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GHANA PRISONS SERVICE

Annual Report 2013


Published Under The Authority Of
The Director-General Of Prisons

FOREWARD
The Ghana Prisons Service made great strides in the performance of its mandatory functions of ensuring
safe custody and welfare of inmates while providing opportunities for their reformation and rehabilitation before
discharge. Healthcare delivery to inmates saw a significant improvement as provisions for inmates to access
healthcare services both within and outside the prison walls, were made. This, coupled with increased production
of vegetables by the farming stations to improve inmates
nutritional status, resulted in reducing the mortality rate
of prisoners significantly.
Due to the determination of the Prisons Service to transform the existing penal system into an effective, humane
and a safe reformatory one, great emphasis was placed on developing the human resource to ensure high
professionalism, efficiency and effectiveness. A significant number of officers were given the opportunity to
undertake academic and professional courses to upgrade their knowledge and skills, A few also attended
international seminars to share practices with the outside world and also acquaint themselves with current trends in
prison management. These opportunities translated into improving performance on the job to an appreciable level.
The inmates educ ational programmes rolled out in the Medium Security Prison in Nsawam and some of the
Central Prisons across the country continued to receive the desired attention from the Service and the Government.
Performance of the students at both the Basic Education Certificate Examinations (BECE) and the West Africa
Senior Secondary Certificate Examinations (WASSCE) has been good since the start of the programme.
In the area of rehabilitation of prisoners, the Service did not relent in its efforts to provide for and encourage as
many inmates as possible to access the skills training in carpentry, tailoring, soap making, catering, block- laying
and concreting, barbering and Information Communication Technology (ICT). It is envisaged that the acquisition
of such employable skills would make the beneficiaries easily make economic adjustment when released into the
conventional society, thus, helping to reduce recidivism.
Successful engagement of prisoners in agriculture was pursued as farming stations continued their drive in
producing food, in pursuance of the policy of the Prisons Service to supplement government ration with
agricultural products produced internally.
In the midst of all these, our prisons continued to be bedevilled with the problem of overcrowding. The increasing
number of remands and persons sentenced by the courts on daily basis to serve various prison terms, led to an
overwhelming congestion in the prisons. This calls for extensive reforms in the sentencing policies of the country
to consider other alternatives to imprisonment. It is highly envisaged that while committing persons convicted of
felonies to prison terms and working out appropriate non-custodian sentences for those convicted of
misdemeanours, our prison would be decongested for effective sentence planning and management.
While waiting for a greater display of public goodwill towards the Ghana Prisons Service in the area of continuous
support for the various programmes being run in the Prisons, I wish to express our deepest gratitude to the
Government of Ghana, the Ministry of the Interior, our colleagues and other stakeholders in the criminal justice
system for their invaluable assistance. I am equally grateful to the various religious organizations, corporate
bodies, non-governmental organizations and civil society groups that continued to contribute towards the
realization of the vision of the Service. The role of the media in our achievements is also highly appreciated.
Finally, to the rank and file of the Ghana Prisons Service who se dedication to duty, fortitude in times of difficulties
and commitment to the course of the Service have helped in bringing the Service this far, I say thank you very
much.
1

MATILDA BAFFOUR -AWUAH


DIRECTOR -GENERAL OF PRISONS

GENERAL REVIEW
The Service remained committed to its statutory function of safe custody and welfare of prisoners. It also
pursued reformation and rehabilitation programmes aimed at facilitating effective re-entry of prisoners after their
release from prison and preventing re -offending behaviour among ex -convicts.
The Service remained focused on its policy of staff development by providing opportunities for both superior and
subordinate officers to attend various academic and professional courses, seminars and workshops for their
personal and career development and improved performance. It is worth mentioning that, 40 officers served on the
United Nations Peacekeeping Operations in five countries in Africa during the reporting year.
The inmates educational programmes in the prisons made a remarkable progress as it registered 60 inmates who
sat for various examinations as follows: 38 for NVTI, 19 for BECE and 3 for WASSCE. It is envisaged that the
momentum would be maintained and the successes chalked will whip up interest and encourage more prisoners to
enrol at both the Junior and Senior High School levels.
The age-old problem of overcrowding persisted, especially in the walled prisons. There was an increase in
prisoner population at the rate of 3.12 % during the reporting year. The average monthly prisoner population was
13,908 as against 13,487 recorded in 2012. The Service remained focused on facilitating and coordinating
activities of the Judicial Review Committee dubbed Justice for All Programme which led to the release of 30
remand prisoners who have out -stayed their commitment warrants while 45 were bailed. The average daily remand
population stood at 3,023 as against 3,027 in the previous year, representing an annual reduction rate of 0.132%.
The Service vigorously pursued its agricultural policy of increasing food, cash crop and livestock production to
supplement government expenditure in feeding the inmates of the countrys prisons. The daily feeding rate of
GH1.80 GP per a prisoner even though inadequate, remained uncha nged.
The Chaplaincy Unit, in collaboration with the various religious groups, intensified its religious programmes in the
prisons. Recognised religious bodies, especially Christian and Islamic groups, continued to fellowship with
inmates and also made pr esentations of food items and used clothing to prisoners.
The Service saw much improvement in the health needs of both inmates and staff. The nutritional value of
inmates ration was enriched through the cultivation and supply of vegetables by the Agric Unit of the Service.
The year saw a vibrant Public Relations Unit which worked hard in educating the general public about the Service
policies and projects in relation to its core functions through the cooperation and support of both the print and the
electronic media. The Unit also maintained good working relationship between the Prisons Service and other
stakeholders in the Criminal Justice Administration as well as Non -Governmental Organisations.

MISSION STATEMENT
The Ghana Prisons Service is tasked with the safe custody of convicted persons from the Courts as well as the
provision of Reformation and Rehabilitation Programmes for their successful resettlement into society. Our
cherished values are humanity, vigilance, fortitude and integrity.
VISION
To transform the Prisons in Ghana into highly efficient correctional facilities managed by a well-trained and
motivated staff.

