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Solutions to Questions - Chapter 4

Fixed Rate Mortgage Loans


Question 4-1
What are the major differences between the CAM, and CPM loans? What are the advantages to borrowers and risks to
lenders for each? What elements do each of the loans have in common?
CAM - Constant Amortization Mortgage - Payments on constant amortization mortgages are determined first by computing
a constant amount of each monthly payment to be applied to principal. Interest is then computed on the monthly loan
balance and added to the monthly amount of amortization to determine the total monthly payment.
CPM - Constant Payment Mortgage - This payment pattern simply means that a level, or constant, monthly payment is
calculated on an original loan amount at a fixed rate of interest for a given term.
CAM - lenders recognized that in a growing economy, borrowers could partially repay the loan over time, as opposed to
reducing the loan balance in fixed monthly amounts.
CPM - At the end of the term of the mortgage loan, the original loan amount or principal is completely repaid and the
lender has earned a fixed rate of interest on the monthly loan balance. However the amount of amortization varies each
month.
When both loans are originated at the same rate of interest, the yield to the lender will be the same regardless of when the
loans are repaid (ie, early or at maturity).
Question 4-2
Define amortization.
Amortization is the process of loan repayment over time.
Question 4-3
Why do the monthly payments in the beginning months of a CPM loan contain a higher proportion of interest than
principal repayment?
The reason for such a high interest component in each monthly payment is that the lender earns an annual percentage
return on the outstanding monthly loan balance. Because the loan is being repaid over a long period of time, the loan
balance is reduced only very slightly at first and monthly interest charges are correspondingly high.
Question 4-4
What are loan closing costs? How can they be categorized? Which of the categories influence borrowing costs and why?
Closing costs are incurred in many types of real estate financing, including residential property, income property,
construction, and land development loans.
Categories include: statutory costs, third party charges, and additional finance charges.
Closing costs that do affect the cost of borrowing are additional finance charges levied by the lender. These charges
constitute additional income to the lender and as a result must be included as a part of the cost of borrowing. Lenders refer
to these additional charges as loan fees.
Question 4-5
Does repaying a loan early ever affect the actual or true interest cost to the borrower?
When loan fees are charged and the loan is paid off before maturity, the effective interest cost of the loan increases even
further than when the loan is repaid at maturity.
Question 4-6
Why do lenders charge origination fees, especially loan discount fees?
Lenders usually charge these costs to borrowers when the loan is made, or closed, rather than charging higher interest
rates. They do this because if the loan is repaid soon after closing, the additional interest earned by the lender as of the
repayment date may not be enough to offset the fixed costs of loan origination.
Question 4-7
What is the connection between the Truth-in-Lending Act and the annual percentage rate (APR)?
Truth-in-Lending Act - the lender must disclose to the borrower the annual percentage rate being charged on the loan.
The APR reflects origination fees and discount points and treats them as additional income or yield to the lender
regardless of what costs the fees are intended to cover.

