refine the way the clips interact with each other and with an audio track. Toggle back and forth
between the two views using the small button to the left of your workspace.

The storyboard view is the default view for the workspace.

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With the storyboard, you combine your clips to tell your story. Drag clips from the collections area and drop them onto the
storyboard in the order you would like them to appear in your movie. To rearrange your clips, just drag and drop them to a
different location on the storyboard.
To remove a clip from the storyboard
1.
2.

Click the clip on the storyboard.


On the menu bar, click Edit, and then click Delete.

After you have assembled your clips, you can preview your project in the monitor. Here's how.
To preview your project in the monitor

Click an empty area in the workspace, and then click the Play button.

Now you can start to get a sense of how the various clips work together, and where some of the shots may be too long or may
require a better transition than the simple "cut" that you get from storyboard sequencing. That kind of refining, along with the
work of adding an audio track, is done in the timeline view.
Using the Timeline View
In the timeline view, the numbers that run across the top of the workspace indicate the duration of each clip. The timeline view
also shows you how clips interact with each other and with the audio track, which is indicated by the bottom bar in the
workspace. The Zoom In and Zoom Out buttons to the left of the workspace show you a more detailed view of how your clips
are working together, and can give you a broader perspective of the entire project.
You can also create more attractive transitions in the timeline view. Its easy to create a cross-fade (also called a "lap dissolve")
in which one scene fades out while the next scene appears behind it and grows clearer as the first one dims.
Another feature of the timeline view is the Record Narration button, which lets you add an audio track keyed exactly to the clip
sequence. You can watch the movie youve created while you narrate it.
You can insert other audio clips into your project in the same way you insert video clips and still images. Audio clips can also be
overlapped, though a cross-fade transition is not created. Instead, the length of time the two audio clips play together is
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determined by the amount of overlap between them. Keeping your clips organized in the Collections area on the left-hand side
of Windows Movie Maker makes it easier and more fun to edit your movie. To organize your clips in folders and subfolders.
Drag everything you want to include in a movievideo footage, audio tracks, still images, and moreinto the collection .You
can further organize your material by creating subfolders within a collection. For example, you may want to organize your clips
by thematic materials, such as vacation pictures or footage of your children. Or you may want to keep everything for a larger
project in one folder, and create subfolders that map to the pieces of that project.
Windows Movie Maker lets you include in your movie existing photos, audio clips, or other video files that you have stored on
your computer. You can import many different file types, including:

Video files with an .asf, .avi, or .wmv file extension.


Movie files with an .mpeg, .mpg, .m1v, .mp2, .mpa, or .mpe file extension.
Audio files with a .wav, .snd, .au, .aif, .aifc, .aiff, .wma, or .mp3 file extension.
Windows Media-based files with an .asf, .wm, .wma, or .wmv file extension.
Still images with a .bmp, .jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .jfif, .gif, or .dib file extension.
Microsoft PowerPoint files and individual slides with a .ppt extension.
System requirements
Windows Movie Maker requires the following minimum system configuration:

300 megahertz (MHz) Pentium II or equivalent


64 megabytes (MB) of RAM
2 gigabytes (GB) of free hard disk space
An audio capture device
A video capture device
An Internet connection and an e-mail program (required for sending a movie to a Web server or in an e-mail message)
IEEE 1394 DV capture card (for true DV capture from a DV device)

The following items are recommended for recording from a DV device:

600 MHz Pentium III or equivalent (or higher)


128 MB of RAM
6.4.3.MGI VideoWave

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Fig.6.3.3.Users interface for MGI VideoWave


Procedure how to produce a video is very similar to Microsoft Movie Maker described
above but MGI offers additional functionalities such as; SmartDV, detect many different IEEE1394 interfaces, has rich library
of transitions and special effects which were availibe only with more expensive professionals editing programs.
SmarDV:
If you are producing to a DV file from DV source material, MGI VideoWave III employs SmartDV, which can greatly reduce the
time required to produce the final video.
With SmartDV, VideoWave III can produce the DV file directly without re-rendering the frames provided the DV file has not
had any effects or transitions applied. Without SmartDV, each frame that is produced must be re-rendered, even if no effects,
such as text or special effects, have been added. With SmartDV, re-rendering does not take place in sections of DV footage that
do not contain applied effects. Under these conditions, much faster production will result.
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Easily Capture
Quickly transfer video from digital or analog camcorders, TV, VCR,
Web cam, or even the Internet.
Tell Your Story
The unique StoryLine approach provides a visual layout of your work
in progress. Use it to quickly arrange scenes, insert transitions, edit
clips, add titles, apply effects, and more!

