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A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD | SEE PAGES 21-28

LIVING A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD | SEE PAGES 21-28 CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
LIVING A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD | SEE PAGES 21-28 CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
LIVING A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD | SEE PAGES 21-28 CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
LIVING A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD | SEE PAGES 21-28 CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 44, No. 41

403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916

On the Web: www.vt-world.com

Email: sales@vt-world.com

February 10, 2016

VT Workers May Qualify for Federal, State Tax Credits page 3

Local USDA Office Makes Literacy Kits for GMUW page 4 LOVE LINES page 16
Local USDA
Office Makes
Literacy Kits
for GMUW
page 4
LOVE
LINES
page 16

There’s Lots

Of Love

In Arnie’s

Ice Cream

page 19

16 There’s Lots Of Love In Arnie’s Ice Cream page 19 Local Sports page 34-35 INSERTS
16 There’s Lots Of Love In Arnie’s Ice Cream page 19 Local Sports page 34-35 INSERTS

Local

Sports

page 34-35

INSERTS IN THIS WEEK’S

INSERTS IN THIS WEEK’S May not be available in all papers Sears Kenyons True Value

May not be available in all papers

Sears Kenyons True Value

EMPTY BOWL BENEFIT

FILL A BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY

A BENEFIT FOR THE VERMONT FOODBANK

BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY A BENEFIT FOR THE VERMONT FOODBANK Saturday, February 13, 2016 • 4:30

Saturday, February 13, 2016 • 4:30 ± 7:00 PM at The Mud Studio, 961 Route 2, Middlesex

THIS AD SPONSORED BY

NOYLE W. JOHNSON INSURANCE GROUP

119 River St., Montpelier •223-7735 83 Washington St., Barre • 479-3366

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SEE PAGE 20 FOR DETAILS
SEE
PAGE 20
FOR
DETAILS
FREE SOCKS February 14-20, 2016 When you make a $5 donation* to Special Olympics Vermont
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February 14-20, 2016
When you make a $5 donation* to
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ing purchase. While supplies last. Promo socks can not be returned for a cash refund & cannot be exchanged for any other style, no exceptions.
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FIND

FIND ACTUAL SIZE (EXAMPLE ONLY) WIN A $ 2 5 * Gift Certificate * from any

ACTUAL SIZE

(EXAMPLE ONLY)

WIN A

$ 25

* Gift Certificate

* from any participating advertiser.

1. Many of this week’s World advertisements contain this special

cupid. All of the cupids are the same size and there are at least 21.
cupid. All of the cupids are the same size and there are at least 21.
2. On a separate sheet of paper, list all the advertisers who have the
special Cupids in their ads. Also include your name, mailing address, and
daytime phone number and your choice of gift certificate on the form
below.
3. Mail your entries to: The World’s Find Cupid, 403 U.S. Rte
302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Fax your entry to 479-7916. Or email us
at sales@vt-world.com
4.
Deadline for entries is Feb. 18, 2016.
5.
Winners will be drawn at random from the contest entries. 1 entry
per household. Winners will be published in the Feb. 24 edition.
Find Cupid
403 Rt. 302-BERLIN • BARRE, VERMONT 05641
NAME
ADDRESS
DAYTIME PHONE
If I win, I would like my
gift certificate from this
partcipating advertiser

Don’t forget to include your list of participating advertisers!

Join us for ALL DAY! Member•Owner Appreciation Day! FREE from local vendors Thursday, February 11
Join us for
ALL
DAY!
Member•Owner
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Thursday, February 11 th
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a
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*5% discount does not include wine, beer, Coop merchandise, newspapers, magazines, gift cards, and equity payments.
Work Optional, Coop Cares, Senior, and Working Member•Owner discounts will remain in effect.
623 Stone Cutters Way • Montpelier, VT 05602 • 802.223.8000 • www.hungermountain.coop

Vermont Chamber, Vermont Business Magazine Open Nominations for Outstanding Vermont Business

The Vermont Chamber of Commerce and Vermont Business Magazine are accepting nominations until March 4 for the Deane C. Davis Outstanding Business of the Year Award that honors an outstanding Vermont business. The deadline for nominating a business is March 4, 2016. Nominees and applicants are encouraged to complete the 2015 Deane C.

Davis Award online nomination form: http://

events.vermontbiz.com/deane-c-davis-nomi-

nations/. To recognize and honor Vermont’s best companies, the Vermont Chamber and Vermont Business Magazine created the Deane C. Davis Outstanding Business of the Year Award in 1990. Named for the former Governor of Vermont, this annual award hon- ors a Vermont business that shows an out- standing history of sustained growth while displaying an acute awareness of what makes Vermont unique. Last year’s winner was Champlain Cable Corporation of Colchester, and recent award winners include Dealer. com, GW Plastics, the Foley Family of

Companies, Small Dog Electronics, and BioTek Technologies. Each year, the Vermont Chamber and Vermont Business Magazine present the Deane C. Davis Outstanding Business of the Year Award during the annual Vermont Chamber Business & Industry EXPO. The award is given to the Vermont business that has made exceptional accomplishments on a consistent basis and demonstrated success by:

•Continued growth in number of employ- ees and/or sales •Commitment of company resources, including employees to community projects •Recognition of the environment as a natu- ral and economic resource for Vermont •Creation of a positive work environment for all employees Finalists of the award will be announced in the May edition of Vermont Business Magazine. The winner will be announced during the opening ceremonies of the Vermont Chamber Business & Industry EXPO on Thursday, May 26, 2016.

What Exactly is a Chamber of Commerce?

It occurred to me after writing about The Central Vermont Chamber’s strong opposition to Local Option Taxes last week that many may have a question about

just what a Chamber of Commerce is and the role that it plays in a

community. A brief explanation is in order. The roots of Chambers of Commerce are found in Marseilles, France. In 1599, the first “Chambre de Commerce” was organized by the city council to promote commerce. The first Chamber of Commerce in the United States was organized in New York City in 1768. The US Chamber was organized in 1911 at the behest of President Taft. The Vermont Chamber of Commerce was orga- nized in 1950. The roots of the Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce reach back to the early 1900s. The current corporation was formally organized in 1971 through the merger of the Montpelier and Barre Chambers. Today, there are nearly 5,000 Chambers of Commerce across the country. What these organizations have in common is that we were all organized to promote com- merce throughout the areas we serve. Chambers believe in free enterprise and the success of private initiative. The original mis- sion has not changed, in fact the Marseille Chambre de Commerce is still operating today. The Central Vermont Chamber, like other Chambers of Commerce is a voluntary mem- bership organization, designated as a not-for- profit corporation by the IRS. It is comprised of members who invest annual dues and who serve on various committees. The Chamber is governed by a Board of Directors. The staff

The Chamber is governed by a Board of Directors. The staff CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

CENTRAL

VERMONT

CHAMBER OF

COMMERCE

of The Chamber are the professionals who manage The Chamber on behalf of the mem- bership. The Chamber is actively involved promot- ing commerce in a variety of ways. Once the Board of Directors has approved a policy position, such as opposition to Local Option Taxes, the Chamber advocates before the appropriate legislative or regulatory body. Such advocacy is to help to create a climate that encourages business growth. The Chamber promotes commerce by pro- viding networking opportunities for busi- nesses through such vehicles as our popular Business After Hours mixers. The Chamber promotes travel and tourism and responds to hundreds of visitors’ requests for Central Vermont tourism information. As an example, we maintain an up-to-date inventory of avail- able accommodations throughout the region for our visitors. We provide educational pro- grams for members and non-members alike that help businesses to stay current with changing trends in management in our Executive Forum programs. We also provide our members with real savings through VACE Plus dental and vision insurance available exclusively to Chamber members, and other value-added programs. As a membership organization represent- ing the business community, The Chamber is responsive to the needs and concerns of busi- nesses throughout Central Vermont. If you are already a member of The Chamber, thank you. If you would like more information about The Chamber, please call me at 860- 229-5711. I’ll be very happy to meet with you and explain all of the many advantages of membership in The Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce.

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VT Workers May Qualify for Federal, State Tax Credits

United Ways of Vermont, Capstone Community Action, The Internal Revenue Service, and the Vermont Department of Taxes want to make life a little easier for Vermont workers by alerting them to a special tax credit that can put money in their pockets. “EITC is a tax benefit for working people and their families and it allows more dollars to flow into our com- munity. Its money workers can use for groceries, rent, utilities and other bills” said, Nelson Baker of United Ways of Vermont. “We want workers who may qualify for EITC to have all the information they need to get the EITC and get it right.” Last year, the credit returned over $65 billion dollars to over 27 million workers. EITC brought $85 million into Vermont’s economy and improved the lives of 44,000 fil- ers. The amount of EITC varies by income, family size and your filing status. It can mean up to $496 dollars in EITC for people without a qualifying child, and up to $6,242 for those with three or more qualifying children. The average Federal EITC amount last year in Vermont was $1,921. The State of Vermont also provides an additional EITC amount. “Vermont is committed to helping Vermonters who are working but struggle to make ends meet,” said Vermont Tax Commissioner Mary Peterson. “Vermont’s Earned Income Tax Credit is 32 percent of the federal credit, and last year the State of Vermont provided an average credit of $610 to more than 44,000 Vermonters.” If you qualify for EITC, you must file a tax return, even if you have no tax to pay, in order to claim the credit. You earned it, now file, claim it and get it. With the exception of some who receive certain dis- ability income, you must work for someone or run your own business or farm to qualify for EITC. Workers who made less than $53,267 should see if they qualify for EITC. If you make less than $54,000, you can get free tax help

and return preparation through volunteer sites. IRS-

certified volunteers ask the needed questions to find out

if you qualify for the EITC and other refundable credits.

They also prepare and e-file (file electronically) your return at no cost to you. Find a location for free tax return preparation near you at www.irs.gov/Individuals/Free- Tax-Return-Preparation-for-You-by-Volunteers or locate

a volunteer site through our 211 number. Bring the following to make sure our volunteers get you the right amount of credit you earned. ·A valid driver’s license or other photo id card ·Social security cards, a social security number verifi- cation letter or the ITIN, individual taxpayer identifying number, for all persons listed on the return ·Birth dates for all persons listed on return ·All income statements: Forms W-2 and 1099, Social Security, unemployment, and other statements, such as pensions, stocks, interest and any documents showing taxes withheld. If you run a business or farm, records of all income earned. ·All records of expenses, such as tuition, mortgage interest or real estate taxes. And, if you run a business or farm, records of all related expenses. ·Copies of last year’s state and federal tax returns, if you have ·Bank routing numbers and account numbers to direct deposit any refund ·Dependent child care information: name and address of who you paid and either the caretaker’s SSN or other tax identification number ·Both spouses to sign forms to e-file a joint tax return In addition, United Ways of Vermont is offering free online federal and state tax services for families with income below $62,000 through its website at www. myfreetaxes.com. The Vermont Department of Taxes offers free online filing for eligible taxpayers through Vermont Free File at www.tax.vermont.gov. Eligibility varies depending on the software vendor.

CVCLPG Offers Sliding Fee Scale

The Central Vermont Collaborative Law Practice Group (CVCLPG) is pleased to announce that as of January 1, 2016, it is offering services on a sliding fee scale. CVCLPG consists of individual lawyers and mental health professionals who are specially trained to help individuals and families resolve dis- putes without going to court. There are many benefits of Collaborative Law. The parties are able to maintain respectful communications even when they disagree. There are tremendous opportunities for creative

problem solving to reach a durable and satisfactory settle- ment. And with a sliding fee scale for those who qualify, Collaborative Law is now more affordable. For more informa- tion about Collaborative Law, to contact a collaborative pro- fessional to schedule a free initial consultation, or to view the application for sliding fee, go to www.centralvermontcollabo- rativelaw.com.

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THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN

THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN Local USDA Office Makes Literacy Kits for GMUW

Local USDA Office Makes Literacy Kits for GMUW

On January 21, about a dozen employees of the Montpelier U. S. Dept. of Agriculture office volunteered to spend part of a day mak- ing children’s literacy kits for Green Mountain United Way. These kits are designed for chil- dren in daycare centers and preschools to enhance their reading abilities and better pre- pare them for Kindergarten and subsequent learning years. The folks at USDA made 16 kits that day. After acquiring several suggested age-appro- priate books, each volunteer made colorful hands-on items from craft materials relating to the story in the books that children can hold and play with while being read to, thus engaging them in the reading process. These kits will be distributed to the Orange County Parent Child Center in Tunbridge, an organization that also recently received a grant from USDA. This is a good example of true collaboration between agencies with Green Mountain United Way, USDA and the Orange County Parent Child Center working together for the benefit of children. USDA Rural Development staff is dedi- cated to assisting rural Vermont communities through its housing, business and community programs. Their mission is to increase eco- nomic opportunity and improve the quality of life for all rural Americans. Rural Development’s Vermont and New Hampshire

Rural Development’s Vermont and New Hampshire • Two Volunteers from Montpelier USDA office with Pam Bailey

Two Volunteers from Montpelier USDA office with Pam Bailey (back) of GMUW.

State Office is located in Montpelier, with Vermont Area Offices located in St. Johnsbury and Brattleboro. For more information about the GMUW Early Learning initiatives, contact their Barre office at 802-622-8056 or visit them at www. gmunitedway.org.

802-622-8056 or visit them at www. gmunitedway.org. • • Wilkins Harley-Davidson hosted its 10th Annual Best

Wilkins Harley-Davidson hosted its 10th Annual Best Damn Chili Cook-Off on January 30, 2016. With 47 entrants, it was the largest Chili Cook-Off the dealership has ever had. Judges included Lt. Governor Phil Scott, Cornerstone Pub and Kitchen Co-Owner Rich McSheffrey and WCAX’s Anson Tebbetts, along with his daughter Adelie. First-place winner was Edna and Ken Elwood with their Sweet Heat Chili. Donations were collected for the event and over $1200 was raised for the Vermont Foodbank.

FRIDAY February 19th • 10am-7pm SATURDAY February 20th • 10am-7pm SUNDAY February 21st • 10am-5pm
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ONLY $5.00 with Coupon Children under 16 FREE! • • • Girl Scout Troop 30380 made

Girl Scout Troop 30380 made 42 scarves and hats to wish a Happy Valentine’s Day to Project Independence attendees! Pictured are Kaylee Hedding, Jaeden Jagemann, Eliza Garland, Cadence Burgess and Holly Lamson.

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Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont Earns Title of Best Performing Call Center of the Year for Providing Outstanding Service

A national program that surveyed more than 3,200 Vermonters about the service they received from the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont (BCBSVT) customer ser- vice team recognized the company as the Best Performing Call Center of the Year among leading member service orga- nizations in the country. The award recognizes the small/mid- sized call center with the highest combined first call resolu- tion (FCR) rating and employee satisfaction and engage- ment. SQM Group is a best practices consulting firm that assists organizations in using voice of the customer (VoC) data to measure and improve contact channel customer experience, operating costs and retention. To receive the prestigious rec- ognition, call center representatives must demonstrate a solid commitment to creating positive member experiences and rank in the top 25 percent of the 500 leading North American call centers that SQM surveys. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont’s customer service call center in Berlin handles more than 250,000 calls a year. SQM Group also recognized BCBSVT with a World Class Certification. In order to obtain a World Class Certification, 80 percent of the customers surveyed must indicate that their issue was resolved with one call; that they were very satisfied with the customer service representative with whom they spoke; and were very satisfied with their overall experience. Eighty-three percent of the 3,200 BCBSVT customers sur- veyed in 2015 met the criteria, earning BCBSVT World Class Certification. BCBSVT is the number one performing Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plan in the country for customer ser- vice, ranks in the top quartile of the 500 call centers SQM surveys nationally and internationally and earns best-in-class designation. “We are extremely proud of our entire customer service team and leaders for this wonderful accomplishment,” said Emily Fair, director of customer service. “Our team is truly dedicated to helping our customers, and we work together across our entire organization to resolve our customer needs and create positive member experiences.” “This award reflects both the achievements of our Customer Service team and the entire organization’s commitment to member experience,” said Don George, BCBSVT President and CEO. “We are grateful for the opportunity to provide health coverage and support to 247,000 Vermonters, and we appreciate the recognition of our efforts to provide them with world-class service.”

