You are on page 1of 52

The Macedonian And Punic Wars

Contents & Introduction………………………………… ……….……2 ...

Timeline…………………………………………………….… ……… 4

..

...

Carthaginian 275 - 146BC ………… ……… …………….…………6

..

...

Gallic 400 - 25BC ………………….……… …………….……….….12 ...

Hellenistic Greek 250 - 50BC……………………………….…………18

Macedonian Successor 320 - 148BC…………………….….……….24

Numidian 300 – 25BC………………………………………………….30

Roman 275 - 105BC………………………………………………… 36 ...

Spanish 200 - 20BC……………………………………………………42

Campaign Map………………………………………………………….48

Mercenaries…………………………………………………………… 50 ..

2
2

Introduction

This is the first supplement for the Crusader rules. It covers the Macedonian and Punic wars with

seven major army lists and a separate list for the mercenaries that may be chosen by various

nations.

  • I have not tried to give a comprehensive history of this period or any specific campaigns or battles

– there are other supplements and books available that can do that far better than myself. What

  • I have tried to do is cover some basic facts, some of the more important but not often mentioned

information, and hopefully some of the events of the period that might inspire a few battles or

campaigns.

The main point about this supplement is the army lists so I’ll briefly explain how they are set out.

Each army needs a general. A leader costs 100 points and his abilities are rolled for randomly

from the table on page 47 of the rules.

An army should generally only have one leader unless

there is a big battle, an obvious ‘split’ to the army, or as part of a pre-generated scenario.

Should you want to work out the points for a pre-designed leader: simply add all of his bonuses for

Morale, Combat, and T&L; and then multiply by 25 to get his actual points cost.

Each army will have a list of available troop types, the points per stand for those troops as listed,

and then optional upgrades that will increase – or in a few rare cases decrease – the amount of

points that each stand will cost. To get the cost of a unit simply multiply the stand cost by the

number of stands in the unit – there are no extra costs involved for command stands within a unit.

The Notes for each army will usually list restrictions on how many of a troop type you have, the

maximum number of units or a relative number of certain morale classes of stands – for example,

not being able to have more veteran stands than non veteran.

Each army will have an allies, mercenaries and restrictions section. This will tell you which

mercenary units you may hire and which other army lists you may include allies from. The

restrictions section tells you what % of the points value of the army must be spent on certain

troop types, or restrictions on the maximum % that may be spent. This is usually as a limit to the

amount of cavalry that you may have, and there is always a limit to the amount of points that you

may spend on allies and mercenaries.

As a final note, I would say that it is impossible for me to restrict army choices too much and yet

still make these lists flexible enough to cover two centuries of warfare. With that in mind, I would

urge you not to simply make up super armies – I’m sure there are enough loopholes to allow you

to do so. A little bit of research and common sense will see a balanced army that you can field

against any opponent.

As always, comments, suggestions and corrections are more than welcome.

Regards

Mark Sims

March 2008

3
3

Macedonian & Punic Wars Timeline

256BC – Expeditionary force under Regulus lands in Africa.

255BC – Battle of Bagradas -- Regulus is defeated and his force destroyed by Carthaginian army under Xanthippus. Roman fleet wrecked in storm – bad year for the Romans then.

This is not meant as a comprehensive timeline, but rather as a guide to some of the important events of this period, so that you have some context with which to read the various army lists information.

I have started with the final subjugation of southern Italy and it concludes with the Jugurthine war and the end of Numidia as a separate nation. Of all of the lists in this book this only leaves the Gauls to fight on into the next century.

Macedonian & Punic Wars Timeline 256BC – Expeditionary force under Regulus lands in Africa. 255BC –

249BC – Carthaginian naval victory against Rome at Drepana.

247BC – Hamilcar Barca begins an offensive in Sicily.

241BC – Rematch at Drepana -- Carthage loses this one and peace is declared. Carthage loses all influence in Sicily, which becomes a Roman province.

240BC – Carthaginian mercenary revolt.

238BC – Rome annexes Sardinia and Corsica.

237BC – Hamilcar Barca begins his conquest of large areas of Spain.

236BC – Gallic raids in northern Italy.

229BC – Start of First Illyrian War.

228BC – Death of Hamilcar Barca in Spain – his son Hasdrubal succeeds him. End of First Illyrian War.

226BC – Treaty of the Ebro between Rome and Carthage defining the River Ebro as the northernmost border for Carthaginian influence in Spain. Major Gallic invasion of northern Italy.

280 BC - Tarentum appeals to Pyrrhus of Epirus who lands at Tarentum with 25,000 troops and 20 elephants. Battle of Heraclea – Pyrrhus defeats Rome.

279BC – Battle of Asculum -- Pyrrhus defeats Rome. Thermopylae and Delphi -- Galatian tribes invade Greece.

278BC – Rome and Carthage sign treaty – Pyrrhus leaves Italy for Sicily.

275BC – Battle of Beneventum – end of Pyrrhus’s Italian campaign.

264BC – Start of First Punic war. Romans form an alliance with the Mamertines. A Roman army lands in Sicily.

263BC – Hiero of Syracuse becomes Roman ally.

262BC – Agrigentum besieged and captured by Rome.

260BC – New Roman fleet defeats the Carthaginians at Mylae.

4
4

225BC – Battle of Telamon, invading Gauls defeated by Rome.

222BC - Battle of Sellasia -- Macedon vs. Sparta. Battle of Clastidium -- Rome defeats Gauls.

221BC – Hannibal succeeds his father Hasdrubal in Spain. Saguntum appeals to Rome for help.

220BC – Rome conquers and creates province of Cisalpine Gaul.

Macedonian & Punic Wars Timeline 256BC – Expeditionary force under Regulus lands in Africa. 255BC –

219BC – Saguntum captured by Hannibal. Second Illyrian war ends in conquest of Illyria. Illyrian King Demetrius flees to Macedon.

154BC – Start of the Lusitanian War.

153BC – Start of the Second Celtiberian War.

218BC – Start of Second Punic War. Hannibal crosses the Alps – battles of Ticinus and Trebbia.

151BC – Carthage declares war on Numidia. End of the Second Celtiberian War

217BC – Battle of Lake Trasimene -- Carthaginian victory against Rome. Battle of Raphia -- Ptolemy vs. Macedon.

216BC – Battle of Cannae – Carthage defeats Rome. Hannibal begins to plunder countryside. Capua revolts against Rome.

213BC – Hannibal captures Tarentum.

214BC – Start of First Macedonian War.

211BC – Hannibal marches on Rome. Rome recaptures Capua. Rome enters an alliance with the Aetolian League against Macedon.

210BC – Scipio Africanus lands in Spain.

209BC – Rome recaptures Tarentum and captures New Carthage.

150BC – Fourth Macedonian War starts.

149BC – Start of the Third Punic War – Carthage besieged by Rome.

148BC – End of the Fourth Macedonian War with defeat of Macedon.

147BC - Macedon annexed as a Roman province.

146BC – Carthage destroyed, Africa becomes a Roman province. Achaean War -- Roman war against the league of Greek Cities – Corinth destroyed by the Romans.

143BC – Start of the Third Celtiberian War.

138BC – End of the Lusitanian War.

133BC – End of the Third Celtiberian War.

207BC – Rome defeats Carthage at battle of Metaurus River.

206BC – Battle of Ilipa – Rome defeats Carthage and effectively wins the Spanish campaign. Aetolians make a separate peace with Macedon.

135BC – Slave revolts in Sicily.

112BC – Start of the Jugurthine War.

106BC – End of the Jugurthine War.

205BC – First Macedonian War ends with neither side gaining any advantage.

204BC – Scipio invades Africa.

203BC – Battle of the Great Plains – Rome defeats Carthage. Battle of Cirta -- King Syphax of Numidia is defeated and captured.

202BC – Battle of Zama – Rome defeats Carthage, end of the second Punic War.

200BC – Start of the Second Macedonian War.

197BC – Rome defeats the army of King Philip of Macedon at Cynoscephalae. End of the Second Macedonian War.

181BC – Start of the First Celtiberian War in Spain.

179BC – End of the First Celtiberian War in Spain.

171BC – Start of the Third Macedonian War.

168BC – Rome defeats Macedon at battle of Pydna.

167BC – End of the Third Macedonian War. Macedon divided into four separate states, Epirus plundered.

5
5

Carthage 275 - 146 BC

The Phoenicians established themselves as dominant seafaring traders and set up trading

colonies along the Mediterranean coast as far as southern Spain. One of these colonies was

Carthage, which gradually became increasingly important over time, until the mid 5 th Century BC

when the Magonid dynasty was founded. Carthage became one of the dominant military powers

in the region over the next 100 years and conquered parts of the North African coast.

Carthage expanded its own trading colonies and also fought sporadic wars against the Greek city

states on Sicily, none of which seem to have gone particularly well and this eventually caused the

downfall of the Magonid dynasty. Carthage again came under the control of the Council of Elders,

the People’s Assembly, and the Tribunal of 104 who elected two ‘rulers’ – vaguely comparable to

the two Consuls of Rome.

Carthage 275 - 146 BC The Phoenicians established themselves as dominant seafaring traders and set up

Once again war was fought in Sicily. In 345BC a large scale campaign was launched to capture

the island, but yet again failed miserably. The Carthaginian armies suffered major defeats and the

Generals chose to either commit suicide or were condemned to death by the Tribunal of 104.

The war in Sicily continued with Syracuse making an alliance with the Etruscans; in return

Carthage found an ally of its own – Rome. The alliance of these two powers effectively put an end

to Greek influence in Sicily and Southern Italy. King Pyrrhus of Epirus campaigned in both areas

against Rome and Carthage, having some success but nothing that could be held onto.

6
6

After defeat in the First Punic War Carthage lost control of Sicily, and much of its African

possessions were ravaged by Regulus’s invasion in 256BC. With the end of the war Carthage

was left with large unpaid mercenary forces evacuated from Sicily and an empty treasury.

