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TECHNICAL TRAINING

TECHNICAL TRAINING

July 2013

Technical Training

PLATINUM CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES


2822 West 5th Street, Fort Worth, TX 76107

Toll Free: 1-877-374-1115


www.platinumcontrol.com

TECHNICAL TRAINING

TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION I: INTRODUCTION

TRAINING OBJECTIVES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10


ABOUT PLATINUM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 11
PLATINUM CONTROL: IMS & BMS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11
HOW IT WORKS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 12
THE BRAINS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 13
APPLICATIONS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 14
INSTALLATIONS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
THE OLD WAY------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 16
POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 16
THE BETTER WAY: BMS & IMS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 17
PAIN POINT CONSIDERATIONS--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 17
PLATINUM CONTROLS PRODUCTS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 18
ROI EXPECTED COSTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 19
ROI POTENTIAL UNANTICIPATED COSTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 20
WHO BENEFITS FROM BURNER MANAGEMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
COMPETITORS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 21
SUPERIOR MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22
PLATINUM CONTROL BENEFITS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 23
THE PLATINUM WAY---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 24

SECTION II: COMBUSTION FUNDAMENTALS

25

FIRE TRIANGLE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 26


CONTROLLED COMBUSTION ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 28
CONTROL BY DESIGN ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 29
CONTROL BY INSTRUMENTS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 30
TYPES OF BURNER ASSEMBLIES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 31
DIRECT FIRED UNITS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 32
INDIRECT FIRED UNITS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33
BURNER CATEGORIES -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 34
LIQUID FUELED BURNERS------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 34
GAS FUELED BURNERS---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 34
FORCED DRAFT BURNERS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 34
NATURAL DRAFT BURNERS---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 35
TYPES OF OILFIELD EQUIPMENT WITH BURNER ASSEMBLIES ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 38
HEATER TREATER ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 38
ELECTROSTATIC TREATER ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 38
HEATED SEPARATOR ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 38
GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 39
AMINE UNIT ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 39
LINE HEATER ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 40
GAS PRODUCTION UNIT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 40
COMBUSTOR ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41
COMBINATION UNIT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 41

TECHNICAL TRAINING

MULTI-WELL UNIT --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42


TANK HEATER --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42
FLARE-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42
THE FIRETUBE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 43
HEAT FLOW IN THE FIRETUBE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 45
FIRETUBE RETURN BEND DESIGNS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 47
THE FIRETUBE STACK ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 47
FLASH ARRESTOR/STACK HEAD ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 48
TURBULATORS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 49
THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 50
THE FLAME ARRESTOR --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 52
BENEFITS OF FLAME ARRESTORS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 54
TYPES OF FLAME ARRESTORS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 55
FLAME ARRESTOR OPERATIONS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 56
STANDARD FLAMECO NOMENCLATURE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 57
MAIN & PILOT BURNER ASSEMBLIES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 58
THE BURNER NOZZLE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 60
THE MIXER ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 61
THE PILOT -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 62
THE FUEL GAS TRAIN --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 64
FUEL GAS TRAIN DRAWING --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 68
FUEL GAS TRAIN DRAWING WITH BMS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 68
CANADIAN B149. 3 FUEL GAS TRAIN DRAWING ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 69
STANDARD FUEL GAS TRAIN P&ID WITH BMS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 69
VESSEL/BURNER EQUIPMENT INSPECTION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 70
OPERATIONAL INSPECTIONS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 70
INTERNAL COMPONENTS INSPECTIONS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 70
CORROSION ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 71
LEAKS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 71
OBSTRUCTIONS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 72
FLAME ARRESTOR CELL -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 72
GASKETS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 73
FUEL GAS TRAIN ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 73
BURNER SYSTEMS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 74
THE STACK ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 75
GAUGES AND TEMPERATURE CONTROLS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 75
INITIAL BURNER STARTUP --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 76
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURE --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 78
RECOMMENDED MAINTENANCE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 79

SECTION III: PLATINUM CONTROLS BMS

81

PRE-INSTALLATION QUESTIONS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 83


WARRANTY STATEMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 84
INTRODUCTION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 85
COMPONENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 86
SHIPPING BOX CONTENTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 86
MICROPROCESSOR BOARD ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 87
PLATINUM BMS-731 PROCESSOR BOARD --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 87
VALVES/TERMINATION BOARD ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 88
PLATINUM BMS-731 IGNITION MODULE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 88

TECHNICAL TRAINING

PILOT ASSEMBLY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 89


INSTALLATION ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 90
PRE-INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 90
MOUNTING THE MAIN CONTROL BOX ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 91
INSTALLING SOLENOID VALVES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 92
MOUNTING THE PILOT ASSEMBLY ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 98
SETTING-UP THE IGNITION MODULE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 102
MOUNTING THE IGNITION MODULE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 102
INSTALLING THE TEMPERATURE DEVICE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 108
INSTALLING THE RTD ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 108
INSTALLING THE TYPE K THERMOCOUPLE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 111
CONNECTING EXTERNAL DEVICES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 114
CONNECTING EXTERNAL ESD (STATUS OUT) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 116
GROUNDING WIRES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 116
CONNECTING VALVES/TERMINATION BOARD TO MAIN CONTROL BOX --------------------------------------------------- 118
CONNECTING POWER TO THE MAIN CONTROL BOX ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 118
OPERATING-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 121
POWERING UP ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 121
FACTORY SETUP ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 122
SOFTWARE REVISION NUMBER ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 123
TEMPERATURE CONTROL ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 123
LOW PRESSURE SWITCH-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 123
HI PRESSURE SWITCH ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 124
ESD SOLENOID -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 124
ESD VALVE SWITCH (POC) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 124
MAIN VALVE SWITCH (POC) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 125
TEMP SENSOR TYPE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 125
SPARE SWITCH -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 126
SET REMOTE ON/OFF ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 126
PILOT OPERATION---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 127
ENABLE THE HIGH FIRE VALVE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 127
SET THE MODBUS BAUD RATE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 127
SET MODBUS PARITY ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 128
SET NUMBER OF MODBUS STOP BITS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 128
SET MODBUS ADDRESS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 128
BACKLIGHT ALWAYS ON -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 129
OPERATING PARAMETERS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 130
TEMPERATURE SCALE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 131
ALARM SETPOINT (HIGH TEMPERATURE SHUTDOWN) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 132
TEMPERATURE CONTROL SETTING ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 133
IGNITION DELAY TIME ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 134
SETTING THE MAIN VALVE DELAY ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 134
SETTING THE FLAME SENSE DELAY ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 135
HIGH FIRE DELAY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 135
SETTING THE HIGH FIRE TEMPERATURE SETPOINT --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 136
SPARE SWITCH DELAY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 136
TIME LOG --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 137
EXITING THE OPERATING PARAMETERS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 138
IGNITION PROCEDURE-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 139
CONFIRM PROPER FUNCTIONALITY OF THE FLAME SENSING PROBE ------------------------------------------------------- 140
TROUBLESHOOTING -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 141
DISPLAY ERROR CODES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 141
MICROPROCESSOR CODES -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 144

TECHNICAL TRAINING

TIPS FOR TROUBLESHOOTING ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 146


PLATINUM RECOMMENDED SPARE PARTS LIST --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 149
BMS-731 CURRENT DRAW ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 150
ADDENDUM DRAWINGS--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 151
BMS 731/BTEX INTERCONNECT DIAGRAM ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 151
BASIC P&ID ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 152
FULL P&ID ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 153

Optional BMS 731-BTEX Addendum

154

SECTION IV: PLATINUM CONTROLS IMS

161

COMPONENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 155


BTEX ADAPTER BOARD (PIGGYBACK BOARD) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 155
INSTALLATION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 156
INSTALLING THREE (3) TYPE K THERMOCOUPLE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 156
OPERATING-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 158
POWERING UP ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 158
OPERATING PARAMETERS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 159
ALARM SETPOINT (HIGH TEMPERATURE SHUTDOWN) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 159

PRE-INSTALLATION QUESTIONS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 162


WARRANTY STATEMENT -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 163
INTRODUCTION -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
POWER---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
OPERATION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
IGNITER MODE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
FLARE MODE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
APPLICATIONS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 165
COMPONENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 166
SHIPPING BOX CONTENTS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 166
MICROCONTROLLER BOARDS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 167
PLATINUM-500 DISPLAY BOARD --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 167
PLATINUM-500 MAIN BOARD ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 168
IGNITION MODULE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 169
PILOT ASSEMBLY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 169
INSTALLATION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 170
PRE-INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 170
EXAMPLE OF A FUEL GAS TRAIN ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 171
MOUNTING THE MAIN CONTROL BOX ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 172
INSTALLING SOLENOID VALVES -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 172
MOUNTING THE PILOT ASSEMBLY ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 177
INSTALLING THE IGNITION MODULE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 179
CONNECTING EXTERNAL DEVICES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 182
CONNECTING EXTERNAL ESD (STATUS OUT) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 182
GROUNDING WIRES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 182
CONNECTING MAIN BOARD TO MAIN CONTROL BOX --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 183
CONNECTING POWER TO THE MAIN CONTROL BOX ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 183
LINE POWER ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 183

TECHNICAL TRAINING

SOLAR POWER WITH BATTERY BACKUP ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 184


LINE POWER WITH BATTERY BACKUP -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 186
SETUP --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 188
POWERING UP ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 188
INITIAL SETUP ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 188
POWER SELECTION -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 189
OPERATING MODE --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 189
SOLENOID VOLTAGE* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 189
ESD SOLENOID*------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 189
PILOT SOLENOID* ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 190
MAIN SOLENOID* ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 190
IDLE STATE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 191
OPERATING PARAMETERS SETUP ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 192
FIRMWARE REVISION NUMBER ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 192
VENT DELAY TIME* -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 192
SPARK DELAY TIME* ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 192
MAIN VALVE DELAY TIME* ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 192
FLAME SENSE DELAY TIME----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 193
REMOTE ON/OFF ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 193
AUTO ON --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 193
STATUS LED MODE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 194
DISPLAY MODE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 194
POWER MODE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 195
OPERATING MODE --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 195
SOLENOID VOLTAGE* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 196
ESD SOLENOID TYPE* ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 196
PILOT SOLENOID TYPE* --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 197
MAIN SOLENOID TYPE* --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 197
FACTORY RESET ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 198
PASSWORD ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 198
TIME AND DATE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 199
CLEAR LOG ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 199
VIEW LOG -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 200
EXIT SETUP ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 200
OPERATING-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 201
FRONT PANEL ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 201
POWERING UP ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 202
SMART START ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 202
RUNNING ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 203
IGNITER & FLARE MODE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 203
RUNNING WITH REMOTE ON/OFF ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 204
RUNNING WITH LOW BATTERY CONDITION --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 204
CONFIRM PROPER FUNCTIONALITY OF THE FLAME SENSING PROBE ------------------------------------------------------- 205
RATINGS------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 206
POWER SUPPLY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 206
POWER CONSUMPTION (RUNNING) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 206
FUSE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 206
CLOCK BACKUP BATTERY ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 206
ESD OUTPUT RELAY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 206
TROUBLESHOOTING -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 207
ESD SCREEN MESSAGES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 207
ERROR SCREEN MESSAGES -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 211
MISCELLANEOUS MESSAGES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 212

TECHNICAL TRAINING

TIPS FOR TROUBLESHOOTING ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 213


ONLINE TRAINING RESOURCES -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 214
AVAILABLE TECHNICAL RESOURCES -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 215
CONCLUSION -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 215
ADDENDUM DRAWINGS--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 216
PLATINUM-500 ELECTRIC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 216
PLATINUM-500 PNEUMATIC ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 217

Glossary

TECHNICAL TRAINING

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SECTION I: INTRODUCTION

TECHNICAL TRAINING

TRAINING OBJECTIVES
1. Gain awareness of fired vessel applications.
2. Work to have an understanding of the components related to natural draft production
equipment.
3. Establish competence in the installation and operations of Platinum Controls Burner
Management Systems.
NOTE
At all times we will consider Safety, Efficiency, and Regulatory requirements. Please consult and follow
appropriate OSHA, NFPA, Canadian Standard, Industry and Company specific safety practices. Always
wear appropriate PPE including, but not limited to the following items:

Hard hat

Safety glasses

FR clothing

Steel-toe boots

Hearing protection

TECHNICAL TRAINING

10

ABOUT PLATINUM
Our team has decades of experience in the oil & gas field and a thorough understanding of all the
production equipment involved. That knowledge has driven our development of the most
technologically advanced, reliable and user-friendly BMS on the market.
Beyond a great product, we value and continue to build strong partnerships with our clients. Always
committed to 100% satisfaction, we provide 24/7 technical support for the life of the unit.
PLATINUM CONTROL: IMS & BMS
Ignition Management System
Platinum Controls Ignition Management System is specifically designed to light, monitor, and re-ignite
natural draft burners used in heating systems for oil and gas production equipment and gas flares.
Burner Management System
Platinum Controls Burner Management System provides remote burner access, automated ignition and
temperature control for oil and gas production. The system records essential data and safely automates
heating processes, decreasing injury risk, maximizing well production and facilitating environmental
compliance.

The above image is of a Burner Management System


(BMS), the BMS-731.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

The above image is of an Ignition Management


System (IMS), the Platinum-500.

11

HOW IT WORKS
BMS & IMS (IGNITER Mode)

Both the BMS and IMS monitor for the presence of a pilot flame through an igniter rod which
feeds the signal back to a microcontroller to determine a safe sequence of events based on the
signal.
Both the BMS and IMS control the pilot, main solenoids and ESD solenoids. In the absence of a
lit pilot, the system will shut all gas sources feeding the pilot and main burner and wait for a
user set wait time before attempting a re-ignition sequence.
Both systems, in the event of a positive ignition will sense the flame and proceed with
monitoring. If either system senses a flame ignition failure, they will lock out the ignition process
after three failed attempts and wait for an operator to troubleshoot and reset the system.

IMS (FLARE Mode)

In flare mode, the IMS does not control solenoids. In the absence of a flame, the IMS will wait
for a fixed delay time of 5 seconds before attempting a re-ignition sequence.
In the event of a positive ignition, the system will sense the flame and proceed with monitoring.
In the event of flame ignition failure, the IMS will restart automatically without any limitations.

BMS

In addition to the features shared with IMS, the BMS has temperature control to establish and
maintain operator adjustable temperature set points.
Remote capability allowing personnel to monitor and adjust operations from off site.
The ability to communicate an alarm in shutdown conditions to notify operators of upset
conditions.

Image of Platinums ignition module, wiring, and pilot installed in a flame arrestor.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

12

THE BRAINS
Manufactured under the strictest production parameters, the control panel is the brain of our BMS/IMS.
Each is precision engineered and rigorously tested to withstand the harshest weather conditions, while
ensuring reliable uptime. We simply do not take shortcuts in the quality we put into every controller.
The system is designed to easily integrate with your other monitoring and data systems to allow
complete visibility into your production site.
A simple interface with intuitive alerts, the system is designed to be very user-friendly in the field and
provide the control to remotely manage your production site.

Platinums BMS-731 microprocessor and valves/termination


board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

Platinums IMS Platinum-500 display and main board.

13

APPLICATIONS
Platinum Controls Burner Management Systems support any natural draft burner up to 10MMBtu/Hr
on oil & gas production equipment. Whether you need one unit or want to integrate all of your burner
systems, Platinum Control can give you the insight to manage your:

Production Units

Treaters

Dehydrators

VOC Combustors

Heated Separators

Oil Stabilizers

Line Heaters

Amine Plants

Combination Units

Multiwell Units

Tank Heaters

Flares

Platinum BMS-731 installed on a gas production unit.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

14

INSTALLATIONS
In yard installations are easier, but will require adjustments in the field after final installation. On
location installations are more involved, but maximize the opportunity for optimum operations.

In yard: Primarily during the manufacturing or refurbishment process

On location: During refurbishment or as an upgrade

The above image is of a new treater with a Platinum BMS-731


installed in the equipment manufacturer yard.

Above is an example of a retrofit installation of a Platinum


BMS-731 on a glycol dehydrator in the field.

In retrofit applications always examine flame arrestor to insure free of plugging, check burner fuel train
for proper operations in addition to inspecting firetube for obstructions, sooting, or hot spots.
All of these items can lead to issues with burner capability and flame quality.
The end result can be improper operation, damage to production equipment, lost revenue or injury.

Carbon debris inside of firetube.

Collapsed hotspot inside of a firetube.

Sooting accumulation inside of a firetube.

ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

Burner manifold components

Inspection of burner systems for installation

Continuing PM of burner systems

Parts and service

TECHNICAL TRAINING

15

THE OLD WAY


Much of the field is using antiquated methods, such as using a rag on a stick to light burners.
Information compiled from OSHA, Federal Bureau of Labor, NIOSH, API, and CDC tells us.

From 2006-2010, the Oil and Gas Industry experienced:


o

15% of incidents fire and explosion related

Injury claims > $47m

Over 81,350 lost work hours

Rag on a stick used to light a


burner.

POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCES
Failure to use Burner Management Systems could result in damaged equipment, lost revenue, legal
claims, injury or fatality.

Image of a burned glycol dehydration unit.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

Treaters and battery on fire in West Texas.

16

THE BETTER WAY: BMS & IMS

INCREASE SAFETY

Prevents serious injury or


death from manually
lighting and re-lighting
burners
BMS provides
temperature control that
protects and preserves
equipment
Limits loss of revenue
due to claims or suits

GAIN PRODUCTION
MINIMIZE ENVIRONMENTAL
EFFICIENCIES
IMPACT
Reduces production shut- BMS temperature
downs due to burner
controlled burning
failure
prevents explosions
Remote control of the
Positions your company for
BMS decreases need for
current and future
field engineers to go on
compliance requirements
site to monitor systems
BMS delivers accurate
Increases visibility into
temperature and pressure
your systems
control to ensure complete
incineration of unusable or
performance
harmful gases
Prevents harmful gases
from releasing into the
environment

PAIN POINT CONSIDERATIONS


A Yes response to any of the below questions warrants the use of a BMS or IMS.
1. Are personnel using an open flame (torch, rag on a stick) to light burners?
2. Have you ever had a burner related near miss, recordable, or lost time incident?
3. Have you ever had a burner failure cause continuous gas venting to the atmosphere?
4. Has a burner failure ever prevented you from selling oil or natural gas?
5. Have you ever had a burner failure cause call-outs for the lease operator or service personnel to
relight the burner?
6. Have you ever risked or had production equipment damage due to a burner failure?
7. Have you ever been fined because of fugitive emissions?

TECHNICAL TRAINING

17

PLATINUM CONTROLS PRODUCTS


MODEL

Platinum 500

BMS 731

BMS BTEX

Applications

Gas Flares

Production
Equipment

Production Equipment

Production Equipment

Operation Mode

Flare

Igniter

---

---

Ignition Control

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Valve Control

---

Yes

Yes

Yes
K-Type Thermocouple
(Can be used to measure
temperature at three
different points)

Temperature
Control

---

---

RTD
K-Type Thermocouple

Typical Power
Connections
(Not including
valves)

12/24 V
0.08 W

12/24 V
0.19 W

12/24 V
9.6 W

12/24 V
9.6 W

Internal Battery
Option

12 V sealed lead-acid
Up to 14 AH

---

---

Internal Solar
Charge Controller

Vmp: 17.3 V
Power: Up to 30 W usable

---

---

Solar Enabled

Yes

Yes

Yes

Redundant
Shutdown

Yes

Yes

Yes

Event Record Log

Yes

---

---

Yes

---

---

Yes

Yes

Yes

---

Yes

Yes

Certification

Pending

CSA/UL Certified for its


intended use
(Model SF 731)
NFPA 87 Standards

CSA/UL Certified for its


intended use
(Model SF 731)
NFPA 87 Standards

Classification

Class I, Division II

Class I, Division II

Class I, Division II

Auto-Restart After
Power Failure
Input(s) for Safety
Devices
Communications

TECHNICAL TRAINING

18

ROI EXPECTED COSTS

TECHNICAL TRAINING

19

ROI POTENTIAL UNANTICIPATED COSTS

TECHNICAL TRAINING

20

WHO BENEFITS FROM BURNER MANAGEMENT

Distributors
o

OEMs
o

Providing customer needed product and service


Leadership and credibility with customers

End Users
o

Field Personnel

Corporate Engineering

Corporate Management

Safety Officer

COMPETITORS

Canalta

ACL Manufacturing

Profire

SureFire

Patton

Platinum Control offers a more consistent, technologically advanced product with the following
benefits:

CSA/UL Certified for its intended use the entire unit versus components

Extremely high commitment to service, customer relationship

Superior quality manufacturing

Platinum personnel strategically located around the US and Canada

Remote monitoring

Centrally located

TECHNICAL TRAINING

21

SUPERIOR MANUFACTURING

State-of-the-art ISO 9001:2008, CSA/UL certified facility

Best quality assurance in the industry

Use only the highest rated component parts

65,000 square feet of manufacturing space virtually unlimited capacity to produce upon
demand

Typically we can meet the demand for nearly any order quantity in days, not weeks, in
conjunction with our distribution network

Main distribution hub and is centrally located near the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

The above three images are of Variosystems, Platinums manufacturer site.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

22

PLATINUM CONTROL BENEFITS

Proven ability to integrate with the ROC system

CSA/UL Certified for its intended use the entire unit versus components

Extremely high commitment to service, customer relationship

Superior quality US manufacturing

Platinum personnel strategically located around the US and Canada

LBP network throughout the US and Canada

Comprehensive technical training program

Centrally located

24/7 customer support hotline- 877-374-1115

TECHNICAL TRAINING

23

THE PLATINUM WAY

We succeed. No Excuses.
We strive to exceed our clients expectations.
We provide our clients with excellent experiences.
We solve our clients problems, even if they are not directly our problems.
We obsess about service.
We dont assume, we listen.
We always operate with integrity.
We are not always right. We admit it when we are wrong and act to solve the problem
as quickly as possible.
Success is never a solitary venture.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

24

SECTION II:
COMBUSTION FUNDAMENTALS

TECHNICAL TRAINING

25

FIRE TRIANGLE

Fuel
Energy

Energy is defined as the ability by work or heat to provide usable power.


It is our goal to incite usable power (energy) to affect a liquid or natural gas stream. The
end result is to heat the stream to improve separation or to prevent hydrates from
forming. The most common way to accomplish this is by using a burner system to affect
(heat) the inlet stream.
In this burner system a repeating chemical process known as combustion is occurring.
There are three components that are required in specific ratios to create combustion. If
any one of these three components are missing, or removed, then combustion cannot
occur or be sustained.

Oxygen

Our atmosphere is composed of 20.9% Oxygen in most normal environments. This


makes oxygen the most available component of the fire triangle. For our applications
Oxygen is normally supplied to the burner by natural draft. The amount of oxygen
available to the burner is critical in relationship to fuel. Therefore, the oxygen supply is
usually regulated by a shutter, or mixing system combining the oxygen with fuel.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

26

Fuel

Many types of fuels can be used in the fire triangle. The primary fuels we will utilize are
natural gas and propane. Both of these fuels are desirable for our application as little
heat is required for ignition and the combustion process is controllable. In natural gas
applications, the fuel supply is commonly provided from the working processes of the
gas stream being generated at the location. There are times when this gas stream may
be sent from an auxiliary location, or central battery. In some instances propane may be
utilized. This occurs when there is little or no natural gas available for burner operations
or the percentage of impurities in the gas stream such as CO2, H2S, etc. prevent burning
the available gas. It is important to be sure of where the fuel stream is coming from, the
type of fuel being used, and British Thermal Unit (BTU) value.

Heat

The final component of the triangle is energy (heat). We are seeking to provide this
component to instigate the process of combustion. This is accomplished by utilizing an
ignition source to generate the necessary heat to complete the chemical reaction. This
component is most safely and conveniently provided by a Platinum Burner Management
System (BMS) ignition device.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

27

CONTROLLED COMBUSTION

Fuel

Exhaust

Oxygen
Heat

Heat

We have established a goal of providing energy (heat) as a chemical treating process. It is then critical to
be able to control this heat to insure safe and efficient operation. By providing the necessary ignition,
and regulating the oxygen and fuel combination, we can harness available heat energy provided by the
chemical reaction. This dictates that we must have the power to control initial ignition and the
individual oxygen and fuel components brought together as a combined mixture. This control is
imperative for a safe and sustained reaction.
The ratio of oxygen to fuel for efficient operation can change subject to the BTU content. Without the
proper ratio, the reaction can burn rich or lean. This affects the available heat energy, operation
efficiency, sustainability, and maintenance issues relating to burner operation.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

28

Control By Design

Image of Platinums ignition module, wiring, and pilot


installed in a flame arrestor.

It is desired for the combustion chamber to be able to operate without the continuous assistance of
personnel. Therefore, the combustion chamber, and supporting devices are designed to be operated
with minimal field operator assistance. The primary assistance comes from startup operations providing
the initial ignition source and adjustment of valves, regulators and oxygen/fuel mixing devices, and is
not ongoing.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

29

Control By Instruments

Dual Platinum BMS-731 units installed for glycol dehydrator


and combustor.

Control of the ongoing heating process is required. Once again, it is desirable to minimize human
contact. By utilizing electrical and pneumatic instrumentation for fuel supply and ignition, we can safely
and efficiently decrease the need for personal attention and adjustment to the components utilized in
burner operation.
It is crucial that field personnel are aware and trained in the operation of the devices utilized on their
field locations. There is a variety of components that may provide similar functions, but with different
operating adjustment parameters. It is our recommendation for affected personnel to review the
operations manuals for any component utilized. This is necessary to insure familiarity and an
understanding of safe work practices related to each piece of equipment and the instrumentation
associated.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

30

TYPES OF BURNER ASSEMBLIES

Emulsion Inlet

Gas Outlet

Oil Outlet

Sketch of an average fired vessel.

Water Outlet

There are many different sizes, shapes, styles, and types of fired production equipment. We are
primarily concerned with the most common types utilized in the oil and gas industry. These are direct
fired and indirect fired.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

31

Direct Fired Units

Clean Oil

Water, Oil and Gas


Emulsion

Sketch of a direct fired heater already labeled.

In the operation of a direct fired device, the area of heat generated energy is directly in contact with the
product to be affected. The heat contact is made in a fluid section. Examples of these types of
production equipment would be emulsion heater treaters, heated separators, tank heaters, and glycol
dehydration regen units.
In a direct fired unit, the generated heat energy from the combustion chamber radiates from the
firetube directly to the process stream to be affected, such as the inlet emulsion, or glycol to be
recycled. Routine maintenance and inspections are recommended as extra precaution. This is due to
the nature of the process fluid usually being flammable, and the direct proximity of the heat source.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

32

Indirect Fired Units

Heated
Outlet

Fluid Media

Gas or
Emulsion
Inlet

Sketch of an indirect fired heater already labeled.