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For Your Valentine Heart Shaped Maple Candies Are Here! Running low on syrup? ENJOY OUR
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Central Vermont Rotary Valentine Dinner - Raffle Silent Auction A FEW OF THE ITEMS IN
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A FEW OF THE
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SILENT RAFFLE
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Friday, Feb. 12, 2016
$2500 First Prize
$500 Second Prize
$150 Third Prize
Two Other Prizes of $100
PLUS Merchandise and
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And Other Surprises!
GREAT BUFFET DINNER!
Tickets $100 each
includes 2 Dinners & Raffle
Call Gary Hass at
802 479-2582 for
more Info/Reservation
•Bragg Farm Maple Syrup
•UVM Men’s
Basketball Tickets
•Boston Red Sox
Autographed
Dustin Pedroia 8x11
•Vermont Mountaineers
Tickets and Autographed
Merchandise
•(5) Vermont Life
Electric Magazines
($9.97 ea. value)
•10-pc. T-fal Kitchen Set
•Applebee’s Gift Certificate
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•Cabot Cheese Pack
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•Midstate Dodge/Hyundai
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•6 Bags of
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Pump & Pantry 3-DAY MEAT EXTRAVAGANZA SALE Tuesday thru Thursday Feb. 9-11 Chicken Breasts Boneless
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from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch is served at the center’s “Fork and Spoon Café” Monday through Thursday at noon. A list of on-going activities can be found on the Calendar of Events section of this paper. Please note that Tai Chi classes and Watercolor painting/adult coloring books will be suspended February 16 – March 10. Washington D.C. Trip A few seats are available for our trip to Washington, D.C. from April 14-19, 2016. If you’d like to join us, please contact the center (802-728-9324) for additional information. The double occupancy price is $510 per per- son, and if you decide on travel insurance, plus $45 each. We are able to accept reserva- tions for the Washington, DC trip up until March 24, 2016.

AARP Tax Assistance AARP Tax Aides will be at the center on Mondays and Thursdays starting mid-Febru- ary. Please call 728-9324 to make your appointment. The “Fork and Spoon Café” Menu for the next two weeks is as follows:

Hale

Thursday, 2/11: VALENTINE’S DAY:

Baked Fish, Brown Rice Pilaf, Stewed Tomatoes, Coleslaw: Whole Wheat Bread, Cherry Cobbler Monday, 2/15 CENTER CLOSED Tuesday, 2/16: Parmesan chicken, Mashed potatoes, Peas & Pearl onions, Spiced muf- fins, Pumpkin stuff Wednesday, 2/17: Liver & onions or chick- en, Parsley potatoes, Spinach, Wheat bread, Pineapple upside down cake Thursday, 2/18: Scalloped Potatoes, Sliced Ham, Broccoli, Carrot/raisin salad, Biscuits, Caramel Pears Monday, 2/22: Meatloaf w/gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Broccoli, Muffins, Brownies Tuesday, 2/23: BBQ Beans, Grilled Hotdogs w/ Buns, Potato Salad, Coleslaw, Ice Cream Wednesday, 2/24: Chicken Divan, Mixed veggies, Whole Wheat bread, Peaches Thursday, 2/25: Dried beef gravy or chick- en, Mashed potatoes, California Blend veg- gies, Cornbread, Butterscotch Pudding Donations are welcome from those 60 and older. For those under 60, the cost is $5. All donations are voluntary and anonymous. Coffee, tea, water and low-fat milk are served with each meal. Call 728-9324 to confirm activities or for additional information.

Washington County Mental Health Services Adopts Slogan

Washington County Mental Health Services (WCMHS) has a new slogan — “Where Hope and Support Come Together.” Over the course of two months last fall, WCMHS conducted an agency wide slogan contest to solicit the most popular and repre- sentative slogan to help the agency capture the work we do to support individuals, families and community partner organizations every day. The successful tag line was voted on by the entire agency workforce, and WCMHS is excited to have this become part of its long- standing tradition of service in central Vermont. “Where Hope and Support Come Together” was submitted by Annick Jean, WCMHS Ch.O.I.C.E. Academy’s English instructor. “I felt that the concept of hope was crucial to our work – and the outcomes we seek to provide. Hope motivates us to do all of the types of work that we do everyday and hope is what motivates our clients to reach out to us in the

first place,” Jean said. “Our support is the observable and measurable manifestation of that hope - as well as our talents, abilities, education and life experiences that we bring to our interactions with one another as a team and to our consumers directly. WCMHS continues to grow and adapt in today’s ever changing health care environ- ment, and the slogan “Where Hope and Support Come Together” will be the beacon that keeps the work focused on the three pillars of suc- cessful health care service; improved quality of care, reduced costs, and increased consumer satisfaction. WCMHS is a comprehensive community mental health center providing mental health and developmental services throughout the Washington County community. Over 5,000 individuals are served annually by this private, non-profit organization with main offices in South Barre, Vermont.

by this private, non-profit organization with main offices in South Barre, Vermont. page 6 The WORLD

Grammy Winner, Blues Hall of Famer Taj Mahal Comes to Barre Opera House Feb. 12

Revered blues innovator Taj Mahal and his trio perform at The Barre Opera House on Friday, February 12, 7:30 p.m., part of the 2015-16 TD Bank Celebration Series. The concert is sponsored by Trow & Holden, Union Mutual of Vermont and North Country Federal Credit Union with media support from The Point. Composer, multi-instrumentalist and vocal- ist Taj Mahal is one of the most prominent and influential figures in late 20th century blues and roots music. Though his career began more than four decades ago with American blues, he has broadened his artistic scope over the years to include music repre- senting virtually every corner of the world – west Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe, the Hawaiian islands and so much more. What ties it all together is his insatiable interest in musical discovery. Over the years, his passion and curiosity have led him around the world, and the resulting global perspec- tive is reflected in his music today. Born Henry Saint Clair Fredericks, Jr. on May 17, 1942 in Harlem, Mahal grew up in Springfield, Massachusetts. His mother was a member of a local gospel choir and his father was a West Indian jazz arranger and piano player. His family owned a shortwave radio which received music broadcasts from around the world, exposing him at an early age to world music. Early in childhood he recog- nized the stark differences between the popu- lar music of his day and the music that was

played in his home. He also became interest- ed in jazz, enjoying the works of musicians such as Mingus, Monk and Milt Jackson. His

parents came of age during the Harlem Renaissance, and they instilled in their son a sense of pride in his West Indian and African ancestry through their stories. Since beginning his recording career in 1968, Mahal has appeared on more than 90 albums, including his own prolific output, soundtracks, children’s records, tributes and collaborative projects. His career has been full of and defined by colorful twists and turns, unexpected whimsical ventures and a commitment to a muse that has long preferred freewheeling innovation to conformity. Mahal accepted the Americana Music Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award

in a September 2014, presented by Keb Mo in

a ceremony at RymanAuditorium in Nashville. He’s also a two-time Grammy winner and a

Blues Hall of Famer. Local bluesman Dave Keller, who earned

a nomination for Best Soul/Blues Album at

the prestigious Blues Music Awards and who is quickly building a regional and national audience, opens the show with a 7:30 set. Tickets for The Taj Mahal Trio are $24-48. Order online at barreoperahouse.org or in person at the box office or call the us at 802- 476-8188. Discounts are available to mem- bers, seniors and students. The Barre Opera House is handicapped accessible and equipped for the hearing impaired.

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Spaulding Student Entering West Point

By Jim Higgins Aidan Reardon, a senior at Spaulding High School, had a longtime dream fulfilled last month. The United States Military Academy at West Point, estab- lished in 1802 by Thomas Jefferson, invited Reardon to join its 2016 Corps of Cadets. “I’ve always thought of the United States Military Academy as the best college in the nation,” Reardon said, “so to get the opportunity to be an officer, along with the unparalleled train- ing and education that West Point offers, should prove to be an outstanding experience.” An honors student and presently the highest ranking cadet in Spaulding’s JROTC program, Reardon also set the school’s cross country record this past fall with a 5K time of 17.2 min- utes. Additionally, he is an active member of the Drama Club, among other school activities. Reardon, who received the endorsement of Vermont’s Congressional Delegation as part of the West Point applica- tion process, is the son of public school teachers Mary and Michael Reardon of Washington, Vermont. In addition to his parents, Reardon says two other people were equally excited when I got the news, his JROTC Army Instructors, Lieutenant Colonel Donald Singer and Chief Warrant Officer Shaun Driscoll. “They have been instrumental in my success,” he said. “Since I joined JROTC in my sophomore year, they have been nothing but encouraging and helpful towards my path to become a part of the Army they retired from.” Reardon, who plans to study languages and travel the world as an Army officer, begins his basic training in June. Upon graduation from West Point, Reardon will be commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army.

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Aldrich Public Library Barre

Aldrich Public Library

Barre

American Red Cross Babysitting Training Course Saturday, February 13, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Do you know a child or teen who wants to be the best, saf- est babysitter they can be? Sign up for the American Red Cross Babysitting training and learn about first aid, child safety, and more. The course is completely free and open to youth ages 11-15. You can sign up by calling the American Red Cross Training Support Center (TSC) at 800-733-2767 with Offering ID#: 04019349, using the Coupon Code:

T148MCCLURE616. Questions? Call us at 802-476-7550 or speak to a librarian.

Story Hours Tuesday, February 16 at 10:30 a.m. Come hear stories about robots and inventions, then make a robot craft to bring home! NOTE: The Library will be closed on Monday, Feb. 15 for President’s Day, so there will be no story hour that day. There will not be Story Hour during February Break so that we can do special programming that week.

February Break in the Children’s Room Kid’s Party: Mystery at the Library! Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1:30-4:30 p.m. How well do you know your library? Make a paper Sherlock Holmes hat and follow clues in a library scavenger hunt to solve the mystery and win fabulous prizes! Then watch a classic children’s film (Rated G) set in Victorian London and featuring a mouse detective based on Sherlock Holmes! Snacks provided.

Freestyle Hula-Hooping for Kids Wednesday, Feb. 24 – 1:30-3:30 p.m. Freestyle hula-hooping for kids with expert instruction. Hula hoops provided.

Lego Club Every Wednesday at 4 p.m. in the Katherine Paterson Children’s Room Come test your creativity in individual and group chal- lenges!

Barre Supervisory Union Art Show Tuesday, February 16 from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Ainsworth Public Library Williamstown

Ainsworth Public Library

Williamstown

The Williamstown Readers Group is reading “The Language of Flowers” by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. Books are available at the Library during regular hours. The discussion will be held on Wednesday, March 2 at 7 p.m. at The Gardens in Williamstown. The Ainsworth Public Library will no longer provide State or Federal tax forms. Tax forms for both can be printed at the Library for .15 per page using shortcut icons on the Library’s public access computer. Vermont paper forms can be ordered toll free at 855-297-5600. Saturday, February 13 at 10 a.m. there will be a Valentine’s Day Celebration at the Ainsworth Public Library with music, storytelling, snacks, and a huge Make Your Own Valentines table. In addition to making Valentines for themselves, par-

(Snow date: Thursday, February 18) Please join us for a celebration of outstanding artistic achievement featuring the works of students in grades kinder- garten through twelve. All are invited to the opening reception February 16, 2016 in the Milne Community Room. The show will be on display through March 25th.

Classic Films with Rick Winston Sunday, February 28, 3 p.m. Film expert and Savoy Theatre founder Rick Winston pres- ents Alfred Hitchcock’s suspense masterpiece, in which a wheelchair bound photographer (James Stewart) spies on his neighbors from his apartment window and becomes con- vinced one of them has committed murder. With Grace Kelly and Thelma Ritter. Use the Jefferson St. entrance for admit- tance.

Friends of the Library Winter Banquet and Auction Saturday, March 5 5:00 – 6:00 Social Hour 6:00 Dinner followed by the live auction Come and relax with friends; enjoy appetizers, drinks, and time to make silent auction bids; then savor a leisurely dinner followed by the live auction hosted by auctioneer David Sanguinetti. Featuring appetizers, cash bar, silent auction, beef tender- loin dinner (vegetarian option available), and ice cream con- tributed by Ben & Jerry’s Silent auction will remain open until live auction begins and will include a homemade pecan pie, a Downton Abbey inspired quilt, art by local artists, Barre Opera House tickets, season tickets to Thunder Road, gift certificates and items from local restaurants and merchants, and much more. Tickets are $25 per person. For reservations, call 476-7550. Purchase your tickets before February 20 to be entered into a drawing for a $50 gift certificate to the Quarry Grill!

Income Tax Preparation with Capstone Community Action Every Saturday from February 13 – April 9 Capstone Community Action can assist Vermonters with filing their Federal and State income tax returns. They can serve taxpayers who had income in 2015 of up to $54,000. They also assist those who only need to file a Vermont Renter’s Rebate or Homestead Declaration. On February 13 they will be in the upstairs conference room, and every Saturday after that they will be in the Milne Community Room to help you with your tax return preparation.

ticipants will make a few Valentines for the Library to distrib- ute to community members. The Valentine’s Day Celebration is for children and adults and is part of the Ainsworth’s Second Saturdays program series. On Tuesday, February 16 at 6:30 p.m., David Newhall will present a talk “Building I-89: Montpelier to Waterbury” at The Gardens in Williamstown. An open discussion will fol- low providing an opportunity for audience members to share their remembrances of the construction of the Vermont Highway System. Refreshments will be served. The Library will be closed on Monday, February 15 for President’s Day, and reopen on Tuesday, February 16 for regular hours. See you at the Library! Library Hours 2:00 to 6:00 Mon, *Tues, Thurs, Fri. (*6:00 to 7:00 volunteer staffed, call ahead.) 9:00 to 6:00 Wednesday, 9:00 to 1:00 Saturday Contact: 802-433-5887, library@williamstownvt.org, ains- worthpubliclibrary.org

The Vermont Historical Society is Throwing a Party 225 Years in the Making

On March 4, 2016, Vermont will celebrate 225 years of statehood. Join us at the Vermont History Museum at 109 State St. in Montpelier from 5-8 p.m. to ring in this birthday with style. We’ll celebrate with tastings from Vermont cider makers, lots of hors d’oeuvres, and a birthday cake. We’ll challenge you to have some fun with Vermont’s history. We’ll

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make toasts and reflect on our state’s heritage. Participating cider makers include Boyden Valley Winery, Citizen Cider, Champlain Orchards, Shacksbury Cider and Woodchuck Cider. You’ll go home with a commemorative birthday glass at the end of the evening. Tickets are $20 for members, $25 for non-members:

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Students in the News

The following honors list is provided from the school. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to the school

BARRE CITY MIDDLE & ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2nd Quarter Honor Roll • 2015-2016 Grade 6 High
BARRE CITY MIDDLE &
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
2nd Quarter Honor Roll • 2015-2016
Grade 6 High Honors
Katherine Blakely, Noah Rubel, Emily Grace Spaulding, Eleanor Steinman, Isabelle
Wightman
Grade 6 Honors
Tasia Avery, Kyle Coache, Charles Codling, Samantha Dean, Cydney Ferrer,
Clayton Flye, Olivia Garneau, Evan George, Grace Isabelle, Riley Jarvis, Bella
Kamont, Carson King, Isaiah LaBay, Jacob Lamphere, Angelina McCall, Alexandria
Miller, Ethan Morris, Emily Morris, Nicholas Pierce, Brooke Premont, Aidan Sayers,
Maxwell Spaulding, Gabriel Stone
Grade 7 High Honors
Josie Diego, Dylan Estivill, Gabriel Guyette, Mallory Kiniry, Savannah LaFlower,
Annie Linendoll, Amina Malagic’, Noah Partridge, Emma Proteau, Zachary Stabell
Grade 7 Honors
Camden Boucher, Steven Corbett, Indira Dzano, Allison Everett, Sandra Fajobi,
Allyson Felch, Casey Flye, Natalie Folland, Adin Jandric, Oliver Johnson, Audrey
Jones, Kiernan Krasofski, Olivia Martinez, Sabring Metcalf, Damian Perkins, Willem
Pontbriand, Raven Premont, Olivia Rousse, Jasmine Sayah, Amer Verem, Nevaeh
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The following honors list is provided from the school. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to the school

WILLIAMSTOWN

MIDDLE / HIGH SCHOOL

Respect ~ Responsibility ~ Recognition

120 Hebert Road ~ Williamstown, VT 05679

Phone: 802.433.5350 ~ www.williamstownmhs.org

Second Marking Period 2015-16 Honor Roll

High Honors with Principal’s Recognition (Average of 4.0 or Higher) Ryan Ashe, Catherine Burke, Brandon Carrier, Evan Choquette, Moriah Covey, TJ DeRose, Shayna Guild, Eric Hulbert, Justin Morande, Jonathan Myles, Natalie Myles, Devin O’Neill, Krystal Parent

