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Installation & Operation Manual

Utility Flare

Hero Flare Model :


Hero Job No. :
Customer :
Jobsite:

F51U8R
H15028
Gases Del Caribe
Cesar, Columbia

Phone Main: 512-772-5744


Website: www.heroflare.com
Rev 0

6/24/1515

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section 1:

General Overview of Equipment

Section 2:

Foundation

Section 3:

Stack Assembly

Section 4:

Pilot & Pilot Retraction System

Section 5:

Stack Assembly & Erection

Section 6:

Guy Wire Installation

Section 7:

Best Practices Operational Considerations

Section 8:

Start-up General Guidelines

Section 9:

Troubleshooting

Section 10:

Preventative Maintenance

Appendix A:

Reference Documentation
a. General Arrangement Drawing
b. Pilot / Ignition System
c. Spare Parts List / Contact Information
d. Sub-vendor Drawings / Data Sheets

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 1: General Overview of Equipment


The Utility Flare System is designed to provide operators with a safe and reliable
method of flaring waste gas produced from tank cleaning operations, pipeline
evacuation, drilling operations, tank battery facilities, etc. Utility flares are
commonly used where the flare gas does not smoke or as emergency flares.
Review the Bill of Material on the General Arrangement drawing located in
Appendix A for the project equipment scope. Some parts of this manual may not
apply.
The Hero Flare Installation and Operations Manual is intended to give the
owner/operator a general overview of how this equipment operates. If you are
unsure or have specific questions that are not outlined within this manual, please
consult Hero Flare. Please note, the installation and operation personal should
have a strong fundamental knowledge of this type of equipment.
Before proceeding, its important that you review the flare drawings located in
Appendix A of this manual before proceeding. It is critical that you understand the
components that were provided with your system as some of the content in this
manual may not apply to your specific equipment if some of the optional
equipment were purchased.

Flare Location
Correct placement of the flare system is important to ensure a safe
operation. There are several factors that deserve consideration before an
installation site is chosen.
1. Must have access to electrical power to operate the blowers.
2. Must be placed within a safe working distance from personnel and
process equipment - Sudden and unexpected release of process
gas to the flare can generate a tremendous amount of heat
creating a hazardous condition for personnel and process
equipment. Please refer to API standards to determine a safe
working distance as well as the Flare Radiation Curves that were
supplied by HERO Flare for your flare system.
3. Must be located at a safe distance away from power lines, elevated
structures and trees.

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 1: General Overview of Equipment


Smokeless Operation
Utility flares do not have any special features to prevent smoke, however in
many cases Hero Flare optimizes the tip size to enhance mixing and reduce
smoke formation. Many light hydrocarbons do not smoke when burned in
our standard utility flare tip.

Hero Utility Flare System


The standard Hero Utility Flare System consists of three (3) main
components. The Stack, HES Pilot Ignition System and Flame Arrestor. The
below provides a brief overview of these components to give a fundamental
understanding of each component.

Stack
The flare stack can be either free standing or guy wire supported
depending on which option was purchased. In addition, the flare
stack may be shipped in a single piece or multiple stack sections
depending on the total height of the flare stack and / or the final
destination of the equipment. It is important that you refer to the
Flare General Arrangement Drawings located in Appendix A of this
manual to identify the type of flare stack support system your flare
stack was designed for as well as the number of stack section that
must be field assembled.
In addition, the flare stack base may include a liquid knock out pot in
the base for select Air Assist Flare models. For those flare models
that includes a knock out pot in the base section, connections are
typically provided by Hero to allow for level sight gauges, level
controllers, etc. to be connected to the stack.

HES Pilot (Ignition System)


The High Energy Spark (HES) Ignited Pilot System is designed to
operate 24 hours a day. A clean, filtered and regulated fuel gas
supply is required. The pilot is designed to operate on natural gas
but can be provided with the proper orifice to operate on propane if
requested. Pilot performance and fuel gas consumption will be
affected by the amount of pressure supplied to the pilot.