Carthage feared that the mercenaries would become a threat to the city itself. They were moved

to another town and offered a smaller sum than initially agreed – they decided not to take it and

mutinied instead. The oppressed Libyan peasants did what all oppressed peasants tend to do in

this kind of situation – they rose up in revolt, as did some of the Numidian tribes.

After defeat in the First Punic War Carthage lost control of Sicily, and much of its

The Mercenary War that followed was over in two years, both Rome and Syracuse offering

tacit support to Carthage by not intervening or supplying the rebel forces. However, when the

mercenary garrison of Sardinia offered to hand the island over to Rome, she certainly didn’t turn it

down. This almost precipitated another war between Carthage and Rome, but sensibly Carthage

backed down.

After the Second Punic War Carthage hung on as a minor power on the North African coast, but

many in Rome would not settle for anything less than its complete destruction. The opportunity

was given them by the Numidians whose raids on Carthaginian territory finally forced a

Carthaginian declaration of war. As Carthage was forbidden

by its peace treaty to declare war without Rome’s consent,

this led to the Third Punic War. Carthage offered peace and

gave into Rome’s demands until it was finally demanded that

the inhabitants must leave the city – which would be destroyed

– and that they could settle where they liked, so long as it was

at least 10 miles from the sea!

After a prolonged and bloody siege Carthage was captured

and destroyed, as were any cities that had remained loyal to

her. Her African possessions were then made into a Roman

province in 146BC.

7
7
Building a Carthaginian army “Spoilt for choice” sums up this army best, and you just need

Building a Carthaginian army

“Spoilt for choice” sums up this army best, and you just need to decide where you want to spend

your points. You have access to some good heavy Punic cavalry, decent infantry, as well as a

wide selection of mercenaries, allies and some elephants. The only problem is making all of these

diverse units fight together as a co-ordinated army.

Elephants are best employed in front of your troops or between units – don’t try to use these

as mobile anti-cavalry platforms – they are best used historically to try to break up and shake

the enemy battle line. With a bit of luck they will do this, but you’ll need to support them with

skirmishers and make sure your own troops are close enough to take advantage of the havoc they

cause -- and hopefully far enough away so that if an elephant stampedes, it isn’t right back onto

your own troops – tricky.

8
8

Your allied Numidians will be able to supply some

excellent light cavalry, and I would always want at

least one unit of these guys on my side. Send them

out wide and start to annoy and threaten the enemy

early on – between these and your elephants, you

should have the enemy reacting to you rather than

the other way around.

You have a lot of choice for infantry, so its up to you which style of army you prefer – smaller units

of tough troops or a mass of cheap bodies. If you have taken Gauls, then remember that they are

going to be impetuous and try not to get them behind anyone else – even elephants. Spanish are

good in rougher going, and Greeks will be able to stand toe to toe with most opponents – though

you may want to think twice about testing them against a Macedonian phalanx.

A fully tooled-up unit of Punic heavy cavalry is probably going to be a match for most other cavalry

in this period, but you’ll need to decide early on whether you plan to use these in your starting line

up or as a reserve. Add in some Spanish cavalry and you have a couple of hard hitting units, but

don’t get carried away with them – they will still die horribly against a good unit of steady infantry.

This army covers a very large time period and various major campaigns so it’s impossible to

restrict or limit every combination of troops – just don’t take the piss too much, and try to have

some historical context for your army if possible.

9
9

Carthage 275-146BC

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

"African" Infantry (4)

Levy

Poor

-

3

 
  • 2 4

 
  • 5 35

Light

 

Hand Weapons

Upgrades May beTrained (+10 pts), or Regular (+20 pts), May have T&L 6 (+ 2 pts), T&L 7 (+4pts), armour to med (+5pts)

If Regular T&L may be increased to 8 (+6pts), If Trained or Regular CS may be raised to average (+5pts)

 

Hannibals Veterans (1) (3)

Seasoned

Av

-

3

 
  • 2 4

 
  • 7 79

Medium

 

Hand Weapons,

Upgrades Thrown melee weapons (+4pts), to Veteran (+20pts, wounds to 4), may be Steadfast (+5pts)

 

T&L to 8 (+2 pts), T&L to 9 (+4pts), Combat skill to good (+5pts)

 

Early Citizen Spearmen (3)

Levy

Poor

-

3

 
  • 2 4

  • 5 Light

 

35

Hand Weapons

Upgrades Armor to medium (+5 pts), T&L to 6 (+2 pts), T&L to 7 (+4pts), may have Phalanx (+5pts)

 

Combat skill to average (+5pts), to Trained (+10pts), to Regular (+20pts)

 

One unit may be designated Sacred Band and upgraded to Seasoned and Steadfast (+35pts)

 

Late Citizen Spearmen (3)

Levy

Poor

-

3

 
  • 2 4

  • 5 Light

 

35

Hand Weapons

Upgrades To Trained (+10pts), T&L to 6 (+2 pts), May have thrown melee weapons (+4pts)

 

Elephants (2)

Regular

Good

-

5

 
  • 3 6

  • 6 Light

 

167

Elephant, Crew, Tower

Upgrades May have medium armor (+5 pts)

 

Punic Cavalry

Regular

Av

-

3

 
  • 2 8

  • 7 Light

 

78

Hand Weapons, Thrown Melee Weapons, Mounted

 

Upgrades Armor to medium (+5 pts), T&L to 8 (+2 pts), to Seasoned (+10pts)

 

If Seasoned then CS may be raised to good (+5pts)

 

Libyan Skirmishers

Levy

Poor

Poor

2

 
  • 1 6

  • 5 Light

 

35/2

Hand weapons, javelins, skirmishers

Upgrades to Trained (+10pts), T&L to 6 (+2pts), Missile skill to average (+5pts)

 

Bolt Throwers (5)

Trained

Poor

Av

3

 
  • 2 4

  • 7 Light

 

84

Bolt Thrower, Crewed weapon

Upgrades To Regular (+5 pts)

Notes

  • 1 A maximum of 1 unit may be upgraded to Veteran

  • 2 Only one elephant per 1000 points in the army

  • 3 May not have Early and Late Citizen Spearmen in the same army. May not combine Hannibals Veterans & Early Citizen Spearmen in the same army.

  • 4 No more than half of the African Infantry stands may be Regular

  • 5 No more than one per 1500 points in the army.

10
10

Allies, mercenaries and restrictions

Mercenaries - Balearic slingers, Cretan archers, Tarantine cavalry, Italian deserters, Greek Hoplites, Greek Thureophoroi Allies - Spanish, Numidian, Gallic

No more than 50% of the army points may be spent on allies and mercenaries No more than 35% of the army points may be spent on cavalry units

Allies, mercenaries and restrictions Mercenaries - Balearic slingers, Cretan archers, Tarantine cavalry, Italian deserters, Greek Hoplites,
11
11

Gallic 400 - 25BC

The Celtic expansions of the 5 th century BC went on to encompass a huge amount of the

European mainland – from Spain to Ireland and as far east as Galatia. These were not only

military campaigns, but also migrations of peoples that lived beside and integrated with the

former occupants of those lands. The ‘Celts’ themselves could best be described as an ethnic

group rather than a nation. This group is further broken up into various tribes and geographical

locations.

Celtic society was based on tribal groups made up of various clans and led by kings. Sometimes

these tribes may have allied for a common purpose, but it is as likely that they would be fighting

each other. Tribes frequently built fortifications that were military, political, and no doubt economic

centres as well.

This breaking up of the ‘nation’ into tribes is what allowed invaders to play off one

tribe against another, destroying one target before going onto the next. When a number of tribes

allied in a common cause the results could be devastating.

Gallic 400 - 25BC The Celtic expansions of the 5 century BC went on to encompass

In 226 there was a major invasion of northern Italy by Gallic tribes: the Boii, Ligones, Insubres,

Taurini and Gaesati. 50,000 infantry and 20,000 cavalry advanced into Etruria, ravaged the

countryside while avoiding major battle. As the Roman armies converged on them they tried to

head for home via the Etruscan coast, but were blocked and defeated at Telamon in 225BC. The

Romans pushed their advantage over the next five years and defeated the tribes of Cisalpine Gaul

until, in 220BC, it became a Roman province.

12
12

In 280BC the Celts invaded Macedon, Greece and Thrace. The Greek invasion was defeated

and the majority of the forces returned home; three tribes moved on to Asia Minor and became

the ‘Galatians’. They lasted just under 100 years, until in 189BC Rome reduced them to complete

submission as part of its continued expansion in the east.

In 280BC the Celts invaded Macedon, Greece and Thrace. The Greek invasion was defeated and the

Celtic tactics tended to involve the warriors

working themselves up into a battle frenzy,

lots of noise, and a ferocious headlong charge

‘rushing at their adversaries like wild beasts…’.

This in itself was sometimes enough to break

the enemy formation; but if not, their lack of any

other plan, reserve, or tactics made them very

vulnerable if ‘Plan A’ failed.

Cavalry are of a generally good quality for

the period, being recruited from nobles and

their retainers. The numbers would suggest

that these were not all ‘Noble’ cavalry (20,000

’nobles’ in an army 70,000 strong is a very

high Chief:Indian ratio). As such, the army list

differentiates between armoured nobles and

those less well equipped.

Chariots are mentioned as late as 225BC at the

battle of Telamon, but skirmish tactics are the

norm – charging in against formed troops only

seems to have been attempted if the enemy

were already disrupted or weakened.

Building a Gallic Army

Many Gallic tribes supplied mercenaries and

acted as allies to various powers throughout

this period, so you are almost certainly going

to be able to find an opponent if you put

together a Gallic force. Fighting against Rome,

Macedonia, Greece, Thrace, and other Celts,

as well as supplying large allied contingents

to fight for (and against) Carthage, should

give you plenty of choice when it comes to

campaigns.

Your Gallic army has some strengths and

weaknesses that you will need to get the hang

of before you are going to win with it. They

have a good balance of cavalry and infantry,

with both being able to have some good

quality troops. You are going to be light on

skirmishers, and they are also going to be

pretty crap quality, so don’t expect too much

from them.