High Honors (Average of 3.75 or Higher) Nicole Ashe, Brody Brown, Vanessa Choquette, Mackenzie Christman, Taylor Clark, Lauren Covey, Gabriel Dexter, Alycia Dickinson, Bryton Hanchett, Kirsten Hanchett, Elizabeth Laughlin, Courtney Scholtz, Christina Thivierge, Matelyn Thygesen, Brittaney Townsend, Kaitlyn Trottier, Skyler Woodworth

Honor Roll (Average of 3.0 or Higher) Jennisa Bannapich, Brieonna Bassette, Svetlana Bell, Jordan Benedini, Gage Bishop, Cannon Blanchard, Jared Blanchard, Jolene Cafarelli, Aurora Carminati-King, Nicole Carrier, Riley Cheney, Alona Clark, Blake Clark, Lexis Coates, Leah Cole, Emily Coletti, Matthew Collins, Carson Corriveau, Brooke Corrow, Gideon Covey, Hunter Covey, Savannah Covey, Tristan Covey, Hunter Day, Syerra Day, Cassidy DeForge, James DeForge, Jacob Descoteaux, Maximus Dexter, Nicholas Donovan, Jayme Ducharme, Michaela Ducharme, Emilie Duff, Eliza Dwinell, Alexa Eaton, Peter Evans, Marcus Fleury, Riley Flowers, Curtis Gauthier, Colby Gingras, Lauren Gingras, Abrianna Gould, Connor Graves, Madasyn Gundry, Emma Lee Hallock, Mariah Hardaker, Alyssa Hatch, Austin Hegarty, Zoey Henry, Samantha Hepsley, Brittany Hood, Cody Hood, Alexus Isham, Kail Johnson, Jordan Jones, Savannah King, Shylah King, Xander Laboudy, Gabriel Lamson, Amanda Lasell, Journi LeClair, Alexander LeFevre, Hannah MacAskill, Kyle MacAskill, Marshall Marineau, Kate Mascitti, Brianna McLaughlin, Jade Mitchell, Alyssa Morande, Emily Noelk, Karla Nowak, Tyler Orton, Autumn Parrott, Thomas Parrott, Jacob Peloquin, Tristan Perreault, Caroline Perry, Abbigail Perusse, Mikaya Potvin, Nathan Poulin, Andrew Proof, Riley Provost, Paige Quintin, Gabriel Ramos, Erin Rivers, Mariah Royea, Derrick Ruel, Cameron Shangraw, Colleen Sheridan, Darion Stone, Ciera Sweet, Amber Sylvester, Ahna Taylor, Benjamin Thygesen, Hunter Townsend, Haley Trottier, Madison Varano, Eve Walka, Rachel White, Timothy Worn

Congratulations, Students, on Your Educational Achievements!

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The following students were named to the Castleton University Dean’s List for the fall semester of the 2015-16 academic year:

Shelby Alberghini of Middlesex; Alayna Campos, Connor Garand, Jeffrey Virge, Dylan Watts, Megan Trombley, Justin Goulet, Ashley Pelkey, Nicholas Ross, Elizabeth Scott, and Sunny Singh of Barre; Courtney Covey and Tyler Davidson of Vershire; Simona Croccolo and Emily Mumford of Waitsfield; Bryanna DuPont of Marshfield; Nicholas Gauthier of Hardwick; Sierra Hein and Tyler Strong of Bethel; Rebekah Jensen of Berlin; Brooke Kennedy and Alexis Vincelette of Tunbridge; Sandra Jones, John Skoda and Haley Lary of Randolph; Christin Martin of Plainfield; Victoria Pollard of Worcester; Carol Sourdiff of Waterbury; Kate Steller of Rochester; Kayla Striebe and Rachael Townsend of Northfield; Kody Weaver Willow and Barbero Menzel of Montpelier. Lyndon State College announces the Dean’s List recipients for the Fall 2015 semester: Quinlan Anderson and Cole Cacicio of Montpelier, VT; Samantha Austin, Matthew Chamberlin, Shaunna Royce, Carter Norheim, Kyle Gadapee, Olivia Genier and Hilary Bailey of Danville, VT; Kory Barclay, John Dickson, Brandon Thomas; Nicole Kish, Alana May, and Victoria Foster of Hardwick, VT; Ben Estes and Erik Graves of Plainfield, VT; Emma Kaplan and Emily Kubicke of Peacham, VT; Aleah Benjamin-Morse of South Barre, VT; Kelsey Brown of Worcester, VT; John Costello of Moretown, VT; Owen Davie and Harley Davis of Groton, VT; Sierra Dreesman of South Royalton, VT; Jessica Fondry of East Montpelier, VT; Dylan Jacobs of Braintree, VT; Carmen Mears of Barre, VT; Allana Ricker of South Ryegate, VT; Lily Sargent of Orange, VT; Elizabeth Start of Northfield, VT; Kelsey Stratton of Randolph, VT; James Tetreault of Williamstown, VT; Brandon Walker of Marshfield, VT; and Jake Zani of West Brookfield, VT Lyndon State College announced the President’s List recipients for the Fall 2015 semester: Ethan Bean and Matthew Bean of Barre, VT; Ashley Doyle of Groton, VT; Alycia Moore of Danville, VT; Valerie Morse of Adamant, VT; and Madeline Olson Morse of Cabot, VT The following students have been recog- nized on the Dean’s list at Norwich University for the fall 2015 semester: Josie Lynn Gombas of Barnet; Ava Michelle Driscoll, Alayna Colleen Badeau, Richard Vaughn Gariboldi, Elizabeth I Tchantouridze, Christopher Matthew Eddy, Holly Elizabeth Brown, Nicholas Wade Belcher, Michelle Louise Lunde, Mariah Jade Jacobs, Tiffany Amber Joslin, Kevin Michael Stark, Paige Elizabeth McNally, KatieAnn Sterling, Kaylee Rachel Relation, Shannon Lynn Violette, Andrew R Van Buskirk, Sophronia Mae Goodrich, and Kaitlyn Elizabeth Roy of Barre; Justin Michael Laperle of East Barre; Cole Alan Stever of Fairlee; Faith Christine Lloyd of Marshfield; Julie Marie Morris of Orange;

Lloyd of Marshfield; Julie Marie Morris of Orange; A Promise Kept!! Northfield Elementary School (NES)

A Promise Kept!!

Northfield Elementary School (NES) Principal Wayne Howe (left) promised the 282 students of

his school that he would have his hair shaved off

if they raised $2500 for Special Olympics. Last

Friday morning, in front of the student body he made good on his promise. Using a variety of fundraisers (a Penny war, a 50/50 raffle, a school dance, and a pie throwing contest) the students raised $1734 and then the volunteers for this

year’s Penguin Plunge raised a total of $1,960 for

a school total of over $3,600. Doing the “honors”

was NES fourth grade teacher Jen Gray, who said she “eagerly volunteered” to do the cutting. Photo by Bill Croney

Jessica Boucher Hurlbert of Plainfield; Morgan Jenna Riddle of Randolph Center; Shane Breer of South Barre; and Kaitlyn Marie Florucci, Katelyn Lisa Stein, Kimberlynn Ann Gilbert, and Heather King Powell of Williamstown. Tufts University recently announced the

Dean’s list for undergraduate students enrolled for the fall 2015 semester, which included Rayleigh Parker of Waitsfield, VT and Hayes Ward of Calais, VT. Barre, VT resident, Derek Walbridge, has been named to Husson University’s Honors List for the Fall 2015 semester. Berlin, VT resident, Aisling Stephenson, has been named to Husson University’s President’s List for the Fall 2015 semester. Mikayla Vanhooke from Barre was recently named to the Dean’s List at the College of William & Mary for the fall 2015 semester. Barre residents Kristin Rouleau and Audrey Grubb, and Plainfield resident Rachael Phillips, were named to Northeastern University’s Dean’s list for the fall semester, which ended in December 2015. The following students were named to the Dean’s List at Paul Smith’s College during the fall 2015 semester: Wyatt Blanchard of Sharon, VT; Sawyer Levy of Bethel, VT; and Patrick White of Danville, VT. White was also named an Adirondack Scholar, having achieved a cumulative average of at least

3.8.

The Dean’s list at Colby College included:

Carl M. Vitzthum of Montpelier, VT; Kaitlin C. Fitzgerald of Fayston, VT; and Laurel L. Whitney of Waterbury, VT. Tyler J. Glass from Montpelier, VT, is among the 543 students who earned Dean’s list honors for the fall 2015 semester at Mount St. Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland.

The following honors list is provided by the school. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to the school

High Honors:

6th Grade Reese Clayton, Caiden Crawford-Stemple, Colin DeMasi, Jiayi Huo, Nicholas Passalacqua 7th Grade Tess Ayres, Joshua Bolio, Hailey Brickey, Jaylyn Davidson, Hollie-Nicholle Davis, Adam Gerdes, Abigail Hebert, Faith Hoagland, Joshua LaJeunesse, Peter Milne, Ethan Monmaney-Utton, Molly Yacavoni 8th Grade Corinne Bolding, Lucy Gray, Maya Humbert, James Stephens 9th Grade Emma Arguin, Mariel Dunn, Ruth Milne 10th Grade Elizabeth Andrew, Christian Bolding, Anya Hoagland 11th Grade Courtney Amell, Kim Breitenmoser, Gabrielle Cicio, Abigail Detrick, Catherine Donahue,

Honors List:

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Lawliss, Jesse Marble, Tea Miles, Caleb Morvan, Avery Motyka, Lilian Olson, Hazel Slesar, Oliver Wells 9th Grade Alyssa Atwood, Amara Freeman, Adam Gadbois, Lexus Jarvis, Chiara Smith, Amelia Wrigley 10th Grade Bridget Doney, Samuel Marble, Zachary McGinnis, Catherine Miles, Laura Milne, Madison Nintzel, Julia Passalacqua, Dakota Vance 11th Grade Sean DesRoberts, Lotte Kuiper, Kaitlyn LaFaille, Ashton Morvan, Laura Schulz, Kayla Spaulding-Hyatt, Alec Steward 12th Grade Lucianna Bailey, Lyndsay Baker, William Dickinson, Aurora Drown, Jesse Hunt, Baylee Lambert, William Noyes, Morgan Smith

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Aran Hird, Analiese Morvan, Maren Paulsen, Lydia Reed, Kristin Smith 12th Grade Lindsay Albee, Michael Cetrangolo, Rachel Gordon, Matthew Matheson, Nathan Ranker, Emma Stephens, Taylor Woodbury

6th Grade Colena Bolio, Kiara Burt, Ryleigh Chamberlin, Kayla Evans, Lindsay LaCasse, Paige Lagerstedt, Preston Lilly, Makayla Locke, Jacob Parent, Samuel Perry, Hayden Sargent, Lorcan Sargent, Samantha Sicely, Colby Stearns 7th Grade Danielle Guerrero, William Hagenlocher, Jillian Haviland, Grey Kramer, Violette Maring, Isabella Martel, Greta Smith, Devon Surprenant, Elsie Wawryzniak, 8th Grade Megan Andrew, Daniel Baroffio, Kailie French, Bryce Hird, Caden Hurley, Ahleah

Congratulations, Students, On Your Educational Achievement!

February 10, 2016

The WORLD

page 9

Caden Hurley, Ahleah Congratulations, Students, On Your Educational Achievement! February 10, 2016 The WORLD page 9
Malcolm Joslyn Malcolm “Pinky” Joslyn passed away on January 29 after a long illness. He

Malcolm Joslyn

Malcolm “Pinky” Joslyn passed away on

January 29 after a long illness. He was 87 years old. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, the former Sandra Tassie and their five children and their spouses, Sharon Joslyn, Michael and Donna Joslyn, Cindy and Ed Larson, Steve and Tammy Joslyn, Tim and Rhoda Joslyn, five grandchildren: Haley, Cameron, and Sarah Joslyn, Ryan Larson and Melany Morris, and great grandson, Jameson Morris. Malcolm came from a prominent Vermont family, his

grandfather, Jesse Joslyn, was Secretary of State for the State of Vermont for many years, his father, Maurice, was Secretary/Treasurer for Vermont Mutual Insurance Company, his Grandmother, Elizabeth, a historian, was an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Pinky himself was a proud Vermonter, attended Montpelier schools, graduated from Montpelier High School in 1946, served his country twice in the army, once at the end of WWII

in Germany and during the Korean conflict in the US.

A salesman most of his life, he sold Fuller Brush,

Electrolux vacuum cleaners, and insurance for Bankers Life and Casualty Company. Finally, he served as Head Steward for the American Legion Post #3 from which he retired in 1990. He was a lifetime member of Montpelier Post #3 and VFW Post #792. The family lived in their home at the top of East State Street for nearly 50 years. They vacationed at Cape Cod for a few years until a visit in 1993 to Prince Edward Island Canada resulted in their buying a cottage there, and eventually in “The Joslyn Compound” with three other cottages, purchased by two of the children.

Pinky loved his family, “the Island”, fishing, lobstering, walking the beach, keeping the lawns mowed, spending time with friends, and exploring the island from end to end. Guare and Sons are handling the end of life details. There are no calling hours planned at the pres- ent time. A private graveside service will be scheduled

ent time. A private graveside service will be scheduled in the spring at Berlin Cemetery. Those

in

the spring at Berlin Cemetery. Those wishing to express online condolences may do

so

at www.guareandsons.com

Other passings

ROD CLARKE, an award-winning journalist, whose passion for his craft was exceeded only by his love of family, died Jan. 25, 2016, at Berlin Health and Rehab. He was 77. Born Jan. 2, 1939, to Joseph and Sarah Clarke, Rod was raised and went to school in Freeport, New York, where he was a standout athlete in foot-ROD CLARKE

ball, wrestling and lacrosse. In 1963, “Rock,” as he was known then, met Loretta Carroll, and after a whirlwind two-month courtship they were married and embarked on a journey of love, affection and adventure; a partnership that would last until her passing 44 years later. Soon after the wed- ding, Rod and Loretta moved to Montana, then back to Long Island, finally settling in Vermont in 1965 to raise their family. In 1997, they re-located to Florida, but always considered Vermont, where he had spent his childhood summers, their home. He returned home in January 2015. Although he received several athletic scholarship offers, he never attended college until he taught journalism as an adjunct professor in the Vermont State College System. Before launching a career in journalism in 1967, he worked as a cowboy on a ranch in

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Montana, a bartender/bouncer, a bulldozer operator in an open pit mine and a logger. He owned an asphalt paving business,

a restaurant/motel and, later, a public relations consulting

firm. In 1971, he and Loretta and the kids moved into a rug- ged tract of land along the Canadian border and homesteaded for a year with no road in, no electricity, no running water and no telephone. He worked in print, photographic and broadcast media and was bureau manager and Vermont state news editor for United Press International (UPI).

ERLENE B. DICKINSON, 86, of Colchester, passed to eternal life surrounded by her family’s love on Sunday, Jan.

31, 2016. Erlene was born in Barre, the daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Morrie) Bombard. She attended St. Monica’s School and graduated from Spaulding High School. On May

5, 1951, she was united in marriage with Richard Dickinson,

her beloved spouse, in St. Monica’s Church. Erlene was a car- ing and loving wife, mother and homemaker. She will be remembered for her devotion to her family, her faith and her friends. Her many gifts and inspirations will be treasured forever. She was also a faithful communicant of Holy Cross Church and participated in many church related ministries and activities

in many church related ministries and activities KIM ELIZABETH GALE , beloved wife of Jeff Danziger,

KIM ELIZABETH GALE, beloved wife of Jeff Danziger, passed away quietly early January 26 morning, after a long and courageous battle against cancer. Kim was a Barre, Vermont, native, born in 1964, and a graduate of Spaulding High School. She attended Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts, graduating with honors in classics and history and began work in

finance in the Merrill Lynch training program. She worked in software development in Wall Street advancing to a position

in international finance at Deutschebank AG. She worked for

the bank in Frankfurt am Main for several years, in New York, and in Chicago, reaching the rank of director. She is remem- bered as bright, loving, caring, generous, quick to solve a problem and offer help. Her friends are numerous in the U.S. and Europe, but her fondest friends were from her native Vermont, a state and place she loved for its warmth and prac- tical kindness. She contributed to several Vermont charities including the Vermont Foodbank and many animal shelters.