In the operation of an indirect fired device, the area of heat generated energy is now providing heat
energy to a media fluid. This media fluid, is heated, and transmits the heat energy to the process
stream. This can be a gas or fluid stream. Examples of these types of production equipment would be
water baths on gas production units, salt bath heaters, or line heaters.
An indirect fired unit is an example of heat exchange in which heat is applied to one media, and then
this heat is transferred to the process stream to gain the desired results.
It is important to know whether the equipment being used is direct or indirect fired. This will assist in
having a full understanding of safe, correct, and efficient operation.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

33

BURNER CATEGORIES
The majority of fired equipment contains a fuel train, combustion chamber, the firetube, and stack. We
will discuss the additional components which make up the fuel train and combustion chamber later.
There are many different varieties of burner assemblies. The two most common are liquid fueled and
gas fueled. For our purposes we are only concerned with gas fueled, and more specifically gas fueled
natural draft burners.
Liquid Fueled Burners These are burners that use oil, crude oil, diesel, gasoline, kerosene, etc. for
burner fuel. The units are not typically practical in our area of operational
requirements due to the availability and ease of operation of natural gas
burners. In addition there is a requirement for forced oxygen supply and less
stability resulting in more intensive equipment for operation.
Gas Fueled Burners

There are two types of gas fueled burners usually found in petroleum industry
production applications. These are forced draft and natural draft.

Forced Draft Burners

Forced draft burners require a blower or fan to force oxygen through the air
intake to be combined with fuel.

The above image is of a forced draft burner on a horizontal


heater.

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Natural Draft Burners

Platinum BMS-731 units installed on multi-well production units.

This is the area of focus for us. Natural draft burners utilize oxygen supplied by the draft created due to
the heat inside the firetube. The oxygen is drafted into the firetube through a flame arrestor
(sometimes called burner front). The most commonly used fuel is natural gas produced on the site of
the burner systems. There is a broad spectrum of usable natural gas from 850 BTU/scf to 1400 BTU/scf.
The difference in supply gas BTU values will affect the heating capability of the burner. Propane may
also be used as fuel for a natural draft burner. Propane has a higher heating value of 2512BTU/scf.
When using propane, or high BTU natural gas, it may be necessary to reduce the fuel gas pressure up to
40% , or reduce the orifice size up to 40% due to the higher heating value of propane. While not
common, it is not out of the question to find landfill gases, or waste gases being burned in the
petrochemical industry. The btu values of such gases can vary greatly, and may require using supplied
propane to maintain a stable flame. It is essential to have a gas analysis to confirm heating value and
combustibility to use landfill or waste gas as a supply.
The most common type of burner found in the field in petrochemical applications is the gas fired natural
draft burner. These burners are used for convenience and ease of operations. When properly sized and
maintained gas fired natural draft burners will perform reliably. Key components are the fuel gas train,
flame arrestor, burner mixer, burner nozzle, pilot mixer, pilot nozzle, burner management or ignition
device, firetube, and stack. There are additional components that may be found on some installations
such as secondary air adjustment, turbulators, shutters, combustion air controllers, but we will discuss
these later. The burner should be sized according to the expected flow conditions of the location. It is

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always preferential to have a gas analysis and Btu content of the gas supply to be used. Note it is a
common practice to move equipment from location to location as wells deplete. This can create a
situation in which improperly sized equipment designed for a completely different set of conditions is on
the site. This can result in poor heating capacity, unsatisfactory equipment performance, or even safety
concerns.
All natural draft burners operate on a gas fuel supply, and are not designed for liquid fuels. The fuel gas
supply will flow from the source. This could actually be the equipment that the burner is situated on.
An example would be a heat treater, or gas production unit. The gas supply flows through a scrubber to
remove liquids, possibly a filter and/or a Y strainer to remove impurities, then to a pressure reducing
regulator to maintain between 5 to 15 pounds average pressure, and then a fuel gas supply valve to
allow for gas flow when required, and to shut gas flow off when not needed. A pilot gas supply is usually
taken from the fuel gas scrubber as well; however this usually operates from ounces, possibly up to 8
pounds (average 2-5 lbs.). In addition there can be relief valves, isolation valves, and gauges in the fuel
gas train. The supply gas then goes into the combustion chamber to be mixed with oxygen which, is
drafted into the firetube via the flame arrestor.
There are a variety of brands of manufacture of all of the components in the fuel gas train and burner
components in the combustion chamber.
It is critical to have an understanding of correct burner adjustment procedures specific to the
components being utilized to insure safe, reliable, and efficient burner performance. Proper burner
tuning is essential to minimize heat release rate and allow for maximum combustion efficiency.
There are several variables to be considered to allow for optimum burner adjustment:

BTU content

Confirm no impurities such as CO2 in gas supply stream

Process volume through vessel

Desired temperature for separation, prevention of hydrates

Fuel gas pressure

Unobstructed flame arrestor

Firetube free of sooting, hot spots, paraffin buildup

Orifice sizing

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Liquid in gas stream/plugging or freezing

Primary air

Requirement for secondary air

Correct stack height

Atmospheric conditions and elevation

Correct operation of the burner will prevent excess cycling or excessive heat transfer. Both of these
situations cause inefficient or wasted gas consumption.
Thermal efficiency can be reviewed in some cases using a thermal heat gun. A complete analysis should
be performed using a flue gas analyzer.

Flue Gas Analyzer

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TYPES OF OILFIELD EQUIPMENT WITH BURNER ASSEMBLIES


Heater Treater
A vessel that heats an emulsion and removes water
and gas from the oil to raise it to a quality acceptable
for a pipeline or other means of transport. A heater
treater is a combination of a heater, free-water
knockout, and oil and gas separator.

Electrostatic Treater
A vessel that receives emulsion flows and resolves
the emulsion to oil, water, and usually gas, by using
heat, chemicals, and a high-voltage electric field.
This field, produced by grids placed perpendicular to
the flow of fluids in the treater, aids in breaking the
emulsion. The electrostatic treater is also called the
Chemelectric or electrochemical treater.
Heated Separator
An item of production equipment used to separate
liquid components of the well stream from the
gaseous elements. Separators are vertical or
horizontal and are cylindrical or spherical in shape.
Separation is accomplished principally by gravity, the
heavier liquids falling to the bottom and the gas
rising to the top. In this vessel a firetube or heating
element has been added to prevent freezing or assist
with emulsion separation.

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Glycol Dehydrator
A unit used to remove minute water particles from
natural gas if dehydration has not been attained
using separators. A glycol dehydrator unit is
composed of an absorber, reboiler, and supporting
components.

Amine Unit
An Amine Unit is a combination of a contactor
tower, surge drum, regenerator, condenser, and
accumulator assembled together with associated
instrumentation for the removal of the acid gases
CO2, H2S, plus additional contaminants from a
natural gas stream. The sour gas is absorbed by
Amine in the contactor tower. Hydrocarbon is
separated from the solution in the surge drum. The
acid gases are stripped from the rich amine in the
regenerator. The now lean amine is circulated
back to the contactor, while the acid gas and
condensed liquids are sent to the condenser for
cooling and then collected in the accumulator. This
process can be found in both field and plant
operations.

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Line Heater
A container or vessel enclosing an arrangement of
tubes and a firebox in which an emulsion is heated
before further treating, or in which natural gas is
heated in the field to prevent the formation of
hydrates.

Gas Production Unit


A unit that is a combination of a line heater, and a
separator together on one skid or possibly
enclosed housing. These units can also be referred
to as stack packs and T-packs. More elaborate
units can have multiple combinations housed
together and may include dehydration equipment
as well.

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Combustor
A device used to incinerate waste gas emissions
VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds), and BTEX
(Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl Benzene, Xylenes)
resulting from the production process. It
eliminates and vaporizes these hazardous
emissions by maintaining a certain temperature
at the flash point. Maximum destruction
efficiency is paramount.

Combination Unit
These units may be the combination of a gas
production unit and a dehydration system
combined on the same skid and enclosed.

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Multi-well Unit
These units are essentially two or more gas
production units on the same skid and are usually
enclosed. They are designed for use on multiple well
pad locations.

Tank Heater
These are firetubes designed to be mounted in the
door of storage tanks. The units are found primarily
in colder climates.

Flare
A device designed to ignite vent gas and other
emissions. The flare does not have the destruction
efficiency of an incinerator.

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THE FIRETUBE

Wildlife Protector
Stack Arrestor

Turbulators

Flame
Arrestor

Firetube

Flange
Main Burner

Return
Bend

Pilot Burner and Igniter


Ignition
Module

Sketch of firetube and components.

The firetube is an integral part of the burner assembly. As discussed earlier, it allows for control by
design. Without the firetube there would be no requirement for a burner assembly. While we are
discussing fired vessels, it is important to note that fired vessels fall into a category of heated vessels.
Not all heated vessels use an actual fire. We distinguish the equipment in our conversation as fired
vessels, because they do in fact have a fire contained within the combustion chamber and firetube. The
firetube itself houses the flame, a barrier from the process fluids or media, and provides for heat
exchange. The heat produced in the firetube is communicated to the media or process fluids, thereby
raising their temperature.

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When properly adjusted, the flame in the firetube should not reach further than the beginning of the
first bend of the firetube. It is an important consideration that the flame from the burner does not
contact the firetube wall. Prolonged contact with the firetube wall can weaken the firetube causing
hot spots or weak areas in the firetube that are subject to failure. If a firetube fails, the results could
be catastrophic. A potential for explosion or fire would be possible if for example crude oil came in
contact with the flame from the burner. A serious threat would be posed to safety, the environment,
additional equipment, and revenue in the case of such an event.

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Heat Flow in the Firetube


Once stabilized, the temperature of heat in the firetube is generally about the same as the temperature
of the fluid surrounding the firetube. This is possible even when the temperature of combustion is far
greater inside the firetube. This is due to the fact that heat exchanges from the firetube into the fluid
faster than it moves from the combustion gas. Liquid is more dense than flue gas, allowing heat to
move faster.
Note in the illustration the heat flows from the hot gas through the firetube to become flue gas. Heat
moves in the firetube from the inside to the outside. The metal firetube then absorbs and transfers heat
to the liquid.

Heat Transfer

Heat transfers from hot


flue gas to firetube.
Heat transfers through
firetube shell.
Heat raises temperature
of process.

Example of firetube heat transfer.

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Example of firetube concerns.

Hot spot in firetube.

Example of carbon in the firetube.

Scale or paraffin buildup


on outside of firetube.

Example of a hotspot in the firetube.

Sooting inside firetube.

Example of sooting inside of the firetube.

Be very cautious of hot spots developing on the firetube, as well as scale or paraffin buildup on the
outside of the firetube. This paraffin buildup will prevent heat transfer to the liquid, but will cause the
metal to superheat and development of hot spots or weak points in the firetube.
When liquid hydrocarbon is present, it will not completely burn. This results in coke forming inside the
firetube. This coke will insulate the firetube and prevent well dispersed heat transfer. This will decrease
the bath temperature, and increase the stack temperature. Thereby efficiency is decreased.

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Firetube Return Bend Designs


Square Miter

Square Miter

Smooth Return

4 Miter

There are 4 different types of return bend designs for firetubes. It is worth noting that the square miter
is the least expensive of the firetube designs, however it is the weakest. The longer the firetube leg,
larger the diameter, and the more temperature cycling, the more susceptible to stress cracking the
firetube becomes. It is also useful to note the firetube miter design for cleaning purposes and whether
the firetube is a horizontal or vertical configuration.

The Firetube Stack


The stack is designed to incite oxygen flow or draft into the firetube via the flame arrestor. Due to this
draft hot gases are expelled from the firetube via the stack. The design size and capacity of the
combustion chamber and firetube dictate the height of the stack. The hot gases will rise ultimately to
be dispersed outside the stack area. This creates a void in the firetube causing a lower pressure area
around the burner. This allows the cooler oxygen to flow (draft) into the firetube and react in the
combustion chamber. This process is integral to the ongoing chemical reaction of combustion taking
place in the combustion chamber. The height of the stack, which may be between 10 and 25 long, is
also designed to insure adequate stack drafting. Stack temperature can be monitored to prevent
excessive heat loss or extreme fuel gas pressures to the main burner. Improper drafting can cause main
and pilot burner flameouts, inefficient fuel consumption, poor combustion, and soot buildup.

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Flash Arrestor/Stack Head

Flash arrestor/stack heads installed on production equipment.

Not all fired vessels come equipped from the manufacturer with these devices. They are important
considerations for safe and efficient operations. Flash and stack arrestors are designed to be mounted
at the top of the firetube stack to prevent sparks, flashes, or any burning material from escaping the
stack. Any escaping burning debris could ignite any combustibles that could be around or near the
burner or stack assembly. Sparks are basically burning carbon remnants. An inefficient burner will
generate the burning carbon. This carbon becomes attached to the firetube walls which can decrease
drafting efficiency. This carbon can also crack, fall off, and re-ignite, potentially igniting any
combustible material in proximity. The flash/stack arrestor can prevent these from escaping, but the
burning carbon will cause soot buildup on the inside of the firetube, which leads to additional problems.
The flash arrestor and stack arrestor are mounted on the stack head if the vessel is so equipped. These
devices consist of an arresting element to prevent short duration sparks or flashes. These devices are
designed of sufficient size to not add to backpressure on the stack which would prevent proper drafting.
The stack head is utilized to minimize the possibility of pilot or main burner flame blowouts due to down
drafts, or wind issues. Stack arrestor size must be at least as large as flame arrestor. Accurate sizing
requires BTU requirement, firetube diameter, length, and stack height.
NOTE

Not all fired production equipment is supplied with stack heads, stack arrestors, flash arrestors. Installation of these devices is
usually determined by the producer, purchased from equipment manufacturer, and determined by state and federal land
regulations.

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Turbulators

Wildlife Protector
Stack Arrestor

Turbulators

Flame Arrestor

Flange

Firetube

Return Bend

Main Burner

Pilot Burner and Igniter


Ignition
Module
Sketch of firetube and components.

A firetube turbulator is a component installed in the second leg of the firetube past the return bend.
The purpose of the turbulator is increase heat transfer on the back side of the firetube. The turbulator
directs flue gas outward towards the wall of the firetube. This increases heat retention and heat
transfer from the firetube, lowers stack temperatures, decreases pressure loss, increases efficiency,
while decreasing operating expense.

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THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER


Hood
Pilot Gas
Air
Flow

Flange

Fuel Gas

Flame
Arrestor
Burner
Nipple

Burner Mixer

Inspection
Port
Air
Flow

Ignition
Module

Ground
Cable

Pilot Mixer

Pilot Nozzle

Pilot Nipple
High Voltage
Cable

Burner
Nozzle

Igniter Rod

Ten-Conductor
Cable

Sketch of combustion chamber and components.

The combustion chamber is the front end portion of the firetube adjoined with the flame arrestor. This
is where oxygen from outside the firetube is combined with the supplied pilot and main burner gas for
ignition and sustained combustion. The combustion chamber consists of piping coming in to the
chamber from the fuel gas train, the pilot orifice, mixer and nozzle, the main mixer, and burner nozzle,
in addition to burner ignition components. It is recommended the burner nozzle extend from the flame
cell into the firetube 4.

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Flame arrestor orientation and installation.

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The Flame Arrestor


Gas Inlet
Flame Arrestor Housing

Burner Mixer

Firetube Flange

Burner Mixer
Burner Nozzle

Inspection
Port

Pilot Nozzle
Pilot Mixer

Flame Arrestor

Sketch of flame arrestor and components.

The purpose of the flame arrestor is to insure that combustion stays in the combustion chamber. In
case of an explosion, the flame arrestor cools the vapors from inside the combustion chamber to
prevent a potential ignition on the outside of the arrestor. The flame arrestor is the shell that holds the
flame cell. The flame cell is a tortuous path of passages that serves as heat exchanger. This path arrests
all flames providing safety and protection. The flame cell is sized to deliver an excess air level of 15
percent considering the lowest draft amount available for ignition and sustained reaction. This also
serves to dissipate the heat generated internally in the combustion chamber to below ignition
temperature on the outside of the flame arrestor. The flame arrestor flame cell or element is
engineered with sufficient mass to endure being positioned near the burning flame inside the
combustion chamber.
It is important to know that there are two different types of combustions that occur within a
combustion chamber near the flame arrestor. These two types of combustions are deflagration and
detonation. The controlled burning that takes place at the burner tip is known as deflagration. A
substantial flame velocity fed by high internal pressures with extreme gas turbulence is known as
detonation.

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The flame arrestor element is designed to withstand explosions (detonations) in the firetube or prevent
flashes from passing through the element that could potentially ignite outside the flame arrestor. To do
so the wrap density of the flame arrestor must be sufficiently tight utilizing alternating wraps of flat and
corrugated metal. The flame arrestor housing is engineered with the same considerations in mind. In
addition, considerations are made in regards to the design being able to withstand adverse hot and cold
weather conditions. Most modern flame arrestors are made of aluminum or stainless steel in offshore
applications. In the past arrestors were made of carbon steel, and many of these are still in service.
Gaskets used between all jointed components of the flame cell are critical. These gaskets must be in
good shape and provide a seal to prevent fugitive combustible material from exiting the flame arrestor
area.
It is recommended to service flame arrestors and the combustion chamber on a regular basis to be
determined by the equipment usage. It is important to inspect these components for damage, plugging,
debris, wear, holes, leaks, etc..

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Benefits of Flame Arrestors

Flame arrestor disassembled.

Flame arrestors have not always been used, and it is possible to find vessels in the field that still do not
have flame arrestors on them. These have what was called a burner front. These can be dangerous as
an open flame may be exposed. These units should be replaced for safety and to be compliant with
regulations in most areas.
The flame arrestor itself provides many benefits:

Ease of inspection and cleaning.

Corrosion resistant.

Explosion resistant retaining band which when maintained allows for a long service life.

Designed to prevent debris and other materials from entering the firetube.

Provides a measure of dampening of burner noise.

Decreases potential for downdrafts or wind to blow out the burner or pilot flame.

Total combustion of fuel gas by providing steady oxygen feed to the main and pilot burners.

An important additional component of the flame arrestor is the inspection port. The inspection port is
typically on the front of most modern flame arrestors and may contain a temperature resistant window.
This port is beneficial for inspection of flame, burner components, and can assist in troubleshooting.
NOTE

NEVER REMOVE INSPECTION PORT COVER WHILE A FLAME IS PRESENT IN THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER. A HAZARDOUS
FLASHBACK CAUSING INJURY COULD RESULT.

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Types of Flame Arrestors


There are a variety of flame arrestor types, brands of manufacture, and sizes. We will illustrate some of
the more common below. Examples are of the T-Type, O-Type, Barrel Type, and A-Type.
T-Type

O-Type

Barrel-Type

A-Type

T-Type flame arrestor on horizontal treater.

O-Type flame arrestor on gas production unit.

Barrel/Box Type flame arrestor on line heater.

A-Type flame arrestor on line heater.

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Flame Arrestor Operations


The flame arrestor is a valuable safety device. To remain an asset, and not turn into a liability, the flame
arrestor must be in good operation condition with maintenance performed regularly.
Inspect regularly as determined by usage, weekly, monthly, quarterly, semi -annual.
Confirm the flame arrestor element is free of plugging, oily residue, sand, soot, corrosion, etc
Look for signs of warping or heat damage.
Insure firetube is free of sooting, obstructions, or hot spots
Check positioning of burner equipment.
Check gas flow through main and pilot burners.
Check and test thermostats.
Inspect gaskets, and observe sealing surfaces and seams for integrity.
Always use new gaskets when performing maintenance or repairs.
Clean flanges before re-assembly during maintenance.
Flame arrestor and firetube joint seal must be airtight.
All seams on firetube must be free of pinholes or cracks.
Make sure sight glass cover is clean with no cracks.
Be sure inspection cover is in place and sealed.
Make sure there are no additional ignition sources near flame arrestor.
Remove any flammable materials from the area around flame arrestor.
Inspections of fuel gas supply and fuel gas train should be conducted at this time.
Inspect and clean any additional flame or stack arrestors at this time.
CONSULT API RP 12N FOR OPERATION, MAINTENANCE, AND TESTING OF FLAME ARRESTORS

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Standard Flameco Nomenclature

STANDARD A TYPE F/A SIZES

A Type (Flameco O Type)

Box Type Flame Arrestor

MM Btu/Hr.
0.05
0.10
0.25
0.40
0.50
0.75
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.50
3.00
3.50
4.00
4.50
5.00
6.00
7.00

Standard Model #
SB 12-6-1
SB 12-6-1
SB 12-8-1-1/2
SB 16-8-2
SB 16-8-2
SB 20-10-3SS
SB 24-12-3SS
SB 26/18-14/3CI
SB 28/18-14/3CI
SB 32/18-20/4SS
SB 34/18-20/4SS
SB 30-20B-4CI
SB 32-20B-5CI
SB 36-24B-5CI
SB 38-24B-5CI
SB 40-24B-5CI
SB 30-18B-4CI
SB 32-20B-5CI
SB 36-24B-5CI

Mixer Style
Mixer Head
Mixer Head
Mixer Head
Mixer Head
Mixer Head
Single Stage
Single Stage
Compound
Compound
Compound
Compound
Compound
Compound
Compound
Compound
Compound
Two Compound
Two Compound
Two Compound

NOTE:
Low noise burner applications use the same arrestor, mixer and nozzle combinations, but use a larger orifice.
SB 12 / 16 6B 1CI (TWO) - Firetube Count
Compound Mixer
Burner Size
Box Type
Firetube Size
Body Length (12 is Standard)
Element Diameter
Single Burner
MB-MultiBurner

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MAIN & PILOT BURNER ASSEMBLIES


Hood
Pilot Gas

Flange

Fuel Gas

Flame
Arrestor

Air
Flow

Burner Mixer

Inspection
Port

Ground
Cable

Ignition
Module

Air
Flow

Pilot Mixer

Pilot Nipple
High Voltage
Cable

Burner
Nipple

Burner
Nozzle

Pilot Nozzle

Igniter Rod

Ten-Conductor
Cable
Sketch of flame arrestor with burner components.

The burner assembly housed inside the flame arrestor/combustion chamber is made up of the following
components:

Fuel gas supply nipple

Main gas primary air mixer

Main gas burner nipple

Main gas burner nozzle

Pilot gas supply nipple or tubing

Pilot gas orifice

Pilot gas mixer

Pilot gas burner tip

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Keep in mind when adding a Platinum Burner Management System or Igniter, you will also see the
following components in the combustion chamber and firetube area. These items will be discussed later
at length.

Igniter module

10 conductor wire from BMS panel

Ground wiring

Ionization rod wiring

Ionization Rod and standoff

When installing or performing burner maintenance, make sure and inspect each of these components to
confirm working condition.

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The Burner Nozzle

Sticktite Burner Nozzle

Rosebud Burner Nozzles

Slotted Burner Nozzles

The burner nipple, burner tip, pilot nipple, and pilot tip are all non-adjustable and designed according to
manufacturer specifications. They only need to be inspected and cleaned periodically or replaced if
needed.
Many different styles of burner nozzles are available. These diverse nozzles provide specific flame
shapes to meet the firetube application. Single port nozzles that produce long cylindrical flames work
well on equipment with long firetubes. These nozzles may not work as well on firetubes with shorter
firetubes that may require more modest fuel gas supply pressures. Nozzles with smaller ports are more
suited to shorter firetube applications. For example a rosebud style nozzle produces a shorter bushier
flame suited to vertical heat treaters with firetubes typically less than 6 long. Just as with the pilot
nozzle, main burner nozzles have a ring of smaller ports around the main burner port. These ports serve
to keep the flame by continuing to ignite fuel as it is diverted through these ports.

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The Mixer

Single Stage Venturi

Mixer Head
Primary Air

Adjustable Orifice

Fuel Gas Inlet

Image of an eclipse mixer with single state venture.

The main burner mixer is designed to mix the oxygen supply and fuel gas for ignition of the main burner.
This component can see fuel gas pressures between 5 psig to 30 psig. An average is more likely to be
between 8 psig and 15 psig. This varies due to the type of equipment, size of burners, and btu value of
the gas.

Sketch of parts breakdown of an Eclipse mixer.

The mixer for the main burner gas is adjustable with gas flow stem, orifice and usually an air shutter.
This is by design to allow for mixing of primary oxygen and fuel. Flame adjustment is performed utilizing
the fuel flow stem and air shutter and pressure from the fuel gas supply regulator. Most manufacturers
recommend a main burner flame that is mostly blue with flecks or fingers of red and yellow at the flame
tips. The burner pictured above uses primary air, or a single air source being drafted in through the
flame arrestor. This air volume is adjusted using the primary air shutter. In cases where it is difficult to
establish anything but a long yellow potentially smoky flame a secondary air source should be
considered. Note there are other circumstances that can cause similar symptoms such as restrictions of
the orifice, mixer, or burner nozzle. The nozzle pictured above comes equipped with venturi. Many
modest size burners do not have these. The venturi can increase burner efficiency. Much like an orifice
the venturi regulates the flow going to the burner and disperses the gas stream at a lower velocity than
the mixer inlet.

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The Pilot

Assembled Platinum pilot assembly.

The pilot assembly is a similar but smaller version of the main burner. The majority of pilot mixers are
non-adjustable however, there are adjustable pilot mixers available that can be used to improve
operations with very rich or very lean gas mixtures. Positioning of the pilot tip is crucial as main burner
ignition cannot be achieved otherwise. Additionally the position of the flame ionization rod used to
ignite the pilot is just as critical

Platinum pilot mixer with close-up of orifice.

Platinum pilot mixer

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Adjustable pilot mixer.

62

There are many pilot nozzles available from a variety of brands. Platinum uses the RHSB Pilot nozzle.
The flame retention ports assist this nozzle in working under a variety of conditions. The shroud with
strategically placed ports helps to minimize the effect of wind and turbulence by helping to keep the
flame in place. The RHSB nozzle also maintains enough heat to relight the pilot in the event of a short
duration flameout.

Various types of pilot nozzles.

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THE FUEL GAS TRAIN

Example of fuel gas train on a dehydrator.

Example of a Canadian compliant fuel gas train.

The fuel gas train is an assembly of components that transports, removes liquids and impurities, allows
monitoring, and regulates the fuel gas stream to the burner section inside the combustion chamber.
Please follow appropriate API, OSHA, Canadian Standard, industry and company specific safety practices.
In Canada reference Canadian Standard B149.1 and B149.3-10 burner code, Alberta OHS, Alberta Gas
Code Regulation AR 113/2005. In the US, reference API RP 12N. Both the Canadian Standards and API
recommended practice address the installation, operations, and maintenance of fuel gas delivery
systems. The Canadian burner code also sets the baseline for burner management systems.

Example of fuel gas train on a gas production unit.

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Example of an insulated fuel gas train.

64

Example of a Canadian compliant fuel gas train.

Example of fuel gas train on a vertical heater treater.

The fuel gas train is typically supplied by the gas outlet stream on the equipment utilizing the burner
section such as treaters, dehys, gas units, amine systems, etc. In some cases, the gas supply may come
from another piece of equipment on location. In other circumstances, the gas supply on location may
not be usable due to contaminants, poor btu content, or low volume. In those instances, another fuel
gas such as propane may be piped in to the location, or a propane bullet set nearby. It is important to
understand where the gas stream is coming from, before installation considerations are made, or
adjustment to the burner system is attempted.
Emulsion Inlet

Gas Outlet

Oil Outlet

Water Outlet
Sketch of an average fired vessel.

