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Awakening Your 6 th Sense

Dissolved
Gas Analysis
for the smart grid
and for the future

To give our customers a competitive edge by awakening their


6th sense

VISION

To provide insight and information to help our customers


reduce waste and inefficiency in their most resource-intensive
processes

MISSION

Our Focus Markets

Global
Energy

Industrial
Materials

LumaSense Global Energy customers


include the worlds leading power
producers and energy transmitters
such as electrical utilities as well as
oil/gas refineries.

LumaSense Industrial Materials customers include the worlds leading


manufacturers of glass, metals, and
plastics.

Advanced
Technologies
LumaSense Advanced Technologies
customers include the worlds leading semiconductor, solar, and LED/
MOCVD equipment manufacturers.

Corporate History
1958
Impac is
founded

1969
Andros and
Mikron are
founded

1978
Luxtron and
Innova are
founded

2005

2006

LumaSense is
founded and
acquires Luxtron

Acquires Innova

2007
Acquires Andros,
Impac and Mikron.

2010
Acquires Opsens
Energy and ITC

2011
Acquires Reliability
Point for Service
Offerings

2012
LS6 Systems at
50,000+ sites, First
SmartDGA for
Energy Launched

Global Energy Usage


reservealthough still running and
pollutingand used only to generate
power several dozen hours per year.
This costs consumers money and
means unnecessary pollution from
power plants.

The electric grid is the vast network


of transmission lines, substations and
power plants that deliver electric
power to our homes and businesses. It
is one of the great engineering feats
of the 20th century, and includes more
than 9,000 generating plants and
around 300,000 miles of transmission
lines in the U.S.

A "smart" electric grid allows homes


and businesses to use, as well as
produce and sell, electricity in a more
technologically advanced way. We
are about to spend $1.5 trillion to
upgrade and expand the electric grid
in the United States over the next 25
years.

But the current grid is inefficient, and


has changed little in concept since
the days of Thomas Edison. Up to ten
percent of the power we generate
is lost in transmission. Many power
plants, often the dirtiest, are held in

Figure 1.
World energy
consumption,
1990-2035
(quadrillion Btu)

Non-OECD
OECD

800
600

573

619

721

671

770

406

1990

2000

25% cut in global warming pollution


from transportation with a fully
deployed smart grid

Did you Know:


65% of global warming pollution is
estimated to come from energy generation
and usage
$25 billion is paid by consumers every
year for electricity estimated to be lost to
inefficient transmission and distribution
in the United States

$108 billion is spent each year on energy


bills for commercial buildings in the
United States

354

200
0

30% cut in global warming pollution


from the electric sector with a full
deployment of smart grid technology

$150 billion is lost every year due to


power outages and blackouts in the United
States alone

505

400

This will result in:

2008

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

30% of energy used by commercial


buildings could be cut through investments
in energy efficiency

Current Trends for Smart Grid Investment


Over $2 Trillion in capital investments over the next
20 years.
Annual Smart Grid spending is expected to reach
$65 Billion by 2017
By 2017, $278 Billion will have been invested in T&D
infrastructure, with only $48 Billion in Smart Meters

National Electricity Infrastructure Gap:


Estimated at $732 Billion by 2040
(in billions of 2010 dollars)

Type of Infrastructure

Cumulative
2020

2040

Generation

12.3

401.1

Transmission

37.3

111.8

Distribution

57.4

219

U.S. Total

107

731.8

Source: ASCE

Large Investments in New Assets Requiring


Smart Instrumentation

$732B Investment Gap by 2040 Will Exist Existing Assets Will Need Smart Instrumentation

Investment will be needed in Online DGA for new Transformers/LTC's and to extend life of existing Transformers/LTC's

The Transformer Dilemma


According to the U.S. Commerce
Department, transformer installations
in the United States reached their
peak in 1974 but have decreased
over subsequent years. The average
age of a power transformer is 30-40
years, which means many of these
transformers are now at the end of
their life.