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 1: General Overview of Equipment


HES Pilot - continued
In environments of high winds and/or heavy rain, operators may want
to increase the pilot pressure to ensure pilot stability thus increasing
fuel gas consumption. In environments where there are no adverse
weather conditions, the pilot pressure can be lowered to conserve fuel
gas. Ignition of the fuel gas is assured by an intermittent spark in
the pilot nozzle every two seconds regardless of the pilot flame
temperature. This spark is generated when the spark module (located
in the pilot control panel) delivers a 12
vdc pulse to the ignition coil on the pilot, thus creating the spark.
The pilot is also equipped with a thermocouple to prove pilot flame
by means of a thermocouple controller with an LED display which is
located inside of the Ignition Control Enclosure.
When the pilot temperature reaches 300 F, the green light on the
front of the pilot control panel will illuminate indicating that the pilot
has ignited. A relay is also provided to prove ignition to a data logger
or other recording instrument. Note that CFR 40, Part 60 requires
flare pilot flame to be monitored, which is accomplished by the
thermocouple.
Flame Arrestor

It is common practice to use a flame arrestor on production field


flares. The flame arrestor provides an additional level of protection if
air enters the upstream tanks or vent header. The flow rates are
relatively small and the arrestor may be removed from service for
inspection and cleaning.
On larger flares, flame arrestors are rarely used. As long as air does
not enter the upstream process, the flame cannot flashback. Tank
blanketing systems are effective are preventing air infiltration into
atmospheric tanks.

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 1: General Overview of Equipment


Site Utilities Required
The following utilities will be required to operate your Air Assisted
Flare System.

Pilot Gas (per pilot)

Utilities

Plant Air
Panel Electricity
Blower Electricity

Electrical Area
Ancilliary
Equipment
Offered

Control Panel Type


Blower Motor
Pilot(s)

78 scfh at 5 psig. Clean, dry natural gas.


No Plant Air Required
120V / 1 Phase / 10 Amps is required to operate pilot ignition system
480V / 3 Phase / 60Hz

Non-classified area
Nema 4X (Corrosion resistance fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP))
TEFC, Premium duty suitable for VFD
Two (2)

Blower Size:

Retractable High Energy Spark Ignition w/Gas

N/A

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 2: Foundation
The following installation overview is to be used as a general guideline and specific
installation practices, safety procedures, heavy equipment selection, equipment
handling and overall equipment knowledge should be the responsibility of the
installation contractor carrying out the installation of the Flare System.

Step #1: Obtain Foundation Civil Design


The proper Flare Stack foundation is critical to ensure a safe and reliable
installation is achieved for long-term operation. Because civil engineering
requirements for the flare foundation vary depending on specific site
conditions, it is the responsibility of the erection / owner / operator to
consult with your civil engineers to ensure the site preparation and
foundation designs will meet the requirements for your specific application.
Hero Flare can supply the loads and moments for the flare base and guywire
anchor points.

Step #2: Prepare Flare Foundation


When pouring the foundation, refer to the HERO General Arrangement
Drawings located in Appendix A for the proper anchor bolt layout for the
Flare Base Ring.

Important Note: The Hero Utility Flare Model G30U4 can be purchased
with Optional Ground Anchors that eliminate the need for deadmen.
Additionally, Hero offers a pre-cast concrete base that is structurally
designed to be used in-place of a site formed concrete pad. If the Hero precast concrete base was purchased for your application, the concrete base
can be set directly leveled out chat or placed on stabilized fill or chat

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 3: Stack Assembly


Step #1: Review GA Drawings
The flare stack may be shipped as one (1) complete Flare Stack assembly
or shipped in sections.

You MUST Verify: Before proceeding, refer to the General


Arrangement drawing to identify if your flare stack was shipped in
one (1), two (2) or Three (3) stack sections so you can identify if
the following instructions apply.

If the flare stack is shipped in multiple sections, field welding or bolting up


stack sections will be required and therefore you should continue to read
this section. If your flare stack was shipped as one (1) complete flare stack,
then proceed onto the next section (section 4).
Shipped lose flare stack sections will either require field welding to join the
stack section together, or they will have flange connections to allow the
stack sections to be bolted together. Review the General Arrangement
Drawing located in Appendix A to identify the assembly required for your
flare application.

Step #2:

Remove Shipping Braces

All Flare stack assemblies other than the base section will typically have
temporary shipping stops and / or braces installed at the ends to prevent
the inner stack riser pipe from sliding out during transportation. These
temporary braces / stops must be removed. Refer to the shipping brace
drawing provided at the end of this manual.

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 3: Stack Assembly


Step #3: Assemble

Stack

While stack is at grade level, assemble the stack sections in accordance to


the General Arrangement drawing located in Appendix A.