LEGISLATIVE MANDATE
Prisons regulations, 1958(L.I. 412)
Prisons Standing Orders, 1960
Prisons(Amendment) Regulation, 1970 (L.I 6 48)
Prisons(Declaration of Prisons) Instrument, 1971 (E.I 22)
Prisons Service Decree, 1972, NRCD 46
Ghana Prisons Service scheme of Service Administration of 17 th January, 1989
The 1992 Constitution of Ghana

GOVERNING BODY
Prisons Service Council
The Ghana Prisons Service is governed by the Prisons Service Council which is an advisory and supervisory body.
The Council advises the President on matters of policy in relation to the organisation and maintenance of the prison
system in Ghana.
It is also respo nsible for ensuring the efficient administration of the Prisons Service and the promotion of superior
officers up to the rank of Assistant Director of Prisons.
MEMBERSHIP OF THE COUNCIL
By provisions of the 1992 Constitution, membership of the Council is as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

A Chairman appointed by the President


The Minister for the Interior
The Director -General of Prisons
A medical practitioner nominated by the Ghana Medical Association
A lawyer nominated by the Ghana Bar Association
The Attorney -General or his representative
A representative from the Ministry or Department of State responsible for Social Welfare
A representative from religious bodies
Two members of the Prisons Service, one of whom shall be of a junior rank.
Two other members appointed by the Pre sident.
3

THE FOLLOWING CONSTITUTED THE COUNCIL


1.

MR. BENSON NUTSUKPUI (GHANA BAR ASSOCIATION)

- AG. CHAIRMAN

2.

HON. KWESI AHWOI

MEMBER

3.

MATILDA BAFFOUR AWUAH (DIR. GEN. OF PRISONS)

MEMBER

4.

PROF. JACOB PLANGE-RHULE (GHANA MEDICAL ASSOCIATION)

MEMBER

5.

HON. EBO BARTON-ODRO

MEMBER

(MP, DEP. ATTORNEY GEN. AND MINISTER FOR JUSTICE)


7.

MR. STEPHEN TAMPURI ADONGO (DIR. OF SOCIAL WELFARE)

MEMBER

8.

CSP. ANDREWS K. DZOKOTO (REP. OF SUPERIOR O

MEMBER

9.

CO. JOHANN NARTEY (REP. OF SUBORDINATE OFFICERS)

MEMBER

10. DASEBRE KWEBU EWUSI VII (REP. OF NATIONAL HOUSE OF CHIEFS) -

MEMBER

11. REV. STEPHEN WENGAM (PRESIDENTS APPOINTEE)

MEMBER

12. REJOICE JULIET AHIABLE (PRESIDENTS APPOINTEE)

MEMBER

FFICERS)

PRISON ESTABLISHMENTS
The Prisons Service comprises forty -five/45 establishments as follows:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.

Prisons Headquarters
Prison Officers Training School (POTS)
Senior Correctional Centre, (formerly Ghana Borstal Institute)
Seven/7 Central Prisons
Thirteen /13 Local Prisons
Seven/7 Female Prisons
Three/3 Open Camp Prisons
Nine/9 Agricultural Settlement Camp Prisons
One/1 Medium Security Prison
One/1 Maximum Security Prison
One/1 Contagious Disease Prison (CDP)

Below is a map showing the location of the various prison establishments.


Fig.1

l
5

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
As shown in the table below, the total approved budget for the year under review was One Hundred and Seven
Two Ghana Cedis
Million, Six Hundred and Seventy Thousand, Four Hundred and Twenty
(GH107,670,422.00)
. This was allocated under three (3) main expenditure items namely: Compensation, Goods
and Services and Assets.
However, this vote was inadequate necessitating the need for supplementary allocation of One Hundred
and Twenty-Four Million, One Hundred and Ninety-Three Thousand, Six Hundred and Sixty-Nine Ghana
Cedis (GH124,193,669.00) bringing the total release to Two Hundred and Twenty-Two Million, Eight
Hundred and Four Thousand, Five Hundred and Fifty-One Ghana Cedis, Seventy-Seven Pesewas
(GH222,804,551.77)to enable the Service carry out its core mandate.

Table 1
S/NO.

ITEM

AMOUNT
REQUIRED
GH

APPROVED
BUDGET
GH

AMOUNT
RELEASED
GH

SUPPLEMENTARY
GH

1.

COMPENSATION

77,572,033.68

65,000,000.00

170,705,912.00

105,705,912.00

2.

GOODS AND
SERVICE

49,170,148.00

17,000,000.00

13,590,118.86

(i) Additional
Funding
ASSET

18,487,757.00

18,487,757.00

14,680,000.00

5,670,422.00

617,361.16

(i)Ankaful Maximum
Security Prison
Project

20,000,000.00

20,000,000.00

19,303,402.75

TOTAL

161,422,181.68

107,670,422

222,804,551.77

124,193,669.00

3.

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT


Manpower
The total staff strength of the Service for the period under review stood at Five Thousand, Eight Hundred and
Ninety-eight (5,898) as against Five Thousand and Twenty - five (5,025) the previous year. This total comprised
Four Thousand and Twenty-nine (4,029) males and One Thousand, Eight Hundred and Sixty nine (1,869) females.
Of this figure, Six Hundred and Ten (610) were superior officers while the remaining Five Thousand, Two
Hundred and Eighty -eight (5,288) were subordinates.