SARA JANE GOAD, 69, of Hardwick, died Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, at the UVM Medical Center in Burlington. She was born Feb. 28, 1946, in Albany, the daughter of the late James W. and Avis (Shedd) Goad. She attended Craftsbury and Alburg public schools. She was first married to Eugene Dickson and later mar-SARA JANE GOAD

ried Austin Clyde Isham Sr. on Feb. 3, 1979, in Hardwick. Sara stayed at home to care for her young children and ran a day care. She was a domestic for local families and later worked as a clerk for Hardwick U Save Store. She

enjoyed family gatherings and cookouts, music and cats. Easter was her favorite holiday and she loved yellow roses.

Easter was her favorite holiday and she loved yellow roses. HENRY C. HALE , 84, passed

HENRY C. HALE, 84, passed away peacefully on Jan. 27, 2016, at his stepson’s home in Fayston. He was born in Elmore on Nov. 9, 1931, the son of Daniel and Elda Hale. He attended school in Chelsea. He started working at a young age on his family’s farm wherever they lived in Vermont. The family moved many

times, living in Elmore, Woodbury, Brookfield, Chelsea, Franklin and, finally, Graniteville. Henry helped care for his mother until her death. He also worked at Wells-

Lamson Granite Quarry from 1957 to 1980 and at Rock of Ages Quarry from 1980 to 1995. On Oct. 16, 1971, he married Beverly J. Hayward, of Chelsea. They lived most of their mar- ried life in Williamstown. They had many happy years together before her death on Dec. 20, 1998. For the last two years he has made his home with his stepson, Richard Avery Jr. in Fayston. Henry enjoyed hunting, fishing, going to hunt- ing camp, puzzles, country music, dancing and going to the Barre Legion on Friday nights. He was a hardworking, quiet man who never complained or said a bad word about anyone ever.

who never complained or said a bad word about anyone ever. DOROTHY ESTHER AYERS CASWELL INGALLS

DOROTHY ESTHER AYERS CASWELL INGALLS, 93, a longtime resident of Burlington and more recently of Jeffersonville, passed away peacefully in the comfort of her home on Thursday morning, Jan 28, 2016. Born in Waterbury on Jan. 14, 1923, she was the daugh- ter of the late Max G. and Amy Elizabeth

(Wheeler) Ayers. On Nov. 6, 1944, she married John Q. Caswell in Waterbury. Dorothy married Albert Allen Ingalls on Nov. 30, 1975, in Burlington. Albert passed away on June 9, 2003. Dorothy grew up in Waterbury and was a 1940 graduate of Waterbury High School. She continued her education at Middlebury College, where she was a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority and graduated in 1944 with her bach-

elor of arts degree in English. Following her marriage to John Caswell, Dorothy was happy and busy as a homemaker rais- ing her two sons. She later entered the workforce as a secre- tary for the Vocational Education Department at the University

of Vermont, from which she retired. Gracious, kind and con-

vivial, Dorothy enjoyed all aspects of life and devoted herself to her family, particularly her sons. An exceptional golfer throughout her life, her other talents included being an accom- plished seamstress and excellent cook.

being an accom- plished seamstress and excellent cook. PATRICIA “PAT” LYON-SURREY was trag- ically taken from

PATRICIA “PAT” LYON-SURREY was trag- ically taken from us when she was struck by a vehicle while bicycling on Sunday, Jan. 24, In Tucson, Arizona. She was born in Binghamton, New York, on May, 1945. Pat was the daughter of the late Martin Buchta and Pauline Buchta. On July 29, 1963, she married Robert “Bob”

Lyon. They moved to Vermont in 1969. Bob died unexpectedly on May 12, 1981. On May 5, 1991, Pat

married Roger Surrey. Pat loved Vermont and the ample opportunities it offered to spend time outside. She was an avid biker, skier, kayaker, and hiker. She was more active and fit than most people half her age. She was also passionate about her photography, taking amazing photos of beautiful land- scapes, as well as macro photography and exploratory images using scanners and silhouettes. Of course when she got together with her three sons or her great-grandchildren, pic- tures were mandatory, whether they liked it or not. She also loved to travel. It was on a trip to New Zealand she met Roger for the first time. She had many friends and relatives who helped her to go on many amazing trips. It was on such a trip where this terrible accident occurred.

It was on such a trip where this terrible accident occurred. FRANCIS J. (JOE) MANNING ,

FRANCIS J. (JOE) MANNING, of

Mason, Arizona, died Thursday, Dec. 24, 2015, at the Veterans Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona. He was born in Barre on May 10, 1935, the son of Percy W. and Mildred (Devino) Manning. He attended Jones Brook School and Montpelier High School and laterterrible accident occurred. FRANCIS J. (JOE) MANNING , of got his GED. On Sept. 1, 1956,

got his GED. On Sept. 1, 1956, Francis enlisted in the United States Air Force, where he served until his hon- orable discharge on March 31, 1960. He married Hester Hale. They made their home in Southington, Connecticut. They later divorced. He worked at the Waterbury Anker Fasteners and Mount Southington Ski Area. He moved back to Vermont in 1991 and worked for Wheels for a while and would go to Arizona for the winters. He always stopped in Bronson, Missouri He was a close friend of Box Car Willie. He loved karaoke and singing. Francis belonged to the Moose Club and the American Legion. While in Arizona he helped with the Swing Kids, run by Bill Clinton. He also belonged to the Appachee Junction Karokee.

Clinton. He also belonged to the Appachee Junction Karokee. MAX UDO NEUMANN passed away at his

MAX UDO NEUMANN passed away at his home in Cabot on Jan. 31, 2016, surrounded by his family. He was born Oct. 13, 1939, in Frankfurt Germany to Ilse Schacht and Max Johannes Neumann of Artern. Max came to San Francisco, California, in 1959, the same year his sister, Heidi, came to Ithaca, New York. MaxMAX UDO NEUMANN

managed a parking garage where he met many of the luminaries of the Haight-Ashbury era, including Jim Morrison and Georgio Armani. Max lived in Munich in the 1970s and worked as a bartender for Trader Vic’s Restaurant, where his passion for cooking and entertaining deepened. Max’s father had been a purveyor of poultry and meat in France, Poland, Rumania and Germany, where Max learned to appreciate fine food and hospitality. As a child, Max traveled with his family to Morocco, Spain, Italy, London and Paris. He attended Dover College in the UK. As a young man, he traveled to Mexico where he was a paid tour guide. Later he spent some time in Chile. He then moved to Hartford, Connecticut, where he did fine carpentry. Eventually, Max made his way to Vermont and fell in love with the landscape which reminded him of Germany.

in love with the landscape which reminded him of Germany. EDWARD JUSTIN PFEIFER was born to

EDWARD JUSTIN PFEIFER was

born to Mary Calkins Pfeifer and Charles S. Pfeifer in Detroit, Michigan, on Nov. 22, 1920. He moved with his family to Montpelier in 1931 and graduated from St. Michael’s Elementary School in 1935 and St. Michael’s High School in 1939. In

January 1943, he graduated with a bachelor of arts degree from Saint Michael’s College in Colchester. Upon graduation, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy during World War II aboard the destroyer, USS Albert W. Grant (DD649). For his service, he was awarded numerous honors including the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart. He then attended graduate studies at Brown University, earning a mas- ter’s degree in American civilization. From 1951 to 1953, he was recalled into active duty with the U.S. Navy, serving aboard the USS Cogswell (DD651) and at the U.S. Navy Training Center in Newport, Rhode Island, until his honorable discharge. He then returned to Brown University, where he earned his doctorate in American civilization. He began his initial career with Saint Michael’s College in 1948, working in the English department, retiring from faculty in 1986 with more than 30 years of teaching and mentoring as a professor in the history department and serving as the academic dean from 1965 to 1970. In 1957, he married Joan Sheehey in Burlington.

to 1970. In 1957, he married Joan Sheehey in Burlington. SUSAN PERAL PILETTE , 97, died
to 1970. In 1957, he married Joan Sheehey in Burlington. SUSAN PERAL PILETTE , 97, died
to 1970. In 1957, he married Joan Sheehey in Burlington. SUSAN PERAL PILETTE , 97, died

SUSAN PERAL PILETTE, 97, died peace- fully in her sleep on Jan. 27, 2016, at Berlin Health & Rehabilitation Center in Berlin. She was born on Jan. 7, 1919, in Graniteville, the child of Esperanza Fuertes and Richard Peral. She was very proud of her Spanish heritage and one of the highlights of her later years was trav-

eling to Spain and Italy with her sister, Carmen. She shared a special but unique bond with each of her siblings and had many stories to tell. From surviving the Flood of ‘27 to sneaking out of a second-story window with Tina and Toni to attend a dance, she was always optimistic, resilient and resourceful. The first of her family to graduate from high school in 1937, her alma mater, Spaulding High, remained near and dear to her. She attended her class reunions as long as she was able and remained good friends with many with whom she graduated. She loved telling her grandchildren about how you had to pay for your own books back then and that her sister, Carmen, would give her a quarter every week to do so. On July 22, 1939, she married Gerard E. Pilette. Early in their marriage, they lived on the Pilette Dairy Farm in South Barre. She wasn’t a farm girl but quickly learned to milk and herd the cows despite the fact that they chased her up onto the porch more than once. A very hard worker all of her life, she did whatever she needed to contribute to the sup- port of her family. And she did so with humility and apprecia- tion, from selling tickets at the Paramount Theatre to manag- ing the catalogue department at Montgomery Ward and cater- ing events at the Mutuo Club. In 1959, she and Gerard pur- chased the Frosty Bar in St. Johnsbury.

continued on next page

Vernon M. Kennison VERNON M. KENNISON , 79, of Minister Brook Road, died on January
Vernon M. Kennison VERNON M. KENNISON , 79, of Minister Brook Road, died on January

Vernon M. Kennison

VERNON M. KENNISON, 79, of Minister , 79, of Minister

Brook Road, died on January 29, 2016 at the Woodridge Nursing Home. He was born on July 10, 1936 in Wolcott, VT, the son of Vernon M. Kennison, Sr. and Etta (Brown) Kennison. He attended public schools in Johnson and later at the Vermont Technical College. On November 10, 1953, he enlisted into the United States Army during the Korean War. He served until his discharge on November 14, 1958. After his military service, Vernon worked for several years in the granite industry, then Coca-cola, and eventually in the construction industry working as Head Foreman for Fecteau Homes until his retirement. He was a big family man and enjoyed spending time with his Children, Grand babies, and Great-Grand babies. He also loved NASCAR and was a huge Dale Earnhardt fan. Survivors include his wife of 56 years, Margary (Hayden) Kennison of Worcester, daughters, Diana (Kennison) Bradeen of Worcester and Linda Kennison of Enosburg Falls, VT; sons, Michael Kennison of Worcester, Calvin Kennison of Worcester, and Robert Kennison; 16 grandchil- dren and 12 great grandchildren; and a big extended family that included numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. He was predeceased by two sons; Scott Kennison and Jerry Kennison; a granddaughter; Lisa Kennison, and 8 siblings. The family is planning A memorial service at the Worcester church followed by committal in the Worcester cemetery in the spring. Memorial contributions may be made to the Worcester Volunteer Fire & Rescue, 10 N Route 12 HWY N, Worcester, VT 05682. Those wishing to express online condolences may do so at www.guareandsons.comVernon M. Kennison VERNON M. KENNISON , 79, of Minister

PRISCILLE GOVEA SHERMAN, 75, of Berlin, passed away peacefully at home with her husband by her side January 14 after a long ill- ness. She was born in Marshfield on May 10, 1940. She grew up in Barre. Priscille married Anson Sherman on October 19, 1957. Together they had four boys. She was a member of the Montpelier Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. She enjoyed talking to others about her God Jehovah who gives us, includ- ing those who have died, the hope of living forever on a para- dise earth. (John 5:28,29)

LYNN ANN TAYLOR, 54, passed away in the comfort of her family on Saturday morning, Jan. 30, 2016, at the Vermont Respite House in Williston, following a valiant six-year battle with cancer. Born in Buffalo, New York, on May 29, 1961, she was the daughter of Patricia (Sansone) Boreanaz and the late Harold J. Boreanaz. On Sept. 12, 1987, Lynn married William W. Taylor in Buffalo. Following college, Lynn moved to Stowe, where she worked in the food and beverage industry for sev- eral years before embarking on a career change. Lynn went into real estate sales, first working for the former Vermont Realty Exchange, later Century 21 Realty, both of Waterbury, and then started and became part-owner of New England Landmark Realty in both Waterbury and Stowe. Active in the Waterbury community, Lynn was a member of the Revitalizing Waterbury board of directors, worked on the capital campaign committee for the Waterbury Train Station restoration, served on the Waterbury Recreation Committee and was a volunteer EMT for the Waterbury Ambulance Service for 11 years. In addition, Lynn coached the Waterbury Rapids Swim Team and volunteered as a part of the youth girls soccer program. The true focal point in Lynn’s life has always been the people she surrounded herself with, spending time with her husband, children, large extended family and many friends enjoying times exploring the Vermont outdoors, listening to live music, sharing stories around the bonfire, star-gazing, cooking and traveling.LYNN ANN TAYLOR

around the bonfire, star-gazing, cooking and traveling. SHIRLEY ANN TREVETT, 76, of Creamery Road, passed away
around the bonfire, star-gazing, cooking and traveling. SHIRLEY ANN TREVETT, 76, of Creamery Road, passed away

SHIRLEY ANN TREVETT, 76, of Creamery Road, passed away Wednesday, January 27, 2016, at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H. Born on March 13, 1939, in Hardwick, she was the daughter of

Joseph J. and Hazel L. (Baldwin) Leno. She attended local schools and later obtained her GED. Shirley was first married to Walter Ira “Bud” Hurdle. They made their home in Montpelier and Adamant before moving to Washington. He died on March 4, 1991. On Sept. 23, 1996, Shirley married Rodney C. Trevett in the Macedonia Baptist Church in Plainfield. Following their marriage, they lived in Plainfield and Washington. In earlier years, she had worked as a cook at the St. Augustine Catholic Church in Montpelier. Later, she was employed by the former Sprague Electric Co. in Barre in capacitor production and for the Vermont Department of Human Resources in Montpelier. Shirley was a member of the Washington Baptist Church. She was always engaged with anyone in need and volunteered at the Barre Soup Kitchen.

MARION HELEN “TILLIE” WOOD, 92, passed away peacefully on Jan. 28, 2016, under the loving care of her daughter Lorie and son-in- law Steve Garand at their home on Ferno Road. She was born July 9, 1923, in Adamant to Anna and Edward Ferris. She grew up in Websterville, graduating from Spaulding High School in 1941 and the Boston City Hospital School of Nursing in 1943 as a registered nurse. On Dec. 15, 1945, she married the love of her life, James A. Wood, upon his return from the war in Europe. They lived in Graniteville. In 1952 they moved to Windsor Locks, Connecticut, and in 1955 to Enfield, Connecticut. Helen worked as a nurse at various hospitals and nursing homes. She became the neighbor to go to for ailments, even delivering a neighbor’s baby. In 1965 she and her family returned to Vermont, where Helen and Jim ran the Putnam Rest Nursing Home in Putnamville until 1978. From Putnamville they moved to Woodland Drive in Barre, and Helen continued to work at the former McFarland House Nursing Home. After her Jim passed in 1983, Helen continued to work until retirement in 1990. In retirement she spent living and enjoying her many friends at Williamstown Square. Her pride in her Irish heritage was known by all that knew her, and a trip she took to Ireland fulfilled a life-long dream.

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PUBLIC NOTICE 2016 Town Meeting Warning ORANGE SCHOOL DISTRICT WARNING Orange, Vermont The legal voters
PUBLIC NOTICE 2016 Town Meeting Warning ORANGE SCHOOL DISTRICT WARNING Orange, Vermont The legal voters

PUBLIC NOTICE

2016 Town Meeting Warning ORANGE SCHOOL DISTRICT WARNING Orange, Vermont

The legal voters of the Town of Orange School District in the County of Orange, in the State of Vermont, are hereby warned to meet at the Orange Town Hall on Tuesday, March 1, 2016, A.D. at 6:30 P.M. in the evening to act upon the following Articles, viz:

The following Articles of Business will be considered be- fore the Articles of the Select Board. The business meeting will begin at 6:30 P.M. and continue until finished.