4-1

Question 4-8
Does the annual percentage rate always equal the effective borrowing cost?
The annual percentage rate under truth-in-lending requirements never takes into account early repayment of loans. The
APR calculation takes into account origination fees, but always assumes the loan is paid off at maturity.
Question 4-9
What is meant by a real rate of interest?
A real rate of interest is an interest rate expressed in terms of real goods and is equal to the nominal rate less the expected
rate of inflation.
Question 4-10
What is a risk premium in the context of mortgage lending?
A reason for loan discount fees is that lenders believe that they can better price the loan to the risk they take. The risk for
some individual borrowers is slightly higher than others and these loans may require more time and expense to process and
control.
Question 4-11
When mortgage lenders establish interest rates through competition, an expected inflation premium is said to be part of the
interest rate. What does this mean?
The uncertainty of future economic factors, including the supply of savings, demand for housing and future levels of
inflation, directly affects interest rates. However, interest rates at a given point in time can only reflect the market
consensus of what these factors are expected to be. To be competitive, a lender can only charge an interest rate that reflects
what the market expects inflation to be even if he expects inflation to more.
Question 4-12
Why do monthly mortgage payments increase so sharply during periods of inflation? What does the tilt effect have to do
with
this?
In order to receive the full interest necessary to leave enough for a real return and risk premium over the life of the loan,
more
real dollars must be collected in the early years of the loan (payments collected toward the end of the life of the mortgage
will be worth much less in purchasing power)
Tilting the real payment stream in the early years have to make up for the loss in purchasing power in later years.
Question 4-13
As inflation increases, the impact of the tilt effect is said to become even more burdensome on borrowers. Why is this so?
With the general rate of inflation and growth in the economy, borrower incomes will grow gradually or on a year-by-year
basis. However, as expected inflation increases, lenders must build estimates of the full increase into current interest rates
up front or when the loan is made. This causes a dramatic increase in required real monthly payments relative to the
borrowers current real income.
Question 4-14
A mortgage loan is made to Mr. Jones for $30,000 at 10 percent interest for 20 years. If Mr. Jones has a choice between a
CPM and a CAM, which one would result in his paying a greater amount of total interest over the life of the mortgage?
Would one of these mortgages be likely to have a higher interest rate than the other? Explain your answer. A CPM loan
reduces the principal balance more slowly, as a result, if Mr. Jones chooses a CPM, he will pay a greater amount of interest
over the life of the loan. A CPM may have a lower interest rate. The initial monthly payments for a CPM are considerably
less than those of a CAM, and borrowers are more apt to repay the loan. If an economy were experiencing real economic
growth with relatively stable prices, increases in income and property values would reduce borrower default risk associated
with a CPM loan. Additionally, lenders receive a greater portion of their return (interest earned) early with a CPM. By
decreasing default risk and the effects of default, a CPM may have lower rate of interest than a CAM.
Question 4-15
What is negative amortization? Why does it occur with a GPM? What happens to the mortgage balance of a GPM over
time?
No amortization of principal occurs until payments increase in later periods. The loan balance increases during the first few
years after origination, because the initial GPM payments are lower than the monthly interest requirements at a given rate.
Once the loan payments are more than the monthly interest payments, the balance begins to decline until it reaches zero at
maturity.

4-2

Solutions to Problems - Chapter 4


Fixed Rate Mortgage Loans

Problem 4-1
A borrower makes a fully amortizing CPM mortgage loan.
Principal
=
Interest
=
Term
=

$125,000
11.00%
20 years

CPM Payment:
The monthly payment for a CPM is found using the following formula:
Monthly payment
MLC, 11%, 20 yrs
Payment

=
=
=
=

Principal x (MLC, 11%, 20 years)


.0103219 (from appendix B)
$125,000 x .0103219
$1,290.24

Calculator solution: PV = -$125,000; i = 11/12%; n = 20x12; FV=0; solve for PMT.


PMT = $1,290.24 (slight difference due to rounding.)
CAM Payments:
Principal
=
Term
=
Monthly amortization
Monthly amortization
Monthly amortization

=
=
=

$125,000
20 years
Principal divided by term of loan in months
$125,000 / (240 months)
$520.83 (Rounded)

Set up the following table similar to Exhibit 4-4 to solve for the initial 6 monthly payments.
(1)
Month
1
2
3
4
5
6

(2)
Opening Balance
$125,000.00
$124,497.17
$123,958.33
$123,437.50
$122,916.67
$122,395.83

Problem 4-2
(a) Monthly payment = $671.36
Solution:
N
=
I
=
PV
=
FV
=

(3)
Interest (11%/12)
$1,145.83
$1,141.06
$1,136.28
$1,131.51
$1,126.74
$1,121.96

(4)
Amortization
$520.83
$520.83
$520.83
$520.83
$520.83
$520.83

25x12 or 300
9%/12 or .75
$80,000
0

Solve for payment:


PMT
=
-$671.36
(b) Month 1:
interest payment:
$80,000 x (9%/12) = $600
principal payment:
$671.36 - $600
= $71.36