Over the past several decades, the


expansion of power consumption has
been unprecedented globally with the
additions of several transformers to
the expanding global grid. Significant
industrial growth happened in
the 1950s and beyond. Power
consumption continues to grow on
the average 3-5% per year globally.

Failure Distribution (50% rate)


(all vintages, assuming no replacements)

In a 1975 study, it was found that the


average age at the time of a power
transformer failure was 9.4 years.
In a 1985 study by Hartford Steam
Boiler, it was found to be 11.4 years.
Transformers fail for various reasons
before their expected life, and those
that make it to 40 years survive on
borrowed time beyond that point.

Transformer Failure Rate Functions

35.00

100%

30.00

90%
80%
Hazard Function

25.00
20.00
15.00
10.00

70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%

5.00

10%
0%
0

2015

2013

2011

2009

2007

2005

2003

2001

1999

1997

1995

1993

1991

1989

1987

1985

1983

1981

1979

1977

1975

1973

1971

1969

1967

1964

0.00

Decreasing
Failure
Rate

Failure Rate

Reducing Strength with


time and after incidents

Failure

New

30

40

50

Early
Infant
Mortality
Failure

Constant
Failure
Rate

70

80

90

100

Old

Increasing
Failure
Rate

Observed Failure
Rate
Constant (Random)
Failures

Incidents

Increasing Age

60

Transformer Failure Rate vs. Time

Insulation
Spare
Margin

Insulation
Stress

20

Years

Insulation Stress vs. Strength


Insulation Strength

10

Time

Wear-out
Failures

What is DGA? Why is it important?


Currently, less than 5 percent of transformers have condition-based online DGA monitoring systems, according to industry
sources, and approximately 30 percent of all transformer failures in the United States are related to faulty LTCs.
Widespread condition monitoring was unattainable using traditional technologies, largely due to high costs and excessive
installation time. Whereas other systems take days to install, a SmartDGA monitor can be installed in a matter of hours.
Additionally, SmartDGA monitors will cost up to 50-percent less than other monitors. The first monitor in the new line,
the SmartDGA Gauge, will be the industrys first dedicated online gas monitor for LTCs.

Recent Survey Results


Over a period of 3 months in 2012, LumaSense Technologies conducted a global survey relating to online Dissolved Gas
Analysis and Transformer Monitoring. The survey was implemented via online, written, and verbal interviews. The following charts highlight a few key points from the survey.

Average Age of Transformers on


Transmission System

Average Age of Transformers on Transmission System

30%

27%

Critical Gases/Readings to Monitor

23%

Oxygen

20%

45.0%

15.9%

40.0%

14.8%

35.0%

Ethane

15%

13%

48.9%

Acetylene

0%
Under 25-30
30-35
25
Years Years
Years

ONLINE DGA SURVEY RESULTS

0%

35-40
Years

40-45
Years

45-50
Years

0.80%

Over 50
Years

11

68.8%

Carbon Dioxide

30.1%

Carbon Monoxide

43.2%

20.0%
15.0%
10.0%
5.0%
0.0%

16.0%
6.2%
3.1%
0-10%

Hydrogen

75.0%

10-15% 15-25%

25-40%

40-50%
% of Transf
ormers Mon
itored

ONLINE DGA SURVEY RESULTS

f
83.2% o onitor
nts m
responder less with
25% o e DGA
Onlin
22.8%

25.0%

40.9%

Ethylene

7.40%

5%

30.0%

34.7%

Methane

10%

% of
Respondents 44.4%

47.7%

Nitrogen

Percent of Transformers with Online


DGA Monitoring
Percent of Transformers with Online DGA Monitoring

Moisture

29%

25%

Critical Gases/Readings to Monitor

ONLINE DGA SURVEY RESULTS

7.4%

Over
50%

Benefits of Online DGA vs Offline DGA


DGA is the single most comprehensive
and widely accepted tool for transformer condition assessment. Today,
it is mostly done annually or twice a
year with manual samples offline and
takes one to two weeks for results.
The transition from offline to online
monitoring is driven by the need for
real-time data to support aging and
stressed assets.