Article I

To elect a moderator for the coming term as

Article II

the law directs. To elect a school director for three years

Article III

To elect a school director for two years

Article IV

To see if the electorate will authorize the

Article V

School Treasurer, with the approval of the School Board, to borrow money on the notes of the Town School District or otherwise, in anticipation of taxes. To see what sum of money, if any, the Town

Article VI

School District will vote to pay the School Directors and the School Treasurer. To see if the voters of the Orange School Dis-

Article VII

trict will vote to approve the School board to expend $2,818,562, which is the amount the school board has determined to be necessary for the ensuing fiscal year? This represents a 2.11% increase from the previous year. It is es- timated that this proposed budget, if approved, will result in education spending of $13,504 per equalized pupil. This projected spend- ing per equalized pupil is 5.58% higher than spending for the current year. To see if the Town School District will vote to

close the “Bus Fund” and use the fund balance ($24,750 as of 1/1/16) as revenue to offset taxes in the 2016-2017 (FY2017) Town School District Budget. Article VIII To transact any other business that may prop- erly come before this meeting. Dated this 20th day of January, 2016. ORANGE SCHOOL DIRECTORS Darin Magwire Corinne Relation Article I Alan Small Matt Smith Jessica Foster Article II

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Barre, VT 05641
Tel.: (802)479-2582

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Christine Richardson. Production: Kathy Gonet. Copy Editor: Aaron Retherford. Sales Representatives: Kay Roberts Santamore, Robert Salvas, Mike Jacques. Circulation: Aeletha Kelly. Distribution: Jim Elliot, Gary Villa, Paul Giacherio. The WORLD is published by WORLD Publications, Inc. in Berlin, Vermont. The WORLD is distributed free, and serves the residents of Washington and north- central Orange counties. The WORLD is published every Wednesday. The WORLD assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertising but will reprint in the following issue that part of any advertisement in which the typographical error occurred. Notice by advertisers of any error must be given to this newspaper within five (5) business days of the date of publication. The WORLD reserves all rights to advertising copy produced by its own staff. No such advertisement may be used or reproduced without express per- mission. Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.; Closed Saturday and Sunday. Subscriptions: $8.00/month, $48.00/6 months, $96.00/year. First Class.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT ORANGE UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 1-7-16 Oepr IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

MARGARET G.

RICHARDSON

LATE OF:

ORANGE, VERMONT

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of the Estate of Margaret G. Richardson, late of Orange, Vermont. I have been appointed a personal representative of the above-named estate. All creditors having claims against the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy filed with the register of the Probate Court. The claim will be forever barred if it is not presented as described above within the four (4) month deadline. Dated: February 1, 2016 Signed: Kim Richardson, Executor c/o David A. Otterman, Esq. Otterman and Allen, P.C. P.O. Box 473 Barre, VT 05641 Name of Publication: The WORLD Publication Date: 2/10/16 Address of Probate Court:

Vermont Superior Court Probate Division Orange Unit 5 Court Street Chelsea, VT 0038

Probate Division Orange Unit 5 Court Street Chelsea, VT 0038 The WORLD welcomes Letters to the
Probate Division Orange Unit 5 Court Street Chelsea, VT 0038 The WORLD welcomes Letters to the

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning public issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may be subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should also contain the name of the author and a contact telephone number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our advertising department at 479-2582; non- profit rates are available.

Another Shumlin Blunder

Editor, Governor Shumlin says the next strategy in his War on Climate Change is to divest the state pension fund of all coal and Exxon stocks. He said at a press conference that with the maple sap running in January and not enough snow on the ski slopes, Vermont needs to do everything it can to lead the charge against global warming. Seriously? By selling a few hundred thousand dollars of stock? If Gov. Shumlin really cared about global warming, he would not have led the charge to close the most effective car- bon-free power generator in Vermont history, the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. Now, without its power, Vermont and the rest of New England are burning more fossil fuels for electricity than ever. Our carbon footprint has gone up, not down. Vermonters need to know if this is an attempt to get more state money to support renewable power, which apparently can- not yet stand on its own two feet. It would not surprise me if once those investments are sold, they will “naturally” be “reinvested” in loans and grants and investments in renewable power. It’s just more gravy for the renewable power gravy train. And if these politically-motivated “investments” perform poorly for Vermont state retirees, well, those are the breaks. This is why the Legislature set up a state pension board – to keep our state retirees’ futures from being held hostage to the political whims of a few. I’m glad that Treasurer Beth Pearce is telling the governor and the legislature loud and clear that state pension funds aren’t political footballs to be kicked around. George Clain Barre, VT

New VY Storage Pad Needed Until Feds Take Away Spent Fuel

Editor, This month the Vermont Public Service Board (PSB) will consider the proposed second dry cask storage pad at Vermont Yankee. This concrete pad would support the remaining rein- forced concrete and steel casks containing spent reactor fuel. Vermont Yankee plans to self-finance the $145 million proj- ect, and is willing to begin the fuel transfer two years earlier than planned. The pad’s approval was a condition of the 2013 Entergy/State of Vermont Settlement Agreement providing $50 million of redevelopment funds to Vermont. This pad is a very big deal for all concerned. Without it, the decommissioning cannot proceed as planned and recently found acceptable by the USNRC. A PSB denial could conceiv- ably place at risk the Settlement Agreement and all of its ben- efits. Although Vermont Yankee does not produce electricity anymore, approving this spent fuel storage site is an important next step in the decommissioning process. Ironically, this pad at Vermont Yankee shouldn’t be neces- sary. Thirty years ago, Congress promised Americans a nation- al spent fuel repository. Billions of dollars have since been collected from the industry, but no repository has been opened. Spent fuel at all U.S. nuclear plants remains onsite. Recently a faint light appeared at the end of this long, dark tunnel. Two high-level nuclear waste storage sites have been proposed in the American southwest. One or both sites could open within 5-10 years, according to State Nuclear Engineer Anthony Leshinskie. This plan merits the support of Vermont’s federal delegation. Meanwhile, the spent fuel storage site should equally be supported by the PSB. Guy Page Communications Director, Vermont Energy Partnership

The Blessings of Liberty

Editor,

A number of people have asked me what I am trying to convey

when I write about the blessings of liberty and the tyranny of socialism. When I was a much younger man I witnessed the last stages of the cold war between the United States and the Soviet Union. Americans of my generation were immersed in the gut wrenching true stories of men, women and children trying to escape the tyranny of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

These people were desperate to escape to what was called the free world. They were searching for liberty. Part of the common language of Americans at that time included the words liberty, freedom, socialism and communism. On November 10, 1989 the Berlin Wall came down and the Iron Curtain separating the two worlds fell. I find it both sad and frightening that only a generation has passed and so many of my fellow citizens do not appreciate and understand the concepts of liberty and socialism. I have found the following definitions for both. Socialism is a category that falls under the broader definition of collectivism. “Collectivism is a system that values the group more than the individual. Under this system, a ruling authority arbitrarily sets common moral, social and economic aims, to achieve those aims, dictates the standards by which individuals live and work. Collectivist creed is often promoted in terms of idealized out- comes: social justice, security, and economic equality. Achieving these outcomes, however, requires the progressive destruction of Western Civilization’s tradition of human and economic free- dom. For a collectivist system to “succeed”, individuals must lose the inalienable right to life and liberty, including the free- dom to pursue their economic interests. Progressivism, socialism, statism, communism, totalitarian- ism, Nazism, and Marxism are various forms of collectivism and are all tyrannies against the individual.” — Author unknown. “Why is liberty so important? Liberty is precious, rare, never guaranteed, and always threatened. It can be lost in a single gen- eration if it’s not advanced and defended. Liberty follows from human nature: We are unique individu- als, not a blob or an army of robots to be programmed by those with power. To be fully human, all of us must be free to exercise our choices and govern our lives so long as we permit the same of others. Liberty works. Over and over again, it produces a degree of interpersonal cooperation, innovation, and wealth creation that allows human beings to flourish — nothing else even comes close. Liberty is the only social, political, or economic arrangement that requires that we live to high standards of conduct and char- acter and rewards us when we do so. This is a crucial difference between liberty and the soul-crushing, paternalistic snares that are offered as alternatives. Life without liberty is unthinkable. Who wants to live at the end of another’s leash, fearing at every turn what those armed with force and power might do to us, even if they have good intentions?” — Foundation for Economic Education.

It is stunning to me that of all the states in our republic, the

citizens of our state of Vermont have so thoroughly forgotten the difference between the two conditions. Vermonters would do well to remember the words of President Calvin Coolidge. “I could not look upon the peaks of Ascutney, Killington, Mansfield and Equinox without being moved in a way that no other scene could move me. It was here that I first saw the light of day; here I received my bride; here my dead lie pillowed on the loving breast of our everlasting hills. I love Vermont because of her hills and valleys, her scenery and invigorating climate, but most of all, because of her indomitable people. They are a race of pioneers who have almost beggared themselves to serve oth- ers. If the spirit of liberty should vanish in other parts of the union and support of our institutions should languish, it could all be replenished from the generous store held by the people of this brave little state of Vermont.” — September 21, 1928 Stu Lindberg Cavendish, VT

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Warning for Town Meeting

The legal voters of the Town of Orange are hereby warned and notified to meet at the Town Hall, in said Town of Orange on Tuesday the 1st of March, 2016 at 6:30 P.M. to transact the following business:

To elect a Moderator for the coming term as the law directs. To receive and act upon the reports of the Town Officers as printed in the current Town Report. “Shall the town vote to eliminate the positions of Town Grand Juror, Town Agent and Agent to Deed Land? To elect all necessary Town Officers for the coming term as the law directs.

Article 2.

Article 1.

Article 3.

Article 4.

1

Year Terms:

Town Clerk Town Treasurer Delinquent Tax Collector Town Grand Juror - vote to eliminate this position? Town Agent - vote to eliminate this position? Agent to Deed Land - vote to eliminate this position?

3

Year Terms:

Selectman

Lister Auditor Cemetery Commissioner To set the compensation of the several Town Officers.

To determine if the electorate will vote to raise the sum of $250,102.00 for the General Fund of which $213,578.13 is to be raised in taxes. To determine if the electorate will vote to raise the sum of $448,750.00 for the Highway fund of which $292,645.15 is to be raised in taxes. To determine if the electorate will vote to raise the sum of $3,000.00 to support the Town Cemeteries. To determine what amount of money the town will vote for The Family Center of Washington County. Request: $500.00 To determine what amount of money the town

will vote for Adult Basic Education.

$725.00

To determine what amount of money the town will vote for Orange County Diversion. Request: $200.00 To determine what amount of money the town will vote for Central VT Council on Aging. Request: $1,000.00 To determine what amount of money the town will vote for Capstone Community Action. Request: $300.00 To determine what amount of money the town will vote for Safeline. Request: $500.00 To determine what amount of money the town will vote for Home Share Now, Inc.Request:

$250.00

To determine what amount of money the town will vote for People’s Health and Wellness Clinic. Request: $500.00 To determine what amount of money the town will vote for Central VT Home Health and Hospice. Request: $2,150.00 To determine what amount of money the town will vote for Orange Recreation Committee. Request: $5,000.00 To determine the method of collection of taxes. Shall the town allow a grace period of 5 days after the established time for payment during which the collector of delinquent taxes shall not charge a penalty pursuant to 32 V.S.A. ß 1674? Will the Town vote to set the time to start Town Meeting 2017? To discuss any other business that may come

Article 5.

Article 6.

Article 7.

Article 8.

Article 9.

Article 10.

Article 11.

Article 12.

Article 13.

Article 14.

Article 15.

Article 16.

Article 17.

Article 18.

Article 19.

Article 20.

Article 21.

Request:

Article 22.

before this meeting. Dated at Orange, Vermont, this 25th day of January, 2016

Ron Tallman, Chairman George Wild Dustin Comstock Board of Selectmen

The WORLD

page 13

J ust to bring you quickly up to date,

tell you the name of the nationally

known extermination company who has been paid such an exorbitant amount and still haven’t taken them away. But

when they are finally gone, I assure you I will. Three months for these devils is way too long! And I am always embarrassed to think that “Jane” has a nasty neat house and they still live and prosper there. I just can’t imagine how long it would take to drive them from a house like mine! God forbid. When I got thinking about bed bugs, of course I thought about our house. And although bed bugs have not inundated our house, we have had something else. We have lived in our house for almost all of the 50 years plus we have been married and for probably the entire time, we have also shared our home with mice! Now to be perfectly honest, I don’t know if every year they are a new family, but I really do believe that the mouse family who lives with us is probably the same one and just generations old. But this year it may be a little different. Oh, I should mention that we also share our home with dogs and also at least 2-3 cats. And for the last few years, we have noticed that the cats we have now would no more put a mouse in their mouths than they would go and hunt snakes! I am not sure if Yul would agree to catch a mouse, but just not one of the mouse pets that live in the house though. However, early in the season I put my foot down and went and bought two fancy traps that I wanted to try. Of course, this foot went down after my dear friend Susie Ricketts was cleaning my kitchen and found a wonderfully toasted mouse in the burners of my toaster. And none of us could even guess how long it had been there and worse, I had just eaten a piece of toast that very day! So, even I knew it was time to try the new traps and see if we could get rid of the mice, for their sakes as well as ours. Now the new traps that I bought are quite user-friendly. When and if you catch a mouse, you don’t have to look at their little bodies and the way you know that you have caught one is that their tails hang out the hole that they went in. Much more pleas- ant and easy to open and dispose of the cadaver! Well, Malcolm was amazingly good at setting the traps in the kitchen and after weeks of success thought that we had finally gotten rid of the entire family. But of course, we were wrong. I guess they knew that the kitchen was no longer as friendly as they thought and so they moved. And Malcolm’s ski room became the place to live. So, the new traps moved to this room, too, and once again he became very successful, mouse wise! And each and every time he checked his traps and saw the tail hanging down, he felt it

the bed bugs still rule! I still won’t

necessary to mention to me how lush and attractive their pelts were. And just a few days ago, he added to his comments. My great neighbor Gordie has been very busy this winter try- ing to rid our neighborhood of the coyotes that are eating all the chickens, cats, and every four-footed animal that is easy prey. Fortunately, he has been quite successful. Just the other morning after a cup of coffee, he told our coffee klatch group as we were finishing our coffee and tea, that he had gotten another coyote the night before. And when I got home that morning, I of course, mentioned to Malcolm and we both talked about how lucky we were to have someone with such skill keeping our cats and dogs safe, and any and all chickens that roam our hills. And it was then that Malcolm mentioned the following. “Maybe you could ask Gordie if you could have the pelt from the coyote.” Are you nuts I said, what would I do with a coyote pelt? Well, he said, to date I have caught 29 mice and this isn’t even counting the ones I caught before I started keeping track. And they have such gorgeous pelts themselves and if you sewed them all together they would make such a nice fur coat! And

if Gordie would give you his latest coyote pelt it would make

your mouse coat even more attractive with a gorgeous Coyote collar!

Now I assure you that as much as I might like a fur coat,

it would be a cold day you know where before I would wear

a gorgeous mouse fur coat, even with a coyote collar! Do you

suppose Malcolm is envisioning a mouse fur coat with little tails and legs and arms attached? I know that taxidermy is not one of his skills, so God only knows! I’m surprised he hasn’t asked Jane for her bed bug bodies and has plans to make brooches out of them! And don’t let the mental picture of mouse coats, coyote col- lars or bed bug brooches keep you awake at night. Just keep in mind that you want to keep your house bed bug free because un- like the mouse family, once they find happiness and comfort in your house, bed bugs will be with you forever! And don’t think that the famous extermination company will help you. And if you believe that, I have a nice bridge in Brooklyn that you can buy! Before I put the end to his diatribe, I want to thank Terry and Ginny Brennan for coming to the wonderful 50th Anniversary party my children threw for us. Fortunately it was several weeks before my knee operation and heart attack bonanza because on the actual date of November 27, I was still unconscious in the hospital. But Terry has never forgiven me for not mentioning that he drove for hours to attend the party we did have. So, thanks Terry you are a peach! And hopefully I will be able to attend our 51st even if we don’t have such a wonderful celebration!

if we don’t have such a wonderful celebration! • • • Senate Report: Cabot By Senator

Senate Report:

Cabot

By Senator Bill Doyle

T he Town of Cabot was granted by

chartered in 1781 to 66 grantees.