4-3

(3) + (4)
Monthly Payment
$1,666.67
$1,661.89
$1,657.12
$1,652.34
$1,647.57
$1,642.80

(2) -(4)
Ending Balance
$124,479.17
$123,958.33
$123,437.50
$122,916.67
$122,395.83
$121,875.00

(c) Entire Period:


total payment:
$671.36 x 300
= $201,408
total principal payment: $80,000
total interest payments:
$201,408 - $80,000 = $121,408
(d) Outstanding loan balance if repaid at end of ten years = $66,191.67
Solution:
N
=
25x12 or 300
I
=
9%/12 or 0.75
PMT
=
$671.36
FV
=
0
Solve for loan balance:
PV
=
$66,191.67
(e) Trough ten years:
total payments:
$671.36 x 120
= $80,563.20
total principal payment (principal reduction):
$80,000-66,191.67*= $13,808.33
*PV of loan at the end of year 10
total interest payment:
$80,563.20-13,808.33= $66,191.67
(f) Step 1, Solve for loan balance at the end of month 49:
N
=
300/49 or 251
I
=
9%/12 or 0.75
PMT
=
$671.36
FV
=
0
Solve for loan balance:
PV
=
-$75,793.68
Step 2, Solve for the interest payment at month 50:
interest payment:
$75,793.68x(.09/12)= $568.45
principal payment:
$671.36 - $586.45 = $102.91

4-4

Problem 4-3
(a) Monthly payment = $733.76
Solution:
N
=
I
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve for payment:
PMT
=

30x12 or 360
8%/12 or 0.67
-$100,000
0
$733.76

(b) Quarterly Payment = $2,2024.81


Solution:
N
=
30x4 or 120
I
=
8%/4 or 2
PV
=
-$100,000
FV
=
0
Solve for payment:
PMT
=
$2,2024.81
(c) Annual Payment = $8,882.74
Solution:
N
=
I
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve for payment:
PMT
=
(d) Weekly Payment = $169.23
Solution:
N
=
I
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve for payment:
PMT
=

30
8%
-$100,000
0
$8,882.74
52x30 or 1,560
8%/52 or 0.019
-$100,000
0
$169.23

Problem 4-4
Monthly:
total principal payment:
total interest payment:
($733.76 x 360) - $100,000 =
Quarterly:
total principal payment:
total interest payment:
($2,204.81 x 120)-$100,000=
Annually:
total principal payment:
total interest payment:
($8,882.74 x 30) - $100,000=
Weekly:
total principal payment:
total interest payment:
($169.23 x 1560)-$100,000 =

$100,000
$164,153.60
$100,000
$164,577.20
$100,000
$166,482.20
$100,000
$163,998.80

The greatest amount of interest payable is with the Annual Payment Plan because you are making payments less frequently.
Therefore, reducing you balance less frequently and paying interest on a greater amount each year.

4-5

Problem 4-5
(a) Monthly Payment:
Solution:
N
=
I
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve for payment:
PMT
=

20x12 or 240
8%/12 or 0.67
-$100,000
0
$836.44

(b) Entire Period:


total payment:
$836.44 x240 =
$200,745.60
total principal payment: $100,000
total interest payment:
$200,745.60 - 100,000 =$100,745.60
(c) Outstanding loan balance if repaid at end of year eight = $77,272.67
Solution:
N
=
12x12 or 144
I
=
8%/12 or 0.67
PMT
=
-$836.44
FV
=
0
Solve for mortgage balance:
PV
=
$77,272.67
Total interest collected:
total payment + mortgage balance - principal
$836.44 x (8x12) +
77,272.67
- 100,000
total interest collected = $57,570.91
(d) Step 1, Solve for the loan balance at the end of year 5:
N
=
15x12 or 180
I
=
8%/12
or 0.67
PMT
=
-$836.44
FV
=
0
Solve for loan balance:
PV
=
$87,525.58
After reducing the loan by $5,000, the balance is:
$87,525.58 - 5,000 = $82,525.58
4- The new loan maturity will be 161 months after the loan is reduced at the end of year 5.
Solution:
I
=
8%/12 or 0.67
PMT
=
-$836.44
PV
=
$82,525.58
FV
=
0
Solve for maturity:
N
=
161.37

