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ATP-57(B)

THE SUBMARINE
SEARCH AND
RESCUE MANUAL
ATP-57(B)

ATP-57(B)
THE SUBMARINE
SEARCH AND
RESCUE MANUAL

MARCH 2009

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ATP-57(B)

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ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

Record of Reservations

Chapter Record of Reservations by Nations

1-6 TURKEY

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ATP-57(B)

Record of Reservations

Nation Specific Reservations

TURKEY ATP-57(B) and ATP-10(D) are agreed in principle. Nevertheless, due


to changes will be made when an agreement is reached in accordance
with the 1979 Hamburg convention on Maritime Search and Rescue
between parties concerned. Having the means and capabilities, Turkey
will continue to conduct SAR operations in her maritime Search and
Rescue as declared to the IMO and included in IMOs Globar SAR
Plan.

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THIS PAGE IS RESERVED FOR NATIONAL LETTER OF PROMULGATION

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RECORD OF CHANGES
Identification of By Whom Entered
NATO Effective
Change, Reg No. (if Date Entered (Signature; Rank, Grade or
Date
Any), and Date Rate; Name of Command)

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

RECORD OF CHANGES
Identification of By Whom Entered
NATO Effective
Change, Reg No. (if Date Entered (Signature; Rank, Grade or
Date
Any), and Date Rate; Name of Command)

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ATP-57(B)

Table of Contents

page
No.
Preface
0001 Purpose 1
0002 Scope 1

PART I

CHAPTER 1 - Introduction to SUBSAR Operations


0101 Overall Philosophy of SUBSAR Operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-1
0102 SUBSAR Operations Guidance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-1
0103 Concept of Operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-2
0104 DISSUB Liaison Team (DLT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-3
0105 Recovery of Escapees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-3
0106 Intervention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-3
0107 Rescue of DISSUB personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-4

ANNEX 1A – Summary of SMER applicable STANAGs

1A01 Summary of SMER applicable STANAGs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1-A-1

CHAPTER 2 - The DISSUB


0201 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-1
0202 General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-1
0203 Possible scenario on board of DISSUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-2
0204 SMER facilities on board the DISSUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-3
0205 Ways used by the DISSUB to report on her position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-4
0206 Egress of DISSUB personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-6
0207 Options for the Crew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-7
0208 Advantages of Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-7
0209 Disadvantages of Rescue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-2-7

CHAPTER 3 - Search and Localization of a Distressed


Submarine

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0301 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-1


0302 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-2
0303 International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO) . . I-3-4
0304 Terminology for SUBSAR Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-4
0305 Responsibilities for SUBSAR Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-7
0306 Submarine safety signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-9
0307 Sublook/Submiss/Subsunk/Comcheck procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-10
0308 General instruction to the OSC and Units of the Search Force . . . . . . . . . I-3-12
0309 Provision of SMER experts advice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-14
0310 Ability of the DISSUB to signal her position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-14
0311 Conduct of the search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-15
0312 Communication and signals to be used during the search . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-17
0313 Conduct when contacting with the DISSUB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-19
0314 Action when DISSUB has been located . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-20
0315 Situation Reports . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-20
0316 Management of Search Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-20
0317 Use of Surface Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-21
0318 Search Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-21
0319 Line Abreast Search . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-21
0320 Area Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-22
0321 Guidance on Speed, the Use of Medium range Sonar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-22
0322 Guidance on Distance Apart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-22
0323 Employment of Aircraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-23
0324 Employment of Mine Countermeasures Vessels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-23
0325 Marking the Submarine Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-24

ANNEX 3A – Check Off Lists during Search and Localisation phase

3A01 Check off list ALFA: SSRA, Operation SUBLOOK Search phase . . . . . . I-3-A-1
3A02 Check off list BRAVO: SSRA, Operation SUBMISS Search phase . . . . . I-3-A-3
3A03 Check off list CHARLIE: OSC, Search phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-A-5
3A04 Check off list DELTA: Individual Units of the Search Force . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-A-7

ANNEX 3B – Formats for SUBSAR signals

3B01 DIVING SIGNAL ………………………………………………………… I-3-B-1


3B02 COMCHECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-B-2
3B03 SUBLOOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-B-3
3B04 SUBMISS/SUBSUNK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-B-5
3B05 DISSUB LOCATED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-B-7
3B06 REQUEST FOR SMER ASSISTANCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-B-8
3B07 NATIONAL SMER ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-3-B-9

CHAPTER 4 - Mobilization of SMER Elements


0401 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-4-1
0402 SMER Elements composition and tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-4-2

ORIGINAL
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0403 Other SMER experts and Elements available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-4-3


0404 Priority for Assembly of Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-4-4

ANNEX 4A - Check Off Lists during Mobilization of SMER Elements

4A01 Check off list ECHO: SSRA, Operation SUBLOOK/SUBMISS, Mobilization of


Submarine Escape and Rescue Elements . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . I-4-A-1
4A02 Check off list FOXTROT: SSRA, Operation SUBSUNK, Mobilization of
Submarine Escape and Rescue Elements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-4-A-3
4A03 Check off list GOLF: Escape Gear Ships, Mobilization of Submarine Escape
and Rescue Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-4-A-5

CHAPTER 5 – The Escape and Rescue Phase


SECTION I – COMMAND, CONTROL AND COMMUNICATIONS

0501 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-1


0502 Command and Control (C2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-1
0503 Command relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-2
0504 Communications during Rescue Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-3

SECTION II – Recovery and Rescue of DISSUB Personnel

0505 Recovery of personnel on the surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-5


0506 Intervention prior to rescue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-5
0507 Conduct of the rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-5

ANNEX 5A - Check Off Lists during Escape and Rescue Phase

5A01 Check off list INDIA: OSC, Handover to CRF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-A-1

ANNEX 5B – Communication Scripts

5B01 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-B-1


5B02 SRV/SRC Script – Mating/Demating Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-B-5
5B03 Pod Posting Script Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-B-7
5B04 Ventilation Script Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-B-9

CHAPTER 6 - Medical issues and Organization during


SUBSAR Operations
SECTION I – Introduction to SUBSAR Medical Doctrine

0601 NATO Medical doctrine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-1


0602 General medical guidance for SUBSAR operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-2

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SECTION II – SUBSAR Medical Organization

0603 The medical component of the Submarine Escape and Rescue Assistance Team
(SMERAT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-3
0604 Senior Medical Officer to SMERAT (SMO(S)) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-4
0605 The senior casualty clinician (SCC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-4
0606 Medical Headquarters (MHQ) and the Medical Administration Officer (MAO) I-6-5

SECTION III – Medical Mobilization and Response action lists

0607 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-7


0608 Senior Medical Officer to SMERAT (SMO(S)) action lists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-7
0609 Senior Casualty Clinician action lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-9
0610 Medical Administration Officer (MAO) action list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-11

SECTION IV – Medical Communication and Logistics

0611 Internal communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-13


0612 External communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-13
0613 Logistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-14

SECTION V – Submarine Disaster Survival

0614 Factors affecting crew survival time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-15


0615 Other factors affecting survival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-16

SECTION VI – Escape

0616 Risks associated with the Escape procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-19


0617 Decompression Illness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-21
0618 Barotrauma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-21
0619 Treatment of escapees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-23