The details are as shown in the tables belo w:


Table 2
SUBJECT

MALE

FEMALE

TOTAL

463

115

578

Subordinate Officers

3,449

1,729

5,178

Civilian Employees

Total Staff Strength as at 31/12/2013

5,764

Total Establishment

6,202

Vacancies

839

Superior Officers

Wastage
Table 3
SUBJECT

MALE

FEMALE

GRAND TOTAL

Compulsory Retirement

70

14

84

Voluntary Retirement

Resignation

Desertion/Dismissal

Removal

Death

12

Medical Grounds

The Service continued to pursue its human resource development agenda during the year. A number of officers
were released to pursue both academic and training programmes in various fields. In all 75 officers benefitted from
these programmes.
In the field of International engagements (Peacekeeping) the Service continued to contribute its quota by sending
40 officers to the United Nations Mission in five different countries in Africa.
Below are tables showing the academic and training programmes attended by officers.
Table 4
SRL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES WITH FULL SERVICE SPONSORSHIP


NAME OF PROGRAMME
NO. OF OFFICERS
ADVANCED DIP. IN COMM UNITY
1
NURSING.
STENOGRAPHER SECRETARYSHIP
2
STENOGRAPHER GRADE II
1
HND. IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
1
SECRETARYSHIP & MANAGEMENT
1
DIP. IN TRANS. & ROAD SAFETY
1
MANAGMENT.
HND. IN ESTATE MANAGMENT.
1
HEALTH ASSISTANT COURSE
1
DIP. IN REG ISTERED MENTAL HEALTH
1
NURSING
HND. ACCOUNTANCY
1
TOTAL
11

Table 5
SRL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES WITH STUDY LEAVE WITH PAY


NAME OF PROGRAMME
NO. OF OFFICERS
HND. PURCHASING & SUPPLY
1
BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY
2
DIP. IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
1
MA. COMM. STUDIES
1
BA. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/HRM
2
DEGREE IN
1
CONSTRUCTIONTECHNOLOGY
BSc. PSYCHOLOGY
1
DIP. IN GENERAL AGRIC ULTURE.
1
TOTAL
10

Table 6
SRL
1
2
3
4
5
6

TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT COURSES


NAME OF PROGRAMME
NO. OF OFFICERS
MGT. DEF. IN WIDER SECURITY
1
CONTEST
HUMAN RIGHTS IN PRISONS MGT.
2
INTERNAL SECURITY
2
EFFECTIVE H.R.M.
4
CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION
18
PARALEGAL SUPERVISORS TRAINING
20
TOTAL
47
8

Table 7

SRL
1
2
3

SPECIAL SERVICE TRAINING PROGRAMMES


NAME OF PROGRAMME
NO. OF OFFICERS
DRILL AND DUTY COURSE II
2
FUEL DEPOT ATTENDANTS COURSE
3
JUNIOR STAFF COURSE 61
2
TOTAL
7

SRL
1
2
3
4
5

INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT S (PEACE-KEEPING )


MISSION AREA
NO. OF OFFICERS
UNMIL/LIBERIA
8
UNMISS/SOUTH SUDAN
23
MONUSCO/DR.CONGO
3
UNAMID/DARFUR
5
UNSOM/SOMALIA
1
TOTAL
40

Table 8

OVERSEAS COURSES/ TRAINING


LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE IN LIBERIA- 1/ ONE OFFICER
INMATES EDUCATION
The training and educational programmes for inmates remained a priority for the Service during the year to enable
them improve their trade skills and academic pursuits. The number of inmates who registered and sat for the NVTI
examination, BECE and WASSCE was sixty (60). The details are as shown in the tables below.

Table 9
NATIONAL VOCATIONAL TRAINING INSTITUTE (NVTI) EXAMINATION
SRL

TYPE OF INMATES

1
2
3

JUVENILES
ADULT FEMALE PRISONERS
ADULT MALE PRISONERS
TOTAL

NO.
REGISTERED/SAT
THE EXAMS
29
4
5
38

Table 10
BASIC EDUCATION CERTIFICATE EXAMINATION (BECE)
SRL

TYPE OF INMATES

1
2

JUVENILES
ADULT FEMALE PRISONERS

ADULT MALE PRISONERS


TOTAL

NO.
REGISTERED/SAT
THE EXAMS
10
NIL
9 (7 sat the exams
because 2 had been
discharged)
19
9

Table 11
WEST AFRICAN SENIOR SECONDARY CERTIFICATE EXAMINATION (WASSCE)
SRL

TYPE OF INMATES

1
2
3

JUVENILES
ADULT FEMALE PRISONERS
ADULT MALE PRISONERS
TOTAL

NO.
REGISTERED/SAT
THE EXAMS
NIL
NIL
3
3

AGRIC ULTURE
The Service continued to pursue Agricultural activities as an essential component of its operations in the areas of
food and cash crops production and raising of livestock.
During the year, a total of 1,136 acres, out of the 1,211 acres targeted, were cultivated with
indicated in the table below.
Table 12
S/NO.

CROP TYPE

TARGET
(ACREAGE)

1.

Cereal (Maize, Rice and


Sorghum)

2.

various crops as

461

TARGET
ACHIEVED
(ACREAGE)
447

YIELD

225,000kg

Legumes (Groundnut
and Cowpea)

30

34

7,600kg

3.

Plantation (Oil Palm,


Cocoa, Cashew Mango
and Moringa)

565

551

106,000kg

4.

Root and Tuber (Yam


and Cassava)

52

30

34,300kg

5.

Vegetables (Pepper,
Okra, Tomatoes and
Garden eggs)

74

45

13,500kg

6.

Woodlot (Teak and


Acacia)
Total

29

29

On going

1,211

1,136

As indicated above, targets for cereals, plantation crops, roots and tuber and vegetables were not achieved as a
result of unfavorable rainfall pattern during the period. The target for legumes was however exceeded.

10

With the exception of poultry that exceeded its target, livestock production generally suffered a significant loss
mainly due to mortality . The table below shows the details.
Table 13
S/NO.

LIVESTOCK

1.

Sheep

TARGET
SET
265

TARGET
ACHIEVED
223

2.

Cattle

36

28

3.

Pigs

510

345

4.

Rabbits

236

146

5.

Goats

40

38

6.

Grasscutter

130

72

7.