4-6

5- The new payment would be $788.66


Solution:
I
=
8%/12 or 0.67
N
=
15x12 or180
PV
=
$82,525.58
FV
=
0
Solve for payment:
PMT
=
-$788.86
Problem 4-6
(a) Monthly payment reduction due to principal reduction.
Initial principal
=
Interest rate
=
Initial term
=
Initial monthly payment
Initial monthly payment

=
=

$75,000
10.00%
30 years
Principal x (MLC, 10%, 30 years)
$658.18

Mortgage loan balance after 10 years = PV of 340 payments of $658.18 discounted @10%
Mortgage loan balance after 10 years = $68,203.51
Reducing the mortgage balance by $10,000 leaves a principal balance of $58,203.51. The new payment would be based on 10%
interest and a 20 year term.
New monthly payment = New principal x (MLC, 10%, 30 years)
New monthly payment = $561.68
(b) Maturity shortening due to principal reduction.
Initial monthly payment = Principal x (MLC, 10%, 30 years)
Initial monthly payment = $658.18
The new maturity is the time necessary for the original monthly payments of $658.18 to fully amortize the remaining principal
balance of $58,203.51.
From a financial calculator, using PV of $58,203.51, an interest rate of 10%, and payments of $658.18, we get a new maturity of 161
months or 13 years and 5 months.
This can be checked by noting that $58,203.51 divided by 4658.18 equals 88.43118. This number corresponds to the MPVIFA at
10% interest with a maturity of 161 months.

4-7

Alternative Solution
Step 1, Solve for the original monthly payment:
I
=
10%/12 or 0.83
N
=
30x12 or 360
PV
=
-$75,000
FV
=
0
Solve for payment:
PMT
=
$658.18
Step 2, Solve for current balance:
I
=
10%/12 or 0.83
N
=
20x12 or 240
PV
=
-$75,000
PMT
=
$658.18
Solve for mortgage balance:
FV
=
$68,203.24
(a) New Monthly Payment = $561.67
Solution:
I
=
10%/12 or 0.83
N
=
12x20 or 240
PV
=
$58,203.24*
FV
=
0
Solve for payment:
PMT
=
-$561.67
(b) New Loan Maturity = 161 months
Solution:
I
=
10%/12 or 0.83
PMT
=
-$658.18
PV
=
$58,203.24*
FV
=
0
Solve for maturity:
N
=
161
*$68,203.24 - 10,000
Problem 4-7
The loan will be repaid in 158 months.
Solution:
I
=
7.5%/12 or 0.625
PMT
=
$1,000
PV
=
$100,000
FV
=
0
Solve for maturity:
N
=
157.4226
Problem 4-8
The interest rate on the loan is 12.96%.
Solution:
N
=
25x12 or 300
PMT
=
-$900
PV
=
$80,000
FV
=
0
Solve for the annual interest rate:
I
=
1.08 (x12) or 12.96%

4-8

Problem 4-9
(a) Monthly Payments = $656.70
Solution:
N
=
10x12 or 120
I
=
9%/12 or 0.75
PV
=
-$60,000
FV
=
$20,000
Solve for monthly payment:
PMT
=
$656.70
(b) Loan balance at the end of year five = $44,409.83
Solution:
N
=
5x12 or 60
I
=
9%/12 or 0.75
PMT
=
$656.70
FV
=
$20,000
Solve for the loan balance:
PV
=
-$44,409.83
Problem 4-10
(a) Monthly Payments = $800
Solution:
N
=
10x12 or 120
I
=
12%/12 or 1
PV
=
-$80,000
FV
=
$80,000
Solve for monthly payments:
PMT
=
$800
(b) Loan balance = $80,000
Solution:
N
=
12x5 or 60
I
=
12%/12 or 1
PV
=
-$80,000
PMT
=
$800
Solve for loan balance:
FV
=
$80,000
You also know the loan balance will be the same as initial loan amount because this is an interest only loan where there is no loan
amortization or reduction of principal.
(c) Yield to the lender =12%
Solution:
N
=
PMT
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve or the annual yield:
I
=
(d) Yield to the lender =12%
Solution:
N
=
PMT
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve or the annual yield:
I
=