In the diagram shown above, the fuel gas stream would be taken from the gas outlet in the top right
area of the vessel.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

65

Gas supply from the production vessel or alternative source is piped to the fuel gas scrubber. This piping
is typically one inch pipe, but can vary depending on equipment sizing. When the scrubber inlet
pressure exceeds 125 psig from the supply, a pressure reducing regulator such as the Fisher 630 Big Joe
regulator or Fisher 627 Little Joe regulator should be used to reduce the pressure to below 125psig from
the gas source, before entering the fuel gas scrubber. The fuel gas scrubber is used as volume pot for
liquids and impurities from the gas stream to drop out via gravity. The fuel gas scrubber should
contain a mechanical float valve that automatically shuts off the gas supply if the scrubber pot fills with
liquids. This scrubber pot, should be drained regularly depending on inlet fuel gas conditions. A relief
valve (PSV) should be installed on the fuel gas scrubber, and a backup on the fuel gas piping train going
to the burner system. Many fuel gas trains also have a regulator such as the Fisher 67CFR installed on a
pipe T or pipe cross on the top of the fuel gas scrubber. This device is installed to divert supply gas to
other instrumentation devices such as liquid level controls and liquid dump valves.
Once the gas supply has left through connection on the top of the fuel gas scrubber it should pass
through an isolation valve, and pressure gauge. Depending on quality of fuel gas a Y-Strainer or self
draining filter may be used next to remove any intrained liquids or impurities that may have escaped the
fuel gas scrubber. Regular draining of fuel gas scrubber minimizes this issue.
The next step of fuel gas flow would be through a pressure reducing regulator such as the Fisher 627
Little Joe to drop pressure to a burner usable pressure below 20 psig. From this regulator, gas will flow
through a control valve, thermostat valve, or burner valve such as a Kimray 112SMTDAB burner valve
which is controlled by a Kimray T-12 thermostat. The thermostat will be immersed in the production
vessel or process bath. Note when using a Burner Management System, the burner control valve will
remain in place, but the thermostat will be replaced by the RTD or Thermocouple tied to the Burner
Management System.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

66

At this point a pipe T would be placed to allow for straight flow to an additional isolation valve, and then
into the main burner mixer. The diverted flow may be through pipe, or even tubing. This flow would
then go through an isolation valve and pressure gauge. A regulator such as the Fisher 912 would be
used to step the pressure down to an amount usable for the pilot. Typically between 3 ounces and 5
psig depending on btu content and volume. From this regulator there is one more isolation valve, and
then piping through the flame arrestor and to the pilot mixer.
In Canadian applications you will find an Emergency Shutdown Device (ESD), high pressure switch, and
high temp shutdown. Many of these items apply to NFPA 87 as well. Therefore, while they are not
always found on US installations, they are becoming more common in pursuit of improved safe work
operations.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

67

Fuel Gas Train Drawing

Fuel Gas Train Drawing with BMS

TECHNICAL TRAINING

68

Canadian B149. 3 Fuel Gas Train Drawing

Standard Fuel Gas Train P&ID with BMS

TECHNICAL TRAINING

69

VESSEL/BURNER EQUIPMENT INSPECTION

It is extremely important to conduct regular inspections on all production equipment. The importance is
even greater when fired components are utilized. Maintaining regular inspections is recommended. It
would also be encouraged to add additional inspections whenever variables change such as flow
conditions, equipment being added or removed, extreme temperature changes, weather changes such
as hail, blowing dirt, etc.
Operational

Establish a routine inspection

Inspections

schedule, and make


allowances for additional
inspections when changes in
variables (such as flow
conditions or seasonal
temperature changes)
warrant.

Glycol dehydrator with combustor.

Internal

It is recommended to periodically drain,

Components

flush, and purge vessels so that they may

Inspections

be safely inspected internally. For


example materials such as paraffin, or
salts can coat firetubes and prevent heat
transfer. In turn this causes the firetube
to overheat in the area of buildup, and
degrades the metal causing hot spots
which can collapse or cause leaks.

Firetube pulled from vessel.

Additionally sand or other impurities such


as iron sulfide can restrict flow, heat
exchange, or even cause corrosion.

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70

Corrosion

Internal or external corrosion is


a leading indicator that the
possibility of a leak or pressure
release is on the way. Corrosion
detection and remedy are a
substantial component of the
inspection process. Visual
inspections and methods such

Example of surface corrosion.

as ultrasonic thickness testing


can be employed.
Leaks

Fluid or gas leaks pose risk to


safety, the environment, and
profitability. The possibility of
leaks must be removed. Check
the shell of the vessel and all
connection points on the vessel.
In addition thoroughly trace all
components of the fuel gas
train. The risk of leaks can be
even more significant on vessels
with fired components. A

Leaks from wet gas venting from solenoids.

hydrocarbon, or natural gas leak


that is ignited can be
catastrophic.

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71

Obstructions

Restrictions in firetubes, vessels,


nozzles, valves, piping, or
instrumentation can prevent
heat exchange or process flow.
This will affect efficiency at a
minimum, and can lead to
potentially serious
consequences. Insure all
firetubes, vessels, valves, and
paths of fluid or natural gas flow

Collapsed firetube resulting from a hotspot.

are free of debris, dirt, welding


slag, or any other materials that
may present an obstacle to
process flow.
Flame Arrestor

It is essential for the flame cell

Cell

to be completely free of damage


or clogging from oily residues,
sand, etc. to insure proper air
flow through the flame cell and
therefore a safe and efficiently
operation burner. A change in
the operational surface area of
the flame cell can cause failure
of the flame arrestor.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

Flame arrestor restricted from residue of leaking firetube.

72

Gaskets

The gaskets used in all joining


sections must be in good
condition to prevent fluid or gas
leaks which would pose a hazard
to safety, the environment, or
equipment on the location. The
concern is increased on fired
components to verify the
gaskets sealing the flame
arrestor and flame cell are
functional to prevent an ignition
outside the combustion
chamber.

Fuel Gas Train

Gaskets needing to be replaced on flame arrestor.

Observe the pathway that fuel


gas for main and pilot take to
reach the combustion chamber.
Drain fuel gas scrubbers, inline
filter, y strainers, and regulator
drains for liquids or solids as
often as required. Confirm
adequate fuel gas supply
pressure is being delivered to

Leaks and tubing needing to be replaced on a fuel gas train.

the regulators. Make sure there


are no liquid residues dripping
from piping or gas seeps from
the connections or fittings.
Replace any faulty component
immediately.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

73

Burner Systems

Evaluate from piping on flame


arrestor through burner tip on the
main and pilot burners for leaks.
Inspect main and pilot burner nozzles
for proper placement in the firetube.
Be sure to confirm that the flame
when lit is centered in the firetube
and not touching the firetube wall as
this can lead to hot spots. Make
sure orifices are free of restrictions

Ignition module, pilot, and wiring installed in flame


arrestor.

and that fuel gas adjustment stems


move freely, and are set to provide
an acceptable flame. Black smoke is
an indication of a rich of fuel mixture.
Decrease the fuel adjustment to
lean the oxygen/fuel mixture. A
stable blue flame with red and yellow
flecks or tips is preferred. This flame
should not exceed the first turn of
the firetube. If it does, the fuel gas
regulator pressure is too high.

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74

The Stack

Observe the stack for corrosion or


pinholes which will cause drafting
issues. Dark smoke exiting the stack
indicates the fuel gas stream is too
rich. If the stack is insulated, observe
insulation. It is possible for water to
get between insulation and the metal
of the firetube stack. Corrosion can
occur when this condition exists. At
night conditions, observe to
determine if any sparks may be
exiting through the stack. If this is
the case take steps to remedy such as
repairing or adding a stack arrestor.

Gauges and

Confirm the working condition and

Temperature

accuracy of all pressure gauges,

Controls

temperature gauges, gauge cock and

Rich burning gas mixture.

columns. These are indicators of the


safety and efficiency of vessel
operations. Devices that are not
registering accurately can endanger
personnel, the environment, and
equipment.
RTD, pressure, temp, and sight gauges on a
heater treater.

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75

INITIAL BURNER STARTUP

Preparing to startup a Platinum BMS-731 on a vertical


heater treater.
NOTE:
BURNER START-UP OPERATIONS SHOULD ONLY BE EXECUTED BY TRAINED AND QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.

Observe other operations taking place on the location.


Alert other personnel on location as to what work you are performing.
Conduct and document pre-job planning tailgate meeting with affected personnel.
1.

Be sure the area surrounding the flame arrestor is free of obstacles in order to complete a quick
evacuation if necessary.

2.

Visually inspect the flame cell for deformation or impediments. Inspect the flame arrestor
housing to insure all connections are free of leaks. Check to confirm that all gaskets are in place
and in good condition with fasteners properly tightened. A combustible gas indicator can be used
to find leaks or other fugitive combustible gas sources in the area.

3.

Ensure firebox, stack, and stack arrestor (if equipped) are clear of debris or impediments.

4.

Survey the area for possibility of an open flame.

5.

Close all supply gas valves, drain fuel gas scrubber, and clear firetube of all combustible vapors.

6.

Confirm adequate fluid level above firetube.

7.

Determine that the only air path supply into the firebox is through the flame arresting element.

8.

Check for the presence of combustible gas. Wait at least 5 minutes for firetube to clear. It is
preferable to use a combustible gas indicator. If a positive indication is made, re-check all valves,
piping, and instrumentation for leaks. If no combustible gas is indicated, then proceed.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

76

9.

Evaluate all pressure, temperature, and level gauges for accuracy.

10. Adjust all controls, valves, instrumentation, and gauges to proper operating parameters. Fuel gas
pressures are usually set between 5 and 15 psig depending on BTU value of gas. The lower the
BTU value, the higher the pressure.
11. Open air shutter on air gas mixer approximately 1/8 for the mixer to receive primary air. If
mixer has internal orifice adjustment pin, make sure it is backed out to not disrupt gas flow. Do
not operate the unit with the pin backed out so that the threads are inadequate to secure.
12. Open pilot gas and main burner gas supply isolation valve. Average 2-5 lbs.
DO NOT STAND IN FRONT OF THE LIGHTING PORT, FLAME ARRESTOR ELEMENT, OR FIRETUBE DURING IGNITION.
STAND TO THE SIDE AND UPWIND (IF POSSIBLE) OF THE LIGHTING PORT AND END PLATE OF THE FLAME ARRESTOR

13. Engage the BMS/IMS to ignite the pilot. Once pilot is established, the burner system will open
main burner valve to interact with pilot and ignite main burner.
14. The flame should be centered in the firetube, the burner should be regulated for continuous
firing. The air gas mixer should be set to provide proper combustion and to prevent hazardous
firetube carbon deposits. Visual flame setting is a blue flame exiting the burner nozzle and to red
and yellow fingers. Proper adjustment fine tuning can be performed with a stack gas analyzer.
Adjust fuel gas volume and pressure for desired efficiency.
15. Re-inspect equipment once start-up is completed and with heat at operating temperature. It is
important to check bolts for tightness and to check for any leaks in system as equipment warms
up, and once it is at operating temperature.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

77

SHUTDOWN PROCEDURE
1.

Locate On/Off button below on right of BMS screen and turn off.

2.

Close main and pilot burner isolation valves.

3.

Check for leaks in fuel gas train.

4.

Perform Lockout tagout.

5.

Bleed system at fuel gas scrubber if necessary.

6.

Allow at least 5 minutes for firetube to clear before removing inspection cover on arrestor.

7.

Insure internal components have cooled before attempting service or repairs.

CAUTION

LOCKOUT TAGOUT ELECTRICAL POWER AND FUEL GAS SUPPLY, THEN CLEAR COMBUSTION CHAMBER, BURNER ASSEMBLY, AND
FIRETUBE BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO CLEAN, SERVICE OR REPAIR EQUIPMENT.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

78

RECOMMENDED MAINTENANCE

FREQUENCY

DETAILED TASKS
Observe gauges and temperature controls for
accuracy
Drain fuel gas scrubber

Daily

Drain fuel gas filters


Clean Y strainer
Visually inspect vessel
Visual flame arrestor inspection
Test safety systems and emergency shutdowns

Monthly

Check the fuel gas train


Evaluate operational efficiency
Test high temperature controls
Test low temperature controls
Test high level controls

Semi-Annually

Test low level controls

Inspect firetube

Flame cell and arrestor inspection


Stack arrestor inspection
CAUTION

LOCKOUT TAGOUT ELECTRICAL POWER AND FUEL GAS SUPPLY, THEN CLEAR COMBUSTION CHAMBER, BURNER ASSEMBLY, AND
FIRETUBE BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO CLEAN, SERVICE OR REPAIR EQUIPMENT.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

79

TECHNICAL TRAINING

80

SECTION III:
PLATINUM CONTROLS BMS

TECHNICAL TRAINING

81

Platinum BMS-731 set up for 2 treaters.

Platinum BMS-731 on gas production unit.

The most hazardous part of operating fired vessels has historically been ignition of the pilot flame. In
the past, many burner assemblies were constructed so that the operator was required to open the
combustion chamber and manually ignite the pilot. This has proven repeatedly to be a hazardous
situation. A method to ignite the burner without exposing the operator to the hazard of being burned
and critically injured while performing this function was needed.
Platinum Control Technologies has the solution to this problem.
Our Burner Management System (BMS) allows for a pilot operated ignition system that will
automatically light the pilot flame with no attending personnel. This ignition device works in
conjunction with the safety system and will automatically shut off the fuel supply in the event of failure
for the pilot to establish after 3 tries. This CSA/UL compliant system has many other functions such as
temperature control and communication via modbus. In addition to being the safe work solution, this
equipment has positive environmental and regulatory benefits.
We are now ready to proceed to the installation portion of our training program. But first, there are a
few questions that need to be answered. The answers to these questions will assist in identifying the
equipment needed and considerations for the scope of the installation.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

82

PRE-INSTALLATION QUESTIONS
1.

Is this a new location or retrofit?

2.

Does the customer require solar, battery, or line (grid) power?

3.
4.

What type of production equipment is the BMS unit being installed on? (Dehy, Combustor,
etc...)
What size BTU unit or arrestor size will BMS be used with?

5.

Is temperature control required?

6.

Does the unit require RTD or Thermocouple?

7.

How many temperature points are needed? (1,2,3) More than 1 requires thermocouple.

8.

Which temperature points are needed? Process, Stack ?

9.

Will there be an ESD Valve?

10.

Does the customer have or prefer pneumatic or electric burner valves?

11.

Is the customer using field supply gas or propane?

12.

Is thermowell connection and thermowell available?

13.

If thermowell is available, what is insertion length, and thread size and type? (ex. NPT)

14.

Is communications/Modbus needed?

15.

Where does the customer prefer to have panel mounted in proximity to equipment?

16.

Confirm panel can be mounted within 15 of arrestor, otherwise longer cable needed.

17.

On retrofit units has the unit been running, or decommissioned? Has firetube and flame
arrestor been inspected/cleaned?
Is a level switch being used? If so, pneumatic or electric?

18.
19.

Electrical and pipefitting work to be performed. Insure qualified personnel are available, or
we are accommodating.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

83

WARRANTY STATEMENT
Platinum Control Technologies (PCT) warrants all its manufactured products to be free from defects in
material and workmanship, under normal use intended for the product, for a period of twelve (12)
months from the date of installation, not to exceed eighteen (18) months from the date of shipment.
The warranty does not cover damage to attached or ancillary devices.
The warranty shall be void for the following reasons:
1. Product is installed or modified by personnel not trained by, or considered representatives of,
Platinum Control Technologies.
2. Damage to the product caused by misuse.
3. Willful or intentional damage to the product.
4. Product neglect.
5. Product is damaged or destroyed by Acts of God (i.e., hurricane, tornado, etc.).
Warranty repairs are FOB (Freight On Board) origin; the customer is responsible for shipping costs to
Platinums facility. All repairs are to be mailed to the below address:
Platinum Control Technologies
Technical Services Department
2822 West 5th Street
Fort Worth, Texas 76107
If you have technical support questions, please contact 877.374.1115 or 817.529.6485 for help. Onsite
calls are subject to labor and travel charges to and from site.
WARNING
A. Platinum Burner Management Systems (BMS) are certified for Class I, Division II, Groups C and D and any
areas considered unclassified.
B. A Platinum BMS controller is Class I, Division II rated and therefore MUST be mounted in an appropriate
area compliant with its classification. Adherence to local classification of areas is crucial to safety and
operation.
C. DO NOT install a Platinum BMS in a Class I, Division I area.
D. DO NOT open the Platinum BMS unless the area has been declassified by qualified personnel.
E. Any substitution of parts or assemblies may compromise suitability of classification, causing injury or
death.
F. The Platinum BMS Ignition Module is not rated and therefore MUST be mounted in an unclassified area,
such as inside the spark arrestor.
G. There can be NO substitution or splicing of the ignition wire or other components of the Platinum BMS.
Substitution may impair the operation of the system, which could cause faulty operation, injury or death.
H. Before beginning the installation or operation of a Platinum BMS, please read this entire Manual.

NOTE

All Platinum BMS units are intended for oil and gas industry, direct and indirect natural draft fired heaters only, and are not to
be used for residential or commercial buildings of any kind.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

84

INTRODUCTION
Platinum 731 Burner Management System (BMS) model SF731 has been designed to meet the following
CSA/UL codes:

CSA C22.2 No. 0-M1982


CSA C22.2 No. 0.8 M1986
CSA C22.2 No. 199-M89
CAN/CSA E-60730-1 (Annex H)

UL372
UL873
UL1998

They are specifically designed to monitor and re-ignite natural draft gas burners used in heating systems
rated up to 10 MMBtu/hr. Our systems operate on 10VDC to 30VDC power. Your model is designed to
operate in a specific configuration and should NEVER be used alternately.
The Platinum BMS monitors for the presence of a pilot flame through an igniter rod which feeds a signal
back to a processor to determine a safe sequence of events based on the signal. In the absence of a
flame the BMS will shut off all gas sources feeding the pilot and main flame assembly and wait for a user
set delay time before attempting a re-ignition sequence. In the event of a positive ignition, the system
will sense the ion path of the flame and proceed with monitoring. In the event of a flame ignition failure,
the system will lock out the ignition process after three attempts and await an operator to troubleshoot
and reset the system.
Platinum BMS systems have temperature control that allows the installer to replace the temperature
indicator with an optional RTD (Resistance Temperature Detector) or an optional type K thermocouple.
With the addition of temperature control, the BMS has the ability to precisely control the process
temperature and perform high temperature shutdowns.
Examples where Platinum Burner Management Systems are used:

Dehydrator Re-boilers
Treaters
Heated Free Water Knockouts
Amine and Glycol Re-boilers
Salt Bath Heaters
Utility Heaters
Tank Burners
VOC Incinerators
BTEX Incinerators
Oil Stabilizers

TECHNICAL TRAINING

85

COMPONENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS


Shipping Box Contents
Upon receipt of shipping box, inspect the units for physical damage or missing parts, and become
familiarized with the system.
Components that will be shipped with the Platinum BMS:

Platinum
BMS-731
Main Control Box

Pilot Assembly

20 Gray TenConductor Cable

6 Blue High Voltage


Cable

Ignition Module
6 Black Ground
Cable
Mounting
Hardware

Optional components that may be shipped with the Platinum BMS:


Solenoid Valves
DO NOT install Solenoid Valves that are in excess of 14 Watts 24 VDC or below 1.4 Watts 24 VDC. Low watt solenoid
valves are recommended for solar applications. Any substitutions of solenoid valves must be reviewed and approved
by Platinum. Solenoid Valves outside these parameters will impair the operation of the system, potentially causing
injury or death.

1000 ohm RTD or Type K Thermocouple

TECHNICAL TRAINING

86

Microprocessor Board

Platinum BMS-731 with enclosure open to view


electronics.

Platinum BMS-731 Processor Board


The Platinum BMS Processor Board is in the main control box of the system, and manages the various
processes and functions of the Platinum BMS. Two (2) switches are located on this Processor Board; the
RESET button is used to reboot the system and the FACTORY SETUP button allows you to set up the
various system options.

Manual Reset
Button

100ma Fuse
Factory Setup
Button

100ma Spare Fuse

Platinum BMS-731 Microprocessor board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

87

Valves/Termination Board
8A Spare Fuses
8A
Main Power Fuse
Power Connector

ESD Valve
Connector

Main Valve
Connector
External Devices
Connector
Ignition Module
Connector

RTD/
Thermocouple
Connector

Pilot Valve
Connector

ESD Out
Connector
Modbus
Connector
Platinum BMS-731 Valves/Termination Board.

The connectors are sized to accept a single conductor 16 to 24 gauge wire.


Platinum BMS-731 Ignition Module
The Ignition Module is connected to the Main Control Box with the Ten-Conductor cable. The Ignition
Module is connected to the Pilot Assembly with the High Voltage cable and Ground cable.

Platinum Ignition Module

TECHNICAL TRAINING

88

Pilot Assembly
The Platinum Pilot Assembly consists of the Igniter Rod, Pilot Nozzle, and Pilot Mixer.

Outside view of Platinums pilot assembly box.

Igniter Rod

Platinums pilot nozzle, mixer, and igniter rod.

3/16 Spacing

Pilot Nozzle

pipe or nipple
length as required
(Not included)

Site of High
Voltage Cable
Connection

Mounting Bracket

Pilot Mixer

Platinums pilot components fully assembled and labeled.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

89

INSTALLATION
Pre-Installation Requirements
In order to properly install the Platinum Burner Management Systems the following will be required:
a. Fuel Train Requirements:
i. Main regulator
ii. Pilot regulator
iii. Main control valve (pneumatic valve ideally)
iv. Pressure gauge for main valve
v. Pressure gauge for pilot valve
vi. Main Ball valve, recommended but not necessary
b. Unistrut to mount the Main Control Box. The unit must be mounted within 15 feet of
the arrestor. (Longer cables available, if needed.)
c. Arrestor needs to be large enough to mount the Ignition Module inside of the arrestor.
d. Thermowell in vessel for RTD or Thermocouple. (Platinum recommends a pneumatic
high temperature shutdown for redundancy, i.e. T-12.)
e. Power Requirements: 10-30 Volts allowed. (24 volts is recommended.)
f.

Suggested 5 AMP power supply.

g. Up to 10 MMBtu/hr natural draft burner.


h. Type K Thermocouple wire if thermocouple is being used.

Platinum BMS-731 installed on a vertical heater treater.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

90

Mounting the Main Control Box


The Main Control Box contains two (2) electronic circuit boards. The Processor Board is mounted in
the door, and the Valves/Terminations Board is mounted in the main body of the case. They are
connected by two (2) multi-conductor flat cables.
STEPS:
1. Attach the Main Control Box mounting hardware to the back of the Main Control Box
with the hardware provided. Specific instructions are located in the Main Control Box
mounting hardware package.
2. Mount the Main Control Box in a secure Class I, Division II area.
3. The Main Control Box will need to be within 15 feet of the arrestor.
a. If this is not possible, please contact us for a longer ten-conductor cable.
WARNING
A.
B.
C.
D.

Platinum Burner Management Systems (BMS) are certified for Class I, Division II, Groups C and D and any
areas considered unclassified.
DO NOT install a Platinum BMS Main Control Box in a Class I, Div. I area.
DO NOT open the Platinum BMS Main Control Box unless the area has been declassified by qualified
personnel.
Adherence to local classification of areas is crucial to safety and operation.

Platinum BMS-731 Main Control Box installation.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

91

Installing Solenoid Valves


WARNING

DO NOT install Solenoid Valves that are in excess of 14 Watts 24 VDC or below 1.4 Watts 24 VDC. Low watt solenoid
valves are recommended for solar applications. Any substitutions of solenoid valves must be reviewed and approved
by Platinum. Solenoid Valves outside these parameters will impair the operation of the system, potentially causing
injury or death.

As there are a number of different solenoid valve system configurations, suitable solenoid valve
types will vary based on the application. Typical types are:
1.

24 volt high-power single coil Solenoid Valve (11.6 Watts) (Platinum BMS 731 Only)

2.

24 volt low-power single coil Solenoid Valve (1.4 Watts) (Platinum BMS 731 Only)

It is very important that you use the appropriate Solenoid Valves. DO NOT try to substitute Solenoid Valves outside
the above specifications without first consulting with Platinum.

Installation of a solenoid in the fuel gas train.

STEPS:
1. Install the Pilot Solenoid Valve into the tubing between the pilot pressure regulator and
the arrestor in the tubing line. Install the Main Solenoid Valve into the tubing before the
main temperature control valve in the tubing line. Install the ESD Solenoid Valve as the
first thing after the inlet pressure regulator into the tubing line controlling the
pneumatic ESD Valve.
TIP

Be sure to orient Solenoid Valves correctly with the respective valve flow direction. ASCO Solenoids are
configured port 1 out, port 2 in and port 3 vent.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

92

2. Open the lid of the Main Control Box by simply unlatching the two (2) latches.
WARNING

DO NOT pull open the box lid forcefully. Two (2) multi-conductor flat cables connect the Valves/Termination
Board and the Processor Board, and opening the lid forcefully could potentially cause damage to the boards.

3. Safely unplug the two (2) multi-conductor flat cables from the Valves/Termination Board
and unscrew the 4 screws holding the Valves/Termination board to the box. Place the
Valves/Termination board in a safe, anti-static location.
WARNING

DO NOT drill any holes in the Main Control Box without at least removing the Valves/Termination board. Any
damage to the circuit boards while drilling holes is not covered under the warranty.

Platinum BMS-731 with Valves/Termination board removed to locate and drill


holes.

Conduit fitting holes identified.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

Drilling holes for conduit fittings.

93

4. Determine the best method to run the wiring to each solenoid. This will typically be flex
conduit or rigid conduit. The conduit can be run directly to each solenoid or preferably
to each in series through conduit Ts attached to each solenoid. It is preferable to have
the fewest penetrations possible into the Main Control Box. Locate all holes in the Main
Control Box to the front edge so as not to interfere with the circuit board.

Wiring solenoids.

Solenoids located in fuel gas train.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

94

5. Install Meyers hubs (preferred), seals and conduit as required.


WARNING

Always follow local codes for sealing, electricity, etc. Proper sealing methods will need to be used when
changing areas of classification.

Conduit fittings installed.

6. Pull wires through conduit and connect to solenoids as required. Be sure to pull ground
wires to terminate the solenoid grounds as well.

Running wire into the Main Control Box.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

95

7. When installing flex conduit it is good practice to install a service or drip loop where
warranted.

Platinum BMS-731 with drip loop installed on vertical treater.

8. On the right hand side of the Valves/Termination board there are three connectors for
the 3 different Solenoid Valves. Each connector is labeled for the respective valve; ESD,
PILOT, or MAIN.
WARNING

Be sure to insert the ESD wires into the connector labeled ESD, the Pilot wires into the connector labeled
PILOT, and the Main wires into the connector labeled MAIN.

9. To install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The
connector has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of
the connector, turn screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the
stripped wire into the terminal slot until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to
shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to ensure that it is firmly in place.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

96

10. Single coil (S.Coil) Solenoid Valves are hooked up as in the figure below.
NOTE

On the Main Solenoid Connector, there are two (2) connections for the single coil Main Solenoid Valve, and
two (2) connections for the optional High Fire Solenoid Valve.

Main solenoid wiring.