Poultry

1,500

2,000

Financial Target Achieved


Total Revenue

GH462,558.69

Total Expenditure

GH171,851.57

Profit

Total Revenue less Total Expenditure

Profit

GH290,706.94

Some challenges that confronted the Service in her pursuance of agriculture during the year included; irregular
rainfall pattern due to climate change, low level of mechanization, frequent breakdown of tractors and lack of
drying and storage facilities.

11

MANAGEMENT OF PRISONERS
PRISONER POPULATION
The average prisoner population for the year 2013 stood at 13,908 as against 13,487 in 2012, representing
an annual population increase of 3.1%.
The tab le below shows the yearly monthly population figures of prisoners from 2010 to 2013.
Table. 14
MONTH

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Average Daily
Population

AVERAGE MONTHLY DAILY POPULATION


2013
13,446
13,488
13,630
13,714
13,826
13,931
13,924
14,014
14,019
14,120
14,360
14,425

2012
13,567
13,557
13,396
13,421
13,407
13,397
13,451
13,470
13,504
13,546
13,525
13,501

2011
13,252
13,300
13,267
13,431
13,406
13,347
13,334
13,468
13,493
13,474
13,479
13,527

2010
13,601
13,795
13,424
13,469
13,495
13,567
13,534
13,575
13,501
13,414
13,327
13,384

13,908

13,487

13,396

13,507

CONVICT POPULATION
The average daily convict population for the reporting year was 10,886.This represents an annual
convict
population growth rate of 2.7% .Of the figure, 10,725 representing 98.2% were male convicts while
191
representing 1.8% were female convicts. The female to male convicts ratio for the year was 1:53
Tables 15,16 and 17 show the statistical distribution of the convict population.

12

Table 15
TOTAL CONVICT
POPULATION
AVERAGE MONTHLY
DAILY

MONTH
JANUARY

10,450

FEBRUARY

10,531

MARCH

10,638

APRIL

10,766

MAY

10,844

JUNE

10,895

JULY

10,897

AUGUST

11,014

SEPTEMBER

11,072

OCTOBER

11,115

NOVEMBER

11,201

DECEMBER

11,207

Average Daily Convict Lock


-up
10,886

Table 16
MALE CONVICT POPULATION

MONTH

JANUARY
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER

MONTHLY
DAILY
AVERAGE
POPULATION
10,283
10,354
10,471
10,598
10,681
10,738
10,749
10,868
10,918
10,960
11,039
11,043

Average Daily Male Convicts Population


- 10,725

Table 17
FEMALE CONVICT POPULATION

MONTH

JANUARY
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER

MONTHLY DAILY
AVERAGE
POPULATION
168
168
167
169
163
157
148
147
154
155
162
163

Average Daily Female Convict Population


159.9

13

REMAND POPULATION
The average daily remand population for 2013 was 3,023. This represents an annual remand reduction rate of 0.1%. Of the
total remand figure 2,966 representing 98.1% were male remands while 57 representing 1.9% were female remands.
Tables 18, 19 & 20 show the statistical distribution of rem and population for the year.

Table 18
MONTH

AVERAGE MONTHLY
DAILY

JANUARY
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER

2,995
2,967
2,992
2,948
2,982
3,036
3,027
3,000
2,947
3,005
3,158
3,218

Average Daily Remand Lock-up


Table 19
MALE REMAND POPULATION

MONTH

JANUARY
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER

MONTHLY
DAILY
AVERAGE
POPULATION
2,928
2,899
2,921
2,878
2,920
2,975
2,964
3,006
2,892
2,950
3,103
3,158

Average Daily Male Remand Population


- 2,966

3,023
Table 20
FEMALE REMAND POPULATION

MONTH

JANUARY
FEBRUARY
MARCH
APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER

MONTHLY
DAILY
AVERAGE
POPULATION
68
68
71
70
62
61
63
61
55
55
55
60

Average Daily Female Remand Population


- 57

14

Juvenile Population
On the average the Senior Correctional Centre held 98 juveniles daily.
The table below shows the monthly population figures of juveniles.
Table 21
MONTH

AVERAGE MONTHLY
DAILY
LOCK -UP

JANUARY

120

FEBRUARY

99

MARCH

98

APRIL

97

MAY

97

JUNE

93

JULY

93

AUGUST

94

SEPTEMBER

95

OCTOBER

96

NOVEMBER

99

DECEMBER

97

Average Daily Lock


-up

98.

PRISONERS ADMITTED
19,800 prisoners were admitted into lawful custody during the year . This represents an annual admission
increase rate of 6.5%. 7,022 of the prisoners admitted were convicts while 12,778 were remand prisoners.
The recidivism rate for the reviewing year was 4.5%

Table 22
MALE - FEMALE ADMISSION
CATEGORY
Male
Female

NUMBER
19,144
656

Total

19,800

The female to male admission ratio was 1:29

15

Table 23
CONVICTS
CATEGORY
Male
Female

NUMBER
6,847
175

Total

7,022

The female to male convict admission ratio was 1:39


Table 24
REMAND
CATEGORY
Male

NUMBER
12,297

Female

481

Total

12,778

The female to male remand admission ratio was 1: 25

Categorizat ion of Convicts Admitted


The table below shows the statistics of three/3 categories of convicts admitted during year under review.
Table 25
CATEGORY
First Offenders
Second Offenders

NUMBER
5,733
971

Recidivists

318

Total

7,022

Fig. 2
Recidivists,
318
Second
Offenders,
971

Pie Chart Of Category of


Convicts

First
Offenders,
5,733

16

First Offenders -

Those who have been admitted into prison for the first time.

Second Offenders - Those with one previous conviction and have been
admitted into prison for the second time.
Recidivists -

Prisoners with more than two/2 previous convictions.