12x5 or 60
$800
-$80,000
$80,000
1 (x12) or 12
12x10 or 120
$800
-$80,000
$80,000
1 (x12) or 12%

4-9

Problem 4-11
Monthly Payments = $982.63
Solution:
N
=
10x12 or 120
I
=
8%/12 or 0.67
PV
=
$90,000
FV
=
-$20,000
Solve for monthly payments:
PMT
=
$982.63
Yield to the lender =8.41%
Solution:
N
=
PMT
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve or the annual yield:
I
=

12x10 or 120
$982.63
-$88,200*
$20,000
.7011 x 12 or 8.413%

*-$90,000 x (100-2)% = -$88,200


Step 1, Solve the loan balance if repaid in four years:
Solution:
N
=
6x12 or 72
I
=
8%/12 or 0.67
FV
=
$20,000
PMT
=
$982.63
Solve for the loan balance:
PV
=
-$68,439.23
Step 2, Solve for the yield:
Solution:
N
=
12x4 or 48
PMT
=
$982.63
PV
=
-$88,200*
FV
=
$68,439.23
Solve or the annual yield:
I
=
.722 (x12) or 8.66%
*-$90,000 x (100-2)% = -$88,200

4-10

Problem 4-12
(a) At the end of year ten $94,622.86 will be due:
Solution:
N
=
12x10 or 120
I
=
8%/12 or 0.67
PV
=
-$50,000
PMT
=
0
Solve for loan balance:
FV
=
$94,622.86
(b) Step 1, Solve for loan balance at end of year eight
Solution:
N
=
8x12 or 96
I
=
8%/12 or 0.67
PV
=
-$50,000
PMT
=
0
Solve for loan balance:
FV
=
$94,622.86
Step 2, Solve for the yield:
Solution:
N
=
PMT
=
PV
=
FV
=
Solve or the annual yield:
I
=

8x12 or 96
0
-$50,000
$94,622.86
.67 (x12) or 8%

Note: because there were no points, the yield must be the same as the initial interest rate of 8% so no calculations were
really necessary.
(c) Yield to lender with one point charged = 8.13%
Solution:
N
=
8x12 or 96
PMT
=
0
PV
=
-$49,500*
FV
=
$94,622.86
Solve or the annual yield:
I
=
.68 (x12) or 8.13%
*-$50,000 x (100-1)% = -$49,500

4-11

Problem 4-13
(a)
Property value
=
Principal
=
Interest rate
=
Maturity
=
Loan origination fee =

$105,000
$84,000
12.00%
30 years
$3,500

Lender will disburse $84,000.00 less the loan origination fee of $3,500.00 or $80,500.00
(b) Monthly payments would be:
$84,000 x (MLC, 12%, 30 years)

$864.03

$80,500

The effective interest cost would be:


$864.03 x (MPVIFA, ?%, 30 years)
Solving for the interest rate, we get 12.58%
(c) The annual percentage rate (APR) is the same as the interest rate in part (b) rounded to the nearest .125%. Therefore, the APR is
12.625%.
Note to Instructors: APRs are rounded to the nearest 1/8 of a percent.
(d) Assuming the loan payoff occurs after 5 years, determine the mortgage balance:
Mortgage balance = PV of 300 monthly payments of $864.03 discounted at 12.00%
Mortgage balance = $82,037.10
The effective interest cost would be:
$864.03 x (MPVIFA, ?%, 5 years) + $82,037.10 x (MPVIF, ?%, 5 years) = $80,500
Solving for the interest rate, we get 13.15%.
The effective interest rate in this part is different from the APR because the loan origination fee is amortized over a much shorter
period (5 years instead of 30 years).
(e) With a prepayment penalty of 2% on the outstanding loan balance of $82,037.10, the penalty would be $1,640.72.
The effective interest cost would be:
$864.03 x (MPVIFA, ?%, 5 years) + $83,677.85 x (MPVIF, ?%, 5 years) = $80,500
Solving for the interest rate, we get 13.44%.
This rate is different from the APR because penalty points are not used in the calculation of the APR.