11. There are also two (2) output connections for an optional forced air purge contactor on
the Emergency Shutdown (ESD) Solenoid valve output. (Refer to connection diagram in
Addendum Drawings for termination requirements.)
12. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Valves/Termination
board.
TIP

If polarity sensitive Solenoid Valves are used, terminal #3 on the solenoid connector is the negative
connection and terminal #4 on the solenoid connector is the positive connection.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

97

Mounting the Pilot Assembly

Igniter Rod

3/16 Spacing

Pilot Nozzle

pipe or nipple
length as required
(Not included)

Site of High
Voltage Cable
Connection

Mounting Bracket

Pilot Mixer

STEPS:
1. Open flame arrestor or remove the flame cell. You will want enough room to properly
mount the pilot assembly to the burner.
2. The pilot assembly needs to be mounted so that the nozzle tip is positioned at the flame
end of the burner and the pilot mixer is partially positioned inside of the arrestor to
allow enough air to the mixer.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

98

3. Determine the length of pipe/nipple that will be needed for the extension of the
pilot assembly. The length of the pipe/nipple will depend on the length of the burner
and positioning of pilot assembly, as mentioned previously.
4. Slide the igniter rod and mounting bracket onto the pipe/nipple before screwing the
pipe/nipple into the nozzle tip end of the pilot assembly.
5. The igniter rod will need to be positioned so that the tip of the igniter rod is 3/16 away
from the top opening of the pilot nozzle within the gas stream. (See Pilot Assembly
Diagram)

Pilot assembly being adjusted.

6. Secure the igniter rod to the pipe/nipple by tightening the 2 black screws on the
mount with a 1/8 Allen key.
WARNING

Dont over tighten the set screws on the bracket that mounts the igniter rod to the nipple on the pilot
assembly. Over tightening can stripe screws or crack insulator.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

99

7. Attach the black Ground Cable to the pilot assembly by removing the small screw
located on the end of the pilot mixer. Place the screw through the hole located in the
Ground Cable followed by the bonding washer and screw back into the pilot mixer.
WARNING

To prevent stripping the threads or breaking the screw, dont over tighten the screw.

8. Pull back the boot on the blue High Voltage cable to expose the connector. Push the
connector into the end of the igniter rod and you will hear a small click. Then pull the
boot over the connector and onto the igniter rod ending.

Pilot assembly with ground wire (black) already attached and high voltage cable (blue) is being inserted.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

100

9. Position the pilot assembly to the burner. The igniter rod will need to be positioned on
top of the Pilot Assembly and adjacent to the burner. Once the pilot assembly is in the
correct position on the burner, securely fasten the pilot assembly tip approximately 1
behind the tip of the burner. Make sure that the securing device isnt touching the
igniter rod.

Pilot nozzle in relation to main burner nozzle.

NOTE

Platinum Control Technologies does not tune burners or guarantee efficiency. We strongly recommend that
a qualified burner technician inspect and tune the burners upon completion of the installation.

Pilot assembly positioned and installed in firetube.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

101

Setting-up the Ignition Module


The Ignition Module common to all Platinum BMS models is a small sealed module which houses the
High Voltage Ignition Controller/Transformer. The Ignition Module produces a high voltage spark
through the Igniter Rod, and senses the presence of a flame through the Igniter Rod.
STEPS:
1. Attach the end of the gray ten-conductor cable with the connector to the side of the
ignition module and secure with the two built in screws.

Platinum Ignition Module

Mounting the Ignition Module


WARNING

The Ignition Module itself is not rated and MUST therefore be mounted inside the flame arrestor (unclassified area).

STEPS:
1. The Ignition Module must be mounted on the inside sidewall of the arrestor.
WARNING

DO NOT mount the Ignition Module on the bottom inside wall of the arrestor. The Ignition Module must be
mounted up and away from any possible water accumulation.

2. Using the ignition module as a template, mark suitable mounting holes on the side of
the arrestor. Drill holes and mount the module with suitable mounting hardware
making sure to capture the ground wire under the head of the mounting bolt.
NOTE

Earth ground must be established.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

102

3. Attach the two high voltage wires from the pilot assembly to the ignition module and
secure.

Ignition module mounted with wiring.

4. Determine the best placement to drill a hole through the arrestor to run the tenconductor wire through to the Main Control Box and then drill a hole through the
arrestor and install a Meyers hub. Be sure the screw on the locking ring is facing out
so you can reach the screw attachment.
5. BE SURE THE VALVES/TERMINATION BOARD HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM THE MAIN
CONTROL BOX.
WARNING

DO NOT drill any holes in the Main Control Box without removing the circuit boards. Any damage to the
circuit boards while drilling holes is not covered under the warranty.

6. Drill a hole through the bottom of the Main Control Box and install the Meyers hub
and run Flex Conduit from the Meyers hub on the arrestor to the Meyers hub on the
Main Control Box. Install seal if required.
TIP

Leave a drip loop or service loop when installing the flex conduit.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

103

WARNING

Always follow local codes for sealing, electricity, etc. Proper sealing methods will need to be used when
changing areas of classification.

7. Run a ground wire with the Ten-Conductor through the flex conduit connection from
the arrestor to the Main Control Box.
TIP

It is good practice to run the ground wire with the Ten-Conductor wire and terminate at each end of the
Meyers hub. If possible, separate and secure the high voltage cable from the ten-conductor cable.

8. Once the Ten-Conductor wire and ground wire have been run through the flex conduit
into the Main Control Box, wrap the bare Drain wire in the ten-conductor wire around
the base of the remaining 10 colored wires and tape off.

Ten-Conductor bare wire drain.

Tape around the drain wire.

Drain wire taped.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

104

9. Locate the connector labeled Ignition Module on the Valves/Termination Board. To


install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The
connector has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of
the connector, turn screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the
stripped wire into the terminal slot until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to
shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to ensure that it is firmly in place.
NOTE

The ten-conductor cable interconnects the Main Controller Box and the Ignition Module. The ten connectors
are labeled by number from the top down. Later production units may have the connector color coded.

Individual wires from ten-conductor cable in correct connector slots.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

105

10. Insert the each wire from the ten-conductor wire into the terminal on the connector
with the following color order(see images below for reference):
a. Black Wire

Terminal #01 Connector Label

b. Brown Wire

Terminal #02 Connector Label

c. Red Wire

Terminal #03 Connector Label

d. Orange Wire

Terminal #04 Connector Label

e. Yellow Wire

Terminal #05 Connector Label

f.

Terminal #06 Connector Label

Green Wire

g. Blue Wire

Terminal #07 Connector Label

h. Purple Wire

Terminal #08 Connector Label

i.

Gray Wire

Terminal #09 Connector Label

j.

White Wire

Terminal #10 Connector Label

Unrestricted views of the ten-conductor


connector terminal.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

106

11. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Valves/Termination
Board.

Wiring of ten-conductor connector terminal in position on the Valves/Termination


Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

107

Installing the Temperature Device


Only one type of temperature device can be installed at one time.
Installing the RTD
STEPS:
1. The 1000 Ohm RTD will need to be placed in a thermowell in the vessel. The RTD length
should match the insertion length of the thermowell. The use of thermal grease is
recommended. Once the RTD is secure in the thermowell of the vessel, open the top of
the RTD by simply twisting the lid counter clockwise.

RTD installed in a vertical heater treater.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

108

2. Three (3) connection wires (typically, 2 red and 1 white) and one (1) ground wire will
need to run from the RTD to the Main Control Box. Drill a hole through the bottom of
the Main Control Box and install a Meyers hub.
WARNING

DO NOT drill any holes in the Main Control Box without removing the circuit boards. Any damage to the
circuit boards while drilling holes is not covered under the warranty.

3. Attached a flex conduit connector to the RTD. Run Flex Conduit from the Meyers
hub on Main Control Box to the hub on the RTD. Be sure to run all of the three (3)
connection and ground wires through before securing the flex conduit to the Meyers
hub. Install seal if required.
TIP

Leave a drip loop or service loop when installing the flex conduit.

WARNING

Always follow local codes for sealing, electricity, etc. Proper sealing methods will need to be used when
changing areas of classification.

4. Secure the three (3) connection wires and one (1) ground wire to the inside of the RTD
by adding a crimp connector to the end of each wire. The ground wire will need to be
secured to the RTD with the screw located on the inside case of the RTD marked ground.

RTD wiring.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

109

5. Loosen the three screws located on the inside of the RTD. Gently place one (1) of the
connection wires underneath one of the loosened screws and tighten screw back.
6. Repeat #5 for all three connection wires.
7. Place the RTD lid back on the top by screwing on clock wise.
8. Locate the terminal connector labeled RTD on the Valves/Termination Board. To install a
wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector has a
removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector,
turn screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the
terminal slot until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and
tug on the wire to ensure that it is firmly in place.
9. Recommended wiring scheme: two common, one differentiated color. Insert the 3
connection wires into the terminals on the connector with the following order:
a. Red Wire

Terminal #3

b. Red Wire

Terminal #4

c. White Wire

Terminal #5

RTD wiring to connector terminal on a


BMS-731 Valves/Termination Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

110

10. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Valves/Termination
Board.
TIP

If the temperature read out on the Main Control Box says 32 degrees and 0 degrees, you have one of your
red wires crossed with the white wire or actual temperature is below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, as unit will not
read temperature lower than 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

Installing the Type K Thermocouple


NOTE

Thermocouple must be of non-grounded type.

STEPS:
1. The Type-K Thermocouple will need to be placed in a thermowell in the vessel. The use
of thermal grease is recommended. Once the Type-K Thermocouple is secure in the
thermowell of the vessel, open the top of the Thermocouple by simply twisting the lid
counter clockwise.

Type-K thermocouple.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

111

2. Type-K connection wire (1 red-negative and 1 yellow-positive) will need to run from the
Thermocouple to the Main Control Box.
WARNING

Only type-K wire (not supplied) can be used with the Type-K Thermocouple.

Type-K thermocouple wiring.

3. Drill a hole through the bottom of the Main Control Box and install a Meyers hub.
WARNING

DO NOT drill any holes in the Main Control Box without removing the circuit boards. Any damage to the
circuit boards while drilling holes is not covered under the warranty.

4. Attach flex conduit connector to the Thermocouple. Run Flex Conduit from the
Meyers hub on Main Control Box to hub on the Thermocouple. Be sure to run the 2
connection wires through before securing the flex conduit to the Meyers hub.
TIP

Leave a drip loop or service loop when installing the flex conduit.

WARNING

Always follow local codes for sealing, electricity, etc. Proper sealing methods will need to be used when
changing areas of classification.

5. Gently place one of the connection wires underneath one of the loosened screws and
tighten screw back. The yellow wire (positive) should be secured to the yellow screw
and the red wire (negative) should be secured to the red screw. Place the Thermocouple
lid back on the top by screwing clock wise.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

112

6. Locate the connector labeled RTD/Thermocouple on the Valves/Termination Board. To


install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The
connector has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of
the connector, turn screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the
stripped wire into the terminal slot until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to
shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to ensure that it is firmly in place.
7. Recommended wiring scheme red wire terminal #1, yellow wire terminal #2. Insert the 2
connection wires into the terminals on the connector with the following order:
a. Red Wire

Terminal #1

b. Yellow Wire

Terminal #2

Type-K thermocouple wiring to connector terminal


on BMS-731 Valves/Termination Board.

8. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Valve Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

113

Connecting External Devices


WARNING

DO NOT connect voltage to any of these inputs. DRY CONTACTS ONLY.

External dry contacts


connector terminal.

1. Spare Switch: This signal will ESD the burner when the switch is open. This switch can be
enabled in the factory settings:
a. Spare switch
b. Suggested uses: level switch
2. Remote ON/OFF Switch: This signal will direct the microcomputer to enter the OFF
state. The burner is ON when the switch is closed. Open the switch only in the NORMAL
burning state. If the contacts are closed, the burner will start. If the contacts are open,
the burner will stop. A remote system should be used to control the burner.
NOTE

The Platinum BMS must be placed in the NORMAL state to enable this feature. (The local interface overrides
the feature if the system is in OFF or ESD.)

3. External ESD Switch: This signal will direct the microcomputer to ESD the burner when
the switch is open. A remote system should be used to shut down the burner.
NOTE

System has to be reset locally on an ESD.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

114

4. Low Pressure Switch: This contact looks for an open when the pressure is low, causing
an ESD state.
5. High Pressure Switch: This contact looks for an open when the pressure is high, causing
an ESD state.
6. ESD Valve Switch (Proof of Closure): This contact looks for an open when the ESD valve
is closed. Optional proximity switches on the valve or a downstream pressure switch on
the pneumatic signal can be used for the input.
7. Main Valve Switch (Proof of Closure): This contact looks for an open when the Main
valve is closed. Optional proximity switches on the valve or a downstream pressure
switch on the pneumatic signal can be used for the input.
8. Unsafe Condition: This signal ties directly to the Watchdog Processor, in order to ESD
the burner on an open circuit. This function resets the Processor directly and produces a
Watchdog failure.
NOTE

Manual reset of unit will be required.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

115

Connecting External ESD (status out)

ESD connector terminal.

Terminal 1

Normally Closed

Terminal 2

Common

Terminal 3

Normally Open

WARNING

DO NOT connect voltage to any of these inputs. DRY CONTACTS ONLY.


These contacts are used for an ESD OUT or Status signal. The contacts will change state when an ESD occurs.

Grounding Wires
STEPS:
1. You should have multiple disconnected ground wires in the Main Control Box. The
number of ground wires will depend on the specific setup.
2. Create a termination site inside of the Main Control Box.
3. Connect all of the ground wires to this termination site.
WARNING

Always follow local codes for proper grounding methods.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

116

Grounding site inside BMS Main Control Box.

Grounded vessel.

Grounding site inside BMS Main Control Box.

Grounding the Platinum Pilot Assembly.

Grounding site inside BMS Main Control Box.

Grounding the Platinum Ignition Module.

Grounding site for the RTD.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

117

Connecting Valves/Termination Board to Main Control Box


STEPS:
1. Re-connect the Valves/Termination Board back onto the Main Control Box with the four
(4) screws. Make sure the Valves/Termination Board is secure.
2. Reattach the two (2) multi-conductor cables to connect the Valves/Termination Board
(located in the right hand side of the Main Control Box) with the Processor Board
(located in the left hand side door of the Main Control Box).
WARNING

Only connect the Valves/Termination Board to the Main Control Box if all drilling into the Main Control Box is
complete.

Connecting Power to the Main Control Box


STEPS:
1. In the upper left hand corner of the Valves/Termination Board is the connector for
power.
2. Locate the connector on the Valves/Termination Board. To install a wire into a
connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector has a removable
top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn screw
counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal
slot until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on
the wire to ensure that it is firmly in place.
3. Insert the positive and negative wires into the terminals with the following order:
a. Negative Wire Terminal #1
b. Positive Wire

TECHNICAL TRAINING

Terminal #2

118

Main power connector terminal.

4. Turn each screw clockwise to close the connector terminal and lightly tug on the wire to
make sure it is securely connected to the connector.
5. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Valves/Termination
board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

119

TECHNICAL TRAINING

120

OPERATING
WARNING

Prior to powering up the Platinum BMS-731, a second inspection of wiring, solenoid flow direction and setup is recommended.
The Platinum BMS-731 power terminates in the two (2) terminals supplied on the top left of the Valves/Termination Board.

POWERING UP
Close the Main and Pilot gas source valves and proceed to power up the system.
The startup display will read Initializing valve control, then after several seconds will read SYSTEM IS
OFF.
The ESD solenoid (if turned on in the programming) will now be energized, and the remaining Pilot and
Main solenoids will be in the OFF state.
The Platinum BMS-731 will be in the OFF position, waiting for the system to be turned ON.
The following display will appear if the
Temperature Control option is enabled:

Temperature
70F
Input voltage
24.0
SYSTEM IS OFF
SETUP
ON

The following display will appear


if the Temperature Control option is not
enabled:
Not Temp. Controlled
Input voltage
24.0
SYSTEM IS OFF
SETUP
ON

NOTE

The Main Burner is in the OFF STATE and the Pilot flame is OFF.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

121

FACTORY SETUP
Prior to startup, enter the Factory Setup Mode and determine what inputs are being used in the system.
The Factory Setup mode does not allow you to exit and save before viewing each screen. To enter the
Factory Setup Mode, press the Factory Setup button on the Process Board in the Main Control Box (see
image below), located under the multi-conductor flat cable, while the system is in the OFF state.

Manual Reset
Button

Factory Setup
Button

Platinum BMS-731 Microprocessor Board

The following screens will appear in this order, prompting you to choose which functions are required.
NOTE

If an ESD Solenoid has not been installed, the following message will appear: ESD Control Failure. The factory setup button will
need to be pressed twice to enter factory setup.

If at any time you want to exit the Factory Setup menu without saving, press the ESD button on the
front panel.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

122

Software Revision Number


This screen shows the revision date for the Platinum
BMS firmware.

Version 4.32
Mar 15 2012 11:59:14
NEXT

EXIT

DEFAULTS

1. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the


next screen.

Temperature Control
The Temperature Control option is enabled for the

Temperature Control

default setting.

ENABLED
NEXT

CHANGE

1. If you want to disable the Temperature Control,


press the CHANGE button.
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.

Low Pressure Switch


The Low Pressure Switch can be set to open on falling

Low Pressure Switch

pressure. The Low Pressure Switch option is disabled

DISABLED

for the default setting.

NEXT

CHANGE

1. If you want to enable the Low Pressure Switch,


press the CHANGE button.
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

123

Hi Pressure Switch
The Hi Pressure switch can be set to open on rising

Hi Pressure Switch

pressure. The Hi Pressure Switch option is disabled

DISABLED

for the default setting.

NEXT

CHANGE

1. If you want to enable the Hi Pressure, press the


CHANGE button.
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.
ESD Solenoid
ESD Solenoid

This will enable the ESD solenoid in the event one is


installed. The default setting is enabled.
If no ESD solenoid is installed, the system will indicate

ENABLED
NEXT

CHANGE

ESD Control Failure on startup. This function will


need to be disabled if an ESD solenoid valve is not
installed.
1. If you want to disable the ESD Solenoid, press the
CHANGE button.
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.
ESD Valve Switch (POC)
If the ESD Solenoid is disabled, the ESD Valve Switch
screen will not be present.

ESD Valve Switch


(POC)
DISABLED
NEXT
CHANGE

1. If you want to enable the ESD Valve Switch, press


the CHANGE button.
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

124

Main Valve Switch (POC)


The Main Valve Switch (POC) option is disabled for
the default setting.

Main Valve Switch


(POC)
DISABLED
NEXT
CHANGE

1. If you want to enable the Main Valve Switch,


press the CHANGE button.
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.
Temp Sensor Type
Temp Sensor Type

Activate the temperature detection element. Select


either 1000 Ohm RTD or Type-K Thermocouple.
The default setting is 1000 Ohm RTD.

NEXT

1000 ohm RTD


CHANGE

1. If you want to change the Temp Sensor Type to


Thermocouple, press the CHANGE button.
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.
NOTE

When changing sensor type make sure hardware jumpers on


valve board are correctly positioned. See the next images.

RTD Jumper
Placement

Thermocouple
Jumper
Placement

TECHNICAL TRAINING

125

Spare Switch
Spare Switch
1. If you want to enable the Spare Switch option,
press the CHANGE button. Select normally open

DISABLED
NEXT

CHANGE

or normally closed
2. Hit the NEXT button to go to continue on to the
next screen.

Set Remote ON/OFF


The Platinum BMS-731 allows for remote control of
the burner ON/OFF state. With the External Off
Switch closed, the unit will function in its normal
capacity.

Set Remote ON/OFF


DISABLED
NEXT

CHANGE

NOTE

Set Remote On/Off not to be confused with Modbus Remote


On/Off.

With the contacts open, the burner will enter the


Remote System OFF state. If the burner is ON and the
contacts are opened, the Platinum BMS-731 will
extinguish all flames and return to the Remote
System off State (status contacts will only change
state on an ESD or power loss). When the contacts
are closed, the Platinum BMS-731 will return to the
purging state and re-ignition sequence.
NOTE

Any ESD condition will require the operator to restart the unit
from the front panel.

1. If you want to enable the Remote ON/OFF option,


press the CHANGE button.
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

126

Pilot Operation
Pilot Operation

The pilot operational status has two setting options:


pilot always on and pilot tracks main. The pilot
operational status default setting is Pilot always on.

Pilot always on
NEXT

CHANGE

1. If you want to change the setting to Pilot Tracks


Main, press the CHANGE button.
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.
Enable the High Fire Valve
On larger Btu/hr heating systems, this option can be

Enable the High Fire Valve

enabled in order to stage the Main Gas Train,


therefore eliminating back draft and hard firing on

DISABLED
NEXT

CHANGE

startup.
NOTE

This option requires the installation of an additional valve in the


main fuel train.

1. If you want to enable the High Fire Valve, press


the CHANGE button.
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.
Set the Modbus Baud Rate
The MODBUS communication rate is set at one of the
following baud rates; 1200; 4800; 9600; 19200;
38400. The default rate is 19200.

Set the MODBUS Baud Rate


Baud rate 19200
NEXT

CHANGE

1. If you want to change the Baud Rate, press the


CHANGE button to toggle through the options.
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

127

Set Modbus Parity


The MODBUS parity is chosen as one of the following;
No Parity; Odd Parity; Even Parity. No Parity is the
default setting.

Set the MODBUS Parity


No Parity
NEXT

CHANGE

1. If you want to change the Modbus Parity, press


the CHANGE button to toggle through the
options.
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.
Set Number of Modbus Stop Bits
The number of stop bits required for the MODBUS
communication is selected as either one (1) or two
(2). The default number of stop bits is one (1).

Set the MODBUS Number of


Stop Bits
1
NEXT
CHANGE

1. If you want to change the number of stop bits,


press the CHANGE button to choose one (1) or
two (2).
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.
Set Modbus Address
The address of the MODBUS is selected here. It

Set the MODBUS Address

ranges from 0 to 255. The default MODBUS address is


five (5).

NEXT

5
UP

DOWN

1. If you want to change the address, press and hold


the UP or DOWN button to select the desired
address at a faster interval.
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

128

Backlight Always On
The feature allows you to enable or disable the

Backlight Always On

backlight on the front door panel. The backlight


always on default setting is disabled. It is

DISABLED
NEXT

CHANGE

recommended to disabled this option if using solar


applications.
1. If you want to enable the Backlight Always On
option, press the CHANGE button.
2. Press the NEXT button to continue to the next
screen.
NOTE

This is the last step in the Factory Setup Mode.

This screen will appear momentarily as the system


resets and performs a valve check.
SYSTEM IS OFF
Wait testing valves

TECHNICAL TRAINING

129

OPERATING PARAMETERS
The Operation Parameters Menu allows you to specify how certain functions/parameters are
characterized within the Platinum BMS-731. In the Setup Menu, press SETUP to set the options for the
displayed parameter. Press the NEXT and PREV to navigate between operational parameters. When
adjusting the various operation parameters, press ACCEPT to accept the parameter and return to the
Operation Parameters Menu.
NOTE

If at any time you want to exit the Operating Setup without saving, press the ESD button on the front panel. If you would like to
exit and save the Operating Setup early, press the Accept button twice on the front panel.

Temperature
70F
Input voltage
24.0
SYSTEM IS OFF
SETUP
ON

TECHNICAL TRAINING

130

Temperature Scale
(Thermocouple Unit Only; RTD Displays both

SETUP
Temperature Scale

Fahrenheit and Celsius)


In Thermocouple Temperature Control, select

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

Celsius or Fahrenheit for temperature display.


1. Press the EDIT button to change the temperature
scale.

Set Temperature Type


Fahrenheit
CHANGE

2.

Press the CHANGE button to toggle between the


temperature options.

3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

Set Temperature Type


Celsius
CHANGE

131

Alarm Setpoint (High Temperature Shutdown)


SETUP
Alarm Setpoint

This parameter allows you to enter a setpoint at


which the Platinum BMS-731 will ESD on high

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

temperature shutdown. This parameter will only work


with a Platinum BMS-731 that has the Temperature
Control option turned ON.
1.

Set Temperature
ESD Alarm
Setpoint 1804 F
UP
DOWN

Press the EDIT button to enter into the Alarm


screen.

2.

Press and hold UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the setpoint faster.

3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen.

The Alarm Temperature Setpoint is shown in both


degrees Fahrenheit and Centigrade in RTD setting. For
the thermocouple setting, you have to select C or
F. Alarm Temperature Setpoint can be set within
the range of 40F (4C) and 545F (285C) for RTD and
40F and 2481F for thermocouple.
The Alarm Temperature Setpoint cannot be set below
the Main Burner MAIN OFF Temperature Setpoint,
as programmed in the Temperature Control Setting.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

132

Temperature Control Setting


SETUP
Temperature Control

The Temp Setpoints parameter allows you to set


control setpoints to control the Main Burner ON and
EDIT

OFF.
1.

Press the EDIT button to enter the Set


Temperature screen.
An (>) indicates the setpoint being adjusted.

2.

NEXT

PREV

Set Temperature
Main ON>
762F
Main OFF
808F
SWITCH
UP
DOWN

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the setpoint for the Main OFF
temperature.

3.

Press the SWITCH button to change the setpoint


to the Main ON temperature (NOTE: The > will
change to the temperature next to the Main ON).

4.

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the setpoint for the Main ON
temperature.

5.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

133

Ignition Delay Time


This parameter allows you to adjust the delay time

SETUP
Ignition Delay Time

required to eliminate excess gas prior to ignition of


the Pilot. The delay state comes on before each

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

ignition sequence.
1.

Press the EDIT button to enter the Ignition Delay


Time screen.

2.

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or

Ignition Delay Time


Range
15 to 300 sec
Delay
15 Seconds
UP
DOWN

decrease the delay until the desired delay time is


reached.
3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen.

Setting the Main Valve Delay


SETUP
Main Valve Delay

Main Valve Delay is the time from successful ignition


of the Pilot to the opening of the Main Valve. This

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

allows the Pilot to stabilize and create air movement


within the fire tube for successful Main light off. The
delay can be adjusted anywhere from 1 to 300
seconds. The default valve delay is 5 seconds.
1.

Set Main Valve Delay


Range
1 to 300 sec
Delay
5 Seconds
UP
DOWN

Press the EDIT button to enter the Main valve


delay screen.

2.

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the delay until the desired time is
reached.

3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

134

Setting the Flame Sense Delay


SETUP
Flame Sense Delay

Flame Sense Delay is a variable parameter that


allows a time delay for a Pilot flame to stabilize,
prevent nuisance shutdowns if the Main comes on

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

hard, and removes the flame from the Pilot Tip


momentarily. The delay can be anywhere from 0 to 5
seconds. The default delay is 3 seconds.
1.

Press the EDIT button to enter the Flame Sense

Flame Sense Delay


Range
0 to 5 sec
Delay
3 Seconds
UP
DOWN

Delay screen.
2.

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the delay until the desired time is
reached.

3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen.

High Fire Delay


SETUP
High Fire Delay

The High Fire Delay parameter will dictate the time


delay between when the Main comes on and when

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

the High Fire comes on. The High Fire Delay can be
set anywhere from 1 to 60 seconds. The default delay
is 10 seconds.
1.

Press the EDIT button to enter the High fire delay

Set High Fire Delay


Range
1 to 60 sec
Delay
10 Seconds
UP
DOWN

screen.
2.

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the delay until the desired time is
reached.

3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes


and continue on to the next screen.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

135

Setting the High Fire Temperature Setpoint


SETUP
High Fire Setpoint

Use this parameter to set the temperature at which


the High Fire Valve shuts off. This temperature setting

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

cannot exceed the Main Burner OFF Temperature


Setpoint.
1.

Press the EDIT button to enter the High fire delay


screen.

2.

Set Temperature
Hire fire set point
High fire off
808F
UP
DOWN

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the temperature.