13
13

The mainstay of your army will be decent units of foot troops: not very heavily armoured, with

many units only having shields, but there are enough options there for you to have a good solid

core of infantry. Almost all of your foot units are going to be impetuous: this means that unless you

are very lucky, you are not going to be able to stop parts of your army from heading towards the

enemy first chance it gets. What this means is that each turn, at least one of your units will pile

forward; the best way to deal with this is to make it part of your plan.

If you try to hold back your army, you’ll find that you just end up fragmenting and giving the enemy

a chance to take you on piecemeal. Give in to the fact that you have an army of madmen and plan

accordingly; when one unit fails a T&L test, becomes impetuous and advances uncontrollably, then

you may as well advance with the rest – at least you’ll be presenting a solid front – just remember

to keep some reliable troops to cover the flanks of your line.

The mainstay of your army will be decent units of foot troops: not very heavily armoured,

Don’t try to think of any complicated plans – this army isn’t going to follow them! Keep it simple

and you are in with a chance. Impetuous and fanatic troops with low T&L and the ‘shock’ ability

are best used in one way – get stabbing with the enemy as fast as you can, don’t give them time

to draw your impetuous troops out of position, and don’t let them get on your flanks and force you

to make awkward manoeuvres that your units have little chance of carrying out.

Gallic cavalry are worth their weight in gold to this army – while your infantry are charging at

everything in sight, your cavalry need to be covering their flanks and even simply ‘getting in their

way’ to stop the more obvious distractions that the enemy places in their path. Use your few

skirmishers to soak up casualties or to try to cancel out what the enemy is trying to do: impetuous

troops can be worn down and pulled out of position by skirmishers presenting themselves as

‘targets’ and then fleeing.

This is a very hit and miss army, but good fun all the same. If things go well in the first charge,

you are in with a good chance; if you bounce and have to start manoeuvring, you really are in

trouble….

14
14

Casualty & Shaken markers

Markers show that this shaken unit has taken 2 hits. These simple markers are made by
Markers show that this
shaken unit has taken
2 hits.
These simple markers are
made by sticking cat litter
to a small coin and then
flocking in the same style
as your units and terrain.
An assortment of shaken markers. You can make these to compliment your army or as generic
An assortment of
shaken markers. You
can make these to
compliment your army
or as generic markers
for any period.
15

Gallic 400-25BC

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

Gallic Warriors (1)

Levy

Av

-

  • 3 2

 

4

4

Light

43

Hand Weapons, Impetuous, Shock

 

Upgrades to Trained, (+10pts), May have T&L 5 (+2 pts), may have thrown melee weapons (+4pts)

 

Gaesati (2)

Regular

Av

-

  • 3 2

 

4

4

Light

68

Hand Weapons, Fanatics, Shock

Upgrades to Seasoned (+10pts), T&L to 5 (+2pts), Combat skill to good if Seasoned (+5pts)

 

Tribal Warriors (2, 3)

Regular

Av

-

  • 3 2

 

5

4

Light

67

Hand Weapons, Shock, Impetuous

 

Upgrades to Seasoned, (+10pts) to Veteran (+30 pts wounds to 4), May have T&L 6 (+2 pts)

 

may have thrown melee weapons (+4pts), armour to medium (+5pts)

 

Noble Cavalry (4)

Regular

Av

-

  • 3 2

 

6

8

Light

72

Hand Weapons, mounted

Upgrades to Seasoned, (+10pts) to Veteran (+30 pts wounds to 4), May have T&L 7 (+2 pts), T&L to 8 (+4pts)

 

Combat skill to good (+5pts), armour to medium (+5pts)

 

Gallic Cavalry

Trained

Av

-

  • 3 2

 

5

8

None

64

Hand Weapons, thrown melee weapons, mounted

 

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts) to Seasoned (+20pts) T&L to 6 (+2 pts) T&L to 7 (+4pts) armour to Light (+5pts)

 

Skirmish Cavalry (7)

Levy

Poor

Poor

  • 2 1

 

4

 
  • 10 40/2

None

 

Hand Weapons, javelins, mounted

 

Upgrades To Trained (+10 pts) T&L to 5 (+2 pts), armour to light (+5pts)

 

Combat skill to average (+5pts) BS to average (+5pts)

 

Chariots (7)

Trained

Poor

Poor

  • 2 1

 

4

 
  • 10 60/2

Light

 

Hand Weapons, Javelins, Light Chariot, Parthian Shot, Skirmishers

 

Upgrades T&L to 5 (+2 pts), To Regular (+10pts), armour to medium (+5pts)

 

Combat skill to average (+5pts), BS to average (+5pts)

 

Solduri (5)

Regular

Good

-

  • 3 2

 

6

 
  • 4 Light

72

Hand Weapons, Shock

Upgrades to Seasoned, (+10pts) to Veteran (+30 pts), May have T&L 7 (+2 pts), may be steadfast (+5pts)

 

may have thrown melee weapons (+4pts), may have medium armour (+5pts)

 

Skirmishers (6)

Dregs

Poor

Poor

  • 2 1

 

3

 
  • 6 16/2

none

 

Hand Weapons, Javelins, Skirmishers

 

Upgrades To Levy (+10pts) to Trained (+20pts), T&L to 4 (+2pts), armour to light (+5pts)

 

May replace javelins with sling (+5pts) or if not upgraded to light armour may replace javelins with bow (+8pts)

Notes

  • 1 May not have more Tribal Warrior stands than Gallic Warrior stands.

  • 2 Only 1 unit per army

  • 3 May not have more than one Veteran Tribal Warrior unit.

16
16
  • 4 Only 1 unit per army

5

Only 1 unit per army

  • 6 May not have more bow or sling armed stands than javelin armed stands.

  • 7 Must have at least one Noble or Gallic Cavalry unit for each Skirmish Cavalry unit Allies, mercenaries and restrictions No more than 35% of the army points may be cavalry At least 30% of the points must be made up of Gallic warriors and Tribal warriors.

17
17

Hellenistic Greek 250 - 50 BC

The Greek city states and Leagues were sometime allies of Macedon, Rome, and each other at

various points during this period. Their complicated history could take an entire book to cover so

this will be a brief introduction at best.

Mainland Greece could be split into three main power blocks: the Achaean League in the south,

the Aetolian League in north/central Greece, and Sparta at the southern tip of the Pelloponese.

In addition to these, there are the separate city state Athens, the kingdom of Epirus, and the

Macedonian-controlled fortresses of Demetrias, Chalcis, and Corinth.

The Aetolian League was allied with Rome during the First (214BC) and Second (198BC)

Macedonian Wars, but later began to oppose Roman influence in Greece. They sided with

Antiochus during his invasion of Greece, in direct opposition to Rome and the Achaean league.

When defeated in 189BC, the League was forced to sign a peace treaty with Rome, which

disbanded it in all but name.

Hellenistic Greek 250 - 50 BC The Greek city states and Leagues were sometime allies of

The Achaean League grew to control most of the Peloponnese, but in doing so came into conflict

with Sparta. The League allied itself with Macedon to help fight the Spartans, but stayed neutral

during the first Macedonian War. The Achaean league eventually defeated Sparta and took control

of the entire Peloponnesian region. During the Third Macedonian War the League favoured an

alliance with Macedon but did little about it. In 146BC the League openly revolted against Roman

domination and was soundly defeated and dissolved.

In 235BC Cleomenes came to the throne of Sparta. As the Achaean League was looking to unite

the Peloponnese, and Sparta occupies a large chunk of this land, they were bound to come to

blows sooner or later. In 229BC the League declared war on Sparta, but after suffering a series

of near-crushing defeats, had to ask Macedon for help. Antigonus III of Macedon fought against

Sparta and decisively defeated her at Sellasia in 222BC. The end came for Sparta in 192BC when

they finally succumbed to, and were integrated into, the Achaean League.

18
18
Suffice it to say the Greeks fought each other, the Macedonians, the Romans, the Illyrians, and

Suffice it to say the Greeks fought each other, the Macedonians, the Romans, the Illyrians, and the

Syrians at one point or another, as well as supplying many mercenaries. At least you’ll have a lot

of flexibility with allies and who you want to fight….

Greek Armies

This is a period of transition for the Greeks, starting with the traditional hoplites who then become

‘lighter’ in the form of thureophoroi and then turn into Macedonian-like phalangite pikemen.

When this change took place varied amongst cities, states and leagues. It was a gradual change

in tactics and style if you take the region as a whole; as such, I have not restricted the type of

Greek heavy infantry that you are allowed to combine in your army. There are two exceptions to

this:Spartans must either be hoplites or phalangites. They skipped the thureophoroi phase, and

you may not have Spartan citizen hoplites and Spartan citizen phalangites in the same army (this

restriction does not stop you mixing in mercenary or standing units though).

City states would rely on citizen levies and mercenaries, but there were also some standing forces

available to the Leagues at various times. The Citizen levy did not have a great reputation for

quality or training, and the ‘professional’ mercenary troops would most likely be sought after during

conflicts – of which the Greeks seem to have a fair few amongst themselves.

Suffice it to say the Greeks fought each other, the Macedonians, the Romans, the Illyrians, and

So, who has hoplites, phalangites or thureophoroi? As a rough guide you could assume

phalangites after 220-200BC, thureophoroi for approximately 60-70 years before that, and up until

then it would have been traditional hoplite panoply. The heavy troops would have been supported

by lighter peltasts and psiloi, as well as mercenary skirmishers such as Cretan archers, Rhodian

19
19

slingers, and in some cases freed slaves – who cant have been much use. Greek cavalry make

up small proportions of the army, and are either heavy with spear, javelins, armour and shield; or

alternatively armed with xyston but no shield. Light cavalry are what you would expect: shielded

with javelins and spear.

slingers, and in some cases freed slaves – who cant have been much use. Greek cavalry

Organising a Hellenistic Greek army

There is an obvious lack of cavalry, but you are going to have lots of choice with the infantry for

this army. You have the options of excellent heavy infantry – either hoplite or phalangites, both

organised into phalanxes; or alternatively go for thureophoroi, if you want more flexibility with your

main infantry units.