SECTION VII – Survival hazards on the surface after Surface Abandonment or Escape

0620 General considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-27


0621 Underlying medical issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-27
0622 Environmental considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-27
0623 Marine animal hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-28
0624 Physiological/physiological consequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-28
0625 Medical considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-29

SECTION VIII – Rescue

0626 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-31


0627 Potential problems during rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-31
0628 Rescue mission planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-32
0629 Co-ordination of rescue assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-32
0630 Equipment supply to the DISSUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-32

ORIGINAL
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0631 Re-supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-32


0632 Casualties transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-32

SECTION IX – The management of Radiological and other Contamination

0633 General considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-33


0634 Chemical contamination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-34
0635 Biological contamination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-34
0636 Radiological contamination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-34

SECTION X – Triage

0637 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-37


0638 Conduct of Triage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-37
0639 Triage categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-39
0640 Recompression treatment categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-39
0641 Radiation casualties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-40
0642 Allocating survivors to the appropriate treatment areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-40

SECTION XI – Casualty Recording Process

0643 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-43


0644 Casualty identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-43
0645 Information handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-44
0646 Casualty identification when using multiple vessels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-44

SECTION XII – Transfer of casualties from escape and rescue ships to further medical
care

0647 General considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-47


0648 Specific requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-47

ANNEX 6A – OSC Briefing Points

6A01 OSC briefing points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-A-1

ANNEX 6B – Medical Check Off List HOTEL

6B01 Check off list Hotel: Medical brief for recovery boats crews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-B-1

ANNEX 6C – Treatment Areas, Equipment and Personnel

6C01 Medical management areas for escape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-C-1


6C02 Medical management areas for rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-C-5

ANNEX 6D – DISSUB Medical Triage Team Selection, Deployment and Equipment

6D01 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-D-1


6D02 Manpower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-D-1
6D03 Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-D-1

ORIGINAL
XV
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6D04 Role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-D-2


6D05 Equipment and supplies for DMTT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-D-2

ANNEX 6E – Triage Algorithm for Escape

6E01 Triage algorithm for Escape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-E-1

ANNEX 6F – Casualty handling Algorithms

6F01 Casualty handling algorithm for surface abandonment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-F-1


6F02 Casualty handling algorithm for Escape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-F-2
6F03 Casualty handling algorithm for rescuees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-F-3

ANNEX 6G – Selection of Decompression tables

6G01 Tables for Escape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-G-1


6G02 Tables for Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-G-1

ANNEX 6H – Master Casualty State Board

6H01 Master casualty state board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-H-1

ANNEX 6I – Area Casualty State Board

6I01 Area casualty state board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-I-1

ANNEX 6J – SUBSUNK Casualty Reporting (CASEREP)

6J01 Signal format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-J-1

ANNEX 6K – SUBSUNK Casualty Evacuation (CASEVAC)

6K01 Signal format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-K-1

ANNEX 6L – SMERAT medical emergency case and contents

6L01 SMERAT medical emergency case contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-L-1

ANNEX 6M – Reference values and conversion factors

6M01 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6-M-1

GLOSSARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-Glossary-1
ANNEX A - Abbreviations/Acronyms used in SUBSAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-A-1

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PART II - NATIONAL SMER DATA


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1

CHAPTER 1 - Details of National Facilities ashore and


afloat to support SUBSAR Operation
General Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-1
AUSTRALIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-AUS-1
BELGIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-BEL-1
BULGARIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-BGR-1
CANADA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-CAN-1
FRANCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-FRA-1
GERMANY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-DEU-1
GREECE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-GRC-1
ISRAEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-ISR-1
ITALY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-ITA-1
NORWAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-NOR-1
NSRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-NSRS-1
POLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-POL-1
PORTUGAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-PRT-1
SPAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-ESP-1
SWEDEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-SWE-1
THE NETHERLANDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-NLD-1
TURKEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-1-TUR-1
UNITED KINGDOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-1-GBR-1
UNITED STATES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-1-USA-1

CHAPTER 2 – Submarine Specific Data


General Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-1
AUSTRALIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-AUS-1
BULGARIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-BGR-1
CANADA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-CAN-1
FRANCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-FRA-1
GERMANY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-DEU-1
GREECE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-GRC-1
ISRAEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-ISR-1
ITALY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-ITA-1
NORWAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-NOR-1
POLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-POL-1
PORTUGAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-PRT-1
SPAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-ESP-1
SWEDEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-SWE-1
THE NETHERLANDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-NLD-1
TURKEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-2-TUR-1
UNITED KINGDOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-2-GBR-1

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UNITED STATES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-2-USA-1

CHAPTER 3 - Medical Supplement


SECTION I – SUBMARINE CONDITIONS

0301 Toxic atmosphere control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-1


0302 Carbon dioxide level control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-2
0303 Oxygen level control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-3
0304 Atmospheric pressure considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-5

SECTION II – SUBMARINE PARACHUTE ASSISTANCE GROUP


0305 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-7
0306 The team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-7
0307 The insertion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-7
0308 The treatment of escapees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-7

SECTION III – SPECIFIC MEDICAL CONDITIONS


0309 Hypothermia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-9
0310 Cold injures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-12
0311 Hyperthermia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-13
0312 Heat injures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-14
0313 Radiation injures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-16

SECTION IV – TABLES FOR DECOMPRESSION OF RESCUEES


0314 US Navy operational guidance on accelerated oxygen decompression . . . . . . . II-3-19
0315 Basic procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-20
0316 Modifications to the basic procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-21
0317 Decompression of system operators and tenders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-23
0318 Treatment of decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism in submarine rescue
operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-24
0319 Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-26
0320 UK accelerated decompression schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-26
0321 Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-28
0322 Equivalent air depth principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-28
0323 Decompression procedures - Survivors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-28
0324 Decompression procedures – Recompression chamber operators . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-32
0325 Oxygen requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-33
0326 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-35

SECTION V – PROPOSED NATO SUBMARINE RESCUE SYSTEM TUP DECOMPRESSION


SCHEDULES FROM 5 BAR
0327 Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-37
0328 Procedure characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-37
0329 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-38
0330 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-38
0331 Detailed NSRS decompression procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-38
0332 Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-3-43

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List of Illustrations
Page
No.

PART I

CHAPTER 5 – The Escape and Rescue Phase


Figure 5-1 SMER Phase - Authorities relationship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-5-2

CHAPTER 6 - Medical Issues And Organization During


Subsar Operations
Figure 6-1 Organization of the medical component of the SMERAT for escape . . . . . I-6–3
Figure 6-2 Generic C2 diagram for Rescue Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6–4
Figure 6-3 Simulated escape pressure profile for a 180 meter escape . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6–20
Figure 6-4 Safe to escape curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-6–20
Figure 6-5 Medical Incident, Medical Management and Support Triage Sieve . . . . . I-6–38

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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List of Table
Page
No.