Cabot is perhaps the only town in the State of Vermont whose name came as a result of a romantic attachment. The name came from a grantee, Lyman Hitchcock, to honor his fiancée, Ms. Cabot of Connecticut who was a de- scendent of the famous sailor Sabastian Cabot. The lots were drawn by the state surveyor and two lots were set aside for town schools, one lot for a college, one lot for a county grammar school, the rent of which went to Peacham Academy and two lots were for the minister to support the gospel. When Cabot had its first Town Meeting in 1788, six out of the seven town offices were filled by Continental Army Of- ficers. At that time, Cabot was part of Orange County. Cabot previously had been part of Cumberland County and later on was to become part of Caledonia County and now, is in Wash- ington County. During its early period, Cabot had many distinct villages which also had post offices: Cabot, Lower Cabot, Sout Cabot, and East Cabot. There is now only one post office in Cabot, namely Cabot Village which was opened in 1804. South Cabot used to be known to those who lived in the town as Hookers- ville, because of a mill which had been built by Parker Hooker in 1810. The earliest settlement in Cabot took place on what today is known as Cabot Plain, a plateau from which can be seen the White Mountains in New Hampshire and Vermont’s Green Mountains. Colonel Thomas Johnson of Newbury had camped on Cabot Plains during the French and Indian Wars. The origin of Petersville came from Peter Lyford who helped organize a school district. Cabot has been referred to as the mother of the Winooski because the river originates in four of the town’s ponds. One source was Coits Pond, named for one of the state’s first sur- veyors. A second pond near the Cabot/Woodbury line is known

the State of Vermont in 1780 and

as West Hill. Perhaps the other two origins of the river are two of the best known ponds in Vermont, Joe’s Pond and Molly’s Pond. Indian Joe was always friendly to the settlers and he and his wife Molly returned many times after the Revolution to fish. In the spring of 1776, the year of our Declaration of In- dependence, General Jacob Bailey of Newbury was ordered to construct a road from Newbury to St. Johns in Canada so American troops and provisions could be sent to Canada. Three years later, General Hazen was sent to Peacham with a regiment to complete the road started by Bailey. Hazen con- structed a road 50 miles long from Peachem over Cabot Plain, Walden, Hardwick, Greensboro, Craftsbury, Albans and Low- ell at the site of Hazen’s Notch in Westfield. This road today is still known as Hazen’s Road. Cabot’s first distillery was built on Cabot Plain. Until the War of 1812 the surplus was hauled to Boston and Portland by horse teams. During Jefferson’s Embargo which began in 1808, large quantities of whiskey were smuggled to Canada and sold to soldiers in the British Army. This was such a lucra- tive business that at one time, there were 12 distilleries making potato whiskey. The first cider mill was built in 1819. Mr. J.M. Fisher who was one of the historians at Cabot said: “Cider and whiskey were the staple commodities of the time, and were regarded very much as United States currency in these days. No farmer thought of beginning winter with less than 12 or 15 barrels of cider, and one or two barrels of whiskey in his cellar. No occa- sion was perfect without it.” These commodities were impor- tant at such events as births, weddings, funerals, barn raisings, quilting bees, and when the minister made a call to the house. It was said that at quilting bees, all must take some toddy. In 1852, the General Assembly passed a law prohibiting the sale of liquor. With over 40,000 votes cast, statewide prohibi- tion passed by only 521 votes. All of the counties west of the Green Mountains favored the new law, while the counties to the east were opposed, with the exception of Caledonia.

• • •
• •

February 10, 2016

50 th Anniversary Card Shower for Dale & Linda Porter ~ February 19 ~ 7210
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Anniversary Happy The Morse Farm Sugarworks and The WORLD would like to help you wish
Anniversary Happy
The Morse Farm Sugarworks and The WORLD would like to help you wish
a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address &
wedding anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll
have a monthly winner for a Gift Certificate for anything at The Morse
Farm Sugarworks in Montpelier. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send
anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to:The WORLD,
c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S.Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please
provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.
On County Rd. 2.7 miles up Main St. Montpelier
Open Every Day • 223-2740
Please Send Us Your February Anniversaries
And Be Automatically Registered To Win A
Gift Certificate From The Morse Farm Sugarworks
FEBRUARY 8
TAMMY & RITCHIE SMITH, BARRE, 9 YEARS
FEBRUARY 12
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FEBRUARY 14
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THE MORSE FARM SUGARWORKS
“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD
c/o Happy Anniversary
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.
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Happy 92 nd Birthday
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Locally Owned & Operated By Mike & Amanda P. 97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Rd • 802-479-0671

Happy Birthday!

FROM

Barre-Montpelier Rd • 802-479-0671 Happy Birthday! FROM BARRE-MONTPELIER RD. Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The
Barre-Montpelier Rd • 802-479-0671 Happy Birthday! FROM BARRE-MONTPELIER RD. Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.

FEBRUARY 8 Warren Lanigan, Barre FEBRUARY 9 Ashley Nutbrown, 30, Barre FEBRUARY 11 Magenta Isabelle, 16, Barre FEBRUARY 12 Joe Richardson, Waterbury Anne White, Waterbury Center

FEBRUARY 13 Sandy Salvas, Barre Jared Felch, 24, Barre Town Joshua Utton, 29, Waterbury Lucca V. Willett, 5, Stowe FEBRUARY 14 Laura Rappold, Montpelier Andrew Proof, 50, Plainfield FEBRUARY 16 Aaron Retherford

This Week’s Cake Winner:

On FEBRUARY 15, LARS KENWORTHY of BARRE will be 8 YEARS OLD!

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for Julie Fandino (Bakery Manager) or Beverlee Hutchins (Cake Decorator) by Thursday, February 11th to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE

NAME AGE (this birthday) ADDRESS

PHONE

accepted. BIRTHDATE NAME AGE (this birthday) ADDRESS PHONE CVHHH CEO Sandy Rousse (right) sits with State
accepted. BIRTHDATE NAME AGE (this birthday) ADDRESS PHONE CVHHH CEO Sandy Rousse (right) sits with State

CVHHH CEO Sandy Rousse (right) sits with State Senator Bill Doyle at CVHHH’s 16th Annual Seasons of Life fashion show last October.

Community Contributes Over $300,000 to CVHHH in 2015

Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice (CVHHH) is proud to report another successful, generous year of giving on behalf of the community. Taking into consideration the Annual Fund, fundraising events and voter-approved funds, CVHHH raised over $300,000 in 2015. “Donors to CVHHH were generous once again in 2015,” says Daniel L. Pudvah, CVHHH’s Director of Development. “We realized an increase in new and returning donors. In addi- tion, our Annual Fund was enhanced by the honorary chair- manship of Ken Squier, in the spring, and Willem Lange, in the fall.” Goals for two annual fundraising events – The Hospice Memorial Golf Tournament, which enters its 20th Year in 2016, and Seasons of Life Fashion Show, Silent Auction and Dinner – were exceeded under the leadership of Kimberly Farnum, CVHHH’s new Community Relations & Development Manager. At Town Meeting Day, voters in the 23 communities we serve approved CVHHH’s requests for funding. The agency received additional support from Gifts of Gratitude donations, bequests and many gifts made in memory or in honor of loved ones. “Charitable giving continues to be critically important to carrying out our mission of providing high-quality, patient- centered care to all central Vermonters, particularly in the fast-changing environment of healthcare reform and reim- bursement from government programs,” adds Pudvah. Continued support from the community helps CVHHH pio- neer programs to meet the changing needs of central Vermonters and ensures the availability of services for generations to come. There are many options for making a donation, includ- ing via the newly-relaunched CVHHH website, at www. cvhhh.org/donate.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) St. Valentine’s Day magic rules the entire week for romantic Rams and Ewes. Music, which is the food of love, is also strong. The weekend offers news both unexpected and an- ticipated. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your aspects favor the arts -- which the Divine Bovine loves, loves, loves. Also, for those looking for romantic love, Cupid is available for re- quests. After all, his mother, Venus, rules your sign. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Loving commitments con- tinue to grow stronger. Ditto budding relationships. A re- cent move to help start up a new career-linked direction soon could begin to show signs of progress. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Single Moon Children might be eager to take that proverbial chance on love. But your more serious side will feel better if you take things slowly and give your moonstruck self more time. LEO (July 23 to August 22) It’s a love fest for Leos and Leonas this week. Paired Cats might expect to be purr- fectly in sync. And with matchmaking friends, single Sim- bas searching for romance shouldn’t have too far to look. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) More understand- ing on both sides can work miracles in restoring ailing re- lationships to health. Make the first move, and you’ll be closer to your much-wanted reunion. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Accept the fact that you are worthy of being loved, and you’ll find proof in what is revealed to you over the course of the week. Also accept a compliment offered with great sincerity. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Planning to take a new direction in life is exciting. And so is a new aware- ness of someone’s special affection. Expect a slow and mostly steady development of the situation. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Although you might still feel you weren’t treated quite right in a re- cent matter, all that will work out in time. Meanwhile, en- joy the week’s special qualities and potentials. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Deciding not to give up on a troubling romantic situation helps start the healing process. Expect to find some valuable insight into yourself as things move along. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) The week is filled with positive potentials, but it’s up to you to make the right choices. The advice of someone who truly cares for you and your well-being can be priceless. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) It’s a good time to make yourself available to possibilities of the romantic kind. Already paired? Good. In that case, be sure to reas- sure that special person of your feelings. BORN THIS WEEK: Your generosity gladdens the hearts of others, and you bask in their joy.

(c) 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

THIS WEEK: Your generosity gladdens the hearts of others, and you bask in their joy. (c)

Amazing Breast-Feeding Benefits For Moms

BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.

M ore new moms than ever are nursing their newborns, according to the latest

Breastfeeding Report Card from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s great, and if you’re among them or are looking ahead to having a baby soon, you’ve no doubt heard plenty about breast- milk’s big benefits for your little one. But did you know there are major perks for mothers, too? New research is uncovering evidence of previously unknown health boosts for nurs- ing women, one that lasts decades after your child is weaned. By switching on the amaz- ing biochemical factory that produces breast- milk, you re-boot parts of your metabolism. You become more sensitive to insulin (the hormone that controls blood sugar process- ing), levels of heart-threatening blood fats drop, and so do levels of the fat inside your abdomen. We understand that breast-feeding isn’t an option for every new mother. Nursing prob- lems can include a low milk supply, medica- tions you take or a baby who can’t get the hang of it. And then there are the everyday time constraints (other kids) and a lack of support. Just remember, as a wise lactation consultant once said, “The most important thing is to feed the baby.” But if you’re among the estimated 95 per- cent of new moms who don’t face insur- mountable nursing obstacles or the 79 per- cent who currently give it a try, you’ll love knowing how this ancient art nurtures you, too. Easier weight loss, less visceral fat. According to the U.K.’s Million Women Study, women who breastfed their infants for six months or longer (breast-feeding burns 500 calories a day, the researchers note) were 30 percent less likely to become obese later in life. Breast-feeding also helps burn off deep abdominal fat that can accumulate during pregnancy. In one study, breast-feed- ing women had 28 percent less visceral fat than those who did not breastfeed. Lower risk for diabetes. Women who breastfed for one year were 24 to 44 percent less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, say Harvard Medical School researchers who

tracked over 70,000 women for 16 years. Shorter stints help, too. In a recent study, women who nursed for at least two months and who had gestational diabetes slashed their risk for developing Type 2 diabetes in half. A healthier heart and blood vessels. Breast-feeding reduced risk for developing high blood pressure, high lousy LDL choles- terol and heart disease by 20 percent or more in one University of Pittsburgh study. Nursing releases calming hormones like oxytocin and prolactin that don’t just make you feel serene, they also seem to relax your blood vessels. Benefits persist beyond menopause! Reduced risk for some cancers. Nursing discourages ovulation. While this natural form of birth control isn’t perfect (about 1 in 50 breast-feeding women who don’t use contraception become pregnant), it could lower your odds for breast and ovarian can- cer somewhat. Every month of breast-feed- ing cuts risk for some types of ovarian cancer by 1.4 to 2.2 percent. Protection from rheumatoid arthritis. One large study noted that women who nursed their baby for at least a year cut their risk for developing this painful, degenerative joint condition by 50 percent. We know that nursing’s not always easy. Fortunately, today you’ve got more support than ever to help you make it work. Two big tools:

Insurance coverage for lactation consul- tants. Most health insurance now covers visits from these trained breast-feeding coaches. Check your plan for details. A certified lactation consultant can help get the two of you off to a great start and sug- gest solutions if problems crop up along the way. Coverage and help for pumping breast- milk, too. Heading back to work? Keep nursing. Under the Affordable Care Act, most health insurers now cover costs for breast pumps and supplies, too. In addition, many employers must now provide a clean, private place for women to pump breast- milk and must allow nursing moms to take pumping breaks.

AARP Scam Alert Bulletin Board

* * * Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen, M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into “The Dr. Oz Show” or visit www.sharecare.com.

(c) 2015 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Weekly Health Tip by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph. Benefits of Aerobic Exercise Thirty minutes of
Weekly
Health Tip
by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph.
Benefits of
Aerobic Exercise
Thirty minutes of aerobic
exercise like walking,
swimming or biking has many
health benefits. Regular aerobic
exercise can reduce the risk of
many conditions including
heart disease, high blood
pressure, type 2 diabetes,
obesity, stroke and certain types
of cancer. Weight-bearing
aerobic exercise like walking
can also reduce the risk of
osteoporosis. It can help keep
arteries clear by increasing
HDL (good cholesterol) and
loweringLDL(badcholesterol).
It boosts mood, keeps off extra
weight and increases stamina.
Be sure to check with your
doctor before starting any
exercise program.
20 South Main Street
Barre • 479-3381
M-F 8:30am-6pm, Sat. 8:30am-1pm
The Center for Leadership Skills BUSINESS & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT Lindel James coaching & consulting Taking

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THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN

THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN One Hour Reiki Special $30 Some Of The
One Hour Reiki Special $30 Some Of The Reiki Healing Health Benefits: • Creates deep
One Hour Reiki Special $30
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• Creates deep relaxation and aids the body to
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• It accelerates the body’s self-healing abilities,
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Therapeutic Practice & Apothecary
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Romance Scams

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner. Many “sweetheart” scammers are targeting online dating sites to find victims. Some scammers are particularly fond of faith-based sites because people are more likely to fall for a scam if they assume that someone of their own faith could never be a con artist. Be care- ful what you share online and be careful what types of questions a would-be sweetheart is asking you. Go to www.aarp.org/fraudwatch- network and sign our petition to urge online dating sites to crack down on these scams. Keep your warm heart safe and leave sweet- heart scammers out in the cold. Be a fraud fighter! If you can spot a scam,

out in the cold. Be a fraud fighter! If you can spot a scam, you can

you can stop a scam. Contact local law enforcement or the AARP Fraud Watch Network www.aarp.org/fraud- watchnetwork or 1-877-908-3360 to report a scam or for more information on scam and fraud prevention.

Montpelier Senior Activity Center

Van Transportation to MSAC Begins Soon! We are looking for- ward to an late February/early March launch of a new trans- portation program to bring seniors to the Montpelier Senior Activity Center on Tuesdays. Rides will be provided at no cost to residents of Montpelier and Berlin. The van will travel twice each morning and twice each afternoon, allowing riders to come for FEAST lunch only, or activities before/ after lunch. Please contact us at 262-6288 if you would like to try out this service, and our ride planner will be in touch with you to dis- cuss details. Thank you to Hunger Mountain Coop, Walmart Foundation, North Country Federal Credit Union, and the Vermont Community Foundation for supporting this program!

Tax Clinic AARP Tax-Aide volunteers will prepare personal federal and VT income tax returns at the Montpelier Senior Activity Center. Appointments are filling fast! Call us at 223- 2518 for appointment.

Great Upcoming Events Call us at 223-2518 for information and join us at 58 Barre Street for these great pro- grams!

and join us at 58 Barre Street for these great pro- grams! GAL Program Monday, February

GAL Program Monday, February 15, 1-2 p.m. Free and Open to the Public!

Learn more about volunteering for the Guardian Ad Litem program in Washington County. The program is in need of volunteers to help vulnerable children in the court sys- tem. Learn about the need, number of foster children in VT, and basics of the program and hear from current GALs about why they vol- unteer.

Armchair Travel – Prauge to Budapest February 16, 6:30-8 p.m. Free and Open to the Public! Have you ever wondered what a trip on a river boat along the Danube River would be like? Are you curious to see the inside of a riverboat? Travel from Prague to Budapest with photos of many of the sights along the way.