Full Penetration Weld Required: All stack riser welds must


receive a full penetration weld and the appropriate NDT must be
carried out to ensure a satisfactory weld is achieved. It is the
responsibility of the field erection crew to carry-out the
appropriate weld procedures for the materials being welded.

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Step #1: Confirm if Pilot was Shipped Lose or On Stack


The HES Pilot assembly and Pilot Retraction System may be installed on the
flare stack for shorter height flare systems. Although, typically the HES Pilot
and HES Pilot Retraction System are shipped lose to prevent the Pilot
System from being damaged during handling and shipping of the flare.
Therefore, the field will be required to install the HES Pilot System and
Retractable Pilot System on the flare in the field.

You MUST Verify: Before proceeding, refer to the HERO Flare


General Arrangement to identify if your flare system includes a
Pilot Retraction System or not. The Pilot Retraction System is
an optional feature and is only provided if purchased with the
original equipment.
Step #2: Confirm if Pilot System if Fixed or Retractable
Refer to the General Arrangement drawing to identify if your system
includes a Fixed HES Pilot Assembly or a Retractable Pilot Assembly.
Fixed Pilot (Included on base flare model)

Fixed Pilot Systems are designed so that the pilot is mounted


to the stack and cannot be raised or lowered for
maintenance at ground level. Additionally, the Pilot Wiring is
ran through fixed hard conduit and pilot gas supply line
consist of fixed tubing.

Retractable Pilot (Only included if this option purchased)

Retractable Pilot Systems have a cable system that allows


the pilot to be raised and lowered from grade level using a
manual winch located at grade level. The pilot wiring is
supplied with the flare and is flexible. Additionally, the pilot
supply gas utilizes a flexible stainless steel hose.

10

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Fixed Pilot Assembly


This section only applies to flare stacks with FIXED pilot systems. If your system
utilizes a RETRACTABLE pilot system then proceed to the section referring to
Retractable Pilot Systems.

Step #3:

Considering Erecting Stack Before Proceeding


To ensure the pilot is not damaged during the erection of the
flare stack the site will need to evaluate if they feel more
comfortable installing the pilot at grade level and avoid damage
during erection of the stack. If there are any concerns with
damaging the pilot during erection of the stack, it is highly
recommended that you proceed to Section 5 and proceed with
erecting the flare stack before continuing on with Step #4 (Pilot
Assembly).

Step #4:

Mount the pilot(s) to the mounting bracket(s) that are welded

Step #5:

Attach a fuel gas line to the FPT connection on the pilot


inspirator.
Run a 3/8 stainless tubing to the pressure
regulator at the flare base.

Step #6:

on the stack in accordance with the General Arrangement


Drawing.

Wire Pilot by providing following circuits


a. 120 vac 5-amp circuit for the pilot control panel. (AC-UPS
only)
b. 1 pair of type K thermocouple wires (16 22 ga) from the
pilot control panel to the thermocouple on the pilot.
c. Ignition coil wires (14 ga 3-conductor) from the pilot
control panel to the ignition coil assembly on the pilot.
d. Wiring (2 conductors) from the pilot control panel to the
control room to alert operators of pilot system failure
(optional).

11

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Fixed Pilot Assembly


Step #7:

Using standard wiring practices:


a. Run conduit and pull wire from the pilot control panel to
the pilot. Grouping the thermocouple and low voltage
ignition wire into a single conduit is our standard practice
on hundreds of applications. However, client standards
may mandate separating the thermocouple wire from the
low voltage ignition wire. Either one will work.
For flares with multiple pilots and control panels, we
recommend one conduit per panel/pilot combination.
This helps keep wires properly associated.
b. Run conduit and pull wire from the pilot control panel to the
control room.
c. Terminate a 120 vac 5-amp pilot control circuit in the pilot
control panel. (AC-UPS only)
d. Terminate the thermocouple wires as shown on drawing
SOL-2 or AC-UPS-2. Terminate the thermocouple wires at
the thermocouple on the pilot.
e. Terminate the ignition coil wires as shown on drawing SOL2 or AC-UPS-2. Terminate the ignition coil wires at the
ignition coil assembly on the pilot.
(Red - positive, black - negative, green - ground.)
f. Terminate the pilot failure alarm wires in the pilot control
panel from the control room (optional) as shown on drawing
SOL-2 or AC-UPS-2.
NOTE: This pilot failure alarm relay is wired in a fail-safe
mode. Therefore, alarm status is represented by the
normal position of the relay.