Age Distribution of Convict Prisoners Admitted


The age distribution of the convicts admitted during the reporting year is shown in the table below.
The mean age is 29.7years.
Table 26
AGE
RANGE
12 - 17
18 - 25
26 - 35
36 - 45
46 - 50
51-60
61-70
71+
TOTAL

CUMULATIVE

FREQUENCY

59
3,228
5,402
6,403
6,773
6,914
7,022
7,022

59
3169
2174
1001
370
141
108
0

0.84%
45.13%
30.96
14.26
5.27
2.01
1.54
0

7022

100.00%

Fig. 3

Cumulative Frequency Curve Of Ages of Prisoners


8000
C 7000
u 6000
m 5000
4000
F
3000
r
e 2000
q 1000
0

Age Range of Prisoners

17

Offences Committed by Prisoners Admitted

The table below shows the detailed regional distribution of the offences committed by prisoners.
Stealing continue d to be the major cause of imprisonment.

ASHANTI REGION

VOLTA REGION

B/AHAFO REGION

NORTHERN REGION

TOTAL

PERCENT

25
2
11
90
163
1034

4
3
28
277
344

1
2
2
24
13
365

2
4
58
62
644

6
7
38
6
249

1
3
10
110
54
194

5
2
1
107

1
3
2
72

6
10
82

45
24
26
375
579
3124

0.59%
0.3%
0.34%
4.9%
8%
40.8%

3
2
1

220
43
2
171
62
208

20
23
21
26
20
12

25
21
73
24
17

31
34
36
103
69
91

25
10
12
8
27
2

66
14
19
24
17
22

11
9
4
2

1
3
3
6
10
3

3
4
14
5
2
-

391
152
121
425
237
358

5.1%
2.0%
1.58%
5.55%
3.09%
4.67%

5
12

1
35
81

3
47
78

103
90

37
133

2
12
5

2
21
34

12
8

26
9

27
-

8
325
450

0.10%
4.24%
5.88%

2
134

5
19

2
12

10
51

1
-

25
2

2
1

1
-

48
219

0.63%
2.86%

10

0.13%

15

10

32

0.42%

14

12

49

0.64%

15

0.20%

10

10

21

54

0.71%

1
2

11
1

2
-

0
0

2
-

16
4

0.21%
0.05%

U/WEST REGION

WESTERN REGION

12
1
33

U/EAST REGION

CENTRAL REGION

MURDER
MANSLAUGHTER
RAPE
DEFILEMENT
ROBBERY
STEALING
POSS. NARCOTIC
DRUGS
THREAT OF DEATH
CAUSING DAMAGE
CAUSING HARM
ASSAULT
FRAUD
CONTEMPT OF
COURT
CONSPIRACY
UNLAWFUL ENTRY
DISHONESTLY
RECEIVING
DRIVING OFFENCES
POSS. OF STOLEN
PROPERTY
DEFRAUDING BY
FALSE PRETENCE
ABETMENT OF
CRIME
POSS. OF OFFEN.
WEAPON
ESCAPING FROM
CUSTODY
INDECENT
ASSAULT
RESISTING ARREST

EASTERN REGION

OFFENCES/REGIONS

GT ACCRA

Table 27

18

BEING ON
PREMISES FOR
UNLAW
INCEST
HUMAN
TRAFFICKING
UNLAWFUL
DAMAGE
DEFRAUDING
FRAUDULENT
BREACH OF TRUST
OTHERS
TOTAL

2
5

4
1

0
1

6
7

0.08%
0.09%

0.05%

15
14

23

1
27

1
-

17
67

0.22%
0.87%

2
45

121

20
44

170

1
28

12

12

23
448

0.30%
5.85%

469

661

177

161

168

7659

100.0%

70 2384 1125 875 1569

PERCENTAGE
5.2

19

5.8

30

9.1

14

4.2

14

4.2

330

100

73

13

13

11

CENTRAL

WESTERN

ASHANTI

BRONGAHAFO

VOLTA

14

UPPEREAST

NORTHERN

TOTAL

93

43

112

23

18

13

THAI

17

GUINEAN

55

10

CHINESE

17

EASTERN

REGION/COUNTRY

GABONESE

INDIAN

MOROCCAN

KENYAN

6.4

IVORIAN

21

LIBERIAN

MALIAN

CAMEROUNIA N

5.4

BENINOIR

18

NIGERIEN

NIGERIAN

59.7

BURKINABE

197

TOGOLESE

TOTAL

Foreigners Admitted
A total of 330 foreigners were admitted during the reporting year.
The table below shows the regional distribution of foreigners admitted.
Table 28

19

Pregnant Women, Nursing Mothers and Babies Admitted


The table below shows the distribution of pregnant women, nursing mothers and babies admitted
during the reviewing year.
Table 29
STATION
Kumasi Female

PREGNANT
WOMEN
1

NURSING
MOTHERS
1

BABIES
1

Ho Female

Sunyani Female

Tamale Female

Total

Fig 4

Prison & the Number of Pregnant Women, Nursing Mothers &


Babies
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y

2
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.2
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0

Pregnant
Women
Nursing
Mothers
Babies

Prison

20

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND OF PRISONERS ADMITTED


The table below shows the educational background of convict prisoners admitted
Table 30

S/NO.