Acupuncture Clinic Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon Treatment in a group setting performed by licensed acupuncturist Jen Etheridge. Treatments are all auricular acupuncture; all points chosen will be in the ears. Group acu- puncture is recommended for many condi- tions including stress and anxiety manage- ment including PTSD, addiction manage- ment, and sleep issues. Treatments are about 30 minutes each. All treatments conclude at 12, so you must arrive before 11:30 to have a treatment. No appointment necessary. Open to everyone 50 and older. $10 to Integrative Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Susette & her husband Jon, Montpelier Comprehensive breast care. This close. The right place to
Susette & her husband Jon,
Montpelier
Comprehensive breast care. This close.
The right place to treat breast cancer is right
where you live. As part of the UVM Health Network,
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3D breast imaging technology, a full range of medical
services for breast cancer treatment, and access
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In short, we’re your doorway to exceptional breast
care close to home.
To learn more and read Susette’s story,
visit UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Cancer.
Or call (802) 371-2500.
Accredited by the Commission on Cancer
The heart and science of medicine.

Valentine

Poetry Poetry

CORNER

CORNER

By Corinne Davis

When I see you, myself is a glow My energy surging with nowhere to go

I glance your way and catch your stare,

As I uncomfortably shift about in my chair This attraction has me possessed If I’m not distracted, then I’m obsessed Wouldn’t it be nice, if you and me, Could let go of fear and be totally free

If this is a gift from God above, Then why can’t I touch you and give you my love

I wanting for you, and you for me,

Not questioning why, just to be For some reason, I want to deny Myself this feeling that is sending me high When will we torch this passion to feed So we can embrace our innermost needs

Valentine of My Heart

By Old George

You’re the Valentine of my heart. For I have loved you from the start. Have you ever noticed the morning sun sparkles like diamonds, upon the morning snow? For you’re the one true love of my heart. Beautiful as diamonds upon the morning snow. Forever the Valentine Of my heart.

•If you would like to be part of Poetry Corner in The WORLD, please submit your original work to editor@ vt-world.com or mail it to The World, 403 US Rte 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Payton Tiffany, We love our sweet daughter, our favorite Valentine. We love you forever. Love Always, Your Moms

One rose does not a bouquet make, One rose love can make. Love forever & always to my wife Sue

Hammer, you still make my heart pound! Love, Me!

Jasmine & Jenna Sawyer, No matter how old you are, you two will always be our Valentines. Love, Dad & Betty

Taylor & Austin, You two boys rock our world!

00XX’s

Love, Mom & Dad

Penny Marie, This is our first Valentine’s Day as wife and wife! You are the best Valentine ever, baby! Love, Jaime Your Wife

Together through thick and thin. Always - Fee

LOVE

To My Bestest Buddy, Lover & Soulmate, Remember:

you + Me = uS! Today and always! you are my #1 and only #1. Don’t ever forget this! With all of my love, your Hot Sexy Baby

Happy Valentine’s Day, Lauren Smith! Love, Mommy & Daddy

Happy

Valentine’s Day!

K & L

N & K

143

Happy Valentine’s Day to Jordan & Christian! Love, Gigi & Grampa

KEG

+

JCG

Happy Valentine’s Day to Bryanna & Kayleigh! Love, Gigi & Grampa

Happy Valentine’s Day Kylie Rauli Liam

Happy

1st

Valentine’s Day, Max! Love, Papa Pete & Grandma D

LINES

Sandy, My heart for you, My Valentine true. Rob

25 Years

2/16/16

Rob, Chelsea & Jessie- Roses are red, Violets are blue I love all 3 of you so much! It’s true!

Marti My True Love I Love You!! XOXOXOXO

Dan, You’re a wonderful husband, friend, lover, teacher, father, and so much more! Love Always, Bren

Happy Valentine’s Day Logan, Carmelina & Jodi! Love, Garth

SPEAKING OUT
SPEAKING OUT

Who’s your favorite Valentine and/or how do you celebrate the occasion?

favorite Valentine and/or how do you celebrate the occasion? Candy P., Barre “My husband. We might
favorite Valentine and/or how do you celebrate the occasion? Candy P., Barre “My husband. We might

Candy P., Barre

“My husband. We might go out for a quick dinner.”

Kirk T., Barre

“My girlfriend is my favorite Valentine. We’ll go out to eat.”

is my favorite Valentine. We’ll go out to eat.” Cody R., Barre “Going out to eat
is my favorite Valentine. We’ll go out to eat.” Cody R., Barre “Going out to eat

Cody R., Barre

“Going out to eat or something fun with my girlfiend.”

Melissa H., Barre

“My dog Rufus. I always buy him a new toy and watch a sappy love story.”

I always buy him a new toy and watch a sappy love story.” Shanice F., Barre
I always buy him a new toy and watch a sappy love story.” Shanice F., Barre

Shanice F., Barre

“I work that day but will go out to lunch with my parents who are my favorite Valen- tines. They give me chocolates and a small teddy bear.”

Morgan W., Barre

“My parents. They’ve done a lot for me. We usually go out to eat.”

Come Celebrate Our

Come Celebrate Our 4 TH Anniversary This Saturday, February 13 Refreshments ★ Storytime with Mr. Taffel
Come Celebrate Our 4 TH Anniversary This Saturday, February 13 Refreshments ★ Storytime with Mr. Taffel

4 TH

Come Celebrate Our 4 TH Anniversary This Saturday, February 13 Refreshments ★ Storytime with Mr. Taffel

Anniversary

Come Celebrate Our 4 TH Anniversary This Saturday, February 13 Refreshments ★ Storytime with Mr. Taffel
Come Celebrate Our 4 TH Anniversary This Saturday, February 13 Refreshments ★ Storytime with Mr. Taffel

This Saturday, February 13

Celebrate Our 4 TH Anniversary This Saturday, February 13 Refreshments ★ Storytime with Mr. Taffel in

Refreshments Storytime with Mr. Taffel in character at 10:30 AM

★ Storytime with Mr. Taffel in character at 10:30 AM ★ ★ Register for Door Prizes

Register for Door Prizes

Brett Stanciu

of “Hidden View” will be reading & signing her book, 1 PM - 3 PM

View” will be reading & signing her book, 1 PM - 3 PM www.NextChapterBooksVt.com 162 N.
View” will be reading & signing her book, 1 PM - 3 PM www.NextChapterBooksVt.com 162 N.

www.NextChapterBooksVt.com 162 N. Main Street, Barre, VT 05641 802-476-3114 info@NextChapterBooksVT.com

VALENTINE’S

GIFT

GUIDE

Sensual & Natural Valentine Gifts for Your Sweetie! Oils, Bubbles, Soaps & Candles Lovely Lingerie
Sensual & Natural
Valentine Gifts
for Your Sweetie!
Oils, Bubbles, Soaps & Candles
Lovely Lingerie Upstairs
223-7752
68 N. Main St.
Montpelier
Lingerie Upstairs 223-7752 68 N. Main St. Montpelier Valentine’s Cards The Northfield Pharmacy MON.-FRI. 9-6;
Lingerie Upstairs 223-7752 68 N. Main St. Montpelier Valentine’s Cards The Northfield Pharmacy MON.-FRI. 9-6;
Lingerie Upstairs 223-7752 68 N. Main St. Montpelier Valentine’s Cards The Northfield Pharmacy MON.-FRI. 9-6;
Lingerie Upstairs 223-7752 68 N. Main St. Montpelier Valentine’s Cards The Northfield Pharmacy MON.-FRI. 9-6;

Valentine’s

Cards The Northfield Pharmacy
Cards
The Northfield Pharmacy

MON.-FRI. 9-6; SAT. 9-2; SUN. 8-NOON

DEPOT SQUARE • NORTHFIELD

485-4771

LOVE NOVELTIES Open V♥LENTINE'S DAY MASSAGE OILS Sunday, Feb. 14 9:30am-2pm Rubber Bubbles will make
LOVE
NOVELTIES
Open V♥LENTINE'S DAY
MASSAGE
OILS
Sunday, Feb. 14
9:30am-2pm
Rubber Bubbles will make the
RISE!
New Valentine
Orb Balloons!
SOFT
PLUSH
♥FREE Delivery in local area on Feb. 14th♥
With purchases over $30.00
Stuffed Balloons make the Best Gift!
Rubber Bubbles
STUFFED
Balloon & Party Supply
BALLOONS
802-476-6011 Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-2:00
Barre-Montpelier Rd. Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-2:00 February 12 • 8AM - 8PM February 13 & 14
Barre-Montpelier Rd. Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-2:00 February 12 • 8AM - 8PM February 13 & 14
Barre-Montpelier Rd. Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-2:00 February 12 • 8AM - 8PM February 13 & 14
February 12 • 8AM - 8PM February 13 & 14 • 10AM - 7PM Central
February 12 • 8AM - 8PM
February 13 & 14 • 10AM - 7PM
Central VT area, Mad River Valley, Stowe,
Waterbury, Barre/Montpelier, Burlington
(as schedules permit—call early!)
Only $40
Includes a song or two, a rose or chocolates, and
customized card delivered by a quartet from the
“Barre-Tones” women's barbershop chorus
info@BarretonesVT.com or call 552-3489
WINE SALE! Over 900 Brands Varieties Vintages ON SALE Wine for your Valentine! 126 Main
WINE SALE!
Over 900 Brands
Varieties
Vintages
ON SALE
Wine for your Valentine!
126 Main Street, Montpelier • 802-223-2331
Mon.-Thurs. 9:00am-7:30pm • Fri.-Sat. 9:00am-9:00pm • Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
CUSTOM CAKES AND DESSERTS House-made Truffles Tiramisu Raspberry Macaroons French Macarons Tues.&Thurs. 8-4:30
CUSTOM CAKES AND DESSERTS
House-made Truffles
Tiramisu
Raspberry Macaroons
French Macarons
Tues.&Thurs. 8-4:30
Wed.& Fri. 8-5:30
Sat. 8-2pm
15 cottage street
barre•479-7948
ddbakeryVT@gmail.com
delicate-decadence.com
Relax and enjoy time with your loved one with one of our Valentines Day Specials.
Relax and enjoy time with your loved one with one of our Valentines Day Specials.
Relax and enjoy time with your loved one with one of our Valentines Day Specials.
Relax and enjoy time with your loved one with one of our Valentines Day Specials.

Relax and enjoy time with your loved one with one of our Valentines Day Specials.

•Bioelements® Customized Facial •Signature Manicure •Signature Pedicure •Wash and Blowout $125 per person
•Bioelements®
Customized Facial
•Signature Manicure
•Signature Pedicure
•Wash and Blowout
$125 per person
•Bioelements®
Customized Facial
•Signature Pedicure
$95 per person
•Bioelements®
Customized Facial
•Signature Manicure
$85 per person
•Signature Manicure
•Signature Pedicure
$70 per person
Owners:
Lowen Spooner & Nealsa Welch
168 River Street Montpelier
(above Sewing Basket)
Welch 168 River Street Montpelier (above Sewing Basket) 802 • 229 • 4691 World’s Greatest Love

8022294691

Montpelier (above Sewing Basket) 802 • 229 • 4691 World’s Greatest Love Story T he story

World’s Greatest Love Story

T he story of Valentine’s Day begins in the third century.

The oppressive Roman emperor, Claudius, ordered all

Romans to worship 12 gods, but Valentinus was

dedicated to the ideals of Christ. Not even the threat of death

could keep him from practicing his beliefs. He was arrested and imprisoned. During the last weeks of Valentinus’ life, a remarkable thing happened. Seeing that he was a man of learning, the jailer asked whether his daughter Julia might be brought to Valentinus for lessons. She had been blind since birth. Valentinus read stories of Rome’s history to her. He taught her arithmetic, and he told her about God. She saw the world through his eyes, trusted in his wisdom and found com- fort in his quiet strength. “Valentinus, does God really hear our prayers?” Julia asked one day. “Yes, my child, He hears each one,” he replied. “Do you know what I pray for every morning and every night? I pray that I might see. I want so much to see every- thing you’ve told me about.” “God does what is best for us if we will only believe in Him,” Valentinus said. “Oh, Valentinus, I do believe,” Julia said fervently. “I do!”

I do believe,” Julia said fervently. “I do!” She knelt and grasped his hand. They sat

She knelt and grasped his hand. They sat quietly together, each praying. Suddenly there was a bril- liant light in the prison cell. Radiant, Julia cried, “Valentinus, I can see! I can see!” “Praise to God,” Valentinus exclaimed. On the eve of his death, Valentinus wrote one last note to Julia, urging her to stay close to God, and he signed it “From Your Valentine.” He was execut- ed the next day, Feb. 14, 270 A.D., and buried at what is now the Church of Praxedes in Rome. It is said that Julia planted a pink-blossomed almond tree near his grave. Today, the almond tree remains a symbol of abiding love and friendship. On each Feb. 14, St. Valentine’s Day, mes- sages of affection and love are exchanged around the world.

JEWELRYJEWELRY
JEWELRYJEWELRY

Steals & Deals

UP

50%off

TO

Selected Items

Steals & Deals UP 50%off TO Selected Items Over 500 Engagement Rings G OODFELLOW S FINE
Steals & Deals UP 50%off TO Selected Items Over 500 Engagement Rings G OODFELLOW S FINE
Steals & Deals UP 50%off TO Selected Items Over 500 Engagement Rings G OODFELLOW S FINE
Over 500 Engagement Rings
Over 500
Engagement
Rings
50%off TO Selected Items Over 500 Engagement Rings G OODFELLOW S FINE JEWELERS Serving Central Vermont

G OODFELLOW S

FINE JEWELERS

Serving Central Vermont Since 1898

119 North Main Street, Barre, VT 802-476-4002 Goodfellowsvt.com

E-mail us! Classified & Display ADS Now Placing Your Classified Or Display Ad Is Even
E-mail
us!
Classified & Display
ADS
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display Ad
Is Even Easier!
Our E-mail address is
sales@vt-world
.com
Please include contact
person & payment info
( Only)
479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
S S DONUTSDONUTS BROWNIE BATTER HEART Filled with brownie-batter flavored buttercreme and topped with chocolate
S
S
DONUTSDONUTS
BROWNIE BATTER HEART
Filled with brownie-batter flavored buttercreme
and topped with chocolate icing and heart sprinkles
BROWNIE
COOKIE
BATTER
DOUGH
BERLIN
BARRE
MONTPELIER
622-0250
479-0629
223-0928
Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.
Open 24 hrs
Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.
Gift Ideas for Valentine’s Day! Combine your favorite photos with fun graphics & text to
Gift Ideas for Valentine’s Day!
Combine your favorite photos with fun graphics
& text to create beautiful gifts!
POSTERS AND
CARDS
COLLAGES
PERSONALIZED ITEMS
AND GIFT IDEAS
CANVAS AND
CALENDARS
PHOTO BOOKS
FINE ART
WE STILL
DO FILM!
86 No. Main St., Suite 1
Barre, Vermont

There’s Lots Of Love In Arnie’s Ice Cream

L ooking for something truly unique and romantic to give someone (or yourself) for Valentine’s Day? How about a tempting plunge into one of 12 tantalizing Arnie’s Ice

Cream flavors? Arnie’s Ice Cream is the creative sensation of 19-year old entrepreneur Brandon Darmstatd of Montpelier. “I started working on this project in 2013 and wow did I find it wasn’t easy to make it happen,” explains the 2015 U-32 graduate. But with the guidance and support of his parents Chip and Alisia, and even younger brothers Sam and Charlie (“they eat too much of the ice cream”), Brandon got all the permits and licenses for manufacturing and selling his own ice cream. He then rolled his custom-made cart out into the downtown Montpelier summer scene on Aug. 21 with six flavors. “Finally all the little pieces aligned perfectly and we did well and got a ton of returning customers,” reports Darmstatd, who was also working on more fabulous flavors at his manu- facturing plant on 46 Gallison Hill Rd. in Montpelier. As planned, when Darmstatd closed down the cart busi- ness after Columbus Day, he started “phase two” of his busi- ness plan and began to wholesale to local stores and restau- rants such as The Uncommon Market on Elm St., Red Hen Bakery in Middlesex, the Adamant Coop, the Plainfield Coop, Sarducci’s, and The Skinny Pancake in downtown Montpelier. Darmstatd admits he likes making and creating the different flavors of his ice cream more than selling it on the street. “When I make a delivery to a retail business and I hear someone call out ‘Hey ice cream guy!’ That’s real nice,” he said. “Food and its taste is my pas- sion and central Vermont is the perfect market for me.” The help Brandon gets from family and one part time production assistant allows him more time to be focused and creative with his products. He is also hop- ing soon to unveil lots more flavors plus ice cream sandwiches, vegan varieties of ice cream, and even a non-dairy sorbet. Some of the amazing flavors beyond vanilla and chocolate are maple, coffee, spicy maple bacon, mint chocolate chip, vanilla chocolate chip, Aztec (spicy) choco- late, coffee caramel crunch and root beer. “I’m into ice cream all year long,” jokes Brandon. You can order online at ArniesIceCream.com and pick it up at the plant on the road to U-32 before the Civic Center. It’s open Tuesday and Thursday from 3-6 p.m. and Sundays 12-4 p.m. Pints are $5 and 1/2 gallons cost $12. You can also call 802-613-3128 or email brandon@arniesicecream.com for more information. In case you are wondering who “Arnie” is, that would be Brandon’s grandfather, who was the inspiration and spirit

Brandon’s grandfather, who was the inspiration and spirit “It was the only name that everyone agreed
Brandon’s grandfather, who was the inspiration and spirit “It was the only name that everyone agreed

“It was the only name that everyone agreed was the per- fect fit,” Brandon said.

that everyone agreed was the per- fect fit,” Brandon said. When When hearts hearts collide collide
When When hearts hearts collide collide OPEN SATURDAY, FEB. 13 9:30-3:00 Reg. Hours: M-F 9:30-5
When When hearts hearts
collide collide
OPEN
SATURDAY,
FEB. 13
9:30-3:00
Reg. Hours:
M-F 9:30-5
Sat. 9:30-1
Quality Gifts For Every Occasion
124 North Main Street
Suite 1
Barre, VT 05641
(802) 476-4031
www.richardjwobbyjewelers.com
that guided this project.
that guided this project.
Cupid’s Headquarters NOW OFFERING Soup & Chili Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday • Maple Heart
Cupid’s Headquarters NOW OFFERING Soup & Chili Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday • Maple Heart

Cupid’s Headquarters

Cupid’s Headquarters NOW OFFERING Soup & Chili Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday • Maple Heart Candy
NOW OFFERING Soup & Chili Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday
NOW OFFERING
Soup & Chili
Every Friday, Saturday
& Sunday
Soup & Chili Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday • Maple Heart Candy • Burr’s Famous Maple

• Maple Heart Candy

• Burr’s Famous Maple Kettle Corn

• Local Chocolates & Goodies

• Real Maple Creemees

• Gift Certificates

• Books, Cookbooks, Etc.