12

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Retractable Pilot Assembly


This section only applies to flare stacks with retractable pilot systems that have
not been installed in the shop prior to shipment. Only follow this section if it
applies to your application.

Step #3: Install Retractable Mtg. bracket


Before the flare is raised into position, make certain that the retractable
mounting bracket is installed in accordance with the General Arrangement
Drawing (elevation and orientation).
In addition, install the draw and guide cables as shown in the picture below.
Note that the dead end of the draw cable must be threaded around the
pulley from the inside (or closest to the flare). Pull the draw cable until the
dead end meets the thimble on the other end and secure them to the base
of the flare. This will eliminate the possibility of the draw cable unthreading
itself when the flare is vertical.

Retractable Mtg.
Bracket

13

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Retractable Pilot Assembly - Continued


Step #4:

Erect Stack Before Proceeding with Step #5


To ensure the pilot is not damaged during the erection of the
flare stack. It is highly recommended that you proceed to
Section 5 and proceed with erecting the flare stack before
continuing on with Step #5 (Pilot Assembly).

Step #5:

Retractable System Winch Bracket (RS-WB)


Once the flare stack is erected and in position and securely
bolted, bolt the Retractable System Winch Bracket onto the
flare stack base in accordance with the General Arrangement
Drawing with the mounting hardware supplied by Hero.

Step #6:

Thread the upper and lower pilot carriages onto each of the
guide cables as shown in the picture below.

14

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Retractable Pilot Assembly - Continued


Step #7:

Using the shackle provided, connect the draw cable to the


upper pilot carriage (use the hole closest to the pilot).

Step #8:

Install the eyebolts to the winch mounting plate using the


shock absorber, washers and nuts provided. Thread the nut to
where there are 2-3 threads showing. This will allow for
maximum tension adjustment of the guide cables

Step #9:

Using the thimble and cable clips provided, attach the guide
cables to the eye bolts pull the slack out of the guide cables
before tightening the cable clips.

Step #10:

Tighten the eyebolt nuts until all of the slack is out of the guide
cables and they are reasonably tight.

15

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Retractable Pilot Assembly - Continued


Step #11: Thread the dead end of the draw cable into the winch clamp
and secure.
Step #12:

Using a 13/16 deep socket & drill, begin winding the draw
cable onto the winch drum until all of the slack is out of the
draw cable and the top pilot carriage begins to move up.

Step #13:

Locate and unpack the HES pilot and unroll the SS braided
conduit and fuel gas lines.

Step #14:

The HES pilot will have the stab bracket already mounted on
the pilot at the correct elevation (32 from the top of the
bracket to the pilot shield). This bracket is designed to make
mounting the pilot onto the top carriage easy and at the right
elevation.

Step #15:

Lift the pilot into position and hook the stab bracket to the
top pilot carriage. Using the U-bolt provided, secure the pilot
to the top pilot carriage U-bolt holes.

16

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 4:

Pilot Assembly

Retractable Pilot Assembly - Continued


Step #16:

Continue raising the pilot with the winch until the lower end of
the pilot is at a working elevation.

Step #17:

Using the U-bolt provided secure the pilot to the bottom pilot
carriage. The bracket should be positioned at about 70 from
the top of the pilot shield to the top of the bottom pilot
carriage.

Step #18:

Continue raising the pilot. Connect the SS braided conduit and


fuel gas line guide to the draw cable. These guides have been
placed approximately every 5ft.

Step #19:

Once the pilot approaches the pilot receiver assembly, begin


using the hand crank for the final 12 of so of travel. This will
reduce the possibility of over tightening the draw cable.

Step #20:

Slowly crank the winch until the pilot is in position and the
draw cable reasonably tight. Do not over tighten.
Connect the SS braided pilot fuel gas line (JIC to MPT
fitting provided) to the fuel gas supply from the pilot control
rack provided. Interconnecting fuel gas
piping
is
by
others.

Step #21:

Step #22:

Connect the SS braided conduit (1/2 union provided) to the


supplied terminal conduit body.

Step #23:

Attached the pilot ignition wires and thermocouple wires to


the correct terminals

Step #24:

Refer to the SOL or AC schematic for wiring to the control


enclosure.

17

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 5:

Stack Erection

Confirm if Stack is Guy Supported or Free Standing. Refer to General Arrangement


Drawings.
Step #1:

Locate and attach the guy wires (supplied) to the guy wire lugs
using the shackles provided.
Not required for selfsupported flares, only applies to Guy Supported Stacks.