3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen.

Spare Switch Delay


SETUP
Spare Switch Delay

This is a programmable delay that provides a


temporary, timed bypass for the contacts terminated

EDIT

NEXT

PREV

to clear. Example: level switch in an expansion pot


during startup. The range of this delay is 0 to 120
minutes.
1.

Press the EDIT button to enter the Spare switch

Spare Switch Delay


Range 0 120
DELAY 0 MIN
UP

DOWN

delay screen.
2.

Press the UP or DOWN button to increase or


decrease the delay time.

3.

Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and


continue on to the next screen

TECHNICAL TRAINING

136

Time Log
SETUP
Time Log

The Time Log function logs the amount of time the


Pilot and Main Burner Solenoid Valves are engaged,

SETUP

NEXT

PREV

using a dedicated real time clock within the control


unit. The Pilot ON Time screen is a logged record of
the run time of the Pilot Valve.
1.

Press the SETUP button to enter the Time Log

Pilot on Time
Changing date resets
0:00
CONTINUE

hours
EXIT

Main on Time
Changing date resets
0:00
hours
CONTINUE

EXIT

screen.
2.

Operators MUST record the number from this


screen, as it will be reset to zero (0) after this
procedure.

3.

Press the CONTINUE button to reach the next


screen.

The Main ON Time screen is a logged record of the


run time of the Main Burner valve. Operators MUST

Log Start Date


YR
mon day
hr
min
2010 01
01
12
00
NEXT
UP
DOWN

record the number from this screen, as it will be reset


to zero (0) after this procedure.
**Both the Pilot and Main Burner log times are cleared to zero
(0) once a new Log Start Date has been entered on the following
screen. It is therefore important to record these numbers and
the previous log start date when viewing these screens.**

4.

The log function start date and time are


programmed in sequence, starting with the year
on the far left, and moving across to month, day,
hour, and minute, each time you press NEXT.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

137

5.

As each parameter is selected, its symbol


becomes capitalized on the readout, as in the
Year parameter shown above.

6.

Press the UP or DOWN to escalate the

Log Start Date


YR
mon day
hr
min
2010 01
01
12
00
NEXT
UP
DOWN

advancement of years into 5-year increments.


a. The Month parameter increments or
decrements one (1) month at a time
and does not escalate when the
UP/DOWN buttons are pressed.
b. The Day parameter will escalate to 5day increments when UP or DOWN
buttons are pressed.
c. The Hour parameter will escalate to
5-hour increments when UP or
DOWN buttons are pressed.
d. The Minute parameter will escalate
to 5-minute intervals when UP or
DOWN buttons are pressed.
e. The real time clock operates in a 24hour mode only.
7.

Once the new log date and times are correctly


entered, press ACCEPT to clear the log times on
the Pilot and Main Burner and exit the
programming sequence.

Exiting the Operating Parameters


Log Start Time is the last of the programmable
parameters.
1.

SETUP
Press DONE to exit
DONE

NEXT

PREV

Press DONE to exit the programming mode of the


Platinum BMS.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

138

Ignition Procedure
WARNING

Ensure the burner arrestor and arrestor housing are correctly


sealed prior to introducing gas.

WARNING

Temperature
70F
Input voltage
24.0
SYSTEM IS OFF
SETUP
ON

Enable Pilot gas valve only (set gas pressure at 2 to 4 psig) on


initial startup and keep Main gas valve blocked, proceeding to test
Pilot only.

With the Platinum BMS-731 in the OFF state, press


the ON button. The Platinum BMS-731 will then
initiate a purge time delay, which allows excess gas to
evacuate before a burner ignition attempt.

XX denotes the ignition delay count down time


remaining before ignition

Temperature
Relights
Ignition delay

109F

Temperature
Relights
IGNITING

109F

Once the ignition delay has expired, the Pilot valve

XX
OFF

will open and a series of ten sparks will arc between


the Igniter Rod Tip and the Nozzle Tip (ground).
After ignition, the system will check for the presence
of the Pilot flame.

OFF

Temperature
Relights
Waiting for pilot

109F

OFF

TECHNICAL TRAINING

139

Upon successful Pilot ignition, the preset Main Time


Delay for the Pilot to stabilize will start counting. The
display will read PILOT ON and Main Off. Once
the preset Main Time Delay has passed, the display

Temperature
109F 43C
Relights
0 FR 4.77
PILOT ON
MAIN ON
0:01
0:01
OFF

will read Main ON as long as the system is calling


for temperature.
The flame resistance FR requires approximately 20
seconds to establish a stable value as shown above.
This is an indication of flame quality.
NOTE

The first time the burner tries to ignite the Pilot, it may take
several attempts to purge air out of the Pilot line.

Confirm Proper Functionality of the Flame Sensing Probe


1. With the Pilot on, close the Pilot gas valve to starve the Pilot of gas. The loss of flame will cause
the system to close the Main and Pilot Solenoid Valves, initiate a re-ignition cycle, and then
attempt a relight. Once the re-ignition cycle is confirmed, open the Pilot gas, and the Platinum
BMS will automatically relight the Pilot. The number of retries is incremented for each attempt.
A successful relight will be displayed with each relight. The relight number is reset to zero (0) if
the Platinum BMS is set to the OFF state or reset after a shutdown.
2. Once the Pilot is proven, open the Main gas valve slowly and confirm air gas mixture is proper
according to flame color. When using the Temperature Control option, allow the heater to come
up to temperature and confirm proper temperature cutout as preset into the unit.
NOTE

Platinum Control Technologies does not set burners, and strongly recommends that a qualified burner technician inspect and
tune the burner upon completion of the installation.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

140

TROUBLESHOOTING
Display Error Codes
SCREEN ERROR

PROBABLE CAUSE

REMEDY

ESD CNTR Failure A2

Indicates an open in the ESD


solenoid circuit.

Check solenoid wiring and the solenoid


itself.

ESD Coil Short A2

Indicates a short in the ESD


solenoid circuit.

Check solenoid wiring and the solenoid


itself.

ESD Control Failure

Indicates a failure to control the ESD


solenoid or that no ESD solenoid is
installed.

Check solenoid wiring. Should be wired to


lower 2 terminals on ESD solenoid connector
labeled scoil. If no ESD solenoid is
installed, disable the ESD Solenoid option in
the Factory Setup.

E.S.D. Valve Failure

Proof of closure position on E.S.D.


valve does not match BMS. I.e. BMS
says E.S.D. valve should be closed
but P.O.C. indicates open.

If on initial startup wiring to P.O.C. may be


reversed. (N/O V.S. N/C) Main valve may be
stuck. Main may be opening too slowly.

External ESD Signal

Indicates an open circuit on the Ext


Esd Terminals.

Make sure jumper is installed or external


device is closed (n/c).

Flame in Purge State

This indicates some resistance


between the igniter rod and the
pilot tip or ground when the unit is
attempting to light.

This can indicate the presence of a flame


when igniting. Check for leaking or open
Solenoid Valves.
Check for short between igniter rod and
pilot tip or burner tube.
Check to see that pilot/igniter assembly is
not wet.
Check for cracked ceramic on igniter rod.

Flame Sensor Failure

Indicates very low resistance or a


short between the Igniter rod and
either the pilot tip or ground. This
message should only occur while
the unit is running.

High Burner Pressure

Indicates an open circuit on the Hi


Press contacts.

Check to make sure spark gap is sufficient


and that the rod is not touching the pilot tip
or the fire tube wall. A very lean or a very
rich mixture combined with a very small
burner tube can occasionally cause this
failure.
Check for proper system pressure, defective
switch or wiring.

Low Main Pressure

Indicates an open circuit on the Lo


Press contacts.

Check for proper system pressure, defective


switch or wiring.

Main CNTR Failure A2

Indicates an open in the Main


solenoid circuit.

Check solenoid wiring and the solenoid


itself.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

141

SCREEN ERROR

PROBABLE CAUSE

REMEDY

Main Coil Short A2

Indicates a short in the Main


solenoid circuit.

Check solenoid wiring and the solenoid


itself.

Main Control Failure VC


System Requires Manual
Reset

Indicates a failure to control the


main solenoid.

Main Valve Failure

Proof of closure position on main


valve does not match BMS. I.e. BMS
says main valve should be closed
but P.O.C. indicates open.

Check solenoid wiring. Should be wired to


lower 2 terminals on main solenoid
connector labeled scoil
Check for defective solenoid.
Open door and press manual reset button
on top right corner of microprocessor board.
If on initial startup wiring to P.O.C. may be
reversed. (N/O V.S. N/C) Main valve may be
stuck. Main may be opening too slowly.

Max Delta Temp - XX

The temperature change in a


specific time is greater than
allowed. This is used to identify a
failed RTD or thermocouple.

Check temperature sensor and wiring.

Max Retries Exceeded

The unit has tried to light on three


consecutive tries without proving
the pilot.

Check supply gas.


Check for plugged pilot orifice.
Check for correct spark.

Overtemp Aux A
(only on BTEX units)

The temperature indicated has


exceeded the programmed Aux A
alarm temperature.

Look for temperature control valve stuck


open or open thermocouple.

Overtemp Aux B
(only on BTEX units)

The temperature indicated has


exceeded the programmed Aux B
alarm temperature.

Look for temperature control valve stuck


open or open thermocouple.

Overtemp Main

The temperature indicated has


exceeded the programmed main
alarm temperature.

Look for temperature control valve stuck


open or open thermocouple.

Pilot CNTR Failure A2

Indicates an open in the Pilot


solenoid circuit.

Check solenoid wiring and the solenoid


itself.

Pilot Coil Short A2

Indicates a short in the Pilot


solenoid circuit.

Check solenoid wiring and the solenoid


itself.

Remote System Off

Indicates the unit has been


remotely shutdown.

Check for external shutdown either by


modbus or hardwire control.

Reset xx- -xx- System


Requires Manual Reset

Internal microprocessor code.


(MAKE NOTE OF ERROR CODE)

Make note of error code on display, open


door and press manual reset button on top
right corner of microprocessor board. If
problem reappears call for service. Have
error code available.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

142

SCREEN ERROR

PROBABLE CAUSE

REMEDY

Shutdown by Operator

Front panel ESD button has been


pressed.

Restart unit to resume normal operation.

Spare Switch Active

Indicates an open circuit in the


Spare Sw contacts when Spare A
in enabled in hardware setup menu.

Check wiring and external devices. This is


usually where a level switch is connected.

Watchdog Failure

Troubleshoot main processor.

When this error occurs on startup, simply


reset and restart the unit.

WD Unsafe Input

This error will occur when the


Unsafe condition contacts (bottom
two on external devices terminal
strip) are open.

Make sure jumper is installed or external


device is N/C.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

143

Microprocessor Codes
Key for Microprocessor Codes
xx=08

A 08 at the beginning of the


microprocessor code represents a
hardware generated code.

xx=10

A 10 at the beginning of the


microprocessor code represents a
software generated code.

CODE
xx-01
xx-02
xx-03
xx-04
xx-05
xx-06
xx-07
xx-08
xx-09
xx-0A
xx-0B
xx-0C
xx-0D
xx-0E
xx-0F
xx-10
xx-11
xx-12
xx-13
xx-14
xx-15
xx-16
xx-17
xx-18
xx-19
xx-1A
xx-1B
xx-1C
xx-2C
xx-33

DESCRIPTION
Manual reset, not a fault
Checks state_flag to see if the state is entered correctly
State exited with state_flag clear
The state was entered and state_flag was set
The reference voltage did not measure correctly
Bad ADC control register
Bad ADC channel pointer
MUX control register failure
The buffer used to hold the ADC counts failed
Executing code outside the code space
A state procedure exited with the state_flag cleared
The stack pointer is incorrect when the state machine runs
ADC had not finished a scan when the next scan started
Checks to see if the a non state procedure was call outside a state procedure
Failure of the keyboard flag memory
Measure counter memory failed
Temperature look table was generated incorrectly
Memory containing the start voltages for the pulse capacitors failed
Debounce counter failed
Memory adc_flag failed
A register in register bank 0 failed
Memory purge_cntr failed
One of the following timer registers failed CKCON,TMOD, RCAP2H and RCAP2L
Check the state was entered properly
Not used
Check the state flag at the end of the watchdog state
Stack pointer is corrupted when watchdog state machine runs
Checks the state flag on entry to a watchdog state
The value in return state was corrupted
Check the values in the XBAR registers

TECHNICAL TRAINING

144

CODE
xx-34
xx-35
xx-36
xx-37
xx-38
xx-39
xx-3A
xx-3B
xx-3C
xx-3D
xx-3E
xx-3F
xx-40
xx-41
xx-42
xx-43
xx-44
xx-45
xx-46
xx-47
xx-48
xx-49
xx-4A
xx-4B
xx-4C
xx-4D

DESCRIPTION
Port0 configuration failed
Port1 configuration failed
Port2 configuration failed
Port3 configuration failed
Port4 to port7 configuration failed
Code byte CRC failure
The temperature table check failed
The state pointer against failed
The control flags failed
Set point data failed
The high_voltage_flag failed
Comparator zero has an incorrect value
Not used
Comparator 1 did not enable properly
Comparator 1 did not disable properly
Comparator 0 did not enable properly
Comparator 0 did not disable properly
Bad reference control
Invalid burning state pointer
The main system is not stable and caused a system reset
The crystal oscillator would not start
The internal watchdog caused a reset
The sensor short counter failed
The no flame time out counter failed
The delay on the spare input failed
This is the end of the error list

TECHNICAL TRAINING

145

Tips for Troubleshooting


ISSUE
Fuel is not properly getting to

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

Check the pilot orifice to see if it is plugged.

Check to see if fuel gas is getting past the regulator. Can

the pilot tip.

The pilot is not sparking.

you hear gas in the arrestor?

Make sure the fuel gas making it through the solenoid.

Make sure that the igniter rod is positioned approximately


3/16 away from pilot nozzle.

Make sure the ignition cables are properly terminated.

Make sure the ten-conductor cable is terminated properly.

Check to see if the igniter rod has any damage.

Make sure the igniter rod is not touching any metal.

The pilot goes out

Bad connection to igniter rod.

immediately.

Bad ground wire.

Confirm flame sense delay settings.

High BTU fuel or propane may lead to sporadic flame

Flame sense failure.

resistance readings.

Confirm BTU rating of fuel gas.

Further adjustment of pilot fuel mixture may be required.

Adjustable pilot mixer.

Adjust to 5 seconds flame delay.

Confirm proximity of pilot nozzle and igniter to between 1


and 1-1/2 behind burner nozzle.

The main burner comes on

and the pilot goes out.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

Pressure or drafting from main may be pulling pilot flame


away, reduce pressure to main.

Check pilot and main pressures.

Possibly dampen main burner valve opening.

May increase pilot pressure.

Reposition igniter rod.

146

ISSUE
The main burner is not

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

lighting.

Make sure the main (temperature) solenoid is opening.


You should hear a clicking noise.

Make sure the main control valve is opening.

Verify that the Main Control Box is reading Main ON.

Check to see if gas is coming out of the main burner


nozzle.

Main Control Box buttons are

not working properly.

Check to see if the two (2) multi-conductor flat cables are


connected properly. Refer to the section Board MultiConductor Interconnect.

No display on the Main

Control Box.

Check to see if the fuses are blown on the boards.


Additional fuses are located on the boards.

Make sure that the negative power component is


connected to the top terminal on the POWER Connector in
the Valves/Termination Board and the positive power
component is connected to the bottom terminal on the
POWER Connector in the Valves/Termination Board.

The incorrect temperature is

If you are using solar power, contact us.

If the temperature is stuck at 32F 0C then the RTD might

reading out on the display


screen.

be bad or the associated wiring is not connected properly.

If the temperature is stuck at -1F then the Thermocouple


might be bad or the associated wiring is not connected
properly.

The pilot lights, but then goes

out.

Make sure that the ignition cables are terminated


properly.

Make sure that the pilot assembly is mounted properly.


Refer to the section Mounting the Pilot Assembly.

Check to see if the pilot has burned off.

The pilot sparks, but does not

Check to see if the pilot orifice is plugged.

light.

Make sure that fuel gas is getting to the arrestor.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

147

ISSUE

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

When the main lights, it comes

Check to see if the primary air shutter is closed.

back into the arrestor.

The burner tube could be cold and have back pressure.

Make sure the main temperature control valve is not


opening too quickly.

Make sure the rain cap on the arrestor is not causing back
pressure on the exhaust stack.

Make sure you have enough pressure on the main fuel gas
line.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

148

PLATINUM RECOMMENDED SPARE PARTS LIST


PART NUMBER

DESCRIPTION

SS-10L-24V

Solar controller (Sunsaver 24vdc 10 Amp)

103011

Solar Panel 85 Watt

202001DE8G30H

108 Amp Hour Battery

Y011930

Ignition Module (new style)

9925340024

DC Power Supply (120vac in 24vdc out 6.5a)

EF8320G202

ASCO 11.6 Hi Watt Solenoid

2014328

6' Ground Cable (old style)

2014326

20' Ten Conductor Cable (old style w/o connector)

2014040-PN

Pilot Nozzle

1000-11L

Igniter Rod

E9-SSN

Igniter Connector

2014302

Sparker Cable (old style)

2014040-PM

Pilot Mixer

2014040-PO

Pilot Orifice

EF8314G301

ASCO 1.4 Low Watt Solenoid (Low power application)

Y11927

Valve Board

Y11926

Microprocessor Board

Y012204

Door w/Keypad

2014310

Large ribbon cable

2014320

Modbus ribbon cable

2014242

8 amp fuse

246515

100 ma fuse

RT1099401

RTD

002K-4M-15-R06-04

Thermocouple

K20-5-502

Type K Thermocouple Wire

Y012668

20' 10 conductor cable/connector (new style)

Y012671

Spark high voltage wire (new style)

Y012670

Spark ground assembly (new style)

POT Kit

Ignition module kit

TECHNICAL TRAINING

(Retrofit kit includes module, 10 conductor, HV spark cable, and


ground cable)

149

BMS-731 CURRENT DRAW

BMS 731 Off in standby mode backlight off

169 ma @ 24vdc

BMS 731 Off in standby mode backlight on

204 ma @ 24vdc

1 Asco 11.6W solenoid

813 ma

2 Asco 11.6W solenoids

1.48A @ 24vdc

3 Asco 11.6W solenoids

2.18A @ 24vdc

4 Asco 11.6W solenoids

2.85A @ 24vdc

1 Asco 1.4W solenoids

255 ma

2 Asco 1.4W solenoids

400ma @ 24vdc

3 Asco 1.4W solenoids

490ma @ 24vdc

4 Asco 1.4W solenoids

580ma @ 24vdc

TECHNICAL TRAINING

150

ADDENDUM DRAWINGS
BMS 731/BTEX Interconnect Diagram

TECHNICAL TRAINING

151

Basic P&ID

TECHNICAL TRAINING

152

Full P&ID

TECHNICAL TRAINING

153

Optional BMS 731-BTEX


Addendum

TECHNICAL TRAINING

154

COMPONENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS


BTEX Adapter Board (Piggyback Board)
The optional BTEX Piggyback Board enables the BMS-731 to read two additional thermocouple
temperature inputs (CH A and CH B). Each of these inputs has an associated programmable ESD alarm
set point. Only the MAIN thermocouple can be used for temperature control.
NOTE

The Piggyback Board can only be used with the BMS-731 configured for Thermocouple use. Multiple RTDs are not supported
at this time.

The board is mounted piggyback to the Valve Board in the Main Control Box. A single ribbon cable
connects the Piggyback Board to the Microprocessor Board.
BTEX Piggyback
Board
Thermocouple
Connector
Channel A
Thermocouple
Connector
Channel B

BTEX Piggyback
Board

Valves/
Termination Board

TECHNICAL TRAINING

155

INSTALLATION
Installing three (3) Type K Thermocouple
NOTE

Thermocouple must be of non-grounded type.

STEPS
1. The Type-K Thermocouples will need to be placed in a thermowell in the vessel. The use of
thermal grease is recommended. Once the Type-K Thermocouples are secure in the thermowell
of the vessel, open the top of the Thermocouples by simply twisting the lid counter clockwise.
2. Type-K connection wires (1 red-negative and 1 yellow-positive) will need to run from the
Thermocouples to the Main Control Box.
WARNING

Only type-K wire (not supplied) can be used with the Type-K Thermocouple.

3. Drill a hole through the bottom of the Main Control Box and install a Meyers hub.
WARNING

DO NOT drill any holes in the Main Control Box without removing the circuit boards. Any damage to the circuit boards
while drilling holes is not covered under the warranty.

4. Attach flex conduit connector to the Thermocouples. Run Flex Conduit from the Meyers
hub on Main Control Box to hub on the Thermocouples. Be sure to run the 2 connection wires
through before securing the flex conduit to the Meyers hub.
TIP

Leave a drip loop or service loop when installing the flex conduit.

WARNING

Always follow local codes for sealing, electricity, etc. Proper sealing methods will need to be used when changing
areas of classification.

5. Gently place one of the connection wires underneath one of the loosened screw and tighten
screw back. The yellow wire (positive) should be secured to the yellow screw and the red wire
(negative) should be secured to the red screw. Place the Thermocouple lid back on the top by
screwing clock wise. Repeat for all three thermocouples.

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6. Locate the connector labeled RTD/Thermocouple on the Valves/Termination Board and the
Channel A and Channel B connectors on the Piggyback Board. To install a wire into a connector,
strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector has a removable top for easy
insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn screw counter-clockwise to
open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot until it bottoms out. Turn
the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to ensure that it is firmly in
place.
7. Insert the connection wires into the terminals on the connectors with the following order:
1.

RTD/Thermocouple Connector on Valves/Termination Board


i. Yellow Wire (positive) Terminal #1
ii. Red Wire (negative)

2.

Terminal #2

Thermocouple Connector Channel A on Piggyback Board


i. Yellow Wire (positive) Terminal #1
ii. Red Wire (negative)

3.

Terminal #2

Thermocouple Connector Channel B on Piggyback Board


i. Yellow Wire (positive) Terminal #1
ii. Red Wire (negative)

NOTE

Terminal #2

BTEX Multiple thermocouple installation


connector terminal.

If using only one auxiliary channel, insert a jumper wire in the remaining connector to read ambient temperature on that
channel. If no jumper is installed that channel will read -1 degree.

8. Push the removable connectors back onto the connector base on the Valve Board and Piggyback
Board.

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OPERATING
WARNING

Prior to powering up the Platinum BMS-731, a second inspection of wiring, solenoid flow direction and setup is recommended.
The Platinum BMS-731 power terminates in the two (2) terminals supplied on the top left of the Valves/Termination Board.

POWERING UP
Close the Main and Pilot gas source valves and proceed to power up the system.
The startup display will read Initializing valve control, then after several seconds will read SYSTEM IS
OFF.
The ESD solenoid (if turned on in the programming) will now be energized, and the remaining Pilot and
Main solenoids will be in the OFF state.
The Platinum BMS-731 will be in the OFF position, waiting for the system to be turned ON.

For the BTEX option, when the BMS is powered up the microprocessor will see the attached Piggyback
Board and enable the software to read the additional inputs. The Alarm set point menu will change also
to allow the additional set points. The display will now show Ta and Tb on the screen along with Main
temperature. It will take approximately 20 seconds for the additional temperatures ratings to read-out
on the front display panel.

M 19 Ta
24 Tb
80C
Input voltage
24.0
SYSTEM IS OFF
SETUP
ON

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OPERATING PARAMETERS
The Operation Parameters Menu allows you to specify how certain functions/parameters are
characterized within the Platinum BMS-731. In the Setup Menu, press SETUP to set the options for the
displayed parameter. Press the NEXT and PREV to navigate between operational parameters. When
adjusting the various operation parameters, press ACCEPT to accept the parameter and return to the
Operation Parameters Menu.
NOTE

If at any time you want to exit the Operating Setup without saving, press the ESD button on the front panel. If you would like to
exit and save the Operating Setup early, press the Accept button twice on the front panel.

Press the NEXT key until the Alarm Setpoint menu appears.
Alarm Setpoint (High Temperature Shutdown)
This parameter allows you to enter a setpoint at which the Platinum BMS-731 will ESD on high
temperature shutdown. This parameter will only work with a Platinum BMS-731 that has the
Temperature Control option turned ON.
SETUP
Alarm Setpoint
EDIT

1.

NEXT

PREV

Press the EDIT button to enter into the Alarm screen.

NXT

Set Temperature
ESD Alarm
Setpoint 1804 F
ALM
UP
DOWN

2.

The first alarm setpoint that appears is the Main setpoint.

3.

Press and hold UP or DOWN button to increase or decrease the setpoint faster.

4.

Press the NXT ALM button to bring up the Channel A setpoint.

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NXT

Set Temperature
Ch A Alarm
Setpoint 1804 F
ALM
UP
DOWN

5.

The second alarm setpoint that appears is the Ch A setpoint.

6.

Press and hold UP or DOWN button to increase or decrease the setpoint faster.

7.

Press the NXT ALM button to bring up the Channel B setpoint.

NXT

Set Temperature
Ch B Alarm
Setpoint 1804 F
ALM
UP
DOWN

8.

The third and final alarm setpoint that appears is the Ch B setpoint.

9.

Press and hold UP or DOWN button to increase or decrease the setpoint faster.

10. Press the ACCEPT button to save the changes and continue on to the next screen or press

the SELECT button on the main control box twice to save and exit.

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SECTION IV:
PLATINUM CONTROLS IMS

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161

PRE-INSTALLATION QUESTIONS
1.

Is this a new location or retrofit?

2.

Does the customer require solar, battery, or line (grid) power?

3.
4.

What type of production equipment is the BMS/IMS unit being installed on? (Dehy,
Combustor, etc...)
What size BTU unit or arrestor size will BMS/IMS be used with?

5.

Is temperature control required?

6.

Will there be an ESD Valve?

7.

Does the customer have or prefer pneumatic or electric burner valves?

8.

Is the customer using field supply gas or propane?

9.

Where does the customer prefer to have panel mounted in proximity to equipment?

10.

Confirm panel can be mounted within 15 of arrestor, otherwise longer cable needed.

11.

On retrofit units has the unit been running, or decommissioned? Has firetube and flame
arrestor been inspected/cleaned?
Electrical and pipefitting work to be performed. Insure qualified personnel are available, or
we are accommodating.

12.