Transformer Failure Methods


2%

6%
6%

25%

Online DGA helps utilities to:


Obtain real-time data for real-time
actions
Avoid unplanned failures

3%

11%
12%

13%
22%

Tempering
Adopt lower cost condition based
maintenance
Defer capital expenditures by
extending the transformer's useful
life

Lightning
Through Faults
Insulation Deterioration
Inadequate Maintenance
Moisture
Loose Connections
Workmanship
Overloading
All Others

Chart Source: William H. Bartley, P.E.


The Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co.
H2 only, $3-5k
Serveron TM1, Qualitrol 150

GE GLA 100, $3k

Performance/Features

Technology Overview
Technology

Advantages

Disadvantages

Accuracy

Cost

Medium

Low

Low

Medium

Frequent calibrations needed


Auxiliary (carrier) gas needed maintenance cost
Can be difficult to install

Medium

High

Can detect/measure very low (ppm and


ppb) gas concentrations
Low maintenance based on system
filters that are used

Limited ability to measure high gas concentrations


Interfering gases can effect accuracy; however
typically can be compensated
Affected by vibration
Can be difficult to install

High

High

Small size
Good for measuring gases that cant
easily or inexpensively be measured by
other technologies

Frequent calibrations needed


Short/limited life time needs replacement
Single gas measurement

Low

Low

Simultaneous multi-gas measurement


No required calibrations
Low maintenance
Fast gas measurement time
High ease of use and install

Limited ability to detect very low gas concentrations


Interfering gases can effect accuracy; however
typically can be compensated

Near Infrared

Simultaneous multi-gas measurement


Non-frequent calibrations
Low maintenance
Easily installed

Limited ability to measure high gas concentrations


Can be impacted by interfering gases

GC

Able to measure many different gases


Based on standards in many utility labs

PAS

NDIR

Non-Dispersive
Infrared

NIR

Gas Chromatography

Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

Electrochemical

Factors to Consider When Selecting Online DGA


Critical Factors In The Choice of Online DGA Instrumentation

During a 2012 LumaSense Technologies


Global Survey, respondents indicated the
following factors were important to
consider when selecting online DGA
monitoring solutions.

On site service and support


Lead Time
Diagnostics/Analysis Software Available
Ease of Installation
Data Storage
Communication Protocols Used
Warranty
Maintenance Required (consumables)
Reputation of Supplier
Repeatability
Accuracy
System Ruggedness
Operating Temperature Limits
Technology Used
Price
ONLINE DGA SURVEY RESULTS

55.7%
18.4%
2.4%
29.9%
27.0%
22.4%
32.2%
43.1%
21.8%

37.4%
47.7%
28.7%
26.4%
54.6%
69.5%

Standards and Guidelines Governing DGA


IEEE Std. C57.104-2008

IEEE Guide for the interpretation of Gases Generated in Oil


Immersed Transformers

IEEE Std. C57.139.2010

IEEE Guide for Dissolved Gas Analysis in Transformer Load Tap


Changers
Terminology for Power and Distribution Transformers

IEEE Std. C57.12.80-2002


IEC 60599-2007-05 Edition 2.1

Mineral Oil Impregnated Electrical Equipment in Service Guide to


the Interpretation of Dissolved and Free Gas Analysis

Indication/Fault Gas Table


INDICATION / FAULT GAS
Cellulose aging

H2

CO

CO2

Mineral oil decomposition

Leaks in oil expansion systems, gaskets, welds, etc.

Thermal faults Cellulose


Thermal faults in Oil @ 150C - 300C
Thermal faults in Oil @ 300C - 700C
Thermal faults in Oil @ >700C
Partial Discharge
Arcing

CH4

C2H2

C2H4

C2H6

O2

H2O

Trace
Trace

Trace

Combustible gas generation vs. approximate oil


decomposition temperature

1.4

N2

600C

CO

CH4>H2

C2H4
C2H6
(-66%)

Trace

C2H2>10% of C2H4

700C

160C

C2H4>C2H6

500C

C2H4>CH4

C2H2
and CO2

0.6

350C

Ethylene
(C2H4)