LEVEL OF
EDUCATION

NUMBER

1 Degree

PERCENTAGE

181

2.6

24

0.3

3 Secondary

1076

15.3

4 Technical

112

1.6

5 Vocational

18

0.3

6 Commercial

11

0.2

3305

47

969

13.8

1326

18.9

7022

100

2 HND/Diploma

7 JSS
8 Primary
9 Illiterates
TOTAL

Fig 5

A Chart of Inmates & Level of Education


Tertiary
Illiterates

Seconday

HND/Diploma

Commercial
Vocational

Technical

Primary

JSS

21

RELIGIOUS BACKGROUND OF PRISONERS ADMITTED


The ta ble below shows the religious denomination s of convict prisoners admitted
Table 31
TYPE OF RELIGION
Christianity
Islamic
Pagan
Traditional

NUMBER
4377
1592
826
227

PERCENT
62.3
22.7
11.8
3.2

Total

7022

100

Fig 6

A chart of Religious Denomination of


Inmates
Christianity
Total

Islamic

Traditional

Pagan

DISCHARGES
A total of 6 ,049 convict prisoners were discharged during the reviewing year under the conditions stated
in the table below
Table 32
TYPES OF DISCHARGE
1/3 Remission
Fine Paid
Bailout
Court Order
Expiration of warrant
Amnesty

NUMBER
4804
591
73
294
164
123

PERCENT
79.42
9.77
1.21
4.86
2.71
2.03

Total

6049

100
22

Fig 7

Pie Chart of Types of Discharge


Expiration of
warrant

Court Order

Amnesty

Bailout
Fine Paid

1/3 Remission

WASTAGE
Causes Of Death Of Prisoners
During the reporting year, 86 prisoners died. This figure shows a decrease of 1.2 % over the previous year.
The death rate for the year

was 0.6%

Table 33
NO.
1
2

DISEASE
HIV/AIDS
Malaria

FREQUENCY

14

16.3

3.5

Pulmonary Tuberclosis

12

14

Anaemia

15

17.4

Ascities
Cerebro Vascular
Accident

4.7

Cardiac Arrest

9.3

Hepatitis

2.3

23

Gestroenteritis

10
11

Meningitis
Pneumonia

3
4

3.5
4.7

12
13

Septic Shock
Septiceamia

2
6

2.3
7

14

15

Hypertension
Respiratory Heart
Failure

5.8

16

Typhoid

1.2

17
Total

Others

7
86

8.1
100

Fig 8

Bar Chart of inmates & Cause of Death


15
I
N
n
o
m
.
a
t
o
e
f
s

10
5
0

Disease

The table below shows the prison by prison distribution of death


Table 34
NO

PRISON

1
2
3
4

Nsawam 'M'
Nsawam 'F'
Koforidua
Ankaful 'M'

NO. OF
DEATHS
21
1
2
4

%
24.4
1.2
2.3
4.7

24

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

Ankaful 'A'
C.D.P
Ankaful Max
Sekondi 'M'
Hiawa
Ekuasi
Tarkwa
Kumasi 'M'
Obuasi
Kenyasi Camp
HO "M'
Sunyani 'C'
Kpando
Yeji Camp
Ahinsan
Gambaga
Tamale "M'
James Camp

2
3
1
9
2
1
2
12
4
1
2
5
1
1
1
1
6
3

23

Winneba Local

2.3
3.5
1.2
10.4
2.3
1.2
2.3
13.9
4.7
1.2
2.3
5.7
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
6.9
3.5
1.2

86

100

Total

Fig 9
25
N
o
.
o
f

I
n
m
a
t
e
s

Bar Chart of Prisons & Number of Deaths

20
15
10
5
0

Disease

25

Regional Distribution of Deaths


The table below shows the regional distribution of deaths.
Table 35

REGION

NO. OF
INMATES

Greater Accra

3.5

Northern

8.1

Western

14

16.3

Central

11

12.8

Eastern

24

27.9

Volta

3.5

Brong Ahafo

8.1

Ashanti

17

17.8

U/East
U/West

0
0

0
0

Total

86

100

Fig 10

Bar Chart of Region & Number of Deaths


N 25
o
. 20
o 15
f
10
D
e 5
a
t 0
h
s
Region
26

ESCAPES
During the year, 33 prisoners escaped from law ful custody. Eleven/11 of the
escapees were however recaptured. The escape rate for the year was 0.2%.
Table 36
REGION

TYPE OF

Greater Accra
Eastern
Central
Western
Brong Ahafo
Ashanti
Volta
Northern
U/East
U/West

INTERNAL
1
5
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

Total
Escape rate is 0.2%

ESCAPE

TOTAL

EXTERNAL
0
1
2
2
2
8
3
8
0
0

1
6
2
2
3
8
3
8
0
0

3
18.2
6.1
6.1
9.1
24.2
9.1
24.2
0
0

26

33

100

Recapture rate is 42%


Fig 11

Region & Number of Escapes


N 8
o 7
6
o 5
f
4
3
I
n 2
m 1
a 0
t
e
s

Internal
External

Region
27

Station by Station Distribution of

Escapes

Table 37

STATION

James Camp
Akuse Local
Nsawam Med.
Forifori Camp
Osamkrom
Camp
Awutu Camp
Ekuasi Camp
Kumasi
Central
Obuasi Local
Amanfrom
Camp
Kpando Local
Kenyasi Sett.
Tamale
Central
Yendi Local
Salaga Local
Gambaga
Local
Total

TYPE OF

ESCAPE

TOTAL

RECAPTURE

INTERNAL
1
0
0
5

EXTERNAL
0
1
2
0

1
1
2
5

1
0
1
4

0
0
0

1
1
2

1
1
2

0
0
0

0
0

1
2

1
2

0
0

0
0
1

3
3
2

3
3
3

0
3
0

0
0
0

2
1
4

2
1
4

0
0
2

26

33

11

28

Fig 12

Prison & Number of Escapes


N5
o
4
.
3
o
f 2

Internal
External

I 1
n
m0
a
t
e
s
Prison

SENIOR CORRECTIONAL CENTRE


Being the only juvenile facility of the Service, the centre had a total inmate population of One Hundred and
Seventeen (117) who were all first offenders. It is noteworthy that, during the period under review forty- five (45)
juveniles were admitted.
The statistics below indicates their demographics, offence s committed and the trend of their offending behaviour.