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WARRANTY STATEMENT
Platinum Control warrants all of its manufactured products to be free from defects in material and
workmanship, under normal use intended for the product, for a period of twelve (12) months from the
date of installation, not to exceed twenty-four (24) months from the date of shipment from Platinum
Control facilities. The warranty does not cover damage to end devices. The warranty shall be void for
any one of the following reasons:
1. If the product is installed or modified by personnel not trained by, or considered representatives
of, Platinum Control.
2. If the product is installed improperly.
3. If there is damage to the product caused by misuse.
4. If there is willful or intentional damage to the product.
5. If the product is neglected.
6. If the product is damaged or destroyed by Acts of God (i.e., hurricane, tornado, lightning, etc.).
Warranty repairs are FOB (Freight On Board) origin; the customer is responsible for shipping costs to
Platinums facility. All repairs are to be mailed to the below address:
Platinum Control, Technical Services Department 2822 West 5th Street, Fort Worth, Texas 76107
If you have technical support questions, please contact 877.374.1115 or 817.529.6485 for help.
On-site calls are subject to labor and travel charges to and from site.
WARNING
A. Platinum Ignition Management Systems (IMS) are certified for Class I, Division II, Groups C and D
and any areas considered unclassified.
B. A Platinum IMS controller is Class I, Division II rated and therefore MUST be mounted in an
appropriate area compliant with its classification. Adherence to local classification of areas is
crucial to safety and operation.
C. DO NOT install a Platinum IMS in a Class I, Division I area.
D. DO NOT open the Platinum IMS unless the area has been determined to be non-hazardous.
E. Any substitution of parts or assemblies may compromise suitability of classification, causing
injury or death.
F. The Platinum IMS Ignition Module is not rated and therefore MUST be mounted in an
unclassified area or explosion proof Class I, Division I enclosure.
G. There can be NO substitution of the ignition wire or other components of the IMS. Substitution
may impair the operation of the system, which could cause faulty operation, injury or death.
H. Before beginning the installation or operation of a Platinum IMS, please read this entire Manual.
NOTE
All Platinum IMS systems are intended for oil and gas industry, direct and indirect natural draft fired
heaters only, and are not to be used for residential or commercial buildings of any kind.

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INTRODUCTION
The PLATINUM-500 Ignition Management System (IMS) is specifically designed to monitor and re-ignite
natural draft gas burners used in heating systems for oil and gas production equipment.
POWER
The PLATINUM-500 includes a built-in battery charger that has the ability to charge sealed lead acid
(SLA) batteries from either solar or line power. The battery charger automatically controls the solar
panel voltage and output current to provide maximum power point tracking (MPPT). The PLATINUM-500
IMS can be powered three different ways:
1. Line power from 12-28 VDC
2. Line power from 17-28 VDC with battery backup
3. Solar panel with battery backup
OPERATION
The Platinum IMS monitors for the presence of a pilot flame thro ugh an igniter rod which feeds a signal
back to a microcontroller to determine a safe sequence of events based on the signal.
IGNITER MODE
In IGNITER mode, the IMS controls the ESD, pilot, and main solenoids. In the absence of a lit pilot, the
IMS will shut off all gas sources feeding the pilot and main burner, and wait for a user set delay time
before attempting a re-ignition sequence. In the event of a positive ignition, the system will sense the
flame and proceed with monitoring. In the event of a flame ignition failure, the system will lock out the
ignition process after three (3) attempts and await an operator to troubleshoot and reset the system.
FLARE MODE
In FLARE mode, the IMS does not control solenoids. In the absence of a flame, the IMS will wait for a
fixed delay time (5 seconds) before attempting a re-ignition sequence. In the event of positive ignition,
the system will sense the flame and proceed with monitoring. In the event of a flame ignition failure, the
IMS will restart automatically without any limitations.

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APPLICATIONS

Treaters

Flares

Tank Heaters

Dehydrator Re-boilers

Gas Production Units

Heated Separators

Salt Bath Heaters

Utility Heaters

VOC Incinerators

BTEX Incinerators

Oil Stabilizers

Multiwell Units

Combination Units

A Platinum-500 unit installed.

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COMPONENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS


SHIPPING BOX CONTENTS
Upon receipt of shipping box, inspect contents for physical damage or missing parts, and become
familiarized with the system.
Components that will be shipped with the PLATINUM-500:

20 Four-Conductor Cable (Grey)

PLATINUM-500 Main Control Box

Ignition Module

Mounting Hardware
High Voltage Cable (Blue)

Pilot Assembly

Ground Cable (Black)

Anti-Static Bag

Solenoid Valves (Optional)


DO NOT install Solenoid Valves that are in excess of:
Single coil: 15 Watts
Single coil peak/hold: 23.6 Watts
Dual coil latching: 25.2 Watts
Low watt and peak/hold solenoid valves are recommended for solar applications. Any substitutions of
solenoid valves must be reviewed and approved by Platinum Control. Solenoid Valves outside these
parameters will impair the operation of the system, potentially causing injury or death.

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MICROCONTROLLER BOARDS
PLATINUM-500 Display Board

The PLATINUM-500 Display Board is located in the door of the Main Control Box and provides the userinterface functions of the IMS, including the display and front panel keys. Two (2) push-button switches
are located on the board; the RESET push-button is used to reboot the system and the SETUP button
allows you to setup the various system options.

Display connector
(J3) connection to
Main Board

RESET Button
SETUP Button

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167

PLATINUM-500 Main Board

Display
Connector (J4)

Lithium Cell Holder CR2032 type


for clock backup (BAT 1)

Charger Power
Fuse (F1)
Solar-in/Line-in
Power Connector
(J3) Connection
for solar or line-in

ESD Valve
Connector (J2)

Main Power Fuse


(F2)

Main Valve
Connector
(J5)

Line-in/Battery
Power Connector
(J6) Connection
for line or battery
power

Pilot Valve
Connector
(J8)

External Devices
Connector (J10)

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ESD Out
Connector (J11)

Ignition Module
Connector (J12)

168

IGNITION MODULE
The Ignition Module is connected to the Main Control Box with the Four- Conductor Cable and to the
Pilot Assembly with the High Voltage Cable and Ground Cable.

PILOT ASSEMBLY
The Platinum Pilot Assembly consists of the Igniter Rod, Pilot Nozzle, and Pilot Mixer.

3/16 Spacing

Pilot nozzle
Igniter Rod

Site of High
Voltage Cable
Connection

pipe or nipple
length as
required (not
included)
Mounting
bracket

Pilot Mixer

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INSTALLATION
Please visit platinumcontrol.com for the most current version of this manual and additional technical
resources.
PRE-INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS
In order to properly install the IMS the following items will be required:

Fuel Train Requirements (IGNITER Mode): Main regulator


Pilot regulator
Main control valve
Pilot solenoid
Pressure gauge for main valve
Pressure gauge for pilot valve
Main ball valve, recommended but not necessary

Unistrut or alternate hardware to mount the Main Control Box. The unit must be mounted
within 15 feet of the arrestor (longer cables available, if needed).

Arrestor needs to be large enough to mount the Ignition Module inside of the arrestor.

Power Requirements:
LINE POWER

12-28 volts allowed (3A suggested)


24 volts required for use with 24 volt high-watt or
peak/hold high-watt solenoids

LINE WITH BATTERY

17-28 volts (24 V recommended) 2 A


12 V SLA battery (capacity depends on application)

SOLAR WITH
BATTERY

TECHNICAL TRAINING

17.3 Vmp solar panel (size depends on application)


12 V SLA battery (capacity depends on application)

170

EXAMPLE OF A FUEL GAS TRAIN

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171

MOUNTING THE MAIN CONTROL BOX


The Main Control Box contains two (2) microcontroller boards. The Display Board is mounted in the
door, and the Main Board is mounted in the main body of the case. They are connected by one (1) multiconductor flat cable.
STEPS
1. Attach the Main Control Box mounting hardware to the back of the Main Control Box with the
hardware provided. Specific instructions are located in the Main Control Box mounting
hardware package.
2. Mount the Main Control Box in a secure Class I, Division II area.
3. The Main Control Box will need to be within 15 feet of the arrestor. (If this is not possible, please
contact us for a longer Four-Conductor Cable.)
WARNING
A. Platinum Ignition Management Systems (IMS) are certified for Class I, Division II, Groups C and D
and any areas considered unclassifie d.
B. DO NOT install a Platinum IMS Main Control Box in a Class I, Div. I area.
C. DO NOT open the Platinum IMS Main Control Box unless the area has been determined to be
non-hazardous.
D. Adherence to local classification of areas is crucial to safety and operation.
E. In retrofit applications, contents may be hot and a cool down pe riod will be required before
removing and/or installing any equipment.
INSTALLING SOLENOID VALVES
SOLENOID OPERATION
The PLATINUM-500 can operate both 12V and 24V solenoids. Operation with dual coil latching, single
coil and single coil peak/hold (PWM) solenoids is available. Solenoid installations can then be optimized
for any of the following:

Power consumption

Gas flow

Solenoid cost

The PLATINUM-500 can operate different solenoid types on each of the three (3) outputs: ESD, Pilot and
Main.

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172

The limitations are as follows:

The voltage rating for each solenoid must be the same as the other solenoids in the system.

11.6 W solenoids must be run with 24 V solenoid voltage and 24 V line system power.

23.6 W peak/hold solenoids must be run with 24 V solenoid voltage and 24 V line system
power.

Examples of valid solenoid combinations:


POWER

Solar/Battery

POWER

Solar/Battery

SOLENOID VOLTAGE

12 V

SOLENOID VOLTAGE

12 V

ESD

None

ESD

Peak/hold 11.6 W
12 V

PILOT

0.55 W 12 V

PILOT

Latched 12 V

MAIN

0.55 W 12 V

MAIN

Latched 12 V

POWER

Line/Battery

POWER

Line - 24 V

SOLENOID VOLTAGE

24 V

SOLENOID VOLTAGE

24 V

ESD

None

ESD

Peak/hold 23.6 W
24 V

PILOT

1.4 W 24 V

PILOT

Peak/hold 10.6 W
24 V

MAIN

1.4 W 24 V

MAIN

Peak/hold 23.6 W
24 V

POWER

Line - 24 V

SOLENOID VOLTAGE

24 V

ESD

11.6 W 24 V

PILOT

11.6 W 24 V

MAIN

11.6 W 24 V

WARNING
DO NOT install Solenoid Valves that are in excess of 11.6 W single coil 12/24 VDC, 11.6 W peak/hold 12
VDC, 25.2 W (dual coil) latching 12 VDC, or 23.6 W peak/hold 24 VDC. Low watt or peak/hold solenoid
valves are recommended for solar applications. Any substitutions of solenoid valves must be reviewed
and approved by Platinum. Solenoid Valves outside these parameters will impair the operation of the
system, potentially causing injury or death.

As there are a number of different solenoid valve system configurations, suitable solenoid valve types
will vary based on the application. Supported types are:
1. 12/24 V low-power single coil Solenoid Valve (0.55 W)

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173

2. 12/24 V low-power single coil Solenoid Valve (1.4 W)


3. 24 V single coil Solenoid Valve (11.6 W)
4. 12 V latching dual coil solenoid valve (25.2 W)
5. 12/24 V peak/hold single coil solenoid valve (10.6 W or 11.6 W)
6. 24 V peak/hold single coil solenoid valve (23.6 W)
It is very important that you use the appropriate Solenoid Valves. DO NOT try to substitute Solenoid
Valves outside the above specifications without first consulting with Platinum.

STEPS
1. Install the Pilot Solenoid Valve into the tubing between the pilot pressure regulator and the
arrestor in the tubing line. Install the Main Solenoid Valve into the tubing before the main
temperature control valve in the tubing line. If used, install the ESD Solenoid Valve as the first
thing after the inlet pressure regulator into the tubing line controlling the pneumatic ESD Valve.
TIP
Be sure to orient Solenoid Valves correctly with the respective valve flow direction. ASCO
Solenoids are configured port 1 out, port 2 in and port 3 vent.
2. Open the lid of the Main Control Box by simply unlatching the two (2) latches.
WARNING
DO NOT open the Main Control Box lid forcefully. The multi-conductor flat cable connects the
Main Board and the Display Board and opening the lid forcefully could potentially cause damage
to the boards.
3. Safely unplug the multi-conductor flat cable from the Main Board and unscrew the 4 screws
holding the Main Board to the box. Place the Main Board in a safe, anti-static location. Platinum

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174

recommends using the Anti-static Bag included in the shipping box. Fold over the bag for better
protection. ALWAYS practice safe anti-static methods, such as discharging your hands to earth
ground prior to handling electronics.

WARNING
DO NOT drill any holes in the Main Control Box without at least removing the Main Board. Any
damage to the microcontroller boards while drilling holes is not covered under the warranty.
4. Determine the best method to run the wiring to each solenoid. This will typically be flex conduit
or rigid conduit. The conduit can be run directly to each solenoid or preferably to each in series
through a three-way conduit junction box attached to each solenoid. It is preferable to have the
fewest penetrations possible into the Main Control Box. Locate all holes in the Main Control Box
to the front edge so as not to interfere with the microcontroller board.

5. Install Meyers hubs, seals and conduit as required.

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175

WARNING
Always follow local codes for sealing, electricity, etc. Proper sealing methods will need to be
used when changing areas of classification.

6. Pull wires through conduit and connect to solenoids as required. Be sure to pull ground wires to
terminate the solenoid grounds as well.
7. When installing flex conduit it is good practice to install a service or drip loop where warranted.

8. On the right hand side of the Main Board there are three (3) connectors for the different
solenoid valves. Each connector is labeled for the respective valve; ESD, PILOT, and MAIN.
WARNING
Be sure to insert the ESD wires into the connector labeled ESD, the Pilot wires into the
connector labeled PILOT and the Main wires into the connector labeled MAIN.
9. To install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector
has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn
screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot
until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to
ensure that it is firmly in place.

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176

10. Single coil (S.Coil) solenoid valves are connected as in the figure below.

11. Single coil (S.Coil) peak/hold solenoid valves are connected as in the figure below.

12. Dual coil (latching) solenoid valves are connected as in the figure below.

13. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Main Board.
TIP
If polarity sensitive Solenoid Valves are used, terminal #2 on the solenoid connector is the
negative connection and terminal #1 on the solenoid connector is the positive connection.
MOUNTING THE PILOT ASSEMBLY
STEPS
1. Open flame arrestor or remove the flame cell. You will want enough room to properly mount
the Pilot Assembly to the burner.
2. The Pilot Assembly needs to be mounted so that the Pilot Nozzle tip is positioned at the flame
end of the burner and the Pilot Mixer is partially positioned inside of the arrestor to allow
enough air to the mixer.
3. Determine the length of 1/2 pipe/nipple that will be needed for the extension of the Pilot
Assembly. The length of the pipe/nipple will depend on the length of the burner and positioning
of Pilot Assembly, as mentioned previously.
4. Slide the Igniter Rod and mounting bracket onto the 1/2 pipe/nipple before screwing the
pipe/nipple into the Pilot Nozzle tip end of the Pilot Assembly.

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177

5. The Igniter Rod will need to be positioned so that the tip of the rod is 3/16 away from the top
opening of the Pilot Nozzle within the gas stream. (See Pilot Assembly Diagram)
6. Secure the Igniter Rod to the 1/2 pipe/nipple by tightening the 2 black screws on the mount
with a 1/8 Allen key.
WARNING
Dont over tighten the set screws on the bracket that mounts the Igniter Rod to the nipple on
the Pilot Assembly.

7. Attach the black Ground Cable to the Pilot Assembly by removing the small screw located on the
end of the pilot mixer. Place the screw through the hole located in the Ground Cable followed
by the bonding washer and screw back into the Pilot Mixer.
WARNING
Dont over tighten screw to prevent stripping the threads or breaking the screw.
8. Pull back the boot on the blue High Voltage Cable to expose the connector. Push the connector
into the end of the Igniter Rod until you hear a small click. Then pull the boot over the connector
and onto the Igniter Rod ending.
9. Position the Pilot Assembly to the burner. The Igniter Rod will need to be positioned on top of
the Pilot Assembly and adjacent to the burner. Once the Pilot Assembly is in the correct position
on the burner, securely fasten the Pilot Assembly tip approximately 1 behind the tip of the
burner. Make sure that the securing device isnt touching the igniter rod.

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NOTE
Platinum Control does not tune burners or guarantee efficiency. We strongly recommend that a
qualified burner technician inspect and tune the burners upon completion of the installation.
INSTALLING THE IGNITION MODULE
The Ignition Module, common to all Platinum IMS models, is a small sealed module which houses
the High Voltage Ignition Transformer. The Ignition Module produces a high voltage spark through
the Igniter Rod, and senses the presence of a flame through the Igniter Rod.
STEPS
1. Attach the end of the gray Four-Conductor Cable with the connector to the matching connector
on the side of the Ignition Module and secure with the two built in screws.

WARNING
The Ignition Module itself is not rated and MUST therefore be mounted inside the flame
arrestor (unclassified area) or explosion pro of Class I, Division I rated enclosure for external
mounting.
2. The Ignition Module should be mounted on the inside sidewall when mounting inside the flame
arrestor.
WARNING

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179

DO NOT mount the Ignition Module on the bottom inside wall of the arrestor. The Ignition
Module must be mounted up and away from any possible liquid accumulation.
3. Using the Ignition Module as a template, mark suitable mounting holes on the side of the
arrestor. Drill 1/4 holes and mount the module with suitable mounting hardware making sure
to capture the ground wires from both the ignition module and the pilot assembly under the
head of the mounting bolt. Earth ground must be established.
4. Attach the blue High Voltage Cable from the Pilot Assembly to the Ignition Module and secure.
5. Run Four-Conductor Cable through auxiliary coupling on flame arrestor. When installing on
older flame arrestors, a spare coupling may not exist. In the event an auxiliary coupling is not
available, make arrangements to professionally install this connection or 1/2 Meyers hub into
the flame arrestor.
6. BE SURE THE MAIN BOARD HAS BEEN REMOVED FROM THE MAIN CONTROL BOX.
WARNING
DO NOT drill any holes in the Main Control Box without removing the microcontroller boards.
Any damage to the microcontroller boards while drilling holes is not covered under the
warranty.
7. Drill a hole through the bottom of the Main Control Box and install the 1/2 Meyers hub and run
1/2 Flex Conduit from the Meyers hub on the arrestor to the Meyers hub on the Main Control
Box. Install seal if required.
TIP
Leave a drip loop or service loop when installing the flex conduit.
WARNING
Always follow local codes for sealing, electricity, etc. Proper sealing methods will need to be
used when changing areas of classification.
8. Run a ground wire with the Four-Conductor Cable through the flex conduit connection from the
arrestor to the Main Control Box.
TIP
It is good practice to run the ground wire with the Four-Conductor Cable and terminate at each
end of the Meyers hub. If possible, separate and secure the high voltage cable from the FourConductor Cable.
9. Once the Four-Conductor Cable and ground wire have been run through the flex conduit into
the Main Control Box, wrap the bare drain wire in the Four-Conductor Cable around the base of
the remaining four (4) colored wires and tape off.

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180

10. Locate the connector labeled Ignition Module on the Main Board. To install a wire into a
connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector has a removable top for
easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn screw counter-clockwise
to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot until it bottoms out.
Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to ensure that it is firmly
in place.
NOTE
The Four-Conductor Cable interconnects the Main Controller Box and the Ignition Module.
11. Insert each wire from the Four-Conductor Cable into the terminal on the connector with the
following order:
a. Coil- Black Wire
b. Coil + White Wire
c. FLM + Red Wire
d. FLM - Green Wire
12. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Main Board.

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181

CONNECTING EXTERNAL DEVICES


WARNING
DO NOT connect voltage to any of these inputs.
DRY CONTACTS ONLY.
EXTERNAL ESD SWITCH: This signal will direct the system to ESD the burner when the switch is
open. A remote system should be used to shut down the burner.
NOTE
System must be reset locally on an ESD.
REMOTE ON/OFF SWITCH: This signal will direct the system to enter the OFF state. The burner is
ON when the switch is closed. Open the switch only in the RUN (burning) state. If the contacts
are closed, the burner will start. If the contacts are open, the burner will stop. A remote system
should be used to control the burner.
NOTE
The Platinum IMS must be placed in the RUN (burning) state to enable this feature. (Local
interface overrides the feature if the system is in OFF or ESD.)
CONNECTING EXTERNAL ESD (STATUS OUT)
a. Terminal NO
b. Terminal C
c. Terminal NC

Normally Open
Common
Normally Closed

WARNING
DO NOT connect voltage to any of these inputs.
DRY CONTACTS ONLY.
These contacts are used for an ESD OUT or Status signal. The contacts will change state when an
ESD occurs.
GROUNDING WIRES
STEPS
1. You should have multiple disconnected ground wires in the Main Control Box. The number of
ground wires will depend on the specific setup.
2. Create a termination site inside of the Main Control Box.
3. Connect all of the ground wires to this termination site.
WARNING
Always follow local codes for proper grounding methods.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

182

CONNECTING MAIN BOARD TO MAIN CONTROL BOX


STEPS
1. Re-connect the Main Board back onto the Main Control Box with the four (4) screws. Make sure
the Main Board is secure.
2. Reconnect the multi-conductor cable to connect the Main Board (located in the right hand side
of the Main Control Box) with the Display Board (located in the left hand side door of the Main
Control Box). The connectors on both ends of the multi-conductor cable are keyed to match the
connection on the boards. Damage may be caused to the boards if the multi-conductor cable
connectors are forced onto the boards and power is applied.
WARNING
Only attach the Main Board to the Main Control Box if all drilling into the Main Control Box is
complete and there is no welding work being performed nearby.
CONNECTING POWER TO THE MAIN CONTROL BOX
WARNING
DO NOT connect voltage or power wires until everything has been connected and installed on the
unit, and only after you have metered and checked continuity or voltage for the correct and
required amount of power.
LINE POWER

TECHNICAL TRAINING

183

STEPS
1. Locate power connector J3 (three (3) terminal) on the middle left hand side of the Main Board,
labeled Battery/10-30VB.
2. To install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector
has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn
screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot
until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to
ensure that it is firmly in place.
3. Insert the positive, negative and earth ground wires from the power supply into the terminals
with the following order:
a. Positive Wire Terminal V+
b. Negative Wire Terminal GND
c. Earth Ground Wire Terminal EGND
4. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Main Board.
SOLAR POWER WITH BATTERY BACKUP

TECHNICAL TRAINING

184

STEPS
1. Locate the first power connector J6 (three (3) terminal) on the middle left hand side of the Main
Board, labeled Battery/10-30 V.
2. To install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector
has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn
screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot
until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to
ensure that it is firmly in place.
3. Insert the positive, negative and earth ground wires from the battery bank into the terminals
with the following order:
a. Positive Wire Terminal V+
b. Negative Wire Terminal GND
c. Earth Ground Wire Terminal EGND
4. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Main Board.
5. Locate a second power connector J3 (two (2) terminal) on top left hand side of the Main Board,
labeled Solar/17-30V.
6. To install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector
has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn
screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot
until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to
ensure that it is firmly in place.
7.

Insert the positive and negative wires from the solar panel into the terminals with the following
order:
a. Positive Wire Terminal V+
b. Negative Wire Terminal GND

8. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Main Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

185

LINE POWER WITH BATTERY BACKUP

STEPS
1. Locate the first power connector J6 (three (3) terminal) on the middle left hand side of the Main
Board, labeled Battery/12-28 V.
2. To install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector
has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn
screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot
until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to
ensure that it is firmly in place.
3. Insert the positive, negative and earth ground wires from the battery bank into the terminals
with the following order:
a. Positive Wire Terminal V+
b. Negative Wire Terminal GND
c. Earth Ground Wire Terminal EGND
4. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Main Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

186

5. Locate a second power connector J3 (two (2) terminal) on top left hand side of the Main Board,
labeled Solar/17-28V.
6. To install a wire into a connector, strip 0.3 (7mm) of insulation off of the wire. The connector
has a removable top for easy insertion of wires. Remove the top portion of the connector, turn
screw counter-clockwise to open the terminal slot, insert the stripped wire into the terminal slot
until it bottoms out. Turn the screw clockwise to shut the terminal slot and tug on the wire to
ensure that it is firmly in place.
7. Insert the positive and negative wires from the power supply into the terminals with the
following order:
a. Positive Wire Terminal V+
b. Negative Wire Terminal GND
8. Push the removable connector back onto the connector base on the Main Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

187

SETUP
WARNING
Prior to powering up the PLATINUM-500, a second inspection of wiring, solenoid flow direction and
setup is recommended.
POWERING UP
Close the Main and Pilot gas source valves and proceed to power up the system. The following screens
will appear in sequence:

Platinum Control
PLATINUM-500
FW Version: 0.35
04/10/13
Testing System
.
INITIAL SETUP
When the PLATINUM-500 is initially powered up, the system will go through an initialization and testing
process and then into a short required setup. The screens will allow you to select the type of input
power, solenoid type and solenoid voltage.
Setup Information

Use the Up/Down


( / ) keys to
Modify settings

All changes are


saved on exit.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

188

The following screens will appear in the below order, prompting you to choose the required selections.
Use the Up ()/Down () keys to cycle through to the desired selection, then press the Next button to
advance to the next screen.
(*) Menu screens marked with an asterisk are not accessible in FLARE mode. To learn more about FLARE
mode, please see the INTRODUCTION section.
POWER SELECTION

Power: None Sel


Must select!
OPERATING MODE

Operating mode: Must


select!
SOLENOID VOLTAGE*
Solenoid Voltage Must
select!
ESD SOLENOID*
Esd Sol: NoneSel Must
select!

SETTING OPTIONS

Power: Solar + Bat Next


Power: 17-28V + Bat Next
Power: 12-28V Line Next
SETTING OPTIONS

Mode: FLARE Next


Mode: IGNITER Next
SETTING OPTIONS

Solenoids: +12V Next


Solenoids: +24V
SETTING OPTIONS

Esd Sol: None Next


Esd Sol: Latch Next
NOTE
Latched solenoids are only selectable
when the solenoid voltage is set to 12V.

Esd Sol: <1W Next


Esd Sol: 1-10W Next
Esd Sol: 10-15W Next Esd
Sol: P/H<12W Next
Esd Sol: P/H 24W Next
NOTE
If P/H (Peak/Hold) is selected, you must
use the up/down ( / ) keys to set the
duty cycle on the next screen.

ESD Duty: 30% Next

TECHNICAL TRAINING

189

PILOT SOLENOID*

Pilot Sol: NoneSel Must


select!

SETTING OPTIONS

Pilot Sol: None Next


Pilot Sol: Latch Next
NOTE
Latched solenoids are only selectable
when the solenoid voltage is set to 12V.

Pilot
Pilot
Pilot
Pilot
Pilot

Sol:
Sol:
Sol:
Sol:
Sol:

<1W Next
1-10W Next
10-15W Next
P/H<12W Next
P/H 24W Next

NOTE
If P/H (Peak/Hold) is selected, you must
use the up/down ( / ) keys to set the
duty cycle on the next screen.

Pilot Duty: 30% Next


MAIN SOLENOID*

Main Sol: NoneSel Must


select!

SETTING OPTIONS

Main Sol: None Next


Main Sol: Latch Next
NOTE
Latched solenoids are only selectable
when the solenoid voltage is set to 12V.

Main
Main
Main
Main
Main

Sol:
Sol:
Sol:
Sol:
Sol:

<1W Next
1-10W Next
10-15W Next
P/H<12W Next
P/H 24W Next

NOTE
If P/H (Peak/Hold) is selected, you must
use the up/down ( / ) keys to set the
duty cycle on the next screen.