O2

1.0

CH4

250C

Ethane
(C2H6)

Acetylene
(C2H2)

H2 (+79%)

300C

65C

Hydrogen
(H2)

Methane
(CH4)

1.8

200C

Partial discharge (not temperature dependent)


Range of normal operation
Hot spots
Arcing
(of increasing
Conditions
temperature)

0.2
0

Gas generation (not to scale)


Approximate oil decomposition temperature >150C

40
Temperature (C)

80

Gas Ratio Analysis


The diagnostic theories based upon
the thermal degradation principles
employ an array of ratios of certain
key combustible gases as the fault
type indicators. These five ratios are:

The first ratio method (Doernenburg)


utilizes Ratios 1, 2, 3, and 4. This
procedure requires significant levels
of the gases to be present in order for
the diagnosis to be valid.

Ratio 1 (R1) = CH4/H2


Ratio 2 (R2) = C2H2/C2H4
Ratio 3 (R3) = C2H2/CH4
Ratio 4 (R4) = C2H6/C2H2
Ratio 5 (R5) = C2H4/C2H6

The second method (Rogers) utilizes


Ratios 1, 2, and 5. The Rogers method
does not depend on specific gas concentrations to exist in the transformer

for the diagnosis to be valid. However,


it suggests that the method be used
only when the normal limits of the
individual gases have been exceeded.

Doernenburg Ratios Method (IEEE Std. C57.104-2008)


This method utilizes the gas concentration from ratio of CH4/H2 , C2H2/CH4,
C2H4/C2H6 , and C2H2/C2H4. The value
of the gases at first, must exceed the
concentration L1 (2 times limit for one
of following: H2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H4
and one times limit for CO or C2H6)
to ascertain whether there is really
a problem with the unit and then
whether there is sufficient generation
of each gas for the ratio analysis to be
applicable.

SUGGESTED FAULT
DIAGNOSIS
SUGGESTED
FAULT
DIAGNOSIS

KEY GAS

CONCENTRATIONS L1
[L/L (PPM)]

Hydrogen (H2)

100

Methane (CH4)

120

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

350

Acetylene (C2H2)

Ethylene (C2H4)

50

Ethane (C2H6)

65

RATIO 1 (R1)
CH4/H2

RATIO 2 (R2)
C2H2/C2H4

RATIO 3 (R3)
C2H2/CH4

RATIO 4 (R4)
C2H6/C2H2

Oil

Gas space

Oil

Gas space

Oil

Gas space

Oil

Gas space

1. Thermal decomposition

>1.0

>0.1

<0.75

<1.0

<0.3

<0.1

>0.4

>0.2

2. Partial discharge
(low-intensity PD)

<0.1

<0.01

Not significant

<0.3

<0.1

>0.4

>0.2

>0.3

>0.1

<0.4

<0.2

3. Arcing (high-intensity PD)

>0.1 to <0.1 >0.01 to <0.1

>0.75

>1.0

Rogers Ratios Method (IEEE Std. C57.104-2008)


Ratio 1
CH4/H2

Ratio 2
C2H2/C2H4

Case

Ratio 3
C2H4/C2H6

SUGGESTED FAULT TYPE

<0.01

<0.1

<1.0

Normal

1.0

0.1, <0.5

1.0

Discharge of low energy

.0.6, <3.0

0.1, <1.0

2.0

Discharge of high energy

<0.01

1.0

<1.0

Thermal fault, low temp <300C

<0.1

1.0

1.0, <4.0

Thermal fault, <700C

<0.2

1.0

4.0

Thermal fault, >700C

CO2 vs. CO Ratio (IEEE Std. C57.104-2008)


The ratio of CO2/CO is sometimes used as an indicator of the thermal decomposition of cellulose. This ratio is normally
more than seven. For the CO2/CO ratio, the respective values of CO2 and CO should exceed 5000ppm and 500ppm in order
to improve the certainty factor, i.e., ratios are sensitive to minimum values. As the magnitude of CO increases, the ratio
of CO2 /CO decreases. This may indicate an abnormality that is degrading cellulosic insulation.