Peltasts and psiloi can be of reasonably good quality, and at least some of these will be essential

to cover your phalanx; the same goes for cavalry. You will probably not have the chance for

more than one or two units of cavalry, but I would take the max possible unless you are following

historical battle organisations.

You are going to have to decide how to organise your pikes or spears. The army list gives hoplites

or phalangites -- the phalanx ability as standard, but you obviously pay the points for it. The point

being that if a phalanx drops below 5 stands (the minimum number of stands you would need to

keep 2 ranks) it loses its phalanx bonuses. If you decide to have your phalanx as six stands you

20
20

will get more units but they will be more brittle; go for 8 and they are tough (and look nice) but you

get less units. If you want to go for 10 or 12, you will almost certainly have an unstoppable unit;

but with all your eggs in one basket, you will need some good flank cover for this mob.

This is a heavy infantry biased army, and in my experience they are the ones that most need a

plan before you deploy. If you just pop your units down in a row and hope for the best, don’t be

surprised if you find enemy units on the flanks running over one phalanx after another.

21
21

Hellenistic Greek 250-50BC

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

Citizen Hoplites

Levy

Av

-

   
  • 3 5

    • 2 4

 

Light

50

Long Spear, Phalanx, hand weapons

Upgrades to Trained(+10 pts), T&L to 6 (+2 pts), T&L to 7 (+4pts), Armour to medium (+5pts)

 

Standing Hoplites (2)

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 6

    • 2 4

 

Light

62

Long Spear, Phalanx, hand weapons

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), to Seasoned (+20 pts), to Veteran (+40pts, wounds to 4) Armour to medium (+5 pts)

 

May be Steadfast (+5pts) T&L to 7 (+2pts) to 8 (+4 pts), if Veteran may increase T&L to 9 (+6pts)

 

If Seasoned or Veteran may increase combat skill to good (+5pts)

 

Peltasts and Thureophoroi

Levy

Av

-

   
  • 3 5

    • 2 4

 

Light

44

Hand Weapons, Thrown melee weapons

Upgrades To Trained (+10 pts), to Regular (+20pts), to Seasoned (+30pts) T&L to 6 (+2pts), T&L to 7 (+4pts)

 

May be light troops (no points cost), may have feigned flight if light troops (+5pts)

 

Greek Psiloi (3)

Dregs

Poor

Poor

   
  • 2 4

    • 1 6

 

None

18/2

Hand Weapons, Skirmishers

Upgrades To Levy (+10 pts), to Trained (+20pts) May have slings (+5 pts), may have short bows if no armour (+5 pts)

 

May have staff sling if no armour (+8pts), May have light armour (+5 pts) missile skill to Av (+5pts)

 

If no other missile weapon may have javelins (free points cost), T&L to 5 (+2pts)

 

Greek Light Cavalry

Levy

Poor

Poor

   
  • 3 5

    • 2 8

 

None

44

Mounted, Hand Weapons, thrown melee weapons

 

Upgrades To Trained (+10 pts), to Regular (+20pts) T&L to 6 (+2 pts), T&L to 7 (+4 pts), may have feigned flight (+5pts)

Weapons skill to average (+5pts) missile skill to average (+5pts) To light armour (+5 pts)

 

Skirmishing Light Cavalry

Levy

Poor

Poor

   
  • 2 5

    • 1 8

 

None

40/2

Mounted, Hand Weapons, Javelins, skirmishers

Upgrades To Trained (+10 pts), to Regular (+20pts) T&L to 6 (+2 pts), T&L to 7 (+4 pts)

 

missile skill to average (+5pts) To light armour (+5 pts), may have Parthian Shot (+5pts)

 

Greek Heavy Cavalry (1)

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 6

    • 2 8

 

Light

62

Mounted, Hand Weapons

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), to Seasoned (+20pts) May have medium armour (+5 pts),

 

T&L to 7 (+2 pts), T&L to 8 (+4 pts), may have thrown melee weapons (+4pts)

 

If no medium armour and no thrown melee weapons may have Xyston (+10pts)

 

Citizen Phalangites

Levy

Av

-

   
  • 3 6

    • 2 4

 

Light

57

Pike, Phalanx, hand weapons

Upgrades To Trained (+10 pts) T&L to 7 (+2pts) , Armour to Medium (+5 pts)

 

Trained Phalangites

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 7

    • 2 4

 

Light

69

Pike, Phalanx, hand weapons

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), to Seasoned (+20pts) T&L to 8 (+2pts) , Armour to medium (+5 pts)

 

If Seasoned may increase CS to Good (+5pts)

 
22
22

Notes

  • 1 Only 1 unit per army

  • 2 Only 1 Veteran unit of standing army hoplites allowed in the army

  • 3 Only 1 bow armed unit of Greek psiloi and only 1 staff sling armed unit allowed in the army Allies, mercenaries & restrictions Mercenaries - Galatians, Cretan Archers, Mercenary Peltast/Thureophoroi, Thracians, Mercenary Hoplites/Phalangites Allies - Romans, Macedonians At least 40% of the army points must be made up of Hoplites, Phalangites or Thureophoroi No more than 20% of the points of the army may be cavalry No more than 30% of the points may be allies or mercenaries

23
23

Macedonian Successor 320 - 148 BC

Going into the history of the Macedonian Successors is outside the scope of this supplement, so a

brief overview of the various Macedonian wars should give you some idea what they were up to.

First Macedonian War

Philip V of Macedon made an alliance with Carthage in 214BC and so became involved in what

was to be known as the First Macedonian War. Philip’s naval campaign in the Adriatic was of little

importance and easily contained by a Roman fleet. However, after the crushing defeats in Italy

and with Hannibal loose in the south of the country, the Romans had no forces available to stop

Philip’s land campaign.

Moving north towards Illyria, the Macedonians captured several cities, and as Rome was unable to

stop them, the Senate approached the Aetolian League in Greece, created an alliance, and used

them to counteract Philip on land. In 209BC the league was joined by Attalus of Pergamum, and

between them they managed to contain the Macedonian expansion. Only a year later, however,

Attalus returned to Pergamum, which left the Aetolians in a pretty crappy poisiton. Philip invaded

their land, and with no help from their allies, by 206BC the Aetolians were forced to sue for peace.

Philip increased his gains on the eastern coast of the Adriatic over the next year, but when Rome

forced the withdrawal of Hannibal from Italy, they were able to assemble legions and prepare

to take the war to the Macedonians. By this time both sides were ready for peace: Philip had

captured many cities and was willing to settle for his gains so far, and Rome was worn out by its

long and costly war with Carthage.

24
24
Second Macedonian War Philip used the uneasy peace between Macedon and Rome to further expand his

Second Macedonian War

Philip used the uneasy peace between Macedon and Rome to further expand his influence – first

in Illyria and the Roman protectorates that were formed after the Illyrian wars. When Roman

objections to this became too strong to ignore, he turned his attention to the south into Greece and

to the east into to the Black Sea.

By 201BC Philip was fully at war with Rhodes and with Attalus of Pergamum, the latter a good ally

of Rome. Diplomatic missions, and Rome’s realisation that Macedon would have to be confronted

sooner or later, prompted the Senate to send an ultimatum to Philip – withdraw from all Roman

protectorates and those of Rome’s allies.

were again at war.

Philip rejected this demand and Rome and Macedon

In 200BC Philip had sent one army to invade Attica which belonged to the independent city

state of Athens, while a second army under his command acted against towns in Thrace. Rome

sent two legions to Illyria to begin recouping some of its losses there, a fleet was sent to aid the

Greeks, and the Aetolian league was again convinced to join against Philip. By 198BC the Greek

Achaean League also entered the war on the side of Rome. This meant that Macedon was at war

with practically all of Greece, Pergamum, and Thracia, as well as Rome.

The Macedonians were soundly defeated by Rome at the battle of Cynoscephalae and had no

choice but to negotiate an unfavourable peace. Macedon had to give up all claims to Greek

territory and had to hand over any of its Greek towns to control of Rome, including the ‘Fetters of

Greece’: the three fortresses of Demetrias, Chalcis and Acrocorinth.

25
25

Rome effectively made Macedon a buffer between their interests and the Thracian, Celt, and

Illyrian tribes, as well as an ally in case of Syrian aggression. In 194BC the Romans evacuated

all of the Greek cities they had been occupying, and effectively handed the country back to the

Greeks – though under Roman protection.

Rome effectively made Macedon a buffer between their interests and the Thracian, Celt, and Illyrian tribes,

Third and Fourth Macedonian Wars

In 179BC Philip V died and the throne passed to his son Perseus, who immediately set about

expanding Macedonian influence beyond its borders. This was in direct violation to the treaty

imposed by the Romans after the second Macedonian war. He also arranged an alliance with

Antiochus III of Syria who was a long time enemy of Rome.

By 171BC continuing Macedonian interference in Illyria, Pergamum, and Greece forced Rome to

declare war. The first few years of the war went badly, with the successive Roman commanders

seeming to prefer to plunder Greece and line their own pockets, rather than take the war to

Macedon. By 168BC a consul was appointed who actually intended to invade Macedon, and at

the battle of Pydna the Legion once again defeated the phalanx. Perseus was forced to surrender

to Rome, and Macedon was split into four republics, each of which had restrictions placed on its

trade and diplomacy, which effectively crippled the country.

Misrule, corruption, and lack of a permanent military presence or support meant that the

Macedonians and Greeks became more and more dissatisfied with Roman ‘protection’. By 149BC

Andriscus, the alleged grandson of Philip V, reunited the four republics and the Roman Senate

decided it was time to sort out Macedon once and for all. The revolt was swiftly crushed and

Macedonia was made into a Roman province.