• Jams, Jellies, Nuts, Specialty Crackers & Cookies •Prime Grass-fed Beef •Frozen Ice Cream Pies •Warm Hats, Mitten & Apparel

•Frozen Ice Cream Pies •Warm Hats, Mitten & Apparel 802.223.2740 www.morsefarm.com 1168 County Road Montpelier

802.223.2740 www.morsefarm.com 1168 County Road Montpelier

Now Open 9AM to 5PM
Now Open
9AM to 5PM

just 2.7 miles up Montpelier’s Main St. from the roundabout

One Heart, One Community Valentine’s day Week FOOD & WINE PAIRING at Barre Elk’s Club
One Heart,
One Community
Valentine’s day Week
FOOD & WINE PAIRING
at Barre Elk’s Club
February 13, 6:30pm
Jazzyaoke
Dessert & Wine Pairing
at Espresso Bueno
at Simply Delicious
February 13, 7:30pm
February 6, 6 – 8pm
Vermont’s Funniest
ROMANTIC GIFT BASKET
GIVEAWAY
Shop
~ Dine
Bake Sale
Comedian
February 6 – 13
With your purchase at
participating businesses enter to
win a gift basket full of local
goodies
Discovery
by Richard J Wobby Jewelers
February 13, 10am – 2pm
to support the Barre Town Fire
Dept. Auxiliary
at the Barre Opera House
February 13, 8pm
The Flying Stage
Sledding Party
Taj Mahal Trio
at the Barre Opera House
Friday, February 12, 7:30pm
at Elmwood Cemetery
Hot chocolate provided by A
New Twist Boutique
February 13, 10am – 12pm
at ReSOURCE
February 14, 4 – 7pm
Dana & Susan Robinson,
Dupont Bros., and
Dwight & Nicole
Barre City and So Barre
Firefighter Open Houses
February 13, 10am – 12pm
Fireworks
by Northstar Fireworks
from Vermont History Center
February 13, 6:15pm
Fireworks from Vermont History Center February 13, 6:15pm design and printing by February 10, 2016 The
Fireworks from Vermont History Center February 13, 6:15pm design and printing by February 10, 2016 The

design and printing by

Fireworks from Vermont History Center February 13, 6:15pm design and printing by February 10, 2016 The
Fireworks from Vermont History Center February 13, 6:15pm design and printing by February 10, 2016 The

Central Vermont ‘Empty Bowl Benefit Raises Funds for Vermont Foodbank

H omemade soup served in handcrafted bowls by local potters will be the highlight at the third annual central Vermont Empty Bowl

Benefit, a fundraiser for the Vermont Foodbank, on Saturday, February 13 from 4:30- 7 p.m. at The Mud Studio in Middlesex. The price of admission includes selection of a ceramic bowl to take home and two choices of soup to either eat at the studio or carry out. The Empty Bowl fundraiser held the last two years has been generously supported by the central Vermont community, with over 200 people attending the event in 2015. More than $10,000 has been raised since the event’s beginnings, which translates into 30,000 meals for the 153,000 individuals who are served annually by the Vermont Foodbank. “Potters from all over the region have created an eclectic selection of beautiful bowls for this event. I think of the bowls as a concrete reminder that there are many Vermonters whose bowls are, in reality, empty every day,” said Mike Sullivan, owner

of The Mud Studio. The studio, which is organizing and sponsoring the event, offers classes for all ages and provides gallery space for the work of local artists and craftspeople. The Vermont Foodbank, the state’s largest hunger-relief organi- zation, distributed 10 million pounds of food through its network of food shelves, meal sites, shelters, senior centers and youth programs. “Many of our neighbors who are seeking food assistance have jobs, raise families, work toward educa- tion and struggle with health prob- lems, like all of us,” said Foodbank Executive Director, John Sayles. “Too often our clients also have to make the difficult trade-offs to get enough food for their families.” The minimum adult donation is $25, which includes a bowl, soup and accompaniments. Tickets for children ages 5-15 are $5 for a meal only, and children under 5 are free for a meal only. All proceeds will go to the Vermont Foodbank. Tickets may be purchased at the door or online at https://give.vtfoodbank.org/EmptyBowl.

online at https://give.vtfoodbank.org/EmptyBowl. • • • Local Solar Company Puts Employees to Work Volunteering at
online at https://give.vtfoodbank.org/EmptyBowl. • • • Local Solar Company Puts Employees to Work Volunteering at

Local Solar Company Puts Employees to Work Volunteering at Vermont Foodbank

Catamount Solar, a Randolph-based solar design and installation company will send six members from its office and installation teams to volunteer packing boxes at the Vermont Foodbank in Barre on Wednesday, the second such group in less than two weeks. While Catamount Solar aspires to work year-round completing solar power installations, mid-winter is typically a slow period in its busi- ness. Rather than idle its employees, Catamount Solar has been send- ing employee groups to volunteer at the Vermont Foodbank. “We couldn’t provide food for 153,000 Vermonters each year with-

out the support of volunteers,” said John Sayles, Vermont Foodbank CEO. “And thanks to Catamount Solar, we are getting new support from a group of enthusiastic volunteer at a time when we need them most.” “We know the Foodbank commonly sees a drop in willing volun- teers after the holidays,” said Kevin McCollister, founder of Catamount Solar. “We see our collaboration with the Vermont Foodbank as a win- win.”

collaboration with the Vermont Foodbank as a win- win.” Transform Your Core 81 River Street, Suite
Transform Your Core 81 River Street, Suite 201 Montpelier, VT 05602 phone (802) 262-1500 fax
Transform Your Core
81 River Street, Suite 201
Montpelier, VT 05602
phone (802) 262-1500
fax (802) 262-1505
www.essentialptp.com
Toll Free 866-410-3541 www.midstatedodge.com
Toll Free 866-410-3541 www.midstatedodge.com
US Route 302
US Route 302

Barre-Montpelier Rd. Toll Free:

1-866-410-3541

MONTPELIER PHARMACY 69 Main St., Montpelier • 802-223-4633 Locally owned and proud of our independence

MONTPELIER

PHARMACY

69 Main St., Montpelier • 802-223-4633

Locally owned and proud of our independence

WATERBURY

PHARMACY

149 So. Main St., Waterbury • 802-244-7701

802-223-4633 Locally owned and proud of our independence WATERBURY PHARMACY 149 So. Main St., Waterbury •
Serving up sweets in Central Vermont for over 200 years - Vermont’s premier maple attraction
Serving up sweets in
Central Vermont for over
200 years - Vermont’s
premier maple attraction

OPEN DAILY YEAR-ROUND

“The Capital City’s Beautiful Backyard”

Just 2.7 miles up Montpelier’s Main Street www.morsefarm.com

802/223-2740

up Montpelier’s Main Street www.morsefarm.com 802/223-2740 EMPTY BOWL BENEFIT FILL A BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY A
up Montpelier’s Main Street www.morsefarm.com 802/223-2740 EMPTY BOWL BENEFIT FILL A BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY A
up Montpelier’s Main Street www.morsefarm.com 802/223-2740 EMPTY BOWL BENEFIT FILL A BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY A

EMPTY BOWL BENEFIT

FILL A BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY

A BENEFIT FOR THE VERMONT FOODBANK

BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY A BENEFIT FOR THE VERMONT FOODBANK Saturday, February 13, 2016 • 4:30
BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY A BENEFIT FOR THE VERMONT FOODBANK Saturday, February 13, 2016 • 4:30
BOWL, FEED OUR COMMUNITY A BENEFIT FOR THE VERMONT FOODBANK Saturday, February 13, 2016 • 4:30

Saturday, February 13, 2016 • 4:30 ± 7:00 PM at The Mud Studio, 961 Route 2, Middlesex

Pick out a handcrafted bowl of your choice and then enjoy a hearty supper of home-made soup, bread, cheese & more. Dine in or take out.

$25 minimum donation per adult. Children 5 - 12 $5, under 5 free (meal only)

Tickets at the door or skip the line and buy ahead online at https://gie.vtfoodbank.org/emptybowl

and buy ahead online at https://gie.vtfoodbank.org/emptybowl Special Thanks to: Capitol Copy MiddleGround Florist Red Hen

Special Thanks to:

Capitol Copy

MiddleGround Florist

Red Hen Bakery

Cold Hollow Cider Mill

Dog River Farm

Hunger Mountain Coop

Pete’s Greens

Misty Knoll Farms

North Branch Cafe

The World

Sarducci’s

Willow Moon Farm

Affordable Hair Styling for Men and Children

Affordable Hair Styling for Men and Children at The Master’s Edge 223-7361 100 State St., Montpelier

at The Master’s Edge

223-7361

100 State St., Montpelier

Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. starting at 7AM

(Closed Wednesdays)

802-223-5757 1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14 (follow signs) Desiree Treon
802-223-5757
1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village
on Rt. 14 (follow signs)
Desiree
Treon
Mears
78 Barre St., Montpelier
Mon.-Fri. 9am-7pm, Sat. 9am-2pm
Walk-Ins Welcome
Appointments Suggested
802-229-0366
83 Washington St., Barre 479-3366 119 River St., Montpelier 223-7735 www.nwjinsurance.com

83 Washington St., Barre

479-3366

119 River St., Montpelier

223-7735

www.nwjinsurance.com

PERRY'S OIL SERVICE

Call 1-800-654-3344

For Price & Delivery Date

Minimum 100 gal. delivery CALL FOR CURRENT PRICE
Minimum 100 gal. delivery
CALL
FOR
CURRENT
PRICE
A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD | FEBRUARY 2016 SENIOR LIVING
A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD
|
FEBRUARY 2016
SENIOR
LIVING

© FOTOLIA

Cut the costs of your prescriptions

T he costs of filling prescriptions is simply

too big to bear for many people, even now

that the Affordable Care Act has greatly

reduced the amount of people who are

uninsured. A survey from the

Commonwealth Fund found that 35 million people in America failed to fill a prescription in 2014 because of the cost of the medication. That figure represents an improvement from 2010, when 48 million people did not fill their prescriptions due to the costs of those medications, but it still serves to highlight a need many people have to cut the costs of their medicine. Though people who cannot afford to fill their pre- scriptions often feel helpless, there are a handful of

ways they can cut the costs of their medications and start feeling better.

• Discuss changes with your physician. Perhaps the

simplest way to cut prescription costs is to discuss

medication options with your physician. Brand-name drugs are typically more expensive than generic alter- natives, so speak with your physician about generic drugs or less costly brand-name drugs that may treat your condition as well as expensive brand-name drugs do.

• Consider Patient Assistance Programs. Sometimes

referred to as “Pharmaceutical Assistance Programs,” Patient Assistance Programs, or PAPs, can greatly reduce the burden of prescription drug costs. Sponsored by pharmaceutical companies, PAPs distribute billions of dollars to patients who otherwise could not afford their medications. Eligibility criteria varies depending

their medications. Eligibility criteria varies depending on the program, but men and women struggling to pay

on the program, but men and women struggling to pay for their prescriptions can speak with their physi- cians about PAPs. • Consult your member organizations. If you are a member of the AAA automotive group or the American Association of Retired Persons, you might be eligible for medication discount cards free of charge. These cards provide discounts on your medications, but some come with expensive fees upfront. Look for no-

fee cards, such as those offered to AAA and AARP members or others offered by nonprofit organizations, before considering options offered by pharmaceutical companies or other for-profit businesses. • Contact charitable organizations. Some charitable organizations, such as the National Organization for Rare Disorders and maybe even some local nonprofits, offer prescription assistance to people in need. Visit NORD online at www.rarediseases.org.

SENIOR LIVING | FINANCES

Boost Your Income

T here are many aspects of retirement to look forward to: the travel, the free time and fewer responsibilities, to name a few. But generally speaking, there is also less money coming in.

That leaves many seniors to carefully plan their spending to avoid falling short on the monthly amount they need for groceries, medication and entertainment. If savings, pensions and Social Security aren’t enough for you to live comfortably, you have many options to set yourself up for a brighter financial future. One idea is to consider delaying your retirement until you stow away a nice nest egg or put more into your high-growth savings plan. Check with your local Social Security office to see what your payment struc- ture will look like if you wait a few years to draw it. Below are some other tips for boosting your income during your golden years.

GO BACK TO WORK PART-TIME

If you’re like many newly retired Americans, it may feel strange waking up with no employment responsibilities. Once you settle into a routine of relaxation, you might still feel the pull to become involved with something that keeps you busy throughout the day. Part-time employment can help you offset extra expenses and give you the satisfaction of contributing to the work- force. You may find that orga-

of contributing to the work- force. You may find that orga- nizations are looking for someone

nizations are looking for someone just like you, espe- cially if you’re looking to apply your background and career expertise to help them achieve their goals. Check in with your local career advisory firm to see what is available in your area. Be ready to describe what your ideal role looks like and

how many hours per week you would like to work.

HOME EQUITY

If you own your home, you may be sitting on an excellent source of extra income. A home equity loan, line of credit or a reverse mortgage are all options to consider that can give you a lump sum of money

with a fixed repayment sched- ule, depending on the option you choose. These types of financial tools are there to help you free up extra money for your savings or home improvement projects. Before signing the dotted line on any of the above options, check in with Federal Trade Commission or meet

© FOTOLIA

with a government-approved organization to make sure you’re entering a legitimate agreement. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development approves the official booklet, titled “Use Your Home to Stay at Home.” The guide can navigate you through all the options.

BINGO DIRECTORY

Montpelier Lodge of Elks #924

BINGO Tuesday Nights
BINGO
Tuesday Nights

Doors open at 4:00 pm

223-2600 Ext #27

Montpelier Elks Country Club

GOLF

One Of The Finest Nine-Hole Courses In Vermont ~PUBLIC COURSE~

223-7457

203 Country Club Rd, Montpelier

Italian American Heritage � � WEDNESDAY Early Birds 6PM REGULAR BINGO 7PM ~Refreshments~ � �
Italian American Heritage
WEDNESDAY
Early Birds 6PM
REGULAR
BINGO 7PM
~Refreshments~
MUTUO
CLUB