Part I

CHAPTER 1
ANNEX A
Table 1A-1 Summary of SMER applicable STANAGs. .....................................................I-1-A-1

CHAPTER 3
Table 3-1 Submarine SAR terminology. ...............................................................................I-3-4
Table 3-2 List of distinguishing signals used during SUBSAR Operations. ......................I-3-17
Table 3-3 Pyrotechnic Light Signals ...................................................................................I-3-24

CHAPTER 4
Table 4-1 SSRA decision making flowchart. ........................................................................I-4-1

CHAPTER 6
Table 6-1 Life expectancy times for immersion temperatures without SEIE. ....................I-6-27
Table 6-2 Allocation of treatment area by triage category. ................................................I-6-40
Table 6-3 Medical and recompression triage and treatment grid. .......................................I-6-41

ANNEX H
Table 6H-1 Master casualty state board. .............................................................................I-6-H-1

ANNEX I
Table 6I-1 Area casualty state board. .................................................................................. I-6-I-1

ANNEX M
Table 6M-1 Pressure unit conversion table. ........................................................................I-6-M-1

PART II

CHAPTER 3
Table II-3-1 Effects of high carbon dioxide concentrations. .................................................. II-3-2
Table II-3-2 Effect of low oxygen concentration. ................................................................... II-3-3
Table II-3-3 Submarine Rescue Oxygen Decompression Table ………………………….. II-3-20

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Table II-3-4 System Operator/Tender Oxygen Breathing Times (minutes) …………….… II-3-24
Table II-3-5 Required Oxygen Time ………………………………………………………. II-3-25

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PREFACE

1. ATP-57, The Submarine Search and Rescue Manual, contains principles and procedures that have
evolved as a result of experience and exercises and is used to implement Submarine Search and Rescue
(SUBSAR) Operations based on commonality and interoperability of Rescue Elements and Submarines all
around the world.

2. The Publication supplements the general principles and procedures set forth in the ATP-10
(SEARCH AND RESCUE), and in the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue
(IAMSAR) Manual, published jointly by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

ATP-57 and above mentioned documents, form the basic library for SUBSAR Operations 1.

3. The procedures and information for the Search, the coordination of Multinational Submarine
Rescue Elements during their mobilization to the scene of action, the Escape and Rescue phase of a
SUBSAR Operation, and the medical aspects for SUBSAR Operations are explained in separate chapters.

0001 Purpose

The purpose of the Submarine Search and Rescue Manual (ATP-57) is to provide guidance,
instructions, information and procedures governing the different phases of a SUBSAR Operation and the
command, control and manoeuvring of units during their mobilization to the scene of action, throughout
the Escape, Intervention and Rescue stages.

0002 Scope

This manual deals with information related to Submarine Escape and Rescue (SMER) and
addresses the techniques and procedures for SUBSAR Operations, on which further expansion of the
doctrine may be based. It also provides specialized information needed by authorities engaged in saving
lives at sea from a Distressed Submarine (DISSUB).

The manual provides the instructions and procedures required by Headquarters and/or
Commanders to issue orders to fulfil their responsibilities and enables subordinates to understand and
comply with them.. It also gives details of specific duties associated with the Mobilization of SMER
Resources, and with the execution of associated tasks.

This manual is intended to serve as a guide to worldwide Operational Commands and Commanders
that may be assigned responsibility during SUBSAR Operations, and in particular to the On Scene
Commander (OSC) and to the Coordinator of Rescue Forces (CRF).

1
See Note at page 2

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The International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO) is the coordination
hub which, from the very beginning of a SUBSAR Operation, is responsible for facilitating the rescue
response to such an event (www.ismerlo.org).

This manual does not deal with the onboard aspects of submarine escape, but does deal with the recovery
of escapees once on the surface.

Note:
As indicated in footnote of ATP-10 (D), Page 3-B-1 Turkey does not accept relative zones in the map, until an
agreement is reached. Turkey recognizes her maritime SAR areas as declared in IMO.

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PART I

CHAPTER 1

Introduction to
SUBSAR operations

0101 Overall Philosophy of a SUBSAR Operation

The general philosophy for Submarine Search and Rescue (SUBSAR) Operations is to provide a
reasonable level of assurance for the more likely Submarine accident situations and some, at least, for the
less likely, using those elements which are considered the most appropriate in response to the incident
worldwide.

While rescue is the preferred method of saving lives after a submarine accident, escape is also
possible even though it presents greater risks to the individual. Salvage of the whole submarine is
unlikely to be used as a means of saving life as it would probably take too long to accomplish even under
favourable circumstances. Some salvage related activities may, however, contribute towards escape or
rescue.

0102 SUBSAR Operations Guidance

The following Documents record the principles, techniques and procedures for SUBSAR
Operations on which further expansion of the guidance may be based:

1. The International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual,
published jointly by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Civil Aviation
Organization (ICAO).
The primary focus of the three volumes of this Manual is to assist nations in meeting their own search and
rescue (SAR) needs, and the obligations they accepted under the Convention on International Civil
Aviation, the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (Hamburg 1979) and the
International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).

2. ATP-10 SEARCH AND RESCUE, which provides doctrine, instructions, and procedures
governing the command, control, and manoeuvring of NATO units in Search and Rescue Operations
during peace time. The SAR Panel of the NATO MC Air Standardization Board (MCASB) Air Support
Operations Working Group has the overall responsibility for this Publication, which includes a specific
chapter dedicated to the Search and Localization of a Submarine in distress. 2

3. ATP-57 (The Submarine Search and Rescue Manual) provides guidance, instructions,
information and procedures governing the command, control, mobilization and employment of SMER

2
See Note at page 2.

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ATP-57(B)

Resources during the SUBSAR Operations. This manual is also under the MCMSB SMERWG
responsibility.

0103 Concept of Operations

1. General.

This article briefly describes the different concepts, Authorities, phases and guidance used during
SUBSAR Operations.
It is a SAR principle that the appropriate authority may call upon one or more Rescue Coordination
Centre (RCC) to assist the operation. A SUBSAR operation does not normally come under the
responsibility of a RCC, due to the specific characteristics of a DISSUB, but the relevant RCC must be
duly informed of all activities that will be taking place during any phases of a SUBSAR Operation.
Annex 1A contains a summary of applicable NATO Standardization Agreements (STANAGs)
related to SMER issues, which may be named through this document.

2. The Alert.

Indication that a submarine has sunk or is in distress may come from a variety of sources, ranging
from merchant ships observing an untoward incident, through warships operating with the submarine, to
the Submarine Operating Authority (SUBOPAUTH) realising that the submarine has failed to report as
detailed in her orders, or any unit receiving distress signals from the submarine.

3. SUBSAR Operations phases.

A Submarine Search and Rescue (SUBSAR) Operation can be divided into a number of phases the
first of which begins when the alert of a DISSUB is raised. The principal phases are:

- Search and Localization of the DISSUB


- Search, Escape and Rescue

Chapter 5 describes instructions and procedures for the Escape and Rescue phase. This phase may
last a number of days dependent upon DISSUB status, weather and sea-state conditions and rescue
element capabilities. Although the preference is to rescue the Submarine’s crew, an escape may be
conducted before or during the rescue, depending on the evolvement of the conditions in the DISSUB.
The CRF should only advise escape if waiting to be rescued would increase the hazard to the DISSUB
personnel.

Transition between the phases is rarely well defined, and because of the change of operational
focus, OSC must provide a comprehensive brief to the CRF. During the Escape and Rescue phase, the
OSC will provide the appropriate support to the CRF, utilizing those Forces and resources at his disposal.