26
26

Macedonian Armies

Basically you can have lots of pikes and not very many cavalry. You’ll find that the best

Macedonian phalanx with good quality, well trained and armoured troops is a steamroller – going

over or through most things in front of it. Unfortunately your opponent isn’t likely to be kind enough

to place his army in a position where you are going to be able to do this – well, not after the first

time anyway.

The phalanx is going to be vulnerable to a few things, firstly skirmishers – basically you will never

be able to catch skirmish units unless they make a mistake; and if your opponent is using them

properly, a half-dozen skirmish stands at close range can start to eat away at your units. Flanks

are always going to be a problem; if you are fighting an army that has cavalry superiority or more

units than you, then these are going to have to be watched. You can cover them with small, cheap

units, or deploy in such a way that one phalanx can cover the next in line: refusing one flank and

attacking in echelon is a good way to do this. Lastly – don’t fight in bad going if you can help it.

Cavalry – you don’t get much of this but it can be good quality, so you can use it to smash enemy

cavalry formations before they can start to get round your pikes. The other great anti-cavalry units

are going to be elephants if you are allowed these in your list. I tend to use them on the armies’

flanks opposite enemy cavalry when facing solid infantry armies like Greek or Roman, but as a

shock force in the centre against ‘barbarian’ armies.

As I say with all ‘infantry heavy’ armies your starting deployment and plan is particularly important.

Trying to move a phalanx about from one flank to another, changing direction or facing, or going

through bad terrain are all going to lose you the battle.

A final note on phalanx size and quality: to keep the combat bonus you will need to have at least 5

stands in the unit – this being the minimum that can still be in 2 ranks which you need for phalanx.

You have the option to go for a lot of smaller units, but these can be vulnerable when they start

to lose stands; or alternatively use a smaller number of large units. I tend to go for 8 stands for

pikes which is a happy medium: they can take punishment but are not too unwieldy. Quality of

the troops can determine how many stands you would like – or can afford – per unit. Unarmoured

phalangites are best deployed in large units or they suffer badly from missile fire. You can get

away with poor quality troops so long as they keep their phalanx bonus, but their lack of T&L will

mean they are very inflexible. If you go for a large ‘super phalanx’ of well trained, high quality, well

armoured pikemen, then make sure you cover its flanks!

27
27

Macedonian Successor 320-148BC

 

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

Hypaspists (1)

Seasoned

Av

-

   
  • 3 4

    • 2 7

 

Medium

92

Pike, Phalanx, Hand weapons

Upgrades T&L to 8 (+2pts), T&L to 9 (+4pts), May be Steadfast (+5pts), Combat skill to good (+5pts)

 

May be Veteran (+20pts, wounds to 4)

 

Macedonian Phalangites (2)

Regular

Av

-

   
  • 3 4

    • 2 6

 

Light

87

Pike, Phalanx, Hand weapons

Upgrades To Seasoned (+10pts), to Veteran (+30pts, wounds to 4), T&L to 7 (+2pts), if Veteran T&L may be 8 (+4pts)

 

Armour to medium (+5pts), Combat skill may be raised to good if Seasoned or Veteran (+5pts)

 

Psiloi

Levy

Poor

Poor

   
  • 2 6

    • 1 4

 

None

28/2

Hand weapons, Skirmishers, Javelins

Upgrades To Trained (+10pts), T&L to 5 (+2pts), missile skill to average (+5pts) Armour to light (+5pts)

 

May replace Javelins with short bow if no light armour (+5pts), May replace Javelins with sling (+5pts)

 

Elephants (3)

Regular

Good

-

   
  • 5 6

    • 3 6

 

Light

167

Elephant, Tower

Upgrades to medium armour (+5 pts) T&L to 7 (+2pts)

 

Bolt Throwers (7)

Trained

Poor

Av

   
  • 3 4

    • 2 7

 

Light

84

Bolt Thrower, Crewed weapon

Upgrades To Regular (+5 pts)

Companion Cavalry (4)

Seasoned

Good

-

   
  • 3 8

    • 2 7

 

Light

93

Mounted, hand weapons, thrown melee weapons

Upgrades To Veteran (+20 pts, wounds to 4), To medium armour (+5 points), T&L to 8 (+2pts) T&L to 9 (+4pts)

 

If no medium armour may replace thrown melee weapons with Xyston (+6 pts)

 

If armed with Xyston may be upgraded to shock (+5pts)

 

Greek Heavy Cavalry (5)

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 8

    • 2 6

 

Light

62

Mounted, Hand Weapons

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), to Seasoned (+20pts) May have medium armour (+5 pts),

 

T&L to 7 (+2 pts), T&L to 8 (+4 pts), may have thrown melee weapons (+4pts)

 

If no medium armour and no thrown melee weapons may have Xyston (+10pts)

 

Greek Light Cavalry (6)

Levy

Poor

Poor

   
  • 3 8

    • 2 5

 

None

44

Mounted, Hand Weapons, thrown melee weapons

 

Upgrades To Trained (+10 pts), to Regular (+20pts) T&L to 6 (+2 pts), T&L to 7 (+4 pts), may have Feigned Flight (+5pts)

Weapons skill to average (+5pts) missile skill to average (+5pts) To light armour (+5 pts)

 

Notes

  • 1 No more than one unit of Hypaspists in the army

  • 2 No more than one unit of phalangites may be upgraded to veteran.

  • 3 No more than 1 per 1500 points in the army

28
28
  • 4 No more than one unit in the army

5

No more than one unit in the army

  • 6 No more than one unit in the army

  • 7 No more than 1 per 1500 points in the army Allies, Mercenaries and restrictions Mercenaries - Mercenary Hoplites/Phalangites, Thureophoroi, Thracians Tarantine cavalry, Italian deserters. Allies - Hellenistic Greek At least 40% of the points of the army must be spent on Phalangites and/or Hypaspists No more than 20% of the points of the army may be spent on cavalry. No more than 25% of the points of the army may be spent on mercenaries and allies.

29
29

Numidians 300 - 25 BC

The Numidians were semi-nomadic Berber tribes situated to the west of Carthage. During the

period that we are dealing with, the Numidian nation was composed of two major tribal groups: the

Massyli in eastern Numidia and the Massaesyli in the west. (I’ll call them east and west kingdoms

from here on in…) Knowing this goes some way to explain the Numidians seemingly constant

side-changing and the fact that Numidian troops would often be fighting for both sides in any

conflict involving Rome and Carthage.

The eastern kingdom was closest to Carthage and seems to have had closer ties with them than

the western, even to the extent that its princes may have been educated and raised in Carthage.

Numidia did not pay tribute to Carthage as did other ‘provinces’, and the troops that fought for

Carthage and Rome did so as allied contingents rather than as mercenaries.

Numidians 300 - 25 BC The Numidians were semi-nomadic Berber tribes situated to the west of

During the First Punic War, Rome proposed peace terms with Carthage after Roman successes in

battle, and because Carthage was also embroiled in war with Numidia – presumably the western

kingdom. There is little information on this part of the conflict, but as no major battles between

Carthage and Numidia seem to have been fought, it was presumably a low key affair – though

would still have tied down Carthaginan forces that could be used elsewhere.

30
30

It was during the Second Punic War that Numidia came into the spotlight. At the start of the war

the eastern kingdom was ruled by Gaia and allied with Carthage; the western kingdom ruled by

Syphax was sympathetic to Rome.

Syphax took no real part in the war until 214, when Carthage

sent Hasdrubal to attack his kingdom; in turn Syphax and the western Numidians concluded an

alliance with Rome. Roman military advisors arrived and started training Numidian troops with the

intention of having Syphax in the west attack Gaia in the east.

It was during the Second Punic War that Numidia came into the spotlight. At the start

Meanwhile Gaia’s son Massinissa had been campaigning with the Carthaginian army in Spain, but

when his father died in 206BC, he allied himself with the Romans -- with the understanding that

if he aided them against Carthage, they would help him conquer the eastern kingdom and unite

Numidia under his rule. This triggered King Syphax and the western Numidians to change sides

and ally with Carthage, marrying the daughter of a Carthaginian nobleman no doubt to seal the

arrangement.

With both sides now effectively having swapped alliances, we see King Syphax of the Massaesyli

in the west, with his Roman trained troops fighting on the side of Carthage, and King Massinissa

of the Massyli in the east fighting for Rome. To add to the confusion, Gaia had a second son

– Oezalses – who was also vying for power with Massinissa.

It was during the Second Punic War that Numidia came into the spotlight. At the start

The next two years did not go well for Massinissa, and

he was brought close to total defeat at the battle of

Hippo Regius with his rival Syphax. He managed to

escape, and with the Roman army landing in 204BC, he

joined up with Scipio and defeated Syphax, captured his

capital of Cirta, and was able to fight against Carthage at

the battle of Zama with 10,000 Numidian warriors.

After the second Punic War, the terms imposed on

Carthage meant that they could not declare war without

the prior permission of Rome. Massinissa had united the

tribes of Numidia and was expanding into Carthaginian

territory, presumably with the tacit approval of Rome, as

every commission sent to sort out the problems favoured

Numidia at the expense of Carthage.

Carthage eventually got fed up with this and raised an

army to fight off the latest Numidian incusion – only to be

soundly defeated. Rome took this as an excuse to start

the Third Punic War and we already know the outcome

of that.

31
31

Massinissa died in 148BC and was succeeded by his son Micipsa, who in turn was succeeded in

118BC by both of his sons. Jugurtha, nephew (or adopted son?) of Micipsa killed one of the sons

and went to war with – and defeated – the other. The defeated son - Adherbal - appealed to Rome

for help, and the commission split Numidia into 2 kingdoms – presumably along the lines of the old

eastern and western kingdoms.

It was not too long before Jugurtha was again at war with

his Numidian neighbour. This time he cornered Adherbal

in his capital of Cirta and when the city fell he had Adherbal

killed – along with a bunch of Italians who had supported

and helped defend the city. It was because of this act

that Rome declared war with Numidia in 111BC, the so

called ‘Jugurthine War’.

This war saw Rome repeatedly

fail to fight a decisive battle or campaign, and it lasted until

105BC, when Jugurtha was betrayed and handed over to

the Romans.