Edit With Power


Add fast or slow motion effects with Time Warp. Create picture-inpicture with VideoWave's Video Mixer or chroma key to seamlessly
blend clips. Add titles and credits complete with motion and
animation with the Text Animator. Use the Cutting Room to trim
clips or use the powerful touchup tools in the DarkRoom.
Spice It Up
Swirl, ripple, and fade scenes. Choose from dozens of transitions,
animations, and title effects. Bring your video productions to life by
adding narration, music, and, sound effects. VideoWave's filters help
you create stunning sepia, black and white, mosaic, or selenium clips
with the click of a button.
Fast Production
Once your video is complete, special Produce templates guide you
through turning your video into the appropriate format for sending to
the Web, viewing on your PC, or going out to videotape.
Fast Rendering
No more waiting for your entire video file to render. The exclusive
SmartDV feature renders only the frames that have changed.
Comprehensive File Support
VideoWave supports AVI, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, Windows Media,
RealVideo, DV, MP3, WAV, BMP, TIFF, or JPEG files.
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SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
Minimum System
266 MHz Pentium II (or equivalent)
64 MB of RAM
45 MB of free hard drive space for program
1 GB of free hard drive space for video editing
Video card with 4 MB of video RAM, minimum 800 x 600 resolution at 16-bit hi-color (65,000 colors); Direct Draw
Drivers recommended
16-bit stereo sound card and speakers
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive
Analog capture card (required for analog video capture)
Minimum Recommended System for DV Editing
350 MHz Pentium II (or equivalent)
128 MB of RAM
45 MB of free hard drive space for program
6 GB of free hard drive space for video editing, (Ultra DMA, SCSI-2 sub-system recommended)
Video card with 4 MB of video RAM, minimum 800 x 600 resolution at 16-bit hi-color (65,000 colors); Direct Draw
Drivers recommended
16-bit stereo sound card and speakers
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive
An OHCI Compliant IEEE-1394 card (required for digital video capture)
Operating System Requirements
VideoWave supports the following operating systems:

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Windows 95 OSR1
Windows 98
Windows 98 SE (preferred operating system)
Windows NT 4.0 (Service Pack 3 required, Service Pack 5 recommended)
Windows 2000
Windows ME
Windows XP
MGI VideoWave and Mac OS X
With the release of Mac OS X, Apple has provided a technology called Classic mode. Classic mode allows you to transition to
Mac OS X and extend your ability to use Mac OS 9 compatible applications; MGI is committed to supporting Mac OS X in
future product releases. Although testing is in process and updates may become available, not all current Macintosh applications
are fully tested or approved for operation under Mac OS X Classic mode. For this reason, no technical support will be extended
to users running MGI's products that have not been approved for operation under Mac OS X Classic mode.MGI VideoWave full
version comes together with the most IEEE 1394 OHCI interfaces priced under 1000 NKR or can be copied as FreeWare from
internet.
Conclusion for testing of consumer video film editors
I choose WideoVawe editing software to Digital Video Home Studio because:
-

Supports most of existing hardware such as IEEE 1394 controllers, DV cameras and

analog video capture cards

- Minimum system requirements from all tested programs; it can be applied even on 133Mhz Pentium or Macintosh
with only 64 MB RAM
-

Supports most of existing video formats

- Has most completely tools case which allows to produce high quality video film on DVD, Video CD, DV, VHS-tape
or publish it on WEB
-

Has an easy to understand animated manual

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Is easy to install even for non qualify customers

Has user friendly easy to learn Video Editing interface

Is distributed together with most popular graphics cards or can be free copied from internet

Works to continue;

- Digital Video Home Studio Network will be implemented in Multimedia Laboratory Institute For
Telecommunication and partly Midgard Media Lab
-

Different editing programs packages and hardware interfaces will be integrated in Graphical User Interface

- Research of small office and home computer networks to multimedia applications based on new standards as USB2,
IEEE 1394b will be continued
-

Some wireless multimedia applications will be added to Home Video Studio

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New platforms such as Linux, Solaris WinXP, MacOsX.. will be tested

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