4. Activation/Mobilization of Submarine Rescue Elements.

Once the Alert is established, activation of SMER resources should start as soon as possible. All
mobilization will take place in accordance with either the requests of the DISSUB’s NA, or the initiative

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ATP-57(B)

of those Nations intending to support. This could involve the mobilization of more than one rescue
element.

While the search is proceeding, the Submarine Search and Rescue Authority (SSRA) will normally
coordinate the call-out, embarkation and deployment of the Recovery and Rescue Forces in accordance
with the wishes of the NA. The SSRA should alert ISMERLO in order to obtain information about the
availability of Rescue Elements across the world.
Detailed information about the Search and Localization phase can be found at chapter 3.

ISMERLO is capable of providing a worldwide coordination capability during the mobilization, by


monitoring the availability of those elements which can assist a nation facing a DISSUB incident.
ISMERLO can also provide advice to the SSRA if required or as the situation demands.

Chapter 4 describes instructions and procedures to be carried out during the mobilization of the
SMER resources.

5. Medical Support and Organization.

Chapter 6 deals with medical aspects of a SUBSAR operation.

0104 DISSUB Liaison Team (DLT)

The DISSUB National Authority (NA) should provide a DLT to support the OSC and CRF. This
team should include submarine officers, medical officers (specialized in underwater and hyperbaric
medicine), design authorities, Submarine Escape and Rescue specialists, translators and media advisors.

The DLT must have available all applicable technical details of the DISSUB, to adequately advise
the OSC and CRF.

The DLT will also identify any requirements for additional manpower during extended operations.
Advice on local facilities may also be required from the port area closest to the DISSUB location or used
for forward support.

0105 Recovery of Escapees

Rescue is the preferred method but escape is equally possible, depending on onboard conditions.
Crew may indeed be forced to escape before the arrival of any surface assistance or Rescue Elements, in
which case the Search Force may come upon escapees already on the surface and in need of treatment.

0106 Intervention

Intervention is the use of external resources to increase survivability. This can be surface or
subsurface, and is likely to involve specialist assets for survey, debris clearance and transponder field
preparation on and around the DISSUB. During the waiting time between location and rescue, but also
during the rescue itself, it may be necessary to maintain conditions on the DISSUB by ELSS) either "wet
re-supply using pressure tight pods posted into the escape tower by IROV, ADS or Divers, or "dry" by a
Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) or Chamber (SRC). Some classes of submarine can accept an air

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supply connection and maintain a breathable atmosphere thereby (Ventilation). Chapter 3 deals with
Intervention.

0107 Rescue of DISSUB personnel

If conditions aboard the DISSUB allow, personnel will wait to be rescued. This operation may take
several days to stage during which intervention operations may prepare for the arrival of Rescue Elements.
This could involve survey, debris removal, tracking preparation, re-supply of Emergency Life Support
Stores (ELSS) and, if appropriate Element and interfaces are available, the control of the DISSUB
atmosphere.

Rescue operations should commence once appropriate Rescue Elements arrive at the scene.

Note: No two situations will ever be the same. While not very likely, it is possible that lives will be
saved by both Escape and Rescue from the same DISSUB.

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ANNEX 1A

Summary of SMER applicable STANAGS

1A01 Summary of SMER applicable STANAGs

Table 1A-1 Summary of SMER applicable STANAGs.

STANAG TITLE CUSTODIAN

1074 MINIMUM STANDARD CHARACTERISTICS OF FRA


UNDERWATER TELEPHONES FOR USE IN SUBMARINES AND
SURFACE SHIPS OF NATO NATIONS

1269 HANDBOOK ON MARITIME MEDICINE (AMedP-11) DEU

1297 REQUIREMENTS FOR A NATO COMMON RESCUE SEAT USA

1298 MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF FRA


DEVICES IN DISTRESSED SUBMARINES TO ASSIST
LOCATION BY RESCUE FORCES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF
SUBMARINE MARKER BUOYS

1301 MINIMUM CONDITIONS FOR SURVIVAL IN A DISTRESSED GBR


SUBMARINE PRIOR TO ESCAPE OR RESCUE

1320 MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR ATMOSPHERIC FRA


MONITORING EQUIPMENT LOCATED IN SUBMARINES WITH
ESCAPE CAPABILITY

1321 MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR SUBMARINE ESCAPE AND NDL


SURVIVAL PERSONNEL EQUIPMENT (SESPE)

1372 ALLIED GUIDE TO DIVING OPERATIONS (ADivP-01) GBR

1382 EMERGENCY SONAR BEACONS TO AID THE DETECTION GBR


AND LOCALIZATION OF DISTRESSED SUBMARINES AND
THE HOMING ONTO THEM OF SUBMERGED RESCUE CRAFT

1390 THE SUBMARINE RESCUE MANUAL (ATP-57) ASC

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STANAG TITLE CUSTODIAN

1391 REQUIREMENTS OF A DISTRESSED SUBMARINE FOR THE CAN


RECEIPT OF EMERGENCY LIFE SUPPORT STORES (ELSS) BY
POD POSTING

1432 MULTINATIONAL GUIDE TO DIVING MEDICAL DISORDERS GBR


(ADivP-02/MDivP-02)

1450 COMMON INTERFACES TO BE USED FOR VENTILATING A ITA


DISTRESSED SUBMARINE. (Ratification
Draft)

2879 PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL POLICY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF DEU


A MASS CASUALTY SITUATION

3552 SEARCH AND RESCUE - (ATP-10) GBR

7007 SEARCH AND RESCUE ELECTRONIC SYSTEM (SARES) GBR

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PART I

CHAPTER 2

The DISSUB

0201 Introduction

This chapter provides information and guidance for Surface Forces and other Submarine Escape
and Rescue resources participating in a SUBSAR operation.

The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview of conditions that may exist in a DISSUB, as
well as circumstances and facts that will affect the conduct of the intervention and/or rescue. The chapter
also details the information available to the Commander or “Senior Survivor”, in order to evaluate the
situation.

Information about emergency equipment carried aboard can be found in the National Section of
this publication or will be provided by the DLT.

0202 General Information

1. Cause of Submarine sinking

Submarines are designed to be neutrally buoyant when their main ballast tanks are full of water.
This allows them to dive and operate safely. Even if all electrical and propulsive power is lost a
submarine crew should be able to blow water out of the main ballast tanks, and other compensating tanks,
to give the submarine positive buoyancy to get it to the surface. However, if a large quantity of water
floods into the pressure hull of a submarine, after a catastrophic accident or due failure of a sea water
system which cannot be isolated, a point will be reached during the flooding when no action taken by the
submarine crew can compensate for the increased mass of the submarine and it will sink to the bottom.

2. Physiological considerations of the DISSUB crew.

The DISSUB crew may be exposed to several hazards that limit survivability and directly affect the
stay-time prior to escape and/or rescue. The most critical factors are:
- uncontrolled flooding,
- pressure rise,
- toxic atmosphere,
- temperature,
- loss of life support capability.

Where such catastrophic factors do not apply, the stay-time until surface support arrives for escape
or rescue will depend on previously mentioned conditions.