4-12

Problem 4-14
Points required to achieve a yield to 10% for the 25 year loan.
Monthly payments:
$95,000 x (MLC, 9%, 25 years)
$95,000 x (MLC, 9%, 25 years)

=
=

Monthly payment
$797.24

PV of 300 payments of $797.24 discounted at 10% = $87,773.67


Subtracting $87,773.67 from $95,000.00, we get $7,226.33
The loan origination fee should be $7,226.33 if the loan is to be repaid after 25 years and the lender requires a 10% yield.
If the loan is expected to be repaid after 10 years, the loan balance at the end of 10 years must be determined:
Loan balance after 10 years = Present value of 180 payments of $797.24 discounted at 9%.
Loan balance after 10 years = 78,602.27
Discounting by the desired yield of 10%:
Present value = $797.24 (MPVIFA, 10%, 10 years) + $78,602.27 (MPVIF, 10%, 10 years)
Present value = 89,364.04
Subtracting $89,364.04 from $95,000.00, we get $5,635.96.
The loan origination fee should be $5,635.96 if the loan is to be repaid after 10 years, and the lender requires a yield of 10%.
Problem 4-15
(a) In order to find which loan is the better choice after 15 years, the effective interest rate of each loan must be calculated.
Principal
Nominal interest rate
Term (years)
Points
Payment
Loan Balance after 15 years
Loan Balance after 5 years

Loan A
$75,000
10.00%
30
6
$658.18
$61,248.42
$72,430.74

Loan B
$75,000
11.00%
30
2
$714.24
$62,840.44
$72,873.48

Loan A
$70,500.00 = $658.18 x (MPVIFA, ?%, 180 months) + $61,248.42 x (MPVIFA, ?%, 180 months)
Effective interest rate = 10.85%
Loan B
$73,500.00 = $714.24 x (MPVIFA,?%, 180 months) + $62,840.44 x (MPVIF, ?%, 180 months)
Effective interest rate = 11.29%
Loan A is the better alternative if the loan is repaid after 15 years.
(b) This part is solved the same as (a) except using the assumption that the loan is repaid after 5 years.
Loan A
$70,500.00 = $658.18 x (MPVIFA, ?%, 60 months) + $72,430.74 x (MPVIF, ?%, 60 months)
Effective interest rate = 11.61%

4-13

Loan B
$73,500.00 = $714.24 x (MPVIFA, ?%, 60 months) + $72,873.48 x (MPVIF, ?%, 60 months)
Effective interest rate = 11.53%
Loan B is the better alternative if the loan is repaid after 5 years.
Problem 4-16
(a) Monthly Payments = $1,382.50
Solution:
N
=
10x12 or 120
I
=
11%/12 or 0.92
PV
=
0
FV
=
-$300,000
Solve for monthly payments:
PMT
=
$1,382.50
(b) The borrower will have monthly payments of $1,382.50 during months 1 to 36
Solve for loan balance at the end of month 36
Solution:
N
=
36
I
=
11%/12 or 0.92
PV
=
0
PMT
=
$1,382.50
Solve for loan balance:
FV
=
-$58,649.97

(c) The borrower will have monthly payments of $626.22 during months 51 to 120
Step 1, Solve for loan balance at the end of month 50
Solution:
N
=
50
I
=
11%/12 or 0.92
PV
=
0
PMT
=
$2,000
Solve for loan balance:
FV
=
-$126,139.10
Step 2, Solve for payments during months 51 to 120
Solution:
N
=
120-50 or 70
I
=
11%/12 or 0.92
PV
=
$126,139.10
FV
=
-$300,000
Solve for monthly payments:
PMT
=
$626.22
Problem 4-17
Find the balance at the end of 5 years for a fully amortizing $200,000, 10% mortgage with a 25 year amortization schedule:
PV
i
n