Numidian Armies

The mainstay of the Numidian army is its light cavalry.

Primarily fighting with javelins, they are particularly unsuited

to a stand-up fight, but are perfect mounted skirmishers.

Their tactics were to avoid contact with the enemy, but to

Massinissa died in 148BC and was succeeded by his son Micipsa, who in turn was succeeded

dart in and attack flanks and rear, or cut off groups of pursuers that had overextended themselves.

“The Numidian horse on the Carthaginian right were meanwhile charging through the cavalry on

the Roman left; and though, from the peculiar nature of their mode of fighting, they neither inflicted

nor received much harm, they yet rendered the enemy’s horse useless by keeping them occupied,

and charging them first on one side and then another.”

As well as the light cavalry, a king would often have his own elite bodyguard – either mercenaries

or his noble entourage – or possibly a combination of both. Within the Crusader rules the only

cavalry unit that may be fielded ‘formed’ is this bodyguard – every other Numidian cavalry unit only

has the option of being in skirmish order.

Numidian infantry are not particularly impressive. The preferred tactic seems to have been

the same as that of the cavalry: to avoid contact with the enemy as much as possible and gain

advantage by attacking a flank or wearing the enemy down by constant skirmishing.

The attempt by Rome to train some of king Syphax’s warriors seems to have been partially

successful in that, rather than just allied cavalry, we start to see Numidian infantry appearing on

the battlefield. However, their quality still wasn’t up to much when compared with the mounted

Numidians.

Imitation legionaries in the Jugurthine War are a bit of a mystery, and I personally think that a

single unit of ‘Picked Men’ representing Italian deserters, mercenaries, and so on, is as far as I

would go judging by the scanty evidence. The stats for these troops have been included, and I

would use them as an extension of the ‘trained infantry’ rather than as 6 legions of Roman look a-

likes!

32
32

The infantry statistics are pretty bad no matter how you look at them. Skirmishers are average,

but you will almost always be outclassed by your opponent’s formed infantry units.

Numidian armies made use of elephants extensively with as much luck – good and bad – as

anyone else seems to have had with these beasts in battle.

The infantry statistics are pretty bad no matter how you look at them. Skirmishers are average,

Building a Numidian army

The main problem you are going to face with a

Numidian army is how to stop your enemy walking

straight over you. With very few – if any - good

infantry and almost no formed cavalry, there is not

much you can rely on to hold a battle line. The

simple answer is – don’t try to make one.

Your skirmish cavalry and infantry have no hope

against formed enemy troops unless you can catch

a shaken, depleted unit in the flank – even then

it’s not going to be a foregone conclusion. So,

you’ll need to get your cavalry right up into the face

of the enemy and make sure you have as much

room to dodge back and forth as possible. You’ll

almost certainly have skirmisher advantage, so

get rid of the enemies’, and start getting round

flanks and rears and take every shot you can at the

enemy, while keeping your formed units back out

of harm’s way as long as possible. If the enemy is

still in good order when they get to grips with your

warriors, you are almost certainly going to lose

those match-ups.

The one thing that a Numidian army can rely on is its elephants. If you can use these to stop,

disorder, or blunt the enemy attack, it gives you that much more time to wear them down with your

skirmishers. Take advantage of the fact that your skirmish troops don’t need to pass T&L tests

to change facings or formations, and get into close range to fire; but try to stay out of the enemy

charge arc. Use the whole battlefield, and don’t be afraid to have your cavalry skirmishers right up

behind or on the flank of the enemy, harrying them all the time. This is not an army that can win

battles by defending.

Hopefully the information on the Numidians will show that they don’t have to be used just as allies

for other armies – a solely Numidian army can be a very interesting in its own right. Whether you

are fighting against the Carthaginans or Romans, you’ll have your work cut out winning with such

a ‘light’ army; but it can be very rewarding watching a frustrated opponent try to pin you down and

beat you.

33
33

NUMIDIAN - 300 to 25BC

 

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

Trained Infantry (1)

Levy

Poor

   

2

  • 3 5

  • - Light

4

 

35

Hand weapons

Upgrades To Trained (+10pts),

May be Light Infantry (no points cost), Thrown melee weapons (+4pts)

 

T&L to 6 (+2pts), T&L to 7 (+4pts), Combat skill to average (+5pts)

 

Numidian Warriors

Dregs

Poor

   

2

  • 3 4

  • - None

4

 

22

Hand Weapons, thrown melee weapons, light troops

 

Upgrades Feigned Flight (+5pts), To Levy (+10pts), T&L to 5 (+2pts), T&L to 6 (+2pts), Armour to light (+5pts)

 

Numidian Skirmishers (2)

Levy

Poor

Poor

 

1

  • 2 4

6

None

28/2

Hand weapons

Upgrades Javelins (free), Slings if no javelins (+5pts), Short bow if no javelins (+5pts) To Trained (+10pts)

 

T&L to 5 (+2pts), T&L to 6 (+4pts), Armour to light if no bow or sling (+5pts)

 

If armed only with javelin may have Parthian Shot (+5pts), missile skill to average (+5pts)

 

Imitation Legionaries (1, 3)

Trained

Poor

   

2

  • 3 5

  • - Light

4

 

49

Hand weapons, thrown melee weapons

 

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), Combat skill to average (+5pts) T&L to 6 (+2pts) to 7 (+4pts)

 

In addition to the above upgrades one unit (Picked men) may be further upgraded as follows:-

 

to Seasoned (+20pts), to Medium armour (+5pts), T&L to 8 (+6pts)

 

Numidian Elephants (4)

Regular

Good

   

3

  • 5 6

  • - None

6

 

162

Elephant

Upgrades to light armour (+5 pts) T&L to 7 (+2pts)

 

Noble Cavalry (5)

Regular

Av

   

2

  • 3 6

  • - Light

8

 

76

Hand weapons, thrown melee weapons, mounted

 

Upgrades To Seasoned (+10pts), to Veteran (+30pts, wounds to 4), T&L to 7 (+2pts) to 8 (+4pts), armour to medium (+5pts)

May be Drilled (+5pts), may have Feigned Flight (+5pts), combat skill to good (+5pts)

 

Skirmish Cavalry (6)

Trained

Poor

Av

 

1

  • 2 5

10

None

60/2

Hand weapons, parthian shot, javelins, skirmishers, mounted

 

Upgrades To Regular (+10pts), to Seasoned (+20pts), combat to average(+5pts), missile to good (+5pts)

 

T&L to 6 (+2pts), T&L to 7 (+4pts), T&L to 8 (+6pts), to light armour (+5pts)

 

NOTES

  • 1 may not have more trained infantry/Imitation Legionary units than warrior units

  • 2 At least half of the Numidian skirmisher units must be javelin armed.

  • 3 only one unit may be upgraded to 'Picked Men'

  • 4 only one per 1000 points in the army

  • 5 only one unit per army, may have no more stands than the smallest cavalary unit in the army

  • 6 No more than half of the skirmish cavaly stands in the army may be upgraded to seasoned.

34
34

Allies, mercenaries and restrictions

Allies - Roman, Carthaginian

No more than 25% of the army points may be spent on allies and mercenaries At least 40% of the army points must be spent on Numidian Noble or skirmishing cavalry units

35
35

Rome 275 - 105 BC

After the end of the Samnite Wars Rome was the pre-eminent power in central Italy. It was only a

matter of time before it came into conflict with southern Italy. The Lucanians and Bruttians were

attacking Greek colonies in southern Italy and the Greeks in turn asked Rome for help in 283BC.

The city of Tarentum in Southern Italy had a treaty with Rome that precluded sailing into its waters

or interfering in its area of influence. When Rome answered the call of the Greek colonies and

sent troops to garrison the town of Thurii, the Tarentines took this as a breach of the treaty and

an act of aggression. The upshot of this was war between Rome and Tarentum, the latter soon

turning to King Pyrrhus of Epirus for help.

In 280BC Pyrrhus landed in Italy with 25,000 men – Epirote and Greek -- as well as 20 elephants.

His costly victories and lacklustre response from Greek colonies and Latin allies meant that he had

little choice but to take his forces and leave southern Italy, instead in 278BC heading to Sicily and

conflict with Carthage. Despite victories, his position became untenable and he returned to Italy

in 275BC, only to suffer a defeat at the hands of the Romans, shortly after Pyrrhus left to return to

Epirus. Rome continued its campaign against Tarentum and by 272BC was complete master of

the South.

36
36

After victory in the First Punic War Rome secured

the island of Sicily. Sardinia and Corsica followed

soon after, when their Carthaginian mercenary

garrisons revolted and offered the islands to Rome

– presumably in return for being paid their overdue

money.

Rome saw that a secure northern border rested

on the natural barrier of the Alps. This meant that

the lands of Cisalpine Gaul would need to come

under their control. Passing laws that allowed Latin

settlement of previously Gallic lands was surely

going to result in open warfare sooner or later. This

came about in 225BC with the Gallic invasion of

northern Italy, the result of which was that Rome got

what it wanted: secure land as far north as the Alps.

The history of Roman expansion beyond that would

take more than two pages to do it justice, so I’m not

even going to try. You can refer to the other nations

within this supplement to get an idea of how Rome

influenced – and generally conquered - the people

around it

Roman Army Tactics There are four main types of infantry in the Roman Legion during this

Roman Army Tactics

There are four main types of infantry in the Roman Legion during this period: velites, the light

skirmishing troops, and then three lines of progressively heavier infantry – hastati, principes,

and triarii. These lines were trained to support and relieve each other during battle, set up in

a chequerboard manipular formation to allow ease of movement, and for front and rear ranks

to interpenetrate gaps. However, when it came to actual physical contact with the enemy, the

maniples still closed these gaps and fought in a solid line of troops. If that line were beaten back

it would fall back through the gaps in the maniples behind it, and they in turn would close the gaps

in their maniples and engage the enemy. If both hastati and principes were beaten it was up to the

triarii to cover the withdrawal of the army.