Step #2:

Using standard lifting practices, erect the flare into position. In


most cases, Hero flares are designed for a single point lift. Refer
to the HERO Flare structural calculation package to obtain the
lifting details before proceed.

Step #3:

Do not allow the lifting straps to be placed around the Spark


Ignited Pilot. If the 1 pipe on the pilot is bent, the pilot will not
function properly. Remove pilots and conduit as necessary to
avoid damage during the lift.

Step #4:

Attach the guy wires to the dead men anchors using the
turnbuckles and clips provided. Plumb the flare by tensioning
the turnbuckles.

Step #5:

Torque the anchor bolts per standard construction practice.

Step #6:

Reinstall pilots / conduit and other items if left off during stack
lifting.

Step #7:

Attach a fuel gas line to the NPT connection on the pilot gas
regulator located at the base of the flare.

18

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 6:

Guy Wire Instructions

If your stack is a free standing stack this section does not apply. Guywires,
clips & turnbuckles have been supplied to support the flare stack. While guy wire
installation is common, there are a few areas to keep in mind.
Step #1: Use swaging sleeve and clevis at stack connection. This avoids
clips at high elevations where they cannot be inspected. Ensure
that the clip size matches the wire rope size.
Step #2: Use clips and thimble at turnbuckle connection point. Hero
supplies an extra clip for safety, normally 3 total per wire rope.
Step #3: Position and torque clips per the drawing.
Step #4: Clips are located approximately 2 apart and torqued to 30 ft-lb.
Step #5: To attach clips, first turn back wire rope over a thimble. Apply
the first clip near the dead end of the wire rope. The second clip
should be as close as possible to the thimble. Add the remaining
clips at equal intervals.
Step #6: The live end rests in the clip saddle. In other words, the clip
nuts are on the guy wire side, not the dead side.
Step #7: Tighten nuts. Alternate from one nut to another while
tightening. After 30 days, check torque again.

19

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 7:

Operational Considerations

When operating flares all safety safe guards should be taken to ensure a safe
and reliable operation. The following are best practice operational safe guards
that should be implemented into the flare operation procedures.

Flare Purging
All flare systems can flashback if not properly purged to keep air out of the
flare header and flare stack. Air can enter the flare system from four (4)
separate entry points:

Contained in the Flare Gas: It is imperative that the hydrocarbon flare gas be
free from oxygen at all times. If oxygen can be present, a flashback protection
system is required to protect the plant and personnel.

Upstream Tanks and Vessels: Atmospheric tanks without a natural gas


blanket will breath in air at night, during rainstorms, when the temperature
drops or when liquid is removed from the tank.

Leaks in the Vent Header: The vent header piping must be kept tight. It is
common to flare headers to operate under a slight vacuum. Any leaks, loose
connections or open valves may allow air to enter the vent header and mix with
the hydrocarbon flare gas. If the mixture reaches the combustible range, the
flare pilot will ignite the gas/air mixture which will burn inside the flare
tip/header. Damage can include hot spots on equipment or a catastrophic
fire/explosion.

Backflow through the Flare Tip: Under no flow conditions, air will slowly
diffuse into the flare stack through the open flare tip. Light MW hydrocarbons,
tall stacks and high winds speed up this process. A continuous purge prevents
air from entering the flare tip. Purge reduction seals minimize the continuous
purge rate. Note: In lieu of a continuous purge many production field clients
protect the upstream equipment from flashback by installing a flame arrestor.

20

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 7:

Operational Considerations

Flare Purging (Startup)


It is essential to remove all air from the process vessels, vent header and
flare stack before igniting the flare pilot. The recommended initial purge gas
is nitrogen, although any dry, non-combustible inert gas will suffice. It is
essential to avoid a hydrocarbon/air interface at any point.
Do not use steam as a purge gas. Steam will condense in the flare header.
This pulls air into the flare system through the flare tip.
Purge at least 10 system volumes. The oxygen level in the flare header
must be under 8% (volume) to stay below the Minimum Oxygen Content
(MOC). We recommend purging the flare header to a 1% oxygen level.

Flare Purging (Normal Operation)


A small continuous sweep of nitrogen or natural gas will prevent air from
entering the flare tip. The minimum flow rate is normally around 0.04 ft/sec
based on flare tip flange diameter. Many facilities operate at 0.10 0.50
ft/sec flow rate so that the operator can see a small flame on the flare tip.
In many cases, leaks from the plant relief valves are greater than the
minimum purge rate. Note: In lieu of a continuous purge many production
field clients protect the upstream equipment from flashback by installing a
flame arrestor.
Important Highlights
Never allow air to enter the flare header.
Purge flare header with nitrogen

Use continuous purge to prevent air infiltration through the flare tip.