29

Age Distribution
Table 38
12-15
16-18
Total

15
30
45
Educational Background

Table 39
ILLITERATES
PRIMARY
JHS
SHS
TOTAL

6
22
16
1
45

Religious Background
Table 40
MOSLEMS
CHRISTIANS
PAGANS
TOTAL

7
30
8
45

Offences Committed
The table below indicates the offences committed:
Table 41
OFFENCE
STEALING
ROBBERY
UNLAWFUL ENTRY
CAUSING HARM
THREAT OF DEATH
POSSESSION OF FIRE ARMS
ATTEMPTED MURDER
MANSLAUGHTER
ATTEMPTED RAPE
ABETMENT
NARCOTIC
CAUSING DAMAGE
CONSPIRACY
INDECENT ASSAULT
INCEST
DEFILEMENT

NO. OF PERSON
33
1
12
3
5
2
12
30

FRAUD
OTHERS
TOTAL

1
5
74

Type of Offenders
Table 42
1ST OFFENDERS
2ND OFFENDERS
RECIDIVIST
TOTAL

45
NIL
NIL
45

Rehabilitation and Reformation Programmes:


Chaplaincy Activities
As usual, the Centre undertook a number of activities aimed at reforming inmates. These included moral education,
counselling, preaching and mentoring.

Educational Programmes
The educational programmes comprising the Non -Formal, Junior High and NVTI made steady progress . The
Centre recorded 100% pass in the 2013 BECE and all of them had placement in various Senior High School s and
Technical Institutes within the Greater Accra Region.
Additionally, the Centre presented thirty - one (31) inmates for the National Vocational and Technical Institute
(NVTI) Examination and is awaiting results.

Trade Training
During the year, the Centre ran the under-listed trade training programmes for the inmates. The details are as
follows:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

Auto Mechanics
Welding
Vulcanizing
Carpentry
Tailoring

10
7
3
6
8

31

vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.

General Electrical
Shoemaking
Blacksmithing
Ceramics
Draughtsmanship

10
3
4
7
4

After successfully completing the above listed trade training, the inmates are made to write the NVTI
Examination for certification.

Sports
By way of providing some recreation for the juvenile offenders, the Centre organised football matches, table
tennis, volleyball and other indoor games for its inmates. This was aimed at reducing boredom and to boost their
health.
Counselling
The Counselling Unit at the Centre organised counselling sessions for the inmates on regular basis. The main
activities were on case studies, group work and academic counselling. This was done in collaboration with the
Chaplaincy Unit.

RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS UNIT


The year under review has been very eventful as far as the Religious Affairs Units of the stations are concerned.
All the stations gained spiritually from the numerous religious activities undertaken. Churches, para-church and
faith-based organizations as well as groups professing the Islamic faith visited the prisons in turns to share the
word of God with both inmates and officers.
On the whole, not less than fifty -five (55) churches, thirty nine (3 9) Islamic ,Faith-based ,Non-Governmental
Organizations and eleven (11) spirit -led individuals were given permit during the year to do ministry with the
prisons. The activities of these religious groups complemented those of the eleven (11) chaplains, two (2) assistant
Chaplains and two (2) Imams in enhancing the reformation attempts of the Ghana Prisons Service.
and Prayers, Revivals And Thematic
Activities such as Padres Hour, Open Air Services, Crusades, Fasting
Topical Teachings were carried out. Other activities included teaching on Biblical character, inspirational
preaching, all -night prayers, carols nights as well as wedding s and burial services for officers.
The chaplains provided counselling services to traumatized inmates and disturbed officers to help them learn to
cope with life despite challenges. Officers who got married were taken through pre - marital counselling for them to
gain enough knowledge about the institution before they entered. Similarly, prisoners who went on discharge were
taken through pre -discharged counselling to prepare them for c ivil life after their long stay in prison.

32

Various churches, religious groups and kind - hearted individuals made donations of a myriad of items to the prisons.
The items included soap, detergents, drugs, footballs, bread, rice, sugar, biscuits, drinks, Bibles, hymn books, foot wears, used clothes and TV sets. Prominent among the donors were the Prison Ministry of Ghana, Royal House
Chapel, The Church of Pentecost, Ambariya Sunni Community, Osei Kusi Foundation, Hebron Prayer Camp and
Dr. Abdulai of Shekinah C linic, Tamale.

MUSIC
Both the Regimental and the Dance Bands (Masterpiece) comprised seventy - nine (79) men including two (2)
senior officers. During the reviewing year, they performed a total of One Hundred and Sixty (160) engagements.
The Regimental band performed eighty-nine (89) while the Masterpiece band performed seventy -one (71) with
non-commercial engagements such as passing -out parades and national events dominating the commercial ones.
During the period, the Commandant of the Prison Officers Training School (P.O.T.S) donated a set of brass
instruments to the Regimental Band while the Prisons Administration purchased a set of loud speakers to replace
the obsolete ones.
Three (3) Drum Majors were also sponsored to pursue an Advanced Course in Drum Majorship at the Ghana
Armed Forces Central Band to improve on their performance.

COMMERCIAL UNIT
During the reviewing year, the tailoring section of the Unit remained busy. They sewed 62pairs of trousers and
shirt s for a Security Company, 22p airs of trousers and tops for Centre for Skills Training and 65pairs of trousers
and tops for Judicial Service.
The Unit b randed key holders and openers
using the Service Logo for sale. The project on the manufacture of
2,000 Dual Desk, 300 Te achers tables and chairs and 30 office desk s for Omega School was ongoing.

COMMUNICATION UNIT
The Unit received 120 pieces of Gota Phones (Handset) from the Bureau of National Communications
(BNC) which they distributed them to the stations. It also managed to secure access to other networks on the Gota
for 65 officers to improve information flow.
In addition, t he unit managed to install 12 fax machines at various prisons across the country and carried out
maintenance works on various electronic gadgets including PABX equipment, Fax and Photocopier machines.

