Sie sind auf Seite 1von 2

Observational Learning in Psychology

Many professionals in the medical field have been led to believe that direct reinforcement is the main method of 
learning. Thanks to the work of Albert Bandura we now know this is not true. Humans learn behavior through a 
variety of methods, including direct observation of the behavior of other humans. He found that this is an 
effective way to learn new information. This phenomenon, known as modeling or observational learning, can 
explain many of the behaviors exhibited by people.

Dr. Bandura identified three concepts of basic social learning. The first is observational learning. Through the 
use of a “Bobo” doll, it was shown that children will not only learn behavior from others, they will imitate it. If 
an adult acts in a violent manner while interacting with the doll, the child will too. Yet, he also found that this 
process doesn’t have to involve a real life model. Children also learn a behavior after having it described to them 
verbally or witnessing it through books, television or movies. This theory now encompasses the Internet and 
what is viewed and heard online. Yet, he did note that just because a behavior is learned does not mean it is 
demonstrated.
The second concept identified by Dr. Bandura is the intrinsic reinforcement pattern. Intrinsic reinforcement is an 
internal reward for a behavior such as a feeling of pride or satisfaction. Learning theories, through this method, 
are connected to cognitive development. This approach is classified as a social cognitive theory and external 
stimulus, such as a smile or a thank you, can lead to intrinsic reinforcement.
Modeling is the third concept studied by Dr. Bandura. With this technique, not all behaviors are learned 
effectively. The model and the learner both play a role in the success of this technique. First the person who is 
learning must notice something present in the environment. This is called the attention stage. If the learner does 
not notice what is being modeled, the process stops.
One way to increase the chances of this stage being successful is to provide an interesting or novel model, 
something the child will be attracted to. Once attention has been garnered, the second stage begins. This is the 
retention stage, which is vitally important. If the learner does not remember what he or she noticed in the 
attention stage, he or she will not be able to act on it.
In this process, the third stage is the reproduction stage in which the behavior is performed. Although the 
behavior may only mildly resemble the desired one, improvement will come with practice. Finally, the motivation 
stage is reached. It is here where the child will either receive reinforcement or punishment. Not only will the 
learner become more motivated, others who desire to receive the reward or avoid the punishment will also learn 
from the process. 
These methods of observational learning can be an effective method of changing behavior, both positively and 
negatively.