With the Crusader rules, to have each individual maniple represented would mean each stand

being a separate unit. To recreate the style of fighting that the Romans employed we have given

them the ‘drilled’ ability. Normally formed units are not allowed to interpenetrate each other;

however, if both are drilled they may do so freely. This allows one rank of Romans to move

through another, meaning that you can advance a fresh rank of troops forward, or retire a shaken

or weakened unit back through fresh troops.

Your units on the tabletop will still form up in lines rather than ‘columns’, and this represents a line

of maniples. You can just assume that that gaps are there and that they are opened or closed at

the appropriate time – that’s what the drilled ability is all about. After all – this is supposed to be a

mass battle, not a skirmish game.

37
37

Building a Roman Army

First things first – you will have to balance the number of stands that you have for each type of

regular Roman infantry. If you want ten stands of principes, you need ten of hastati and velites as

well as five of triarii – this can prove to be expensive, so work out what your infantry force is going

to be, and then move on to the rest.

The mainstay of any Roman army is going to be its well trained and flexible infantry. If you want

to get the best of these, then try to use them historically if you can. Velites form up to the fore and

harry the enemy; when the battle lines close pull these back or to the flanks. Lead with hastati

– even if they do not break the enemy in front they are going to weaken them. Use the principes

as support to fall back behind, if need be, and finally keep the triarii – your best troops – to either

stave off complete disaster or to deliver the killing blow. Your lines of supporting troops should

mean that you have someone to recover behind, giving troops time to rally or recover from being

shaken.

Building a Roman Army First things first – you will have to balance the number of

There are two obvious disadvantages to the Roman deployment – it’s going to have a small

frontage, and your troops are going to cost a lot if you go for the best quality. The answer to this

is try to make use of your generally good Training and Leadership as well as your drilled ability. If

you just line up facing the enemy, then you are not getting the most from the flexibility this army

offers.

High morale and well trained units are about the only ones I would suggest making as small as 4-

5 stands; but the Romans can do more with a lot of small, flexible units than they can with a few

large ones. If you can force your opponent to make awkward manoeuvres, then they are going

to start failing their T&L tests (especially the Gauls!) and give your units open flanks and isolated

units to pick on.

38
38

Cover your flanks – the enemy is no doubt going to have a wider battle line than you if you deploy

in depth, so use your allies, skirmishers and cavalry to counter this. These are not going to be

your best troops, so it may be worth holding these back – 5 stands of poor cavalry are still a threat,

but if you commit them and they rout early on, you will find the enemy nipping at your flanks. If

this does happen, then at least you can be fairly sure that your well-trained triarii units will be able

to re-deploy to face them.

The reality of the wargames table is going to mean that unless you are fighting a large battle with

a lot of troops, you are not going to have as many units as you would like. I know it’s really the

individual maniples within a unit that should form a chequerboard formation, but if you want to

extend your frontage and still keep three lines of formed troops, then try it with units instead.

You’ll find that the drilled ability and the highest T&L numbers you can get are worth their weight in

gold – after all, it must have been more than just bendy spears that won the Roman Empire.

39
39

Polybian Roman 275-105BC

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

Velites (1)

Trained

Poor

Av

2

 
  • 1 Light

    • 6 6

   

52/2

Hand Weapons, Javelins, Skirmishers

Upgrades To Regular +10 pts), To Seasoned (+20 pts), Combat to average (+5pts)

 

T&L to 7 (+2 pts), if Seasoned may have Parthian Shot (+5pts)

 

Hastati (1)

Trained

Av

-

3

 
  • 2 61

    • 7 4

 

Light

 

Hand Weapons, Thrown Melee Weapons, Drilled

Upgrades

To Regular (+10pts) To Seasoned (+20 pts), T&L to 8 (+2 pts),

 

Principes (1)

Regular

Av

-

3

 
  • 2 72

    • 7 4

 

Light

 

Hand Weapons, Long Spears, Drilled

Upgrades To Seasoned (+20 pts), T&L to 8 (+2 pts) or 9 (+4 pts), CS to good (+5pts)

 

May replace long spears with thrown melee weapons (Pila) (-1 pt), To medium armor (+10 pts)

 

Triarii (2)

Seasoned

Av

-

3

 
  • 2 96

    • 8 4

 

Medium

 

Hand Weapons, Long Spears, Drilled, Steadfast

Upgrades

To Veteran (+20 pts, wnds to 4), T&L to 9 (+2 pts), T&L to 10 (+4pts) , CS to good (+5pts)

 

Italian & Roman Cavalry

Levy

Poor

-

3

 
  • 2 45

    • 5 8

 

Light

 

Hand Weapons, Mounted

Upgrades To Trained (+10 points), May have thrown melee weapons (+4 pts), May have medium armor (+5 pts)

 

CS to Average (+2 pts), T&L to 6 (+2 pts)

 

Italian Allies (3)

Trained

Av

-

3

 
  • 2 62

    • 6 4

 

Light

 

Hand Weapons, Long Spears

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), To Seasoned (+20 pts), If Seasoned (or Veteran) then CS may be raised to good (+5pts)

May have medium armour (+5pts), May be Drilled (+5 pts)

 

One unit (Extraordinaire) may be upgraded to Veteran (+40pts, wounds to 4)

 

Penal Legion (4)

Dregs

Poor

-

3

 
  • 2 25

    • 4 4

 

Light

 

Hand Weapons

Upgrades To Levy (+10 points), to Trained (+20pts)

 

T&L to 5 (+2 pts), may have thrown melee weapons (+4pts)

 

Bolt Throwers (5)

Trained

Poor

Av

3

 
  • 2 84

    • 7 4

 

Light

 

Bolt Thrower, Crewed weapon

Upgrades To Regular (+5 pts), T&L to 8 (+2pts)

Notes

  • 1 You must have equal numbers of stands of Velites, Hastati and Principes in the army. Within this restriction you may organise the units as you like with differing numbers of stands per unit and they may have different quality and training.

  • 2 You must have exactly half as many Triari stands as you have Principes stands. Within this restriction the Triari may form any size units and those units may be differing quality and stats.

40
40
  • 3 Must have at least one Principes unit for each Italian ally unit.

4

Represents the hastily-raised legions of criminals and conscripts. If there are any Penal Legionaries in the army then the rest of the army may contain only ONE Seasoned and ONE Veteran unit of any kind.

  • 5 No more than 1 per 1000 points in the army Allies, mercenaries and restrictions Mercenaries - Balearic slingers, Cretan archers, Tarantine cavalry Allies - Spanish, Hellenistic Greek, Numidian, Gallic No more than 25% of the army points may be spent on allies and mercenaries No more than 20% of the army points may be spent on cavalry units At least 40% of the points must be spent on Velites, Hastati, Principes, Triari

41
41

Spanish 200 - 20 BC

The Iberian peninsula could be split into three rough cultural groupings during the period that

this supplement covers. To the west – modern day Portugal – we have the Lusitanians; in the

east, centre, and south the indigenous ‘Iberian’ peoples; and in the north, Celts that migrated to

the peninsula during the 9 th and 7 th centuries BC. This final group, the Celts, can arguably be

subdivided further into Celts and the Celtiberians. The latter being a mixture of both the Celtic

and Iberian cultures; and as they seem to be such good warriors, presumably taking the best from

both.

By the 5 th Century BC the tribes in their traditional hill forts – castra – had begun to be grouped

into loose confederations, probably under control of the most powerful leader or faction at any

one time.

These tribal grouping were based on an important town or city, and effectively became

autonomous city states – oppida - that would each control their own area – chorai – that would

include other tribes and included subject castra

These confederations would often be at war with each other, sometimes in alliance and sometimes

not. These states created ‘hospitality pacts’ that roughly equate to ‘defensive pacts’, and the

Romans as well as Carthaginians used these to ally with one tribe while conquering another.

Spanish 200 - 20 BC The Iberian peninsula could be split into three rough cultural groupings

The Carthaginians had developed peaceful trade with Spain through semi-autonomous Phoenician

cities, but after the loss of Sicily and Syracuse they turned their attention to conquering large areas

of Spain and gaining control of the peninsula’s extensive mineral wealth.

42
42

In 237BC Hamilcar Barca set out to conquer Spain. Over the next two years he established

himself, and then began to bring under control the Phoenician cities along the coast, and to

conquer the tribal lands that they dominated. Pushing into the interior of Spain proved more

difficult, and Hamilcar had much more trouble subduing the Celtiberian tribes. In 229BC his luck

ran out, and faced by a superior force he was defeated and killed.

After the death of Hamilcar, his son-in law became the new commander in chief. Hasrubal (the

Elder) was already acting as lieutenant in Spain, and he used diplomacy to secure the conquests

that his father-in-law had gained. In 226BC Rome and Carthage agreed to the Ebro treaty, which

drew a line along the river which determined their respective spheres of influence. Presumably

Carthage could not have been too unhappy with this agreement, as their ‘share’ south of the Ebro

river included almost all of the Iberian peninsula. The one sticking point was the city of Saguntum,

still allied with Rome. It was actually in the Carthaginian territory south of the Ebro and was to

become the cause of the Second Punic War.

In 237BC Hamilcar Barca set out to conquer Spain. Over the next two years he established

Jumping forward to the end of the Second Punic War, we see Rome extending its influence and

eventually subjugating the whole of the peninsula – but not until some particularly bloody wars had

been fought. In 197BC the Turdetani of south-west Spain revolted and between then and 178BC,

the Romans dealt with general uprisings throughout the peninsula.

“The war between the Romans and the Celtiberians was called the ‘fiery war,’ so remarkable was

the uninterrupted character of the engagements”

There had been peace in Spain for almost 25 years, when in 155BC a Lusitanian raid and the

defeat of two Roman praetors encouraged rebellion. Quintus Nobilis was sent with 30,000 men

to quell the revolt but botched the job particularly badly, and was replaced by Claudius Marcellus

who came to terms with the rebels. Off and on for the next 20 years there were wars and

rebellions: first the Lusitanians succumbed in 139BC with the murder of their leader Viriathus; then

in 133BC the Celtiberians were crushed after the fall of their last fortress at Numantia.

