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Announcing

the 2016

REPUBLICAN
CANDIDATES
DISTRICT 34

LEADERSHIP

YOUR 2016 TEAM

JEFF PARTRIDGE
7174 Prestwick Rd.
Rapid City, SD 57702

605-301-4803

jp4district34@gmail.com
www.jeffpartridge.org

CRAIG TIESZEN
3416 Brookside Dr.
Rapid City, SD 57702

605-348-4990

DAN DRYDEN

2902 Tomahawk Dr.


Rapid City, SD 57702

In a few weeks it will again be election season for state


legislators. All the current District 34 legislators will
again be candidates. However, since Senator Tieszen is
term limited in the senate there will be some changes.
Senator Craig Tieszen will be a candidate for the House
of Representatives along with current House member,
Representative Dan Dryden, who will seek re-election. Representative Jeff
Partridge will be a candidate for the Senate. We ask for, and look forward to, your
continued support.

Tieszen and Dryden


will run for the
House in 2016 and
Partridge will run
for the Senate.

605-721-2902

What it takes to be a good legislator?

Listen, Learn, Lead

STATE MONITORS THE PUBLIC


SAFETY IMPROVEMENT ACT
Senator Craig Tieszen > Chair of Senate Judiciary Committee

In 2012, Governor Daugaard convened a work group to study South Dakotas criminal
justice system. South Dakotas high incarceration rates combined with high recidivism
rates were crowding our states prisons. In fact, an expansion of our womens prison was anticipated in a few, short years. As
Governor Daugaard put it, we needed to see if there is a better way to continue to provide public safety, hold offenders accountable
and still slow the growth of the prison population. As a former police chief, it was not a surprise when I was asked to participate in
the work group.
After many months of work, the work group reported its findings and Governor Daugaard proposed Senate Bill 70 to the 2013
legislature. The bill was overwhelmingly passed and became law on July 1, 2013. The bill resulted in some extensive and complex
reforms of our criminal justice system. The changes put more emphasis on holding offenders accountable, maintaining close
supervision, addressing addiction and mental health issues and, when possible, keeping offenders out of prison. Using resources
to continue to expand the prison system were instead redirected to these up front services.
The changes in SB 70 were fundamental to our criminal justice system and required significant adjustments from those who work
in and for the system. Since passage, we have anxiously been watching the results. Trends, such as recidivism, take some time to
develop. To monitor the progress, the Public Safety Improvement Act Oversight Committee was formed and I have been appointed
to that group.
There is some good news to report. Most importantly, the prison population has leveled off and we have no immediate urgency to
build a new prison. The programs we instituted seem to be working well. The corrections system is using evidence based practices
which are producing better results. Recidivism is trending downward. Programs like drug court and DUI court are turning felons
into responsible, job holding, tax paying citizens once they can control their addictions. Unfortunately, there are still plenty of
criminals and we still have plenty of them in prison but it appears we are achieving positive results from the reforms. I look forward
to continuing my work on the oversight committee.

BLUE RIBBON TASK FORCE STUDIES EDUCATION FUNDING


As I prepare for my eighth legislative session, one of my most important responsibilities has been serving on the Blue Ribbon Task
Force. The task force has been studying education funding since the end of the last session and is making a recommendation to
the governor regarding our findings. It is the most comprehensive study on this subject in at least 20 years. In the process, we
have looked at a lot of data and listened to citizens across the state. We have also done some myth-busting by showing that
some commonly held ideas simply are not true. It has been a very educational process for all 26 members of the task force as
well as hundreds of interested parties that have followed our work. All the research of the task force can be found on the states
Department of Education website. Some of the general conclusions of the task force are:
Teachers in South Dakota are underpaid. In comparison to other states, we are, and have been for a long time, ranked 50th. In
comparison to surrounding states, we are at least $8,000 behind the average. The result is an ever increasing drain of teachers out
of state and increasing difficulty in recruiting and keeping teachers in the profession. Pay is not the only issue with teachers. We
need to look for ways to promote the path to a teaching profession and provide training and support for our current teachers.
Numerous inefficiencies and inequities in the current funding formula that need to be addressed. While maintaining the delicate
balance with local control, the state needs to promote and reward efficient use of tax dollars. The state currently provides and
supports technology in the schools thus saving many tax dollars for individual districts. If that model can be replicated in other
areas everyone would benefit.
The bottom line is all of this will cost money-significant money. Do the math. A $1000 increase in average teacher pay will cost about
$10 million. And, this will be an ongoing expense so we will need a source of revenue that is available into the future. The details
of the funding source are yet to be worked out. Your input and ideas on this subject would be greatly appreciated. I appreciate the
fact that the governor and the legislature have been willing to seriously study this issue and feel honored to have been part of the
discussion. - Senator Craig Tieszen