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It must be noted that if the pressure rises following the incident, the chances of carrying out a safe
escape are reduced and that a big proportion of the escapees could suffer from Decompression Illness
(DCI). These important factors will affect the crew stay-time on board a DISSUB.

It is likely that a percentage of the DISSUB personnel will suffer from injuries caused by the
accident itself or from exposure to the above conditions.

Diving and submarine medical experts are needed to make initial diagnoses of escapees and
rescuees, and treat exposure to the above conditions.

Detailed information and advice on physiological and medical issues are given in chapter 6.

0203. Possible scenarios on board of DISSUB

1. Conditions on Board the DISSUB

Conditions in the submarine will depend on the severity of the accident that has caused the sinking
and the crew’s ability to stabilize the situation. Any submarine flooding will result in some internal
pressure rise; it is therefore imperative to keep it as near to atmospheric as possible because increased
pressure, as well as temperature, atmosphere contamination and the availability of food, will adversely
affect crew’s performance and reduce their chance of survival.

It can be safely assumed that it is virtually impossible for a submarine to bring itself to the surface
should any one of her main compartments be flooded. For there to be any personnel in the DISSUB
following an accident at least one of the escape bulkheads must be intact. In the "worst" case all those who
have survived the accident will be in one of the escape compartments. The compartment may be partially
flooded and/or may have an internal pressure above 1.0 bar (absolute). Each of these possibilities will
present different problems to the DISSUB personnel and to the recovery and rescue forces.

The decision on how and when to escape is the sole responsibility of the "Senior Survivor",
although as much advice as possible should be provided by surface forces. Ideally escape should take
place after search and recovery forces have located the DISSUB and are standing by on the surface to
provide assistance. However, conditions in the DISSUB may force the Senior Survivor to start the escape
before the arrival of surface forces that may arrive at the datum and find men in the water.

Factors affecting the time of escape will include conditions of current and tidal stream, light,
weather, and the proximity of surface forces as well as the pressure and atmosphere condition in the
DISSUB. Escape will not normally be delayed beyond the limits of pressure or atmosphere sustainability,
in order to await rescue, unless the Senior Survivor considers that circumstances justify such a delay, or
the depth of the DISSUB is such that successful escape is clearly out of the question. A partial escape to
lower the burden on remaining atmosphere control equipment is also to be considered.

2. Scenarios

Scenario within the DISSUB can be conveniently divided into the following categories:

a. Dry unpressurized. In this scenario, rescue is the preferred method of saving lives. In the event
that the submarine is not located, or some other adverse event or condition exists, escape may be
necessary.

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b. Dry pressurized. In this scenario, the major problem for the DISSUB crew is to decide whether
to escape or not. In general terms if the pressure rises, an increased likelihood of decompression
sickness will occur during escape.

c. Wet unpressurized. Ambient temperatures will fall more rapidly than in the dry unpressurized
compartment and hypothermia will be a major problem.

d. Wet pressurized. All the factors in the dry pressurized compartment apply, except that the rate
of fall in ambient temperature will be significantly greater. Hypothermia may again be a major
problem.

0204 SMER facilities on board the DISSUB.

1. Escape compartments and equipment. Most nations' submarine escape and rescue policy is
based on the concept that, following an accident, if any portion of the submarine is left untouched, it must
be one of or either the forward and aft compartments. For this reason these compartments, or a pressure
tight room between compartments, are designated Escape Compartments and most SMER equipment and
materiel is concentrated in them. In one-compartment submarines, with no internal pressure tight
bulkheads, the whole pressure hull represents a single Escape Compartment.

SMER equipment and gear inside escape compartments could consist of some or all of the
following:

a. Release gear for Indicator Buoy or Messenger Buoy.

b. Submerged Signal Ejector and stores i.e. smoke candles, grenades and communications buoys.

c. Emergency Underwater Telephone with DISSUB Bleeper.

d. Means of providing oxygen.

e. Means of absorbing Carbon Dioxide (CO2).

f. Atmosphere monitoring equipment, electronically or manual (Draeger pumps and tubes)


measuring instruments for monitoring O2, CO2, CO, Cl2 and NOx levels.

g. Thermometer.

h. Absolute pressure gauge.

i. An escape tower with a common rescue seat (see STANAG 1297) around its upper hatch. Small
submarines may not have escape towers in which case only compartment escape is possible.

j. Hood Inflation System (HIS) to provide a supply of air to escapees whilst flooding up in the
escape tower immediately prior to escape and/or a built in breathing system (BIBS) to provide air
for compartment escape.

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k. Sufficient submarine escape immersion suits (SEIS) or hooded life jackets for everyone on
board with a small percentage surplus. (see paragraph 3. below for details on these elements).

l. Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) to be worn by some or all escapees.

m. Instructions on When and How to Escape.

n. Some submarines can release a life raft, which remains tethered to the DISSUB. The escapees
climb into it on reaching the surface.

o. Equipment for receiving ELSS by Pod posting.

The General lay-out and escape equipment fitted on board the different submarines can be found in
every Nation’s data contained in Section II, as well as in the rescue coordination pages of the ISMERLO
web page (www.ismerlo.org).

2. Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)

The crew will take every step to reduce their consumption of oxygen (O2 ) and production of
carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in order to prolong the survival time aboard. The posting of Emergency Life
Support Stores (ELSS) using pressure tight pods would further increase the waiting time. Nevertheless,
morale will be low and every effort must be made by surface forces to keep spirits on board the DISSUB
high, by keeping them well informed of the efforts being made on their behalf.

POD-Posting are carried out by descending pressure tight pods (by a ROV, SRV, ADS or a Diver),
from the surface, through an Escape Tower, to the DISSUB. Some submarines have specific devices to
receive PODs; other submarines may use the torpedo tubes or the escape trunks for it.

3. Escape suits /lifejackets used by submarine’s crew.

A suit that aids escape from a submarine, which meets the requirements of STANAG 1321.

The submarine personnel will utilize individual escape suit, life jacket or surface abandonment suit
which may have an integral life raft to provide thermal protection and buoyancy for personnel survival on
the surface.

0205 Ways used by the DISSUB to report on her position

For communications with the Submarine, see also chapter 5 and ATP-10 chapter 8. National data
concerning communications and ways for the submarine to announce her position are found in Part II.

1. Main Underwater Telephone (UWT). If possible, the DISSUB’s crew will use the UWT as a
primary source for communicating with the Search and Localization Forces (including the SPAG), as well
as with the Escape and Rescue Forces. It is a National responsibility to provide an update to the SMER
community with the technical data (e.g, frequencies both radio and UWT), as well as other embarked
equipment. These data can be found at Annex B of this publication, or at the coordination pages in the
ISMERLO web site (www.ismerlo.org).

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2. Emergency UWT. Some submarines are equipped with an emergency UWT, usually located at the
Escape compartments. These sets generally operate at 8 KHz and are power independent. Their primary
purpose is for communication between the DISSUB’s personnel and the surface forces once the submarine
has been located.

In addition some sets, typically sonar locator beacons, are able to transmit on additional frequencies
(details can be found at Annex B) to assist Search Forces in location or to enable Submarine Rescue
Vehicles to vector themselves on top of the DISSUB (Especially in case of very poor visibility
conditions).