33

SPORTS UNIT
The Service registered and participated in the under listed disciplines during the year under review.
Handball (Men/Women)
Volleyball (Men/Women)
Hockey (Men/Women)
Basketball (Men/Women)
Boxing
Tae-Kwon-Do
Athletics (Men/Women)
Football (Men/Women)
Table Tennis (Men/Women)
Tug-Of-War (Men/Women)
Six boxers out of seven won Gold medals while the other won silver in the boxing discipline. At the end of the
tournament, No. 10292, 2CO Sulemana Tetteh was adjudged the best boxer of the year as a result of his
magnificent performance exhibited throughout the games.
In basket ball,the female team placed second while the male placed t hird.
The football team placed second in the Northern sector after the end of the season with the ladies placing third after
both the Northern and Southern sector results were merged.
The teams performed remarkably well in the remaining disciplines.
Sporting activities were also organized for inmates at the various prisons to keep them fit. The common ones
included football, volley ball, athletics, playing cards and draught.

PUBLIC RELATIONS
The Public Relations (PR) Unit was able to achieve its set objectives in the year under review. It worked tirelessly
in carrying out its primary function of establishing, maintaining and sustaining the Services relationship with other
organisations. It se ized profile-raising opportunities to raise public awareness on the daily operations of the Service
through various media platforms. It also shared the Services successes and challenges with the public.
The PR Unit also maintained existing relationships with various stakeholder groups such as the Ministry of Interior,
National Security Secretariat, State Protocol Department , Security agencies, Embassies, the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, using ethical public rela tions practices.

Visits and Events


The Service hosted important dignitaries such as Professor Wani Eluzai Ladu of the National Prisons Service in
South Sudan as well as visits from Madam Agnetta Jo hnson and Christer Isaksson of Swedish Corrections and
Probation Services.

34

The year also saw the induction of Madam Matilda Baffour -Awuah into office as first female Director-General of
the Ghana Prisons Service.
A mosque was inaugurated at Ankaful Main Camp Prison by the Director-General of Prisons, Madam Matilda
Baffour-Awuah.
The Director-General paid a courtesy call on the Asantehene Otumfuor O sei Tutu II at the Manhyia Palace.
The Director General of Prisons and the Directors responsible for the various regions paid working visits to their
respective priso ns during the period.
The Parliamentary Select Committee on Defense and Interior, led by Hon. George Kofi Arthur, paid a working
visit to the Tamale Female Prison.
Hon. Freda Prempeh, Member of Parliament for Tano North, went on a familiarization tour at the Duayaw
Nkwanta Camp Prison.

The Volta Regional Minister, Hon. Joseph Nii Laryea Afotey - Agbo, and the Member of Parliament for Ho Central
paid a working visit to the Ho Central Prison.
Mr. Issahaku Abdul Gafaru, the Municipal Director of CHRAJ paid a working visit to the Navrongo Central
Prison.

Mrs. Rebecca Amefa of UN HCR paid an official visit to the Sekondi Central Prison. Also, officials from the
British High Commission: Mr. Juan Meuder, Stephavia Selg, Sonia Crouin, Duarte Viera and Rucdo Dosiva paid a
working visit to the prison.
Two officials from the British High Commission , Mr. Charanpreet Walia, Head of Migration Policy for West
Africa, and Mr. Roger Coventry, visited the Sekondi Female Prison.
The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture, Mr. Juan Mendez visited some selected prisons in Ghana.
The Ankaful Maximum Security Prison specifically received the following visit ors : Mr. Roger Coventry and
Charanpreet Walia from the British High Commission; Dr. Sam T. Kwashie of the Ghana Health Services
Directorate, Cape Coast; DOP Cristksson Sweden from the Kofi Annan Peace Keeping Centre; Madam Ellis
Nortey Dowuona from the Ghana AIDS Commission; Mr. David N. Aneere of the Public Service Commission;
Cecilia Arthur and Godfred Nyarko fr om the Dept. of Social Welfare; Henry Afrifa and Tony Amechie from the
British High Commission, Accra; and the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Juan Mendez accompanied by Sonoc
Cronir ,Stephen Selg Duante and Vieirar Ricardo Freitas.

DONATIONS
During the year under review, the following donations were received from organizations and individuals at the
various prisons in the country:

35

The Ghana Football Association donated an amount of GHC 3,800.00 to the Prisons Sports Unit at Headquarters as
their contribu tion towards the years Football League.
The Volunteer Chaplains Association refurbished a Computer Laboratory at the cost of GHC 9,500.00 at the
Senior Correctional Centre. GUFC also donated ten computers and accessories valued at GHC15, 000.00 to the
Centre. Mr and Mrs. Enin of the Holy Ghost Temple of the International Central Gospel Church, Frafraha branch,
sponsored the drilling of a mechanized borehole at the cost of GHC14,000.00 also at the Centre.
GIFEC donated ten computers, and Volunteer Chaplains Association refurbished a computer Centre at the James
Camp Prison.
The Volta Regional Minister, Hon . Joseph Nii Laryea Afotey -Agbo donated a n amount of GHC400.00, seven
bags of 25kg rice, and a bull to the Ho Central Prison. Also, the Member of Parliament for Ho Central, Hon.
Benjamin Kpodo, donated ten bags of 25kg rice, frytol oil and a quantity of tin ned fish to the prison.
Mrs. Theresa Sarpey, a woman who has adopted 25 (twenty -five) inmates since 2004 at the Sekondi Central
Prison, donated food items and toiletries to the inmates at the end of every month. The Lower Pra Ladies
Association also donated various items to the inmates.
A Muslim , solely financed the building of a Mosque in the yard of the Navrongo Central Prison.
The Service received donations from various stakeholders and partners such as the Ministry of Women and
Childrens Affairs, SIC Life Company Limited, Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission in Ghana and Amen scientific and
Herbal Clinic.
Also, various religious bodies donated food items and toiletries to the inmates of the prisons countrywide.

36

Prisons Headquarters
P. O. Box 129, Accra - Ghana
Tel: 0302 777 057 / 760 093-4 / 777 830
Fax: 0302 772 865

Annual Report 2013