Key Gas Method (IEEE Std. C57.104-2008)


KEY GAS

FAULT TYPE

TYPICAL PROPORTIONS OF GENERATED COMBUSTIBLE GASES

C2H4

Thermal oil

Mainly C2H4; Smaller proportions of C2H6, CH4, and H2; Traces of C2H2 at
very high fault temperatures

CO

Thermal oil and cellulose

Mainly CO; Much smaller quantities of hydrocarbon; gases in same proportions as thermal faults in oil alone.

H2

Electrical Low Energy Partial


Discarge

Mainly H2; Small quantities of CH4; Traces of C2H4 and C2H6

H2 & C2H2

Electrical High Energy (arcing)

Mainly H2 and C2H2; Minor traces of CH4, C2H4, and C2H6; Also CO if cellulose is involved

TDCG (Total Dissolved Combustible Gas) Method (IEEE Std. C57.104-2008)


TDCG levels
(ppm)

TDGC rate
(ppm/day)

Sampling intervals and operating procedures for gas generation rates


Sampling Interval

Condition 4

Condition 3

Condition 2

Condition 1

>4630

Operating procedures

>30

Daily

10 to 30

Daily

<10

Weekly

Exercise extreme caution; Analyze for individual


gases
Plan outage
Advise manufacturer

1921 to 4630 >30

Weekly

Exercise extreme caution; Analyze for individual


gases
Plan outage
Advise manufacturer

721 to 1920

720

Consider removal from service


Advise manufacturer

10 to 30

Weekly

<10

Monthly

>30

Monthly

10 to 30

Monthly

<10

Quarterly

>30

Monthly

Exercise caution; Analyze for individual gases;


Determine load dependence

10 to 30

Quarterly

Continue normal operation

<10

Annually

Exercise extreme caution; Analyze for individual


gases
Determine load dependence

C2H4/C2H2 Ratio (IEEE Std. C57.139.2010)


The overall purpose of Load Tap
Changer Dissolved Gas Analysis is to
improve safety and reliability while
reducing cost.
The acetylene (C2H2) concentration
is related to arcing in oil. Acetylene
is always present in the oil of nonvacuum LTCs and usually present in
vacuum interrupter type LTCs in small
quantities.
Ethylene (C2H4) is one of the heating
gases. It is produced when oil is
heated to very high temperatures.
Deteriorated or coked arcing contacts
tend to be associated with abnormal

production of ethylene. The other


heating gases, methane (CH4) and
ethane (C2H6), tend to be produced
at lower temperatures than ethylene
and are typically produced by resistor
heating in a resistance type LTC.
For most non-vacuum LTCs, the
ethylene/acetylene ratio is a very
useful indicator of the condition of
the arcing contacts.

LTC DGA Result Codes


Code

Code Description

Normal (1)

No fault is detected

Caution (2)

Weak indication of a fault

Warning (3)

Strong indication of a fault

Coking:
The formation of a hard
carbonized deposit on the contacts
of a load tap changer. This process
occurs due to the breakdown of oil
from heat and arcing across the tap
changer contacts that are immersed
in oil.

C2H2/H2 Ratio (IEC 60599-2007-05)


In power transformers, on load tap changer (OLTC) operations produce gases
corresponding to discharges of low energy. If some oil or gas communication is
possible between the OLTC compartment and the main tank, or between the
respective conservators, these gases may contaminate the oil in the main tank
and lead to a wrong diagnoses.

A C2H2/H2 ratio two to three times the


level in the main tank indicates possible
OLTC contamination.

C2H2/H2 ratios higher than 2 to 3 in the main tank are thus considered as an indication of OLTC contamination. This can
be confirmed by comparing DGA results in the main tank, in the OLTC and in the conservators. The values of the gas ratio
and of the acetylene concentration depend on the number of OLTC operations and on the way the contamination has
occurred (through the oil or the gas).