Main Duty: 30% Next

TECHNICAL TRAINING

190

IDLE STATE
When the PLATINUM-500 is idle and not running, it will display the current status of the power supply
and show the soft key to press to turn on the IMS. If the remote on/off function is enabled, its status will
also be displayed.
If line power is being utilized, the following screens may appear:
Remote Disabled Line:24.0V

IGNITER standby* Line:24.0V on


FLARE standby Line:24.0V on
Remote Disabled Line:24.0V

If line and battery power are being utilized, the following screens may appear:

IGNITER standby* Bat:13.8V On


IGNITER standby* Line:24.0V On
FLARE standby Bat:13.8V On
FLARE standby Line:24.0V On
Battery Charged Bat:13.8V On
Charge Fault Line:24.0V On
Remote Disabled Bat:13.8V
Remote Disabled Line:24.0V

If solar and battery power are being utilized, the following screens may appear:
IGNITER standby* Bat:13.6V On

IGNITER standby* Sol:17.2V On


FLARE standby Bat:13.6V On
FLARE standby Sol:17.2V On
Battery Charged Bat:13.8V On
Remote Disabled Line:24.0V
Charge Fault Sol:0.5V On
Remote Disabled Bat:13.8
Remote Disabled Sol:17.2V

TECHNICAL TRAINING

191

OPERATING PARAMETERS SETUP


From the idle screen, press the SETUP button on the back of the Display Board to enter the operating
parameters setup menu.
(*) Menu screens marked with an asterisk are not accessible in FLARE mode. To learn more about FLARE
mode, please see the INTRODUCTION section.
The following screens will appear in the following order:
FIRMWARE REVISION NUMBER

STEPS

FW Version: 1.00 Prev


Next

1. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to


continue on to the next or previous
screen.

VENT DELAY TIME*


This parameter allows you to adjust
the delay time required to eliminate
excess gas prior to ignition of the
pilot. The vent delay state occurs
before each ignition sequence.

Vent Time: 15s Prev Next


SPARK DELAY TIME*
This parameter allows you to adjust
the delay from the opening of the
pilot solenoid until the first ignition
spark to allow for different delays in
gas flow to the pilot .

Spark Delay: 2s Prev Next


MAIN VALVE DELAY TIME*
The main valve delay is the time from
successful ignition of the pilot to the
opening of the main valve. This
allows the pilot to stabilize and create
air movement within the fire tube for
successful main light off.

Main Delay: 5s Prev Next

TECHNICAL TRAINING

SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: 15 s
Setting Range: 0-300 s
STEPS
1. To change the delay time, press the
Up or Down key to increase or
decrease the seconds.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.
SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: 2 s
Setting Range: 0-5 s
STEPS
1. To change the delay time, press the
Up or Down key to increase or
decrease the seconds.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen
SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: 5 s
Setting Range: 1-300 s
STEPS
1. To change the delay time, press the
Up or Down key to increase or
decrease the seconds.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.

192

FLAME SENSE DELAY TIME


This is a variable parameter that
allows a time delay for a pilot flame
to re-establish; prevent nuisance
shutdowns if the main burner comes
on hard, and removes the flame from
the Pilot Tip momentarily.

Flame Sense: 3s Prev Next


REMOTE ON/OFF
The PLATINUM-500 allows for
remote control of the burner ON/OFF
state. With the External Off Switch
closed, the unit will function in its
normal capacity.
With these contacts open, the burner
will enter the Remote System OFF
state. If the burner is ON and the
contacts are opened, the
PLATINUM-500 will extinguish all
flames and return to the Remote
System OFF state (status contacts
will only change state on an ESD or
power loss). When the contacts are
closed, the PLATINUM-500 will
return to the vent delay and reignition sequence.

Remote OnOff: Off Prev


Next
AUTO ON
The PLATINUM-500 allows for the
system to automatically restart if
power fails in the Run condition.
When this function is enabled, the
system will automatically enter Run
mode when power is re-established
after performing a successful ignition
sequence and entering the Run
condition.

SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: 3 s
Setting Range: 0-5 s
STEPS
1. To change the delay time, press the
Up or Down key to increase or
decrease the seconds.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.
SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: Off
Setting Options: On (enabled)
Off (disabled)
STEPS
1. To change the Remote ON/OFF
function, press the Up or Down key
to enable or disable the function.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.
NOTE
Any ESD condition will require the
operator to restart the unit from the front
panel.

SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: Off
Setting Options: On (enabled)
Off (disabled)
STEPS
1. To change the Auto On function,
press the Up or Down key to
enable or disable the function.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key
to continue on to the next or
previous screen.

Auto-On Mode: Off Prev


Next

TECHNICAL TRAINING

193

STATUS LED MODE


The PLATINUM-500 allows the user
to select different modes for the
status LEDs. Power down occurs
three (3) minutes after the last
keypress.

LEDs: Always On Prev Next


NOTE
If an ESD occurs with the LED mode set
to off, it will automatically switch to pulse
mode until a key is pressed.
If there is at least one error not reviewed,
the LED will double pulse every two
seconds until you view the error.
Consequently, all of the LED modes in
Setup will be overridden until the error is
viewed.

DISPLAY MODE
The PLATINUM-500 allows the user
to select whether to keep the display
on at all times or to turn off the
display three (3) minutes after the
last keypress.

Display: PwrDown Prev


Next

TECHNICAL TRAINING

SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: On
Setting

Action

Current

Off

Status LED powers off


after 3 m

0 mA

Pulse

Short pulse of active


status LED every 2 s

< 1 mA

Flash

1 s on, 1 s off flash of


active status LED

~ 5 mA

On

Active status LED is


always on

~ 10 mA

STEPS
1. To change the Status LED mode,
press the Up or Down key to select
the desired setting option.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.

SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: Pwr Down
Setting

Action

Pwr Down

Display powers down

Always On

Display always on

STEPS
1. To change the Display Mode
function, press the Up or Down key
to select the desired setting option.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.

194

POWER MODE
The PLATINUM-500 can be powered
from line power, solar with a battery
backup, or line power with a battery
backup.
NOTE
Prior setup of this function is required
during initial setup (see INITIAL SETUP)

Power: Solar + Bat Prev


Next
Power: 17-28V Prev Next
Power: 12-28V Prev Next

SETTING OPTIONS
Solar + Bat

17 V MPP power input to connector J6


(Solar/17-30V)

12 V SLA battery to connector J6


(Battery/12-28V)
17-28V + Bat

17-30 VDC power input to connector J3


(Solar/17-28V)

12 V SLA battery to connector J6


(Battery/12-28V)
12-28V Line

10-30 VDC power input to connector J6


( Battery/12- 28V)

STEPS
1. To change the Power mode, press
the Up or Down key to select the
correct power mode for your
installation.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.
NOTE
Incorrect selection of the power mode
can result in emergency shutdown and/
or improper operation.

OPERATING MODE
The PLATINUM-500 can be
operated in two different modes:
FLARE and IGNITER.
In FLARE mode, ignition delay and
solenoid related screens are not
viewable. Smart start is not used in
FLARE mode.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

SETTING OPTIONS
FLARE

No solenoid control; up to
65535 relights; 5 second
delay before ignition

IGNITER

Solenoid control; 3 relights,


then shutdown; user
selectable ignition delay

STEPS
1. To change the Operating Mode,
press the Up or Down key to select
the desired setting option.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.

195

SOLENOID VOLTAGE*

SETTING OPTIONS

The PLATINUM-500 allows different


types of solenoids for each of the
ESD, pilot and main outputs.
Different models of solenoids operate
at different voltages. Accordingly, the
solenoid voltage must be selected for
the solenoids chosen to run with this
system.

STEPS
1.
To change the Solenoid Voltage
function, press the Up or Down key to
select the desired setting option.
2.
Press the Next or Prev soft-key
to continue on to the next or previous
screen.

Solenoids: +12V Prev Next

NOTE

NOTE

All connected solenoids must be rated for the


selected voltage.
Solenoids inappropriate for the currently
selected voltage will not appear in the
solenoid selection menus.

Prior setup of this function is required during


initial setup (see INITIAL SETUP).

ESD SOLENOID TYPE*

SETTING OPTIONS

The PLATINUM-500 allows different


types of solenoids for each of the
ESD, pilot and main outputs. Each
output must be set separately.

None

No solenoid

Latch

Dual coil latching solenoid - not


available on 24V supply

<1W

Single coil solenoid

1-10W

Single coil solenoid

>10W

Single coil solenoid - not


available on 12V supply

P/H <12W

Peak/hold solenoid

P/H 24W

Peak/hold solenoid - not


available on 12V supply

Esd Sol: None Prev Next

STEPS
1. To change the ESD Solenoid Type,
press the Up or Down key to select
the desired setting option.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.
3. If Peak/Hold is selected, the next
screen will allow you to select the
Duty Cycle for the ESD Solenoid.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

196

PILOT SOLENOID TYPE*

SETTING OPTIONS

The PLATINUM-500 allows different


types of solenoids for each of the
ESD, pilot and main outputs. Each
output must be set separately.

None

No solenoid

Latch

Dual coil latching solenoid - not


available on 24V supply

<1W

Single coil solenoid

1-10W

Single coil solenoid

>10W

Single coil solenoid - not


available on 12V supply

P/H <12W

Peak/hold solenoid

P/H 24W

Peak/hold solenoid - not


available on 12V supply

Pilot Sol: None Prev Next

STEPS
1. To change the Pilot Solenoid Type, press the Up or
Down key to select the desired setting option.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to continue on to the
next or previous screen.
3. If Peak/Hold is selected, the next screen will allow you
to select the Duty Cycle for the ESD Solenoid.

MAIN SOLENOID TYPE*

SETTING OPTIONS

The PLATINUM-500 allows different


types of solenoids for each of the
ESD, pilot and main outputs. Each
output must be set separately.

None

No solenoid

Latch

Dual coil latching solenoid not available on 24V supply

<1W

Single coil solenoid

1-10W

Single coil solenoid

>10W

Single coil solenoid - not


available on 12V supply

P/H <12W

Peak/hold solenoid

P/H 24W

Peak/hold solenoid - not


available on 12V supply

Main Sol: None Prev Next

STEPS
1. To change the Main Solenoid Type, press the Up or
Down key to select the desired setting option.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to continue on to the
next or previous screen.
3. If Peak/Hold is selected, the next screen will allow you
to select the Duty Cycle for the ESD Solenoid.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

197

FACTORY RESET
To reset the PLATINUM-500 to the
factory default settings, a specific key
sequence will need to be entered.
After reset, the system will require
reentry of the INITIAL SETUP
options.

Factory Reset Prev


Next
PASSWORD
The PLATINUM-500 allows the user
to enable or disable a password to
activate or deactivate the unit.

Password: Off Prev Next


NOTE
Call 877.374.1115 to request password
information.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

STEPS
1. To initiate Factory reset, press ( ,
, , ) Up, Down, Up and
then Down.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.

SETTING OPTIONS
Default Setting: Off
Setting Options:
ON (enabled)
OFF (disabled)
STEPS
1. To change the Password function,
press the Up or Down key to enable
or disable the function.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.

198

TIME AND DATE


The PLATINUM-500 allows the user
to set the time and date so that
logged events are saved with the time
when they occurred.

Set Time & Date


Prev Next
09:11:08
Exit Next
Feb 25 2013
Exit Next
Set Time & Date
Prev Next

CLEAR LOG
The PLATINUM-500 allows the user
to clear the log of recorded errors
and ESDs.
Clear Log
Prev Next

STEPS
1. Press the Down key to start setting
the time.
2. Use the Up or Down key to change
the hour (24 hr format).
3. Press Next to move on to the
minutes.
4. Use the Up or Down key to change
the minutes.
5. Press Next to move on to the
seconds.
6. Use the Up or Down key to reset the
seconds to 00.
7. Press Next to move on to the month.
8. Use the Up or Down key to change
the month.
9. Press Next to move on to the day of
the month.
10. Use the Up and Down key to change
the day of the month.
11. Press Next to move on to the year.
12. Use the Up or Down key to change
the year.
13. Press Exit at any time to exit setting
the time and date.
STEPS
1. To initiate Clear Log, press ( , ,
, ) Up, Down, Up and then
Down.
2. Press the Next or Prev soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.
NOTE
The event record log is saved in nonvolatile memory and is maintained even
without power. The event log can be
cleared with the menu operation.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

199

VIEW LOG
The PLATINUM-500 allows the user
to view a list of logged events
including detected causes for errors
and ESDs. Events can include the
information about a burn cycle
including the number of relights, the
time the flame was on, and the total
time of the burn. Times are recorded
in seconds.
View Log w/
Prev Next
Example of an error or ESD:

Error @ 09:59:26
(10) 25 Feb 2013
Reason for error
or ESD
Example of Burn Off:

BurnOff @ 09:59:26
(3) 25 Feb 2013
Relights:
00000000
Flame Time:
00457800s
Total Time On:
00457819s

STEPS
1. Press the Down key to view the most
recent event. The time and date of
the event will be shown briefly before
the event is displayed. The number
of the event is displayed in
parenthesis. The oldest event is (1)
and the highest number is the
newest event.
2. Pressing the Down key shows the
next oldest event.
3. Pressing the Up key shows the
newest event.
4. When the oldest event is displayed,
pressing the Down key again will
briefly display Oldest Event.
5. When the newest event is displayed,
pressing the Up key again will briefly
display Latest Event.
6. Press the NEXT or PREV soft-key to
continue on to the next or previous
screen.
NOTE
The event log is a record of the last 256
recorded events. If more than 256 events
occur without clearing the log, the oldest
events will be lost.
When the unit is manually started using
keypresses to turn the unit on, then off,
the Total Time On indicates that entire
period.
When the unit is enabled for Remote On/
Off, the Total Time On indicates the time
that the unit was enabled to run by the
external input.
The Flame Time reflects the time that a
flame was detected during either of the
above periods.

EXIT SETUP
Move to the Exit Setup screen and press the down key to save and exit. Or you can press the SETUP
push-button switch on the back of the Display Board at any time to exit the setup mode. All changes will
be saved. Setup will automatically exit and save changes after three (3) minutes of no keypresses.

to Save & Exit Prev Next

TECHNICAL TRAINING

200

OPERATING
WARNING
Prior to powering up the PLATINUM-500, a second inspection of wiring, solenoid flow direction and
setup is recommended. Verify all power connections to the PLATINUM-500 Main Board.
FRONT PANEL

SOFT KEYS
SELECT (left)
SELECT (right)
ESD
Up/Down Arrows

Performs the function displayed on the bottom left line of


the screen read-out. The function will vary depending on
the current state of the system.
Performs the function displayed on the bottom right line
of the screen read-out. The function will vary depending
on the current state of the system.
Shuts down any ongoing operating and changes the output
of the ESD output contacts.
Change the setting currently displayed on the screen
during SETUP mode.

PANEL INDICATORS
STANDBY
Blue status LED indicates whether the PLATINUM-500 has
power and is not running.
RUN
Green status LED indicates the PLATINUM-500 is running
and in the burn condition.
ESD
Two white status LEDs indicate the PLATINUM-500 is in an
emergency shutdown condition.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

201

POWERING UP
Close the main and pilot gas source valves and proceed to power up the system. The OLED display will
show several product information screens then will display a test sequence.
If the system has not been previously configured, it will go into an abbreviated setup sequence. The
input power type, solenoid voltage and the type of each solenoid must be selected before the system
will become functional. Additional parameters may be set by pressing the SETUP push-button on the
Display Board any time the system is not running or during an ESD condition.

All solenoids will now be off and the display will show something similar to:

IGNITER standby* Line:


24.0V On

FLARE standby* Line:


24.0V On

The power type text on the bottom left portion of the screen will vary depending on the type of power
input. The screen will update every 2 seconds with additional information.
SMART START
Smart Start is a way to reduce the startup time on a system that has already vented. The ignition delay
(wait time) in IGNITER mode is user selectable from 15 to 300 seconds. However, the system monitors
the time to determine how long the system has already been venting. The display will show a rotating
bar (|, /, -, \, |) while it is in a delay state and not turned on. After the delay time has expired, the
display will show * as above. If the PLATINUM-500 is then turned on, the system will delay for a
minimum of 15s. If the PLATINUM-500 ignition cycle starts before the wait time expires, the system will
delay for the time remaining. Smart Start is not used in FLARE mode since the ignition delay time is
fixed.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

202

RUNNING
After waiting a minimum of five (5) minutes for any gases in fire tube to dissipate, open the main and
pilot gas sources when ready to engage the IMS.
IGNITER & FLARE MODE
When you press the right select key (on), the PLATINUM-500 will operate through the user set delay
time while the system performs tests. The PLATINUM-500 will then follow the user set timing for the
ignition sequence.
(*) Menu screens marked with an asterisk are not accessible in FLARE mode. To learn more about FLARE
mode, please see the INTRODUCTION section.
IGNITION DELAY
Ignition Delay Wait: 30s
Off

Initially, the PLATINUM-500 will


display a screen while the system is
delaying.

PILOT SOLENOID*
Pilot Solenoid On Off

Once the ignition delay has expired,


the Pilot valve will open.

IGNITION
Igniting Off

After the spark delay time has


expired, a series of forty (40) sparks
will arc between the Igniter Rod Tip
and the Nozzle Tip (ground).
After ignition, the system will check
for the presence of the Pilot flame.

FLAME DETECTION
Flame Detect: 3s Flame:
75% Off
MAIN DELAY*
Main Delay: 30s Flame:
87% Off

Upon successful Pilot ignition, the


preset Main Time Delay for the Pilot
to stabilize will start counting.

MAIN SOLENOID*
Main Solenoid: On Flame:
100% Off

After the main delay, the main


solenoid will turn on.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

203

RUNNING
IGNITER running Bat:
13.8V Off

IGNITER running Flame:


85% Off
IGNITER running Sol:
17.2V Off
Run time: 128 hr Burn:
99.95% Off
PASSWORD PROTECTION
Enter Password _ _ _ _

When the PLATINUM-500 ignition


sequence is complete and the
system is running, a screen similar to
the IDLE mode screen is shown with
the flame quality and burn cycle time
also displayed.
NOTE
The first time the burner tries to ignite
the pilot, it may take several attempts to
purge air out of the pilot line.

If password protection is enabled,


the following screen will be displayed
before system start up, shut down or
entering SETUP mode.

RUNNING WITH REMOTE ON/OFF


If Remote On/Off mode is enabled the standby screens will change to show the status. To run in Remote
On/Off mode, you must press the On (right select) key to start.

Remote Standby * Bat:


13.8V On

Unit is in standby, On (right select) key


has not been pressed and Remote
On/Off input is closed.

Remote Disabled * Bat:


13.8V

Unit is in standby, On key has not been


pressed and Remote On/Off input is
open.

Remote Waiting * Bat:


13.8V

Unit is in standby, On key has been


pressed and Remote On/Off input is
open.

Remote Start Wait: 15s


Off

Unit is starting Run, On key has been


pressed and Remote On/Off input is
closed.

RUNNING WITH LOW BATTERY CONDITION


If the battery is depleted while running, the system will shut off and go into standby mode at 11 V. If the
Auto On setting is enabled (On), the system will automatically restart after the battery has recharged to
an acceptable level. The level varies on the mode of operation, FLARE or IGNITER, and the selected
solenoid power ratings. If the system is waiting to restart, the Standby and Run LED panel indicators will
display alternate flashes and the following screen will be displayed (if the display is on):

Run after charge Bat: 11.0V On

TECHNICAL TRAINING

204

CONFIRM PROPER FUNCTIONALITY OF THE FLAME SENSING PROBE


1. With the Pilot on, close the Pilot gas valve to starve the Pilot of gas. The loss of flame will cause
the system to close the ESD, Main and Pilot Solenoid Valves (if installed and enabled - IGNITER
only mode), initiate a re-ignition cycle, and then attempt a relight. Once the re-ignition cycle is
confirmed, open the Pilot gas and the Platinum IMS will automatically relight the Pilot. The
number of retries is incremental for each attempt. A successful relight will be displayed with
each relight. The relight number is reset to zero (0) if the Platinum IMS is set to the OFF state or
reset after a shutdown.
2. Once the Pilot is proven, open the Main gas valve slowly and confirm air gas mixture is proper
according to flame color. Platinum recommends the use of an analyzer.
NOTE
Platinum Control does not set burners, and strongly recommends that a qualified burner technician
inspect and tune the burner upon completion of the installation.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

205

RATINGS
POWER SUPPLY

SOLAR / BATTERY
MODE

Solar Input

LINE / BATTERY MODE

LINE IN MODE

For use with solar panels rated at 17.3


V for maximum power
Voc 32 V maximum
Maximum usable input power -approx.
30 W

Power Control

MPPT

Battery Output

12 V sealed lead acid

Charging Current

2 A output max

Line In

17-28 VDC

Battery Output

12 V sealed lead acid

Charging Current

2 A output max

Line In

12-28 VDC

POWER CONSUMPTION (RUNNING)

MODE

INDICATORS

SOLENOID
CONFIGURATION

POWER
(TYPICAL)

IGNITER

Display on; Run


LED on

3 x No valves
selected

0.48 W @ 24 V

IGNITER

Display off; Run


LED pulse

3 x No valves
selected

0.14 W @ 24 V

IGNITER

Display on; Run


LED on

3 x latch

0.52 W @ 13.8 V

IGNITER

Display off; Run


LED pulse

3 x latch

0.19 W @ 13.8 V

FLARE

Display on; Run


LED on

0.41 W @ 13.8 V

FLARE

Display off; Run


LED pulse

0.08 W @ 13.8 V

FUSE
CERAMIC 250 V FAST 3AB 3A
CLOCK BACKUP BATTERY
CR2032
ESD OUTPUT RELAY
Max. switching voltage 220 VDC, 250 VAC rated current 2A

TECHNICAL TRAINING

206

TROUBLESHOOTING
ESD SCREEN MESSAGES
If the PLATINUM-500 detects a problem that does not require a restart, it will shut down any ongoing
operation and display the cause(s) of the problem. The time/date and reason for shutdown will also be
stored into the event log and can be viewed later.
For the following table, xx.xV, indicated the voltage reading at the time of the problem.
For example:

Line undervolt. 9.7V


MESSAGE

REMEDIES/SOLUTION

Battery undervolt. xx.xV

The battery has been discharged to 10.5V or less; allow the


battery to recharge before use; Verify the line or solar input
voltage is sufficient to charge the battery.

Battery overvolt. xx.xV

The battery voltage is higher than expected or allowable; This


may indicate a problem with the battery charger output of the
Main Board or a battery failure.

ESD check type error

During verification of the ESD solenoid & wiring, the type of


solenoid to verify was detected as corrupted, therefore the
solenoid could not be verified correctly; Use Setup to select
the correct solenoid type; This may indicate a problem with
the Main Board.

ESD latch coil error

A problem was detected with the ESD latch wiring/ solenoid;


recheck wiring and try again (latched solenoids only).

ESD latch solen. open circuit

There is an open connection in either the ESD solenoid latch


wiring or the ESD solenoid latch coil (latched solenoids only).

ESD on type error

During turn on of the ESD solenoid, the type of solenoid to


turn on was detected as corrupted, therefore the solenoid
could not be turned on correctly; A reset may correct this; This
may indicate a problem with the Main Board.

ESD output relay stuck

The emergency shutdown output relay is stuck and has not


responded to actuation; This may indicate a problem with the
Main Board.

ESD peak/hold driver error

The peak/hold (PWM) driver for the ESD solenoid was


detected as not functioning; A reset may correct this; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

ESD rele. sol. open circuit

There is an open connection in either the ESD solenoid


release wiring or the ESD solenoid release coil (latched
solenoids only).

ESD release coil error

A problem was detected with the ESD release wiring/ solenoid;


recheck wiring and try again (latched solenoids only).

ESD shutdown type error

During shutoff of the ESD solenoid, the type of solenoid to


shutoff was detected as corrupted, therefore the solenoid may
not be shut off correctly; A reset may correct this; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

ESD solenoid coil error

A problem was detected with the ESD wiring/solenoid; recheck


wiring and try again.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

207

ESD solenoid overload (short)

There is an short in either the ESD solenoid wiring or the ESD


solenoid coil.

ESD solenoid driver overtemp

The driver for the ESD solenoid has detected a high internal
temperature; This may indicate a short in the ESD wiring, ESD
solenoid or a problem with the Main Board.

ESD solenoid driver powerfail

There is a problem with the power supply for the ESD solenoid
coil; This may indicate a problem with the Main Board.

ESD solenoid underload (open)

There is an open connection in either the ESD solenoid wiring


or the ESD solenoid coil.

ESD solenoid open circuit

There is an open connection in either the ESD solenoid wiring


or the ESD solenoid coil.

ESD verify type error

During verification of the ESD solenoid & wiring, the type of


solenoid to verify was detected as corrupted, therefore the
solenoid could not be verified correctly; Use Setup to select
the correct solenoid type; This may indicate a problem with
the Main Board.

Flame rod short

A short has been detected between the flame rod and ground;
Check the flame rod and wiring and retry.

Line overvolt. xx.xV

The line power input voltage is higher than allowable for


proper operation; Verify the supply is at its correct voltage.

Line undervolt. xx.xV

The line power input voltage is lower than allowable for proper
operation; Verify the supply is at its correct voltage.

Main check type error

During verification of the main solenoid & wiring, the type of


solenoid to verify was detected as corrupted, therefore the
solenoid could not be verified correctly; Use Setup to select
the correct solenoid type; This may indicate a problem with
the Main Board.

Main latch coil error

A problem was detected with the main latch wiring/ solenoid;


recheck wiring and try again (latched solenoids only).

Main latch solen. open circuit

There is an open connection in either the main solenoid latch


wiring or the main solenoid latch coil (latched solenoids only).

Main on type error

During turn on of the main solenoid, the type of solenoid to


turn on was detected as corrupted, therefore the solenoid
could not be turned on correctly; A reset may correct this;
This may indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Main peak/hold driver error

The peak/hold (PWM) driver for the main solenoid was


detected as not functioning; A reset may correct this; This
may indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Main rele. sol. open circuit

There is an open connection in either the main solenoid


release wiring or the main solenoid release coil (latched
solenoids only).

Main release coil error

A problem was detected with the main release wiring/


solenoid; recheck wiring and try again (latched solenoids
only).

Main shutdown type error

During shutoff of the main solenoid, the type of solenoid to


shutoff was detected as corrupted, therefore the solenoid may
not be shut off correctly; A reset may correct this; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

208

Main solenoid coil error

A problem was detected with the main wiring/solenoid;


recheck wiring and try again.

Main solenoid overload (short)

There is a short in either the main solenoid wiring or the main


solenoid coil.

Main solenoid driver overtemp

The driver for the main solenoid has detected a high internal
temperature; This may indicate a short in the main wiring,
main solenoid or a problem with the Main Board.

Main solenoid driver powerfail

There is a problem with the power supply for the main


solenoid coil; This may indicate a problem with the Main
Board.

Main solenoid underload (open)

There is an open connection in either the main solenoid wiring


or the main solenoid coil.

Main solenoid open circuit

There is an open connection in either the main solenoid wiring


or the main solenoid coil.

Main verify type error

During verification of the main solenoid & wiring, the type of


solenoid to verify was detected as corrupted, therefore the
solenoid could not be verified correctly; Use Setup to select
the correct solenoid type; This may indicate a problem with
the Main Board.

Maximum # of tries reached

The unit has attempted to ignite 3 times unsuccessfully and


shut down.

Pilot check type error

During verification of the pilot solenoid & wiring , the type of


solenoid to verify was detected as corrupted, therefore the
solenoid could not be verified correctly; Use Setup to select
the correct solenoid type; This may indicate a problem with
the Main Board.

Pilot delay type error

During the pilot delay, the pilot solenoid type was detected as
corrupted; Use Setup to select the correct solenoid type.

Pilot latch coil error

A problem was detected with the pilot latch wiring/ solenoid;


recheck wiring and try again (latched solenoids only).

Pilot latch solen. open circuit

There is an open connection in either the pilot solenoid latch


wiring or the pilot solenoid latch coil (latched solenoids only).