3. Submarine indicator buoys. Some submarines are fitted with indicator buoys. They can be
released from inside the escape compartments or the compartments adjacent to them. They are usually
tethered to the submarine.

The buoys consist of an inflatable collar to support a radio unit that transmits on international
distress frequencies, (121.5, 243 or 406 MHz). They can be fitted with a flashing light. Because they
have a low margin of buoyancy they are not easily visible in any appreciable sea state except at short
range; it is also possible that they may not be seen in a strong tideway.

Some Indicator buoys transmit a unique 3-figure serial number. National Authorities hold up to
date lists of the indicator buoy numbers of all their submarines. Some nations, although allocated
indicator buoy numbers, have buoys which have no means of transmitting the allocated number.

Some buoys also transmit on the COSPASS/SARSAT frequencies. These buoys, named SEPIRB
(Submarine Emergency Position Indicator Radio Buoy), are normally floating. They transmit a string
containing a certain number of data such as the position coordinates (typically fixed once the buoy gets
activated), the time and an ID string identifying the single submarine. The information is received and
automatically routed to the COSPAS/SARSAT ashore station, automatically decoded by national
authority owning the submarine and in some cases automatically sent directly to the Subopauth for
subsequent actions.

4. Messenger buoys.

Submarines fitted for rescue by SRC may have a so called “messenger” buoy by each rescue seat.
The buoy is released from the escape compartment and carries a thin wire to the surface. This wire is used
to winch the SRC down onto the seat. Messenger buoys do not carry radio units.

5. Other communications buoys. Other communication buoys which could be used by the
submarine for Escape and Rescue purposes are:

a. Submarine Launched One-way Tactical buoy (SLOT Buoy). These buoys are similar to
JEZEBEL sonobuoys and can be released from the submarine signal Ejector at depths down to 300
mts or more. A short voice/CW message recorded on tape is transmitted on a pre-set VHF channel.
Frequencies available are numbers 25, 27, 29 and 31 of the normal JEZEBEL channels.

b. Expendable Communications Buoys (ECB). They can be released from the Submarine Signal
Ejector (SSE) and, in the emergency mode, transmit a pre-recorded message on 121,5 MHz, 243.0
MHz or 406.0 MHz.

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More exhaustive and educational information about typical configuration and equipments available
aboard of a DISSUB, can be found at Annex C

0206 Egress of DISSUB personnel

1. The decision on how and when to escape is the sole responsibility of the "Senior Survivor"

2. There are 4 different ways to evacuate the DISSUB:

a. Rescue. A SRV or a SRC mates with the DISSUB and equalizes the pressure between them.
Thereafter hatches separating them are opened and personnel are transferred, from the DISSUB to
the SRV or SRC and thence to a MOSHIP or a place of safety.

Some Rescue Elements are capable of TUP operations enabling therapeutic decompression of
personnel who have been exposed to raised pressure.

Due to their complicated logistic requirements Rescue Elements may take several days to get to the
scene of an accident. For this reasons most submarine operating nations continue to fit appropriate
escape systems.

b. Escape. There are two methods of escape known as Tower Escape and Rush Escape:
(1) Tower Escape. One or more men in turn, dressed with an escape and survival suit, climb
into an escape tower. Once the lower hatch has been shut the tower is rapidly flooded and
pressurized while the escapee is kept supplied with air to breath and his suit is inflated to give it
positive buoyancy. Once the pressure between the tower and the outside water column is
equalized, the upper hatch opens and the escapee makes a rapid ascent to the surface.

(2) Compartment or rush escape. Some submarines, particularly those with a single
compartment pressure hull, rely on compartment escape. The system requires the whole
compartment being flooded, pressurized and equalised, at which point an escape hatch can be
opened and each man in rapid succession makes an ascent to the surface. Some submarines
fitted with the tower escape system can revert to the rush escape method, which is similar to the
compartment escape except that it is only used if accident has caused the escape compartment
to flood uncontrollably or the escape tower to be unserviceable. The major disadvantage of this
system is that in water deeper than 30 m (100 Ft) the number of casualties caused by prolonged
time under pressure will increase with depth. The likely maximum depth from which such an
escape can be performed is 70 m (230 Ft), with a survival rate of only a few escapees.

c. Submarine Escape Capsules. A small number of submarines are fitted with an escape capsule
which the whole (or a proportion) of the crew can climb into. Once released from the DISSUB,
the capsule floats to the surface.

d. Surface Abandonment. Surface Abandonment is accomplished by egressing the


submarine using main deck or sail/fin hatches. This evolution is difficult from a submarine,
especially in higher sea states and unlike surface ships, submarines are normally not fitted with
large life rafts. Therefore, it is anticipated that numerous individuals will require extraction
from the sea. Submariners who have abandoned ship are unlikely to have experienced DCI.

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0207. Options for the Crew

Once on the sea bed the options available to the crew will depend o nthe depth in which the submarine has
sunk:

1. Below submarine collapse depth. The submarine will implode and there will be no survivors;

2. Less than submarine collapse depth but deeper than maximum escape depth. Rescue may be
conducted dependent upon:
a. DISSUB being fitted with a NATO STANAG 1297 mating seat (submarine details in Part II
National data)
b. DISSUB being shallower than maximum mating depth of available rescue submersibles
(capabilities of rescue submersibles in Part II Chapter 1).
c. Air purification capacity onboard the DISSUB being capable of maintaining air purity within
safe limits whilst awaiting arrival of rescue forces which could take several days. This period
could be extended by posting Emergency Life Support Stores (ELLS) in pressure tight pods
through and Escape Tower, but this is limited to the depth capability of the escape tower.
d. Internal bulkheads being able to withstand the sea pressure.

3. Less than maximum escape depth. Rescue is still the safest means of recovering the crew of the
DISSUB. However if conditions in the submarine are deteriorating and the cre cannot risk waiting for
rescue forces to arrive they may have to take the decision, based on instructions onboard the submarine, to
make an escape. Advice on making this decision can be given by escape and rescue experts on the surface
but in the final analysis it remains the senior survivor’s decision.

0208 Advantages of Rescue

Rescue has the advantage that the DISSUB’s crew are transferred, to the MOSHIP without being exposed
to an increased pressure. In certain circumstances, it is possible to transfer men, who have been
“saturated” at pressure, to a facility for slow decompression to atmospheric pressure. Not all rescue
systems are capable of achieving this and surface decompression t4echniques may have to be used with
their inherent risks.

0209 Disadvantages of Rescue

The major and only disadvantage of using rescue submersibles is that it may take several days for the
submersibles and their mother ships (or VOOs) to get to the scene of the accident. For this reason most
submarine operating nations, particularly those whose submarines spend a large proportion of their
operating cycle in water in which escape would be possible, continue to fit appropriate escape systems.

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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PART I

CHAPTER 3

Search and Localisation of a


Distressed Submarine

0301 Introduction

1. Guidance for Use. This chapter contains information to enable operational commanders to
assemble the forces and equipment needed to search and locate a Distressed Submarine (DISSUB), and
establish communication with her. Guidance is also given to units engaged in the search for the DISSUB
and in particular to the On Scene Commander (OSC). In Submarine Search and Rescue (SUBSAR)
Operations, the Search and Localisation Phase begins transition to the rescue phase when either the
submarine or escapees from her crew are located. When this occurs, SUBSAR operations should transition
to ATP-57 as soon as possible for the recovery of escapees and rescue of survivors. The treatment of
pressure related injuries suffered by the DISSUB’s crew are covered in ATP-57 Chapter 6.