= -200,000
= 10%
= 300

FV
Solve PMT

=0
= $1,817.40

4-14

Solve for balance at end of 5 years:


i
n

= 10%
=240

PMT
FV
Solve PV

= $1,817.40
=0
= -188,327.38

Problem 4-18 Comprehensive Review Problem


Loan = 100,000, 12% interest, 20 years
A.
Monthly payments if
(1) Fully amortizing:
PV = -100,000
i = 12%
FV = 0

B.

C.

n
Solve PMTs

= 240
= $1,101.09

(2) Partial amortizing:


PV = -100,000
i = 12%
FV = $50,000

n
Solve PMTs

= 240
= $1,050.54

(3) Interest only


PV = 100,000
i = 12%
FV = 100,000

n
Solve PMTs

= 240
= $1,000.00

(4) Negative amortization:


PV = -100,000
i = 12%
FV = 150,000

n
Solve PMTs

= 240
= $949.46

Loan Balances for A.1. A.4 after 5 years


A.1

PMTs = 1,101.09
i
= 12%

FV
Solve PV

=0
= $91,744.33

A.2

PMTs = 1,050.54
i
= 12%
n
= 180

FV
Solve PV

= 50,000
= $95,872.16

A.3

PMTs = 1,000.00
i
= 12%
n
= 180

FV
Solve PV

= 100,000
= 100,000

A.4

PMTs = $949.46
i
= 12%
n
= 180

FV
Solve PV

= 150,000
= 104,127

Interest at the end of month 61 for A.1 A.4


A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4

$91,744.33 * .01
$95,872.16 * .01
$100,000.00 * .01
$104,127.84 * .01

= $ 917.44
= $ 958.72
= $1,000.00
= $1,041.28

4-15

D.

APR* for loans in A.1 A.4


A.1
PV = -97,000, PMT = 1,101.09, FV = 0, n = 240 Solve i = 12.50
A.2
PV = -97,000, PMT = 1,050.54, FV = 50,000, n = 240 Solve i = 12.44
A.3
PV = -97,000, PMT = 1,000.00, FV = 100,000, n = 240 Solve i = 11.76
A.4
PV = -97,000, PMT = 949.46, FV = 150,000, n = 240 Solve i = 12.375
*Solution shown based on calculation final answers S/B rounded to nearest 1/8%

E.
Effective yield if loan prepaid EOY 5
A.1
PV = -97,000, PMT = 1,101.09, FV = 91,744.33 n = 60 Solve i = 12.84
A.2
PV = -97,000, PMT = 1,050.54, FV = 95,872.16 n = 60 Solve i = 12.83
A.3
PV = -97,000, PMT = 1,000.00, FV = 100,000.00 n = 60 Solve i = 12.82
A.4
PV = -97,000, PMT = 949.46, FV = 104,127.00 n = 60 Solve i = 12.80
F.

G.

Assume monthly payments in A.1 = 0 for 36 mos. What must payments be from yr. 4-17 to fully amortize the loan
at the end of 24 mos?
Part 1:
PV = -100,000
PMT = 0
i = 12%
Solve FV = 143,076.88
n = 36
Part 2:
PV = -143,076.88
n = 204
Solve PMT = $1,647.12
i = 12%
FV = 0

(1) Total PMTs = (949.46 * 240) + 150,000 = $377,870


Principal = 100,000
Interest = 277,870
(2) n = 204
PMTs = 949.46

FV
= 150,000
i
= 12%
Solve PV = 102,177 balance

(3) 12% because there are no points


(4) 4 points charged, loan payoff 36 months, what is effective interest rate?
PV = -96,000
n = 36
FV = 102,177

PMT
= 949.46
Solve i = 13.62%

Problem 4-19
The effective cost is now 12.64% versus 12.82%.

Problem 4-20
The loan balance is now $61,680 versus $63,793.

4-16