Duval Triangle (IEC 60599-2007-05)


PD
T1

T1

Thermal fault 300C

T2

Thermal fault >300C, 700C

T3

Thermal fault >700C

D1

Discharges of low-energy

D2

Discharges of high-energy

DT T3

DT

Combination of thermal faults and


discharges

20

PD

Partial discharge

[%]

40

60

[%

60

40

%C2H2 = (C2H2/CH4+C2H4+C2H2) x 100

Note: The LumaNostics software


includes the various Duval triangles
for LTC's, Mineral Oil and
other oils presently being used in
transformers.

INDICATION

%C2H4 = (C2H4/CH4 +C2H4+C2H2) x 100

ZONE

T2
CH

%CH4 = (CH4/CH4 +C2H4+C2H2) x 100

Sections within the triangle designate:

20

80

C 2H 4

Instrument Cost

This method uses three ratios to locate


the point within the triangle.

20

80

D1

D2

80

60

40

C2H2 [%]

Basic Gas Ratio (IEC 60599-2007-05)


CASE

CHARACTERISTIC FAULT

C2H2

CH4

C2H4

C2H4

H2

C2H6

PD

Partial discharges

NS

<0.1

<0.2

D1

Discharges of low energy

>1

0.1 - 0.5

>1

D2

Discharges of high energy

0.6 - 2.5

0.1 - 1

>2

T1

Thermal fault
t < 300C

NS

>1 but
NS

<1

T2

Thermal fault
300C < t < 700C

<0.1

>1

1-4

Thermal fault
t < 700C

<0.2

T3

C2H2
C2H4
Z

0.1

0.1

1.0

1.0

10

10

1.0

D1/D2

1.0

0.1
0.1

>1

>4

PD
T1
C2H4
C2H6

2013 LumaSense Technologies,Inc. All Rights Reserved.


LumaSense, SmartDGA, EZHub, and LumaSmart are trademarks
of LumaSense Technologies, Inc.

0.1

1.0

10

CH4
H2

Learn More about our SmartDGA Solution


SmartDGA Benefits:
No consumables, carrier gas, regular
maintenance, or calibration needed
Flexible grouping of products dedicated LTC (Gauge), early warning
(Guard), and full analysis (Guide)
Easy installation (2-4 man hours) with
flexible installations (flow through,
single valve, and two valve)
Up to 1/2 the purchase price of
competition, up to 1/5 total cost of
ownership
Unique features in software,
commissioning, viewing of data and
diagnostics of results

3 Gas (C2H2 , C2H4, CH4*)


LTC Condition Monitor

4 Gas (H2 , CO, CO2*, C2H2)


+ Moisture Transformer
Gas Monitor

9 Gas (H2 , CO, C2H2 , C2H4 , CH4 ,


CO2 , C2H6 , O2 , N2) + Moisture
Transformer Gas Monitor

Technical Features:
Specifications
Gas Measurements
(gas in oil), gas ranges are
user configurable

SmartDGA Gauge

SmartDGA Guard

SmartDGA Guide

MinMax

MinMax

MinMax

Acetylene (C2H2)

5050,000 ppm

0.510,000 ppm

0.510,000 ppm

Ethylene (C2H4)

5050,000 ppm

Methane (CH4)

5050,000 ppm

Moisture (RS):

199%

250,000 ppm
199%

199 %

Hydrogen (H2):

510,000 ppm

510,000 ppm

Carbon Monoxide (CO):

1010,000 ppm

1010,000 ppm

Carbon Dioxide (CO2):

1020,000 ppm*

1020,000 ppm

Methane (CH4):

250,000 ppm

Ethane (C2H6):

220,000 ppm

Oxygen (O2):

10050,000 ppm

Nitrogen (N2):

5,000100,000 ppm

Gas Repeatability

5% or LDL, whichever is greater

5% or LDL, whichever is greater 5 % or LDL, whichever is greater

Sampling Time

Every 24 hours - default,


user selectable from approximately
2.5 hours to 7 days. Sampling time
is progressive based on alarm conditions.

Every 24 hours - default,


user selectable from from approximately 2.5 hours to 7 days.
Sampling time is progressive based
on alarm condition.