2. Purpose. The purpose of this chapter is to:

a. Standardise SUBSAR operational procedures for the Search and Localisation of a DISSUB.

b. Provide basic information to all those who may be confronted with a submarine rescue
scenario, either a distressed submarine on the surface or on the seabed

c. Serve as a guide for all operational commanders responsible for SUBSAR operations.

3. Aim. The aim of the SUBSAR organisation is to save lives by ensuring the earliest possible
localisation of the DISSUB and the recovery of her crew. Due to the relatively limited amount of
equipment immediately available to cope with a submarine disaster, offers of assistance are likely to be
received from many nations and much of them will be needed to ensure that as many lives as possible are
saved. Naturally this will complicate the problems of assembling and coordinating all suitable units and
equipment to the scene of the accident.

Therefore while SAR is in principle a national responsibility, it is for the sake of simplicity and
speed of response that the SUBSAR organisation will be the same in war as in peace, whether it be in a
NATO exercise/operation or not. This is achieved by providing a procedure for the prompt alerting of
forces to take part in the search while Rescue Elements mobilise toward the scene of action and other
vessels prepare more specifically for the rescue or the recovery and treatment of survivors.

The procedure for the prompt alerting and search is applicable to any SUBSAR operation whether
the DISSUB is assigned to NATO or not. Immediate establishment of an alert on the ISMERLO web site

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should be considered as soon as it is suspected that a submarine is distressed on the seabed or on the
surface.

0302 Definitions

Definitions contained in this article, are those specific SAR terms exclusively used during
SUBSAR Operations. They supplement other SAR terms and definitions contained in different related
documents.

1. Check Arrival Report. A signal transmitted by a submarine immediately upon its arrival in port.
This signal may be required by the Submarine Operational Authority (SUBOPAUTH).

2. Surfacing signal. A signal transmitted by a submarine to indicate the completion of a dived period
as covered by a Diving signal. Alternatively it concludes a passage or a leg of a passage as required by the
SUBNOTE and thereby cancels any extant Diving Signal or concludes any preceding series of Subchecks
Reports

3. Authorities. The following are the specific Authorities and Command and Control (C2)
definitions for a SUBSAR operation:

a. National Authority (NA). The State or Command Authority that has sovereignty over the
DISSUB.

b. Alerting Authority (AA). Typically the Commander (SUBOPAUTH) who has operational
control of the DISSUB is responsible for initiating the Submarine Safety Communications Check
(COMCHECK) procedure, as well as the Operation SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK procedures
(see Annex 3B). The SUBOPAUTH is the Naval Authority responsible for the safe routeing of a
submarine under his Operational Control (OPCON).

c. Submarine Search and Rescue Authority (SSRA). The Naval Authority designated by the
National Authority (OPCOM) responsible for the planning and conduct of Submarine search,
escape and rescue operations.

The SSRA may be a national or NATO Maritime Component Commander or appointed maritime
commander, depending upon the requirements of the NA or the Authority which establishes the
submarine OPCON. The SSRA will operate in coordination with the relevant RCC.

The DISSUB’s NA should seek prior agreements with concerned national or NATO
Commands. The SSRA is to be nominated either in an (EX)OPORD or in the relevant tasking
documents. The responsibilities of the SSRA may be passed to or from the relevant
National/NATO Authorities.

d. Support Authority (SA). Any authority that provides assistance to the NA and/or SSRA.

e. On Scene Commander (OSC). The Commander of the military unit which first reaches the
vicinity of an accident or datum is to act as OSC until relieved or confirmed by SSRA..

In the event that the first unit on the scene is an aircraft, the aircraft Commander will retain control
of SAR operations until the arrival of a surface unit Commander, which then will assume the duties

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of OSC. In all other cases, in order to maintain continuity of Command, the Officer who
subsequently may arrive on the scene is not to assume Command by reason of seniority unless or
until:

(1) Ordered to do so by the SSRA, or

(2) In his judgement, a change of Command is essential.

f. Coordinator Rescue Forces (CRF). Designated by the SSRA. The Officer with responsibility
for coordinating and controlling the recovery of escapees and/or the rescue of the crew from the
DISSUB.

During multinational rescue responses takes advice of the Rescue Element Commanders or
National Rescue Coordinators (if assigned) to develop and task the Rescue Element Commanders
(REC) to execute the rescue plan.
The CRF may or may not be subordinated to the OSC; in case it is not subordinated, the CRF will
take the lead on the rescue operations and the OSC will support the CRF as far as it is needed,
sanitizing the area and providing help with available resources. Anyway, close coordination
between CRF and OSC is paramount for the success of the rescue operation.

g. National Rescue Coordinator (NRC). Subordinate to the CRF within the Rescue operation.
Frequently provided during multinational operations by a nation providing rescue elements. (Could
likely be a CRF if responding to his own nations disabled submarine.) Would provide the CRF
advice and recommendations on the best utilization of his/her nations assigned rescue capabilities.

h. Rescue Element Commander (REC). Subordinate to the CRF within the Rescue operation. In
Command of the Rescue Element (rescue or intervention or both) with responsibility for conducting
either the rescue of the crew, the recovery of the escapees or the intervention as indicated and
directed by the CRF. Responsible to his/her own National Authority for the operation of assigned
systems. During multinational operations provides the CRF advice and recommendations on the
best utilization of his/her assigned rescue capabilities.

When an NRC is assigned would follow national procedures with respect to command and
control relationship with the CRF.

4. Submarine Escape and Rescue Specialists. During SMER operations, the headquarters of
the SSRA should be provided with the following specialists (liaison officers):

(1) qualified in submarine operations (preferably by a Commanding Officer and an Engineering


Officer of the same class as the DISSUB),

(2) public affairs,

(3) diving and underwater medicine,

(4) diving operations

Prior to the DISSUB location (Search and Localisation phase), as well as on the scene of action
(during the Rescue Phase), experts mentioned above should also be provided to the OSC and/or to the

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CRF. Diving and underwater medical specialists might be sent to any recompression therapy centre which
could help during the operation.

0303 International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO)

ISMERLO has been established at Allied Submarine Command in Norfolk, VA. This office provides a
worldwide coordination capability and monitors the availability of Escape and Rescue Elements which
may assist any nation facing a submarine disaster. The capability is built from a small group of people,
civilian and/or military, provided by different nations to work in the area of SMER. As a global response
organisation, focused on humanitarian objectives to contribute on saving lives at sea, the ISMERLO is
encouraged to pursue the involvement of all submarine-operating nations.

0304 Terminology for SUBSAR Operations

Definitions and terms shown in table 3 -1 below are used during SUBSAR Operations. Although
some terms belong to the Rescue Phase, hence belong to ATP-57 procedures, they have also been listed on
this table only for information purposes.