Pilot on type error

During turn on of the pilot solenoid, the type of solenoid to


turn on was detected as corrupted, therefore the solenoid
could not be turned on correctly; A reset may correct this; This
may indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Pilot peak/hold driver error

The peak/hold (PWM) driver for the pilot solenoid was


detected as not functioning; A reset may correct this; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Pilot rele. sol. open circuit

There is an open connection in either the pilot solenoid


release wiring or the pilot solenoid release coil (latched
solenoids only).

Pilot release coil error

A problem was detected with the pilot release wiring/ solenoid;


recheck wiring and try again (latched solenoids only).

Pilot shutdown type error

During shutoff of the pilot solenoid, the type of solenoid to


shutoff was detected as corrupted, therefore the solenoid may
not be shut off correctly; A reset may correct this; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

209

Pilot solenoid coil error

A problem was detected with the pilot wiring/solenoid; recheck


wiring and try again.

Pilot solenoid overload (short)

There is an short in either the pilot solenoid wiring or the pilot


solenoid coil.

Pilot solenoid driver overtemp

The driver for the pilot solenoid has detected a high internal
temperature; This may indicate a short in the pilot wiring, pilot
solenoid or a problem with the Main Board.

Pilot Solenoid driver powerfail

There is a problem with the power supply for the pilot solenoid
coil; This may indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Pilot solenoid underload (open)

There is an open connection in either the pilot solenoid wiring


or the pilot solenoid coil.

Pilot solenoid open circuit

There is an open connection in either the pilot solenoid wiring


or the pilot solenoid coil.

Pilot verify type error

During verification of the pilot solenoid & wiring , the type of


solenoid to verify was detected as corrupted, therefore the
solenoid could not be verified correctly; Use Setup to select
the correct solenoid type; This may indicate a problem with
the Main Board.

Pilot/main sol. overload (short)

There is an short in either the pilot or main solenoid wiring or


the pilot or main solenoid coil.

Pilot/main sol. driver powerfail

There is a problem with the power supply for the pilot or main
solenoid coils; This may indicate a problem with the Main
Board.

Pilot/main sol. underload (open)

There is an open connection in either the pilot or main


solenoid wiring or the pilot or main solenoid coil.

Power supply

The power supply type selection has been corrupted to an


invalid value; Use setup to make a valid selection.

Remote ESD input

A remote emergency shutdown has been initiated by the


remote ESD input.

Solar overvolt. xx.xV

The solar panel input voltage is higher than allowable for


proper operation; Verify that the solar panel voltage is correct.

System ESD Reset

An emergency shutdown has occurred; Press the right select


key to exit display of the ESD events.

User press of ESD button

A user has pressed the front panel emergency shutdown key.

Vbb supply overvolt. xx.xV

The solenoid power supply voltage is too high; This may


indicate a problem with the Main Board;This may also be seen
if the solenoid voltage was set to 24V, then changed to 12V;
wait a few minutes for this to clear.

Vbb supply undervolt. xx.xV

The solenoid power supply voltage is too low; This may indicate
a problem with the Main Board.

Vesd supply overvolt. xx.xV

The ESD solenoid power supply voltage is too high; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board;This may also be seen
if the solenoid voltage was set to 24V, then changed to 12V;
wait a few minutes for this to clear.

Vesd supply undervolt. xx.xV

The ESD solenoid power supply voltage is too low; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

210

Vmain supply overvolt. xx.xV

The main solenoid power supply voltage is too high; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board. This may also be seen
if the solenoid voltage was set to 24V, then changed to 12V;
wait a few minutes for this to clear.

Vmain supply undervolt. xx.xV

The main solenoid power supply voltage is too low; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Vpilot supply overvolt. xx.xV

The pilot solenoid power supply voltage is too high; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board. This may also be seen
if the solenoid voltage was set to 24V, then changed to 12V;
wait a few minutes for this to clear.

Vpilot supply undervolt. xx.xV

The pilot solenoid power supply voltage is too low; This may
indicate a problem with the Main Board.

ERROR SCREEN MESSAGES


If the PLATINUM-500 detects a serious problem, it will restart the system then display the problem that
was detected. The time/date and reason for the shutdown will also be stored into the event log and can
be viewed later.

MESSAGE

REMEDIES/SOLUTION

CPU configur. word mismatch

The microcontroller of the Main PCB has detected an internal


configuration problem and reset; Repeated resets due to this
error may indicate a problem with the Main PCB.

CPU illegal opcode

The microcontroller of the Main PCB has executed an illegal


instruction and reset; Repeated resets due to this error may
indicate a problem with the Main PCB.

CPU match error


CPU trap conflict

The microcontroller of the Main PCB has detected an


improper operation and reset; Repeated resets due to this
error may indicate a problem with the Main PCB

CPU VDD brownout

The microcontroller of the Main PCB has detected a low


voltage condition and reset; Repeated resets due to this error
may indicate a problem with the Main PCB.

CPU watchdog timeout

The microcontroller of the Main PCB has detected an


improper operating condition and reset; Repeated resets due
to this error may indicate a problem with the Main PCB.

Invalid ESD solenoid type

The ESD solenoid setting has been corrupted to an invalid


type; Use Setup to change to a valid solenoid type.

Invalid buck-boost voltage

The solenoid voltage setting has been corrupted to an invalid


value; Use Setup to change to a valid solenoid voltage.

Invalid burn display state

Memory used by the burn display routine has been corrupted


to an invalid value; A reset should clear this, but if seen
multiple times might indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Invalid key type

A keypress message has been corrupted to an invalid value; A


reset should clear this, but if seen multiple times may indicate
a problem with the Main Board.

Invalid latch voltage

The solenoid voltage setting has been corrupted to an invalid


value; Use Setup to change to a valid solenoid type.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

211

Invalid LED mode

The LED mode setting has been corrupted to an invalid value;


Use Setup to change to a valid LED mode.

Invalid main solenoid type

The main solenoid setting has been corrupted to an invalid


type; Use Setup to change to a valid solenoid type.

Invalid password state

Memory used by the password routine has been corrupted to


an invalid value; A reset should clear this, but if seen multiple
times may indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Invalid pilot solenoid type

The pilot solenoid setting has been corrupted to an invalid


type; Use Setup to change to a valid solenoid type.

Invalid power mode

The power mode selection setting has been corrupted to an


invalid value; Use Setup to change to a valid type.

Invalid screen variable value

Memory used by the display routine has been corrupted to an


invalid value; A reset should clear this, but if seen multiple
times might indicate a problem with the Main Board.

Wrong voltage for solen. type

Latching, high watt, and high watt peak/hold solenoids can


only be run on specific voltages (12V, 24V, 24V specifically).
The voltage setting has been corrupted and needs to be set
up correctly.

MISCELLANEOUS MESSAGES
The PLATINUM-500 may show messages to show the user a temporary condition. These messages are
not stored into the log.

MESSAGE

REMEDIES/SOLUTION

High W sol. type not valid w/ 12V

High watt solenoids cannot be used with the system


configured to run solenoids at 12 V. The system was set to
run High watt, so the solenoid configuration has been cleared
and must be setup again.

High watt P/H not valid w/ 12V

High watt peak/hold solenoids cannot be used with the


system configured to run solenoids at 12 V. The system was
set to run High watt P/H, so the solenoid configuration has
been cleared and must be setup again.

Initial setup complete

The minimum amount of setup is completed to prevent the


system from running in a hazardous mode. Additional setup
should be performed to ensure that the system is completely
configured.

Latched sol. type not valid w/ 24V

Latching solenoids cannot be used with the system


configured to run solenoids at 24 V. The system was set to
run latching, so the solenoid configuration has been cleared
and must be setup again.

Not charging

The battery is not charging even with power available. The


battery may be bad.

Problem found entering log

One or more serious problems was detected during the


startup or caused a restart. The system will now enter the
event log to show the error.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

212

TIPS FOR TROUBLESHOOTING

ISSUE

REMEDIES/SOLUTION

Fuel is not properly getting to the pilot


tip.

Check the pilot orifice for plugging.


Make sure fuel gas is passing through the regulator and
burner valves.

The pilot is not sparking.

Confirm that the igniter rod is positioned approx. 3/16


away from the tip of the pilot nozzle.
Be sure that the ignition cables are properly terminated.
Confirm that the Four-Conductor Cable is terminated
properly.
Observe the igniter rod for any damage.
Make sure the igniter rod is not touching any metal on the
firetube, burner nozzle, nipples, etc.

The main burner is not lighting.

Ensure gas supply is going to main burner.


Make sure that the burner valve is opening and gas is
passing through it.
Verify that the Main Control Box is reading Main On.

The Main Control Box keys are not


functioning properly.

Check to see if the multi-conductor cable is connected


properly between the Display and Main boards.

No display on the Main Control Box.

Check to see if the fuses are blown on the Main Board.


Check all power connections.
Press any key on the front panel to turn display back on if
display/LED time-out has occurred.

The pilot lights, but then goes out.

Make sure the ignition cables are terminated properly.


Make sure that the Pilot Assembly is mounted properly.
Check wire connection to igniter rod.
Check to see if the pilot nozzle has eroded away.
Check ground wire.

The pilot sparks, but does not light.

Make sure the pilot orifice is not plugged.


Verify pilot gas is getting to the pilot tip.
Confirm the pilot solenoid is opening.

The main burner comes on and the


pilot goes out.

Drafting from main may be pulling pilot flame away from


nozzle. Reposition pilot nozzle further forward of main
burner nozzle. 1 to 1-1/2 average.
Check pilot and main pressures.
Decrease velocity of main burner opening by pinching
main burner ball valve as a test. Solve permanently by
installing slow flow valve.
Reposition igniter rod.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

213

When the main lights, the flame burns


forward in the arrestor.

Check to see if the primary air shutter is closed.


Verify firetube is free of obstacles that would prevent
drafting, such as debris, sooting, collapsed firetube.
The burner tube could be cold and have back pressure.
In this case, heating the firetube with pilot, or burner at
lower volume will warm firetube to improve drafting.
Make sure stack arrestors or wildlife protection screens on
stack are not plugged or restricting draft.
Confirm adequate pressure on main fuel gas line.

ONLINE TRAINING RESOURCES


Additional technical training resources can be found online at platinumcontrol.com. To access these
materials, online registration is required. The registration process is simple, please follow the below
steps:
1. Visit platinumcontrol.com/register/ to access the registration page
2. Fill out the form and click on Submit Registration
3. You will receive an email that your registration is pending approval
4. Once the registration is approved by Platinum, you will receive a confirmation email and you will
now be able to access the web-page
5. Login with your new user-name and password

TECHNICAL TRAINING

214

AVAILABLE TECHNICAL RESOURCES


MEDIA

TITLE

DESCRIPTION

Document

Technical Training - Table of


Contents

A PDF version of the Technical Training Manual


Table of Contents.

Document

Technical Training - Section I:


Introduction

A PDF version of the Technical Training Manual


Section I.

Document

Technical Training - Section II:


Combustion Fundamentals

A PDF version of the Technical Training Manual


Section II.

Document

Technical Training - Section III:


Platinum Control BMS

A PDF version of the Technical Training Manual


Section III.

Document

Technical Training - Glossary

A PDF version of the Technical Training Manual


Glossary.

Video

BMS-731 Installation and


Operation (full version)

A video that provides a walk-through of the


installation and operation of a BMS-731 unit.

Video Segment

Part 1: Mounting the Control Box

Part 1 of the full length version.

Video Segment

Part 2: Installing Solenoid Valves

Part 2 of the full length version.

Video Segment

Part 3: Mounting the Pilot


Assembly

Part 3 of the full length version.

Video Segment

Part 4: Installing the Ignition


Module

Part 4 of the full length version.

Video Segment

Part 5: Installing the Temperature


Device

Part 5 of the full length version.

Video Segment

Part 6: Finishing the Installation

Part 6 of the full length version.

Video Segment

Part 7: Operating the Unit

Part 7 of the full length version.

Video Segment

Part 8: Operating Parameters

Part 8 of the full length version.

CONCLUSION
The Platinum Burner and Ignition Management Systems are simple and safe to use, and provides
extensive operator feedback. For technical assistance, contact Platinum Control Technologies, or your
local authorized distributor.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

215

ADDENDUM DRAWINGS

PLATINUM-500 ELECTRIC

TECHNICAL TRAINING

216

PLATINUM-500 PNEUMATIC

TECHNICAL TRAINING

217

TECHNICAL TRAINING

218

Glossary

TECHNICAL TRAINING

219

TERM

DEFINITION

ALARM SETPOINT

This temperature setting will be a little bit higher than your Main Off setpoint. If for any
reason the bath temperature overheats, once this Alarm Setpoint is reached the BMS will
ESD and shut in all the gas.

AMINE UNIT

An Amine Unit is a combination of a contactor tower, and surge drum, regenerator,


condenser, and accumulator assembled together with associated instrumentation for the
removal of the acid gases CO2, H2S, plus additional contaminants from a natural gas
stream.

API

American Petroleum Institute represents all aspects of the United States petroleum and
natural gas industry.

BAFFLE

Partician plates inside a vessel that reduce turbulence, change the direction of the flow,
and aid in the separation process.

BRITISH THERMAL
UNIT (BTU)

The measure of heat created by burning any material. The amount of heat required to
raise the temperature of 1 pound of water one degree.

BURNER

The component inside the combustion chamber where fuel gas is burned to heat a
process stream or media.

BURNER
MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM (BMS)

A system to provide remote access, automatic ignition, temperature control, and data
collection capability that improves safe operations for production equipment with fired
components.

BURNER MIXER

Component in the combustion chamber used to adjust the mixture of the oxygen and fuel
gas supply to the main burner for optimum combustion.

BURNER NOZZLE

The last component in the burner train. This nozzle allows for dispersion and burning of
the supplied fuel gas.

CLASS I HAZARDOUS
LOCATION

An area in which flammable gases or vapors may be present in the air in sufficient
quantities to be explosive or ignitable.

CO2

Carbon Dioxide is a colorless, odorless, incombustible gas, formed during respiration,


combustion, and organic decomposition. Carbon Dioxide may be found in a natural gas
stream.

COILS

The piping that carries the well stream through a heated media. This is for the purpose of
heat exchange to aid in separation or the prevention of hydrates. These coils have the
same pressure rating as the flow line.

COMBINATION UNIT

These units may be the combination of a gas production unit and a dehydration system
combined on the same skid and enclosed.

COMBUSTION

The process of burning, any process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to produce a
significant rise in temperature and the emission of light.

COMBUSTION
CHAMBER

The front portion of the firetube adjoined with the flame arrestor. Housed in this area is
where oxygen and fuel gas are combined and ignited to produce heat within the firetube.

COMBUSTOR

A device used to incinerate waste gas emissions VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds), and
BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl Benzene, Xylenes) resulting from the production process.
It eliminates and vaporizes these hazardous emissions by maintaining a certain
temperature at the flash point. Maximum destruction efficiency is paramount.

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TERM

DEFINITION

CSA

Canadian Standards Association is an organization dedicated to serving industry,


educational institutions, and government in the field of standardization, including the
standardization of components, materials, and testing establishing.

DEFLAGRATION

Combustion that propagates through a gas or along the surface of an explosive at a rapid
rate driven by the transfer of heat.

DIRECT FIRED

A production equipment component in which the heat energy from the combustion
chamber radiates directly from the process stream. Example: Heat Treater.

DIVISION I

Gas, vapor or mist will be present or expected to be present for long periods of time
under normal operating conditions.

DIVISION II

A zone that has been defined as an area in which an explosive atmosphere is only present
under abnormal conditions.

DRAIN

An outlet connection used to drain fluids from equipment.

ELECTROSTATIC
TREATER

A vessel that receives emulsion flows and resolves the emulsion to oil, water, and usually
gas by using heat, chemicals, and a high-voltage electric field.

EMERGENCY
SHUTDOWN DEVICE
(ESD)

An instrumentation component designed as a safety precaution. In the event of a failure


of main burner system, the ESD would shut off the fuel supply.

EMULSION

A mixture in which one liquid is uniformly distributed in another liquid.

ENERGY

The ability by work or heat to provide usable power.

EXTERNAL ESD INPUT

This connection will receive ESD alerts from other pieces of equipment, signaling the BMS
to shut down the burners. This contact looks for a normally closed condition.

EXTERNAL INPUTS

Any device with a normally closed dry contact can be tied into the BMS. If one of these is
tripped, the BMS will ESD and shut in all gas.

FLAME

The process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light.

FLAME ARRESTOR

A device utilized to insure that combustion stays in the combustion chamber. This item
allows cool air to be drafted into the firetube for the purpose of ignition, but minimizes
possible combustion outside of the flame arrestor and firetube combustion chamber area.

FLAME CELL

Mounted in the flame arrestor, and is a tortuous path of passages that serves as a heat
exchanger. This device is usually made of aluminum.

FLAME IONIZATION

This is the technique we use to recognize a pilot being present. This is done by passing a
current through the flame and measuring change in the conductivity with our kanthol
igniter rod. This process will also measure the flame quality in Meg Ohms. This flame
quality will read out on the front display panel.

FLAME IONIZATION
ROD

Rod used for ignition that also has the capability to sense electrical current through the
burner flame. The appearance or lack of appearance of flame resistance triggers reactions
at the burner management system. In Platinum BMS units this rod is made of a superior
metal alloy known as Kanthol.

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TERM

DEFINITION

FLAME SENSE DELAY

This feature allows the pilot to reestablish itself in the event of a high gust of wind blowing
the pilot off the tip briefly, or the main burner snuffing the pilot flame out for a short
period of time. Allowing the pilot time to reestablish prevents the system from shutting
down and having to go through a relight sequence.

FLARE

A device designed to ignite vent gas and other emissions. The flare does not have the
destruction efficiency of an incinerator.

FLASH ARRESTOR

A device designed to prevent flashes of combustible materials outside the combustion


chamber or area of a fired system.

FILL HATCH

A covered opening for the purpose of adding fluid media to the bath, such as in a line
heater.

FIRETUBE

A U-shaped tube inserted in the heating section of a process vessel. These tubes may be
as small as 6 in diameter and exceed 24 in diameter, with lengths from 3 to over 20.

FLUID INLET

A connection that accommodates liquid or emulsion process flow into a vessel.

FUEL

A component of the fire triangle that when combined with heat and oxygen allows for
combustion. For the purposes of our training, fuel would be natural gas or propane.

GAS OUTLET

A connection allowing and directing the desired exit of the gas stream from the vessel.

GAS PRODUCTION
UNIT

A unit that is a combination of a line heater and a separator together on one skid or
possibly enclosed housing. These units can also be referred to as stack packs and Tpacks. More elaborate units can have multiple combinations housed together and may
include dehydration equipment as well.

GLYCOL
DEHYDRATOR

A unit used to remove minute water particles from natural gas if dehydration has not
been attained using separators. A glycol dehydrator unit is composed of an absorber,
reboiler, and supporting components.

H2S

A colorless, poisonous gas that smells like rotten eggs. It is formed naturally by decaying
organic matter and is the smelly component of intestinal gas. It is also emitted by
volcanoes and fumaroles. Hydrogen sulfide is used in the petroleum, rubber, and mining
industries and may be found in the natural gas stream.

HEAT

The third component of the Fire Triangle. Heat as an ignition source combined with fuel
and oxygen allows for sustained combustion.

HEATED SEPARATOR

An item of production equipment used to separate liquid components of the well stream
from the gaseous elements.

HEATER TREATER

A vessel that heats an emulsion and removes water and gas from the oil to raise it to a
quality acceptable for a pipeline or other means of transport. A heater treater is a
combination of a heater, free-water knockout, and oil and gas separator.

IGNITER ROD

The rod used to electronically convey a spark to the pilot head for the ignition of the pilot
burner.

IGNITION DELAY

The ignition delay is the amount of time given between attempts to light the pilot. This is
especially important when the system is going through a relight. This delay allows a
natural draft to push any excess gas that may be in the fire tube out of the stack before
the pilot sparks and tries to ignite. The delay can be set anywhere from 15-300 seconds.

TECHNICAL TRAINING

222

TERM
IGNITION MODULE
INCINERATION

DEFINITION
The ignition module for the BMS contains the ignition board and the 30,000 volt ignition
coil. There are connections on the board for the sparker cable, the ground cable, and the
10 conductor cable.
The act of burning something completely.

INDIRECT FIRED

A production equipment component in which the heat energy is now conveyed to heat a
media fluid, which in turn transmits the heat energy to the process stream. Example: Line
Heater

INTERFACE

The fluid level in a vessel where distinct differences in the gravities of fluid can be
observed. Example the area where oil and water can noticeably be distinguished from the
inlet emulsion.

LEAN GAS STREAM

A gas steam with minimal ethane, propane, butane, pentane, hexane, heptane,
condensates, benzene, or toluene.

LEVEL SAFETY LOW


(LSL)

Instrumentation to monitor the level of the liquid being heated by the firetube. This
protects against excess temperature of the firetube caused by a low liquid level. This
situation can be potentially dangerous if fluid level drops below firetube.

LINE HEATER

A container or vessel enclosing an arrangement of tubes and a firebox in which an


emulsion is heated before further treating, or in which natural gas is heated in the field to
prevent the formation of hydrates.

LIQUID LEVEL
CONTROLLER

A pneumatic, mechanical, or electrical device that senses liquid height inside a vessel, and
triggers a valve to open or close as desired.

LIQUID OUTLET

A connection that allows for and directs fluid out of the vessel.

LLC CONTROL VALVE

A control valve that opens or closes to maintain the desired liquid level in the vessel.

LOCKOUT

The placement of a lockout device on an energy-isolating device, in accordance with an


established procedure, ensuring that the energy-isolating device and the equipment being
controlled cannot be operated until the lockout device is removed.

MAIN VALVE DELAY

The main valve delay is the amount of time allowed after the pilot has been established,
before the main burner is signaled to come on. This can be set 1-300 seconds. The delay
time should be determined by the size of the burner and the climate at the location. The
larger the burner and/or colder the climate, the more time you will want to give the pilot
to establish flame quality and good natural draft through the fire tube.

MIST EXTRACTOR

A device placed in the gas outlet stream of a production vessel. This component is
typically made of mesh or steel plates to remove fine liquid mist from the gas stream as it
exits the vessel.

MULTI WELL UNIT

These units are essentially two or more gas production units on the same skid and usually
enclosed, which are designed for use on multiple well pad locations.

NATURAL DRAFT
BURNER

A burner that uses oxygen supplied by the draft, created due to the heat inside the
firetube.

NFPA

National Fire Protection Association is an international nonprofit agency dedicated to


reducing the worldwide burden of fire and other hazards on the quality of life, by
providing and advocating consensus on codes and standards, research, training, and
education.

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223

TERM

DEFINITION

ORIFACE

An opening that can be adjustable or non-adjustable allowing a specific amount of the fuel
oxygen mixture to the burner or pilot for combustion.

OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Administration under the Department of Labor is the
federal department responsible for promoting safe working conditions of wage earners in
the United States.

OXYGEN

A component of our atmosphere that when combined with fuel and heat allows for
combustion.

PILOT ASSEMBLY

The pilot assembly comes with the pilot mixer, pilot tip, and the kanthol igniter rod.

PILOT MIXER

Component in the combustion chamber that combines the oxygen and fuel gas, then
mixes and supplies this combined stream to the pilot burner for ignition.

PILOT TRACKS MAIN

Operators have the ability to have this feature enabled or have it set to pilot always on.
The default setting is pilot always on. However, in some cases having an intermittent pilot
is necessary. For example, some states such as New Mexico will award carbon credits to
companies if they only have a pilot on when the main burner is on.

PRESSURE GAUGE

An instrument used to display pressure inside a production vessel or the associated


piping.

PRESSURE RELIEF
VALVE or PRESSURE
SAFETY VALVE (PRV
or PSV)

A device used to allow excessive pressure to be relieved from a production vessel and
associated piping. This is designed to prevent a potentially dangerous over-pressurization
of the production equipment.

PRESSURE SWITCH

Pressure switches can tie into the High Pressure and Low Pressure connectors on the
external inputs. If pressures reach a level that is too high or low, the BMS will ESD and
indicate whether it was due to a High Pressure or a Low Pressure.

PROOF OF CLOSURES

On the external inputs connector there is another port for Proof of Closures. With some
valves, an electronic signal can be sent back to prove that a valve is open or shut.

PROPANE

A colorless, flammable gaseous alkane found in petroleum and used as a fuel.

REMOTE ON/OFF
INPUTS

This signal will direct the microcomputer to enter the off state. The burner is on when the
switch is closed. Open the switch only in the normal burning state. If the contacts are
closed, the burner will start. If the contacts are open, the burner will stop. A remote
system should be used to control the burner.

RICH GAS STREAM

Rich gas stream usually means a significant amount of components other than methane in
the gas. These would typically be ethane, propane, butane, pentane, hexane, heptane,
and some heavier paraffin molecules known as natural gasoline or condensate, depending
on the composition. There can also be some non-paraffin hydrocarbons such as benzene,
toluene, etc

RTD

Resistance Temperature Device. This is a type of probe that can be used in the thermowell
to monitor and control process temperature. (Any RTD used with the Platinum BMS must
be 1,000 ohm.)

SIGHT GLASS

A component used to present a visual indication of the liquid level inside a production
vessel.

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TERM

DEFINITION

SOLENOIDS

These are electromechanical valves that will control the opening and closing of pilot,
main, and ESD control valves.

STACK ARRESTOR

A device designed to be mounted to the top of the firetube to prevent sparks, flashes, or
burning materials, such as carbon, from escaping the stack and potentially igniting
combustible material in the area.

TAGOUT

The placement of a tagout device on an energy-isolating device, in accordance with an


established procedure, to indicate that the energy-isolating device and the equipment
being controlled may not be operated until the tagout device is removed.

TANK HEATER

Firetubes designed to be mounted in the door of storage tanks along with burner
instrumentation. The units are found primarily in colder climates.

TEMPERATURE
SAFETY HIGH (TSH)

Instrumentation device to monitor for high temperature. When a high temperature is


reached, the burner is disengaged.

TEMPERATURE
SAFETY LOW (TSL)

Instrumentation device to monitor for low temperature. When sensed, the burner is
activated to increase the temperature.

TEMPERATURE
SETPOINTS

The temperature setpoints are where the Main On/Off temperatures will be set. The main
burner will cycle between these set points. The burner will shut off when Main Off
temperature is reached, and turn on when temperature has dropped to Main On
temperature. Setpoints can be as close as 5 degrees Fahrenheit.

THERMOCOUPLE

A thermocouple is a type of temperature probe that can be used to monitor and control
process temperatures. A thermocouple will need to be used when measuring
temperatures up above 450 degrees Fahrenheit. (Any thermocouple used with the
Platinum BMS must be Type K.)

TIME LOG

Run times of the pilot and the main will display on the front panel screen during
operation. This data is cleared when the internal reference date is changed. Make sure to
record log time values before changing date.

TURBULATOR

A device installed in the second leg of the firetube and designed to increase heat transfer
by directing heated flue gas towards the firetube wall.

UL

Underwriters Laboratories is an independent product safety certification organization that


tests and lists electrical (and other) equipment for electrical and fire safety according to
recognized UL and other standards.

VENTURI

A tube in the main or pilot gas stream with a tapering constriction in the middle that
causes a gas velocity increase with a pressure decrease, creating suction and draft for
drawing fuel gas to the burner.

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225