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY
BY COLLECTING DEBT
Representative Jeff Partridge

Most South Dakotans understand the need to live within a budget. At the State level,
we have now balanced our budget for 126 years and we live within our means as you do.
However, what if nearly 10% of your annual budget was owed to youevery year? Would you simply hope that the money is sent
in or would you implement a professional process to collect that debt?
In South Dakota, we have passed House Bill 1228 to establish a center to collect the debt owed to the State. As your district 34
House Representative, I served on an Advisory Board, which began right after session and continues today. There are three main
areas of focus that I have for an Obligation Recovery Center.
A functional center that does not grow the government. We are going to rely on an outside company to receive a fee to
set up the center, the process and the behavioral psychology behind professional debt collection. My goal was that we did
not increase the size of government.
Citizens are treated fairly. I have no intention of helping increase the scope of the government. If we all paid our debts
there would be no reason for this center, however, there is a need to put a fair, timely process in place.
Engaging private business is a goal of mine. Today, not a single debt collecting company in South Dakota helps our state
collect its debts. We rely on an out of state company to collect very old debt. I have pushed for this and will continue to try
and get local expertise involved in this process.
Your Republican leadership team from District 34 is focused on carry this bill through to make sure that these 3 things are paramount
in the implementation process.

Hello, my name is Dan Dryden and I am serving my third term in the South Dakota
House of Representatives for District 34. It has been an honor to serve District 34. I will
run for a fourth and final term in 2016.
I have served on the Appropriations committee all three terms and as House Vice Chair
for the Appropriations committee this third term.
The appropriation process is very interesting and time consuming. The Governor has to
present a balanced budget to the Legislature in December for the following fiscal year.
The House and Senate Appropriation committees meet as a joint committee for the agency budget hearings. However, the two
committees meet separately to consider legislation introduced in their respective chamber.
The Joint Appropriations committee of the House and Senate uses the Governors budget as a starting point for discussion. The Joint
Appropriations committee holds hearings on every state government agency that has a budget request included in the Governors
budget. In addition, the House and Senate establishes their priorities to also include in the final budget adopted by the legislature.
Also there is a subcommittee of the Joint Appropriations committee that works with the Legislative Research Council and the
Bureau of Finance and Management to forecast the revenue available to fund the expenditure budget. Representative Partridge
and I have worked over the summer to finalize last years budget and prepare for the upcoming session.
At this point in the process it is a matter of give and take between the House, Senate and Executive branch to arrive at the final
budget presented to and adopted by the full House and Senate.

Paid for by District 34 Campaign

PARTRIDGE - TIESZEN - DRYDEN


STANDARD
US POSTAGE
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PERMIT#618
RAPID CITY, SD

123 4 MAIN STREET | RAPID CITY, SD 57702

YOUR REPUBLICAN TEAM

District

34

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Annou201n6cing
the

REPUBLICAN
CANDIDATES
Representatives use an electronic voting machine to cast their votes in the House
Chambers, but the Senators still rely on the Secretary of the Senate to call the roll for
each vote. You are welcome to attend any part of the legislative session.
Please let us know if you are going to be there and we will make a point to see you!
IT TAKES ONLY A SIMPLE MAJORITY OF THE MEMBERS OF
EACH HOUSE TO PASS THE BILL THAT FUNDS ALL OF
STATE GOVERNMENT, BUT IT TAKES A 2/3RDS OF THE MEMBERS

ALL THREE OF YOUR LEGISLATIVE TEAM HAVE LOCAL GOVERNMENT EXPERIENCE:


Dan Dryden Rapid City School District
Jeff Partridge City Council
Craig Tieszen Rapid City Police Department