43
43
Spanish Armies Spanish armies are fairly well balanced in that they have some decent foot troops

Spanish Armies

Spanish armies are fairly well balanced in that they have some decent foot troops with their

scutarii, good caetrati skirmishers, and fairly decent heavy and light cavalry. What they seem to

lack are any really ‘hard’ units of their own; but with the ability to add Celtiberians to your ranks,

that pretty much covers that too.

This is going to be a ‘light’ army: almost all of your troops have the capacity to be upgraded

to light, and if they do, you should try to make the most of this by fighting in the worst terrain

possible. You can also use the feigned flight ability of your troops to avoid combat and draw your

enemy into a position where they can be flanked. This ability is useful when fighting Roman or

Carthaginian infantry, as they are most likely going to able to beat you in a stand-up fight.

Your caetrati can actually be quite good troops for skirmishers – easily the equal of most other

nationalities; so try to use them to clear away enemy skirmishers. Once that is done they have

free reign to harass the formed enemy units.

Your light and heavy cavalry are not bad, but the heavies probably don’t have the punch to go

straight in against good infantry; so hold them back and wait for the enemy to become weakened

or expose a flank. Alternatively use them to chase off the (most likely) poorer Roman cavalry and

start to threaten flanks.

The Spanish fought with and against both the Romans and Carthaginians as allies and

mercenaries. They also fought amongst themselves a great deal, so there is plenty of scope for

using this army on the tabletop. At the very least a couple of units of scutarii will not look out of

place in any Punic Wars battle.

44
44
45
45

Spanish 200-20BC

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

Scutarii (1)

Trained

Avg

 
  • 3 2

 
  • 6 4

  • - Light

   

56

Hand Weapons, Thrown Melee Weapons

 

Upgrades Morale to Regular (+10pts) to Seasoned (+20 pts), T&L to 7 (+2 pts)

 

may be light troops (no points cost) May have Feigned Flight if light troops (+5pts)

 

Caetrati (1)

Trained

Poor

Poor

 

1

  • 2 6

 
  • 5 40/2

None

 

Hand Weapons, Javelins, Skirmishers

 

Upgrades Morale to Regular (+10 pts), T&L to 6 (+2 pts), CS to Av (+5pts), BS to Av (+5pts), Armour to light (+5pts)

 

Tribal Levies (2)

Dregs

Poor

 
  • 3 2

 
  • 2 4

  • - None

   

14

Hand Weapons

Upgrades Morale to Levy (+10 pts) T&L to 3 (+2 pts), T&L to 4 (+4pts)

 

Armor to light (+5 pts), Thrown melee weapons (+4pts)

 

Celtiberian (3)

Regular

Avg

 
  • 3 2

 
  • - Light

    • 4 4

   

62

Hand Weapons, Thrown Melee Weapons, Impetuous

 

Upgrades Morale to Seasoned (+10 pts) to Veteran (+30pts, wounds to 4) T&L to 5 (+2 pts) or 6 (+4 pts)

 

CS to good (+5pts), armour to medium (+5pts), May be Shock (+5pts)

 

Lusitanian

Trained

Avg

 
  • 3 2

 
  • - Light

    • 4 4

   

52

Hand Weapons, Thrown Melee Weapons

 

Upgrades Morale to Regular (+10pts) to Seasoned (+20 pts) T&L to 7 (+2 pts)

 

May be light troops (no points cost), May have feigned Flight if light troops (+5pts)

 

Slingers (4)

Levy

Poor

Poor

 

1

  • 2 6

 
  • 4 33/2

None

 

Hand Weapons, Slings, Skirmishers

Upgrades Morale to Trained (+10pts) to Regular (+20 pts), T&L to 5 (+2 pts), T&L to 6 (+4 pts)

 

Armour to light (+5 pts), BS to average if Regular (+5pts)

 

Heavy Cavalry (5, 6)

Trained

Av

 
  • 3 2

 
  • 6 8

  • - Light

   

66

Hand Weapons, Thrown Melee Weapons, Mounted

 

Upgrades Morale to Regular (+10pts), morale to Seasoned (+20pts) T&L to 7 (+2 pts) or 8 (+4pts)

 

Armour to medium (+5 pts), CS to good (+5pts)

 

Light Cavalry (5)

Trained

Avg

 
  • 3 2

 
  • 5 8

  • - None

   

59

Hand Weapons, Thrown Melee Weapons, Mounted

 

Upgrades Morale to Regular (+10 pts), T&L to 6 (+2 pts), or 7 (+4 pts), Armour to Light (+5 pts)

 

May be skirmishers (half points, Move to 10, wnds to 2, attacks to 1)

 

If skirmishers may have parthian shot (+5pts), if skirmishers javelins become free (-4 points)

 

Notes

  • 1 Must have at least twice as many Scutarii stands in the army as you have Caetrati stands

  • 2 For each unit of tribal levies you must have at least two other units in the army

  • 3 May have a maximum of 1 Veteran Celtiberian unit.

5

You may not have more heavy cavalry stands in the army than light cavalry units.

  • 6 One heavy cavalry unit may be upgraded to Devotio - If the army commander is killed unit becomes fanatic. Upgrade costs no points but must be declared at start of battle. Mercenaries, allies & restrictions Allies - Carthaginian, Roman, Gallic No more than 35% of the army points may be cavalry At least 35% of the army points must be Scutari and Caetrati No more than 25% of the army points may be spent on allies and Mercenaries

47
47
48
48
49
49

Macedonian & Punic Wars - Mercenaries

 

Troop type (Notes)

Morale

CS

BS

WND ATT

T&L

MOVE Armour Points

Mercenary Hoplites/Phalangites

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 6

    • 2 4

 

Light

62

Long Spear, Phalanx, hand weapons

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), to Seasoned (+20 pts), T&L to 7 (+2pts) to 8 (+4 pts), Armour to medium (+5 pts)

 

May upgrade to Mercenary Phalangites - replace long spear with Pike (+5 pts)

 

Cretan Archers (4)

Regular

Av

Good

   
  • 2 7

    • 1 77/2

6

None

 

Hand Weapons, Short Bow, skirmishers

Upgrades To Seasoned (+10 pts), to Veteran (+20pts, wounds to 3) T&L to 8 (+2 pts)

 

Italian Infantry allies and/or deserters

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 6

    • 2 4

 

Light

57

Hand Weapons, Long Spears

Upgrades To Regular (+10 pts), May be Drilled (+5 pts), armour to medium (+5pts)

 

Tarantaine Cavalry

Trained

Poor

Av

   
  • 2 5

    • 1 60/2

8

Light

 

Hand Weapons, Mounted, Skirmishers, Javelins

Upgrades To Regular (+10 points), (+4 pts), May have medium armour (+5 pts)

 

Combat Skill to Av (+2 pts), Missile skill to good (+5pts) T&L to 6 (+2 pts)

 

Balearic Slingers

Trained

Av

Av

   
  • 2 5

    • 1 55/2

6

None

 

Hand Weapons, Slings, Skirmishers

Upgrades Morale to Regular (+10pts) to Seasoned (+20 pts), T&L to 6 (+2 pts), T&L to 7 (+4 pts)

 

Armour to light (+5 pts), BS to average if Regular (+5pts)

 

Mercenary Peltasts/Thureophoroi

Levy

Av

-

   
  • 3 6

    • 2 4

 

Light

46

Hand Weapons, Thrown melee weapons

Upgrades To Trained (+10 pts), to Regular (+20pts), to Seasoned (+30pts) T&L to 7 (+2pts), T&L to 8 (+4pts)

 

May be light troops (no points cost), may have Feigned Flight if light troops (+5pts)

 

Thracians

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 5

    • 2 4

 

Light

54

Hand Weapons, Thrown melee weapons, Impetuous

 

Upgrades to regular (+10pts), to seasoned (+20pts) T&L to 6 (+2pts)

 

May have heavy weapons (Rhomphia +10 pts), May be light troops (no points cost), CS to good (+5pts)

 

Galatians

Trained

Av

-

   
  • 3 6

    • 2 4

 

Light

57

Hand Weapons, Shock, Impetuous

Upgrades to Regular, (+10pts) to Seasoned (+20 pts), May have T&L 7 (+2 pts), Combat skill to good (+5pts)

 

May have thrown melee weapons (+4pts), armour to medium (+5pts)

 
50
50

Thanks and stuff

Gripping Beast for some excellent photographs - www.grippingbeast.com

Grand Manner for the superb terrain in many of these photos - www.grandmanner.co.uk

Renaissance Inc for their handy pre-cut and magnetised bases that I now use for all of my figures

- www.renaissanceink.net

Allen E. Curtis for his much appreciated help with editing this supplement.

John Johnson for his almost famous terrain tiles.

Phil Beveridge for kindly sending me his Spanish artwork.

Little Big Men Studios for the best shield transfers you can get – www.littlebigmenstudios.co.uk

Vendel Miniatures for allowing me to use some of the web images - www.vendelminiatures.co.uk

Manufacturers that would have had some photos of their figures in this book if I had been a faster

painter.

Baccus - www.baccus6mm.com

Kennington Miniatures - www.shqminiatures.co.uk

Crusader Miniatures

Crusader USA for customers in the US and Canada, Crusader UK for everywhere in the world

outside of the US.

Crusader USA - www.crusaderminiaturesusa.com

Crusader UK - www.crusaderminiatures.com

Crusader Yahoo Group. Thanks to all the people who have taken the time to put army lists up on

the Crusader Yahoo Group - http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/crusaderminis/

Useful books and sources

The Roman Empire -

www.unrv.com

Armies of the Macedonian & Punic Wars – Duncan Head

A History of the Roman World 753-146BC – H.H. Scullard

(If you only buy one book on this period then I would make it this one – it’s superb)

Hannibal and the Punic Wars – Allen E. Curtis

51
51