Moisture Accuracy

3 ppm or 2 % RS

3 ppm or 2 % RS

3 ppm or 2 % RS

Automatic Schedule
Acceleration

When user configurable Rate of


Change (ROC) levels and ratio
(C2H4/C2H2) limits are exceeded

When user configured rate of


change (ROC) levels are exceeded

When user configured rate of change


(ROC) levels are exceeded

Installation Method

Preferred mounting is in line with


filtration system

Mount horizontal and vertical; direct installation in oil phase through


drain valve of transformer main
tank (single valve or dual valve)

Mount horizontal and vertical; direct


installation in oil phase through
drain valve of transformer main tank
(single valve or dual valve)

*Available January 2014

Every 24 hours - default,


user selectable from approximately
2.5 hours to 7 days. Sampling time
is progressive based on alarm condition.

SmartDGA System Diagram

SmartDGA Accessories

EZHub

LumaSMART iCore

SmartDGA EZHub Power, memory storage and communication hub for SmartDGA monitors
LumaSMART iCore Local display along with enhanced memory storage and communications
DGA Viewer software Software to enable easy commissioning and local display of online DGA results
SmartDGA Diagnostics Software* Display comprehensive analytics, graphics, and trending such as Duvals Triangle,
Rogers Ratios, Key Gases, and other tools.
*Available April 2014

Supplier Landscape
>$60K

$50K

Calisto9,
$45K

COMPREHENSIVE
DGA MONITORS

Tap Trans
(for LTC), $70K

TM8, $50K
MTE 1008
$40K

Instrument Cost

$40K

$30K

EARLY WARNING
DGA MONITORS
Guide

MTE 1005
$20K

$20K

$10K

MiniTrans,
$25K
Hydran M2
with models,
$15K

TM3, $21K

MTE 1003
$12K
Delphi,
$12K

Calisto2,
$15K

SMOKE ALARMS
MTE 1001
$6K

$5K

Transfix,
$55K

H2 only, $3-5k
Serveron TM1, Qualitrol 150

GE GLA 100, $3k

Performance/Features

Guard
Gauge
for LTC

Technologies for Transmission & Distribution


Winding Hot Spot Temperature Measurement

LumaSMART

Winding hot spot temperatures are one of the most critical transformer measurements. Hot spots are the highest temperature area in the transformer based
on flux leakage from the windings which can degrade the insulating paper
making the transformer susceptible to failure. Since transformer life is dependent on the insulating paper, accurately monitoring over-temperature conditions
is critical.
Fiber optic monitoring enables true hot spot measurement by sensing
temperature directly in the windings. LumaSenses LUXTRON brand offers
energy and utility companies two solutions:
LumaSMART Fluoroptic-based temperature solution for EHV/UHV/HVDC
transformers, large power transformers, and reactors; and

LumaSHIELD

LumaSHIELD GaAs-based temperature solution for transmission and distribution transformers.

Online DGA Monitoring for Load Tap Changers and Transformers


SmartDGA is the industrys most cost-effective Dissolved Gas Analysis (DGA)
solution, based on proven, state-of-the-art non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) technology. This suite of products is designed to allow customers to continuously
monitor and control the condition of LTCs and transformers.
SmartDGA offerings include the following:
SmartDGA Gauge Online 3 gas + moisture* Load Tap Changer DGA monitor
SmartDGA Guard Online 4 gas + moisture* DGA monitor for transformers

SmartDGA Guide

SmartDGA Guide Online 9 gas + moisture DGA monitor for transformers


SmartDGA EZHub Power and Communication Hub for SmartDGA monitors
LumaSMART iCore Local display along with enhanced memory storage and
communications
DGA Viewer software - Software to enable easy setup and interpretation of
online DGA results

EZHub

SmartDGA Diagnostics Software** Display comprehensive analytics, graphics


and trending such as Duvals Triangle, Rogers Ratios, Key Gases, and other
tools
*Available January 2014
**Available April 2014

SF6 Monitoring
The SF6 Leak Detector 3434i from LumaSense Technologies offers unmatched
performance and convenience. Based on Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS)
technology, the system offers highly accurate, reliable, and stable quantitative
gas detection.