21

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 7:

Operational Considerations

Flame Arrestor

It is common practice to use a flame arrestor on production field flares. The


flame arrestor provides an additional level of protection if air enters the
upstream tanks or vent header. The flow rates are relatively small and the
arrestor may be removed from service for inspection and cleaning.
On larger flares, flame arrestors are rarely used. As long as air does not
enter the upstream process, the flame cannot flashback. Tank blanketing
systems are effective are preventing air infiltration into atmospheric tanks.
The flare gas must be dry and free from condensate and other liquids. If
liquid in the flare gas stream is expected, a knock out drum or other liquid
entrapment device must be provided or the flame arrestor will plug.
The flame arrestor should be inspected regularly for plugging.

22

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 8: Start-up Procedures


Step #1:

The on/off switch on the pilot control panel(s) should be turned


to the OFF position.

Step #2:

Turn on the main power supply to the pilot control panel if you
ignition system is AC powered. If your system is Battery Solar
Powered proceed to next step.

Step #3:

Begin purging the flare gas line with fuel gas or nitrogen.

Step #4:

Purge all air from the fuel gas line. The pilot inspirator has a
1/16 orifice for natural gas and 3/64 for propane. If air is
not purged from the fuel gas line, it will take a substantial
amount of time to purge the line through the orifice.

Step #5:

Turn on the fuel gas line supply and adjust the gas pressure to
5 psi for natural gas or 3 psi for propane.

Step #6:

Turn on the pilot control panel. The green power-on LED on


the spark module will illuminate. The pilot will begin sparking
every 2 seconds as indicated by the red spark LED on the spark
module. The LEDs may not be easily visible during daytime.

Step #7:

Verify the thermocouple controller reads ambient temperature.

Step #8:

Verify that a pilot failure signal has been sent to the control
room (if applicable).

Step #9:

After a short length of time, the air in the fuel gas line will be
purged and the pilot will ignite. Pilot ignition can be verified
by observing the thermocouple controller located inside of the
ignition panel and by listening for the sound of combustion.
The flame from the pilot may not be visible during daylight
hours. After the thermocouple reaches 300F, verify that the
pilot failure signal has been cleared (if applicable) and that the
Pilot On light is illuminated.

Step #10: If your ignition panel is AC powered, disconnect the main


power supply & verify the control panel continues to operate
on battery power. If panel is battery powered skip this step.
Step #11: The flare is now ready for service.

23

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 9: Troubleshooting
The HES High Energy Spark Ignited Pilot is manufactured using the highest quality parts
available. It is then thoroughly tested at the factory before shipment, and should provide
years of trouble free service. If any malfunction should occur, investigate the following:

Problem
Power light not ON

Possible Cause

Solution

Power Switch in Off position


Loss of power to panel

Turn ON Power
Check for blown fuses
Check for loose wiring
connections
Replace bulb

Bulb Failure
Pilot will not light

No spark is made
Pilot fuel gas failed
Air inspirator is restricted
Wiring failed
No 12 VDC

Check ignition system for


proper connection.
Confirm fuel gas is per
specifications
Confirm that the air
inspirator has no restrictions
Inspect and confirm integrity
of wiring
Check Battery & Solar Panel
replace if necessary.

Pilot gas pressure incorrect

Pilot orifice is dirty


Incorrect pilot fuel/orifice

Clean pilot orifice


Install correct orifice for
current fuel
Set pilot gas pressure to
proper setting

Cannot regulate air or gas


pressure to pilot

Pressure regulators not


installed
Pressure regulators not
installed correctly
Gas lines plugged
Gas supply pressure too low or
too high

Install pressure regulators

Pilot will not stay lit

Pilot wind shield damaged


Pilot orifice restricted

Repair/replace pilot shield


Clean pilot orifice

Pilot tip windshield glows


red at night

Pilot is operating correctly

No action necessary

Thermocouple failure

Inspect and correct regulator


installation
Inspect and blow out lines
Confirm supply pressure are
per specification

Repair/replace thermocouple

24

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 9: Troubleshooting
Problem

Possible Cause

Solution

Pilot will not light flare

High nitrogen in vent gas


Improper pilot position
Pilot not lit
Flare gas heating value too low

Purge nitrogen from system


Reposition pilot
Light pilot
Inject assist gas and confirm
composition
Increase flow to minimum
purge rate
Confirm fuel gas is available
at correct pressure

Waste gas flow too low


Fuel gas supply failed
Panel lights not ON
Panel indicates pilots are
not burning

Bulb failure
Loose wiring

Replace bulbs
Check for loose connections

Pilots damaged / mixers


unplugged
Pilot fuel lines plugged

Inspect pilots for tip/mixer


failure
Inspect and blow out pilot
fuel gas lines
Perform check on
thermocouple at grade
Perform check on TC wiring
at grade and inspect
Perform check on
temperature switch in panel
Correct temperature set
points
Perform check on
thermocouple at grade
Perform check on TC wiring
at grade and inspect
Perform check on
temperature switch in panel
Correct temperature set
points

Pilot thermocouple failed


Pilot thermocouple wiring
failed
Pilot temperature switch failed

Pilot Lights but


Thermocouple does not
respond

Panel pilot temperature


settings not correct
Pilot thermocouple failed
Pilot thermocouple wiring
failed
Pilot temperature switch failed
Panel pilot temperature
settings not correct

Flare Smokes

Excessive vent flow


Insufficient air flow
Flare gas composition changed

25

Slow vent flow to flare


Increase blower air flow
Confirm flare gas
composition

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Section 10: Preventative Maintenance


1. Pilot Ignition System
To ensure a reliable ignition source is present at all times, it is recommended
that the following checks occur monthly.
Check#1:

Turn off the pilot fuel gas supply.

Verify:

When pilot is turned off, the pilot alarm circuit should open
when the pilot temperature falls below 300 F. Therefore,
this check will confirm if the thermocouple temperature
controller and / or the thermocouple are operating
properly.

Action:

If no low temperature alarm occurs, then the system is


working properly. If not alarm occurs, then check the
thermocouple and temperature controller are in good
working order. Replace as needed.

Check #2:

Turn back on the pilot fuel gas supply.

Verify:

The pilot lights should illuminate and the thermocouple


temperature controller should read above 300F.

Action:

If temperature controller does not read above 300F, then


check the thermocouple and temperature controller to
ensure they are in good working order. Replace as needed.

Check #3:

Disconnect the main power supply.

Verify:

Confirm that the control panel continues to operate on


battery power.

Action:

If does not continue to operate. Replace battery.

Check #4:

Inspect flare pilots and ignition enclosure, if possible.

Verify:

Confirm components are visually in good working order.

Action:

Replace any worn or damaged components.

Installation & Operations Manual (Utility Flare)

Appendix A

a.

General Arrangement Drawing

b.

Pilot / Ignition System

c.

Spare Parts List / Contact Information

d.

Sub-vendor Drawings / Data Sheets

Spare Parts List


Pricing valid as of January 1, 2015
ITEM
Complete Pilot Assembly
Complete Control Panel
Spark Module
Thermocouple Controller
12VDC Battery
Thermocouple
Solar Panel (SOL only)
Solar Regulator (SOL only)
Spark Plug
Air Inspirator
Ignition Coil Assembly
Nozzle Assembly
Pilot Orifice

PART NUMBER
HES Pilot
SP8-SOM
CN132-12V
621-022
4-K-30-U-72-F4-B8
SOL 50 Watt
SS6
SP8-J99
P8SS-AI
SP8-MSD8203
SP8-PNA
P8SS-AO

PRICE (USD)
$4,070.00
$2,530.00
$ 508.00
$ 388.00
$ 295.00
$ 321.00
$ 308.00
$ 103.00
$
35.00
$ 309.00
$ 651.00
$ 619.00
$ 200.00

Note: Please specify Natural Gas or Propane for Pilot Orifice

Packing Fee
Freight Cost
Pilot Rebuild (By Hero Flare)

$ 165.00
Typically $165-$330
$1,650.00

Note: Pilot must be returned to Hero Flare for rebuild. Customer will be responsible for
freight cost both directions.

Contact Information
For any comments or questions, please contact:
HERO Flare
445 FM20
Bastrop, Texas 78602
Phone: 713 542 0925
www.heroflare.com
Email: sales@heroflare.com
David Giles: David.Giles@heroflare.com
Ty Wolfe: Ty.Wolfe@heroflare.com

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