SF6 Leak Detector 3434i

The growing environmental requirements regarding the use of SF6 make


LumaSenses system a coveted tool designed for everyday use.

LumaSpection TS724DV for Substations


LumaSpection TS724DV (ThermalSpection 724 Dual Vision) is an automated,
continuous thermal and visual imaging system used to identify thermal abnormalities within electrical substations and other process control systems. It offers
remote monitoring of temperatures in real-time via image data obtained from
one or more cameras and sent to a single central controller.

ThermalSpection
724 DV

This LumaSpection system for substations can combine multiple technologies,


including fixed cameras, pan and tilt cameras, and pyrometry for the most cost
effective and comprehensive solution.

LumaSpection for Boilers


With BoilerSpection, coal plant operators can proactively manage their boilers
by gaining visibility on scale buildup directly on the boiler tubes. Return on
investment (ROI) studies by customers have found ROIs measured in only a few
months, not years.

BoilerSpection HD/SD

BoilerSpection MB

BoilerSpection IM

The challenge every coal plant owner or operator faces is to generate the
maximum amount of energy with the lowest emissions in the safest and most
economical way. Currently, coal plant operators use a number of ways to clean
boiler tubes but have inadequate methods to measure their effectiveness and
many have negative impacts such as prolonged downtime and thermal stress to
the boiler tubes.
BoilerSpection HD/SD
BoilerSpection is a revolutionary thermal imaging system with the ability to
see through flames that helps coal plants run more efficiently, extract more
energy from their coal, and increase productivity.
BoilerSpection MB/IM
The BoilerSpection MB/IM systems are both portable solutions with the MB
system providing radiometric readings and the IM system non-radiometric
readings. These easy-to-use mobile imaging solutions can be used for
boilers and furnaces, and include all the components necessary for a user
to be recording images in only minutes. Operators can then direct cleaning
operations, regulate flow of fuel and air, reduce emissions, reduce fuel
consumption and speed up boiler start up.

Infrared Detection Systems for Sulfur Recovery Units


and Flare Stack Monitoring

ET Pulsar III

ET Quasar M8100

Thermometry for Sulfur Recovery


LumaSenses ET Pulsar family of detection systems are designed for
continuous and instantaneous measurement of Refractory Temperature (RT),
Gas Temperature (GT) or Integrated Temperature (FF) in the vessel away from
the heat, vibration, and corrosive gases.
Infrared Flare Stack Detection Systems
LumaSenses ET Quasar family of detection systems are built for continuous
duty monitoring of pilot flame (PM), flared gases (FM), and smoke particulate
(SM) from flare stacks.

What is the 6th Sense?


The 6th Sense is the power of perception beyond the five senses. Some refer to it as intuition, others
say it is the ability to understand the subtle cause and effect relationship behind many events.
LumaSense Technologies provides the sensors and solutions that awaken this 6th Sense in customers
to allow them to efficiently optimize their processes.
06

SUSTAIN

05

01

04

02

IMPLEMENT

UNDERSTAND

VALIDATE

ANALYZE

03

DESIGN

Contact Information
Americas and Australia

Europe, Middle East, Africa

India

Headquarters
Santa Clara, CA
Ph: +1 800 631 0176
Fax: +1 408 727 1677

Sales & Support Centers


Frankfurt, Germany
Ph: +49 69 97373 0
Fax: +49 69 97373 167

Sales & Support Center


Mumbai, India
Ph: +91 22 67419203
Fax: +91 22 67419201

China

Brazil
Sales & Support Center
Campinas, Brasil
Ph: +55 19 3367 6533
Fax: +55 19 3367 6533

Sales & Support Center


Shanghai, China
Ph: +86 133 1182 7766
Fax: +86 21 5877 2383

info@lumasenseinc.com
LumaSense Technologies, Inc., reserves the right to change
the information in this publication at any time.

www.lumasenseinc.com
2013 LumaSense Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved.
poster DGA_FINAL-ebook-Uni - Rev. 10/30/2013