Table 3 – 1 Submarine SAR Terminology

TERM DEFINITION
CHECK ARRIVAL A signal transmitted by a submarine immediately upon its arrival in port. The
REPORT signal may be required by the SUBOPAUTH
The signal originated by SUBOPAUTH when the safety of a submarine is in
COMCHECK
doubt.
Coordinator Rescue The Officer with responsibility for coordinating and controlling the recovery of
Forces (CRF) escapees and/or the rescue of the crew from the DISSUB
Last known position of DISSUB. Used as the starting point for all search plans.
Datum
It will be updated and marked when true position is known.
As it is stated in AAP-6, a DISSUB is a distressed submarine on the seabed
Distressed unable to surface. For the purpose of alert and possible mobilization of
Submarine submarine Escape and Rescue Elements, the Submarine Escape and Rescue
(DISSUB) community also calls DISSUB to a surfaced submarine needing assistance due to
a diving/safety emergency.
A signal transmitted by a submarine before it dives, indicating the date and time
Diving Signal
of dive, date and time of completion, position and reason for diving.
Emergency Life Items of stores for use by the personnel in the DISSUB to enable them to survive
Support Stores whilst awaiting rescue. Stores include such items as CO2 absorbent, O2 candles
(ELSS) and medical stores for emergency treatment of casualties.
Any method by which a man leaves a DISSUB and makes his way to the surface
Escape without direct assistance from outside Rescue Elements. A man who makes an
escape is known as an 'escapee’.
Escape Gear Ship Any ship nominated by the SSRA to carry medical stores and equipment to
(EGS) facilitate the recovery and treatment of escapees on reaching the surface.

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TERM DEFINITION
A communications buoy which can be launched by a DISSUB from a
Submarine
Submerged Signal Ejector (SSE). When on the surface it operates on a
Expendable
predetermined UHF frequency and when released in the emergency mode
Communications
transmits an emergency DF beacon which can be detected by satellites or other
Buoy (ECB)
receivers.
International Submarine Escape & Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO).
Multinational coordinating office for Submarine Escape and Rescue related
ISMERLO
issues. The office provides coordination through its web site management
system on Internet at www.ismerlo.org
A ship used to carry a Submarine Rescue Element to the scene of the submarine
MOSHIP
accident.
The Moving Haven (MHN) is the normal method by which submarines are
routed. The standard MHN is an area 20 Nautical Miles (NM) ahead, 30 NM
Moving Havens behind, and 5 NM on either side of the submarine’s planned position. The MHN
(MHN) should be reduced in size in restricted waters. In peacetime, the shape of an
MHN may be varied to suit the operational requirements. The size of the MHN
is stated in the SUBNOTE.
Responsible for the conduct of the search with the assets allocated by the SSRA.
On Scene The OSC will also carry out the peripheral activities required, among them force
Commander (OSC) protection, after the DISSUB has been located leaving the CRF free to
concentrate on saving lives.
Small radio transmitters in a container capable of withstanding pressure
Personal Locator equivalent to the maximum escape depth of the DISSUB. PLBs are worn by
Beacons (PLB) escapers (though not normally carried by all) and when switched on transmit an
emergency DF beacon. Most recent models are Satellite based.
The Codeword of an exercise which may be executed to test any or all of the
procedures and practices required in a submarine disaster. SMASHEX may
exercise specific parts of the SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK sequence as
follows:
SMASHEX
- SMASHEX ZERO equates to COMCHECK
- SMASHEX ONE equates to SUBLOOK
- SMASHEX TWO equates to SUBMISS
- SMASHEX THREE equates to SUBSUNK
The signal transmitted by a submarine at specified intervals to ensure the
SUBOPAUTH of her continued safety. No other signal received from a
submarine may replace a SUBCHECK REPORT. Non-receipt of other
SUBCHECK Report
anticipated signals should not normally give rise to undue concern although in
such circumstances it may be appropriate to initiate a SUBMARINE SAFETY
COMCHECK.
The Codeword of the procedures initiated by the SUBOPAUTH when the safety
SUBLOOK (Format of a submarine is in doubt, or when a Surfacing Signal, Check Arrival Report or
at Annex 3B) SUBCHECK Report from a submarine under his operational control becomes
one hour overdue.
Submarine Escape A team of Submarine Escape and Rescue experts augmented by medical
and Rescue specialists who are available to provide advice and assistance to the SSRA, OSC
Assistance Team and CRF.
(SMERAT)

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TERM DEFINITION
A communications buoy that can be launched by a DISSUB from a Submerged
Submarine Launched Signal Ejector. When on the surface they operate on one of a number of
One-way Tactical predetermined VHF frequencies (compatible with `Jezebel’ Passive Sonobuoy
(SLOT) Buoy monitoring channels). Although normally used to pass operational data, the buoy
could be also used by a Submarine in Distress (DISSUB).
A bell that can mate with the NATO common rescue seat but in addition has to
Submarine Rescue
be fitted with special securing arrangements. Capable of rescuing up to 6
Chamber
personnel at a time.
Submarine Rescue Any submersible craft which may be used for the recovery of personnel from a
Vehicle (SRV) DISSUB. For full details, see ATP 57.
SUBMISS is the Codeword used for an operation that will be executed in order
to initiate a fully coordinated search for a submarine that is believed to be
missing. The SUBOPAUTH will normally originate a signal with this codeword
SUBMISS (Format
when a Surfacing signal, SUBCHECK Report or a Check Arrival Report of a
at Annex 3B)
submarine is 6 hours overdue, or for one-compartment submarines 3 hours
overdue. These periods are not mandatory and will depend on the situation or
national policy.
As stated in AAP-6, a SUBNOTE is a message report originated by a submarine
operating authority providing operational and movement instructions for
Submarine Notice
submarines in peace and war, including transit and patrol area information. The
(SUBNOTE)
SUBNOTE accurately defines the route that the centre of the Submarine MHN
will follow.
SUBSUNK is the Codeword used for an operation that will be executed in order
to initiate a fully co-ordinated search for a submarine that is known to have sunk.
SUBSUNK (Format
The codeword is also used by any authority or unit to signal when having
Annex 3B)
positive information that a submarine has sunk (eg, when submarine has been
located).
Submarine Parachute A team of escape and rescue experts, augmented by medical specialists,
Assistance Group available at short notice to parachute into the water to rescue survivors and give
(SPAG) first aid medical treatment before the arrival of surface rescue ships.
A signal transmitted by a submarine to indicate the completion of a dived period
Surfacing Signal
as covered by a Diving Signal or SUBNOTE
The term survivor is only to be used for personnel who have escaped or been
Survivor recovered from the DISSUB and, in the opinion of a medical expert, are deemed
likely to live.
The time at which the SUBOPAUTH must have received a Surfacing Signal or a
Check Arrival Report from a Submarine. A SURFACING ZERO (SZER) TIME
is used when a submarine dives on a diving signal or for the last port in a
Subnote. The ARRIVAL ZERO (AZER) TIME is used in SUBNOTES only for
intermediate port visits. The meaning of AZER and SZER in terms of submarine
SURFACING and safety as described in this publication is equal.
ARRIVAL ZERO SURFACING and ARRIVAL ZERO TIME also designates the time to execute:
TIME a. SUBMARINE SAFETY COMCHECK (at SURFACING or ARRIVAL
ZERO TIME).
b. SUBLOOK (at SURFACING or ARRIVAL ZERO TIME plus one
hour).
c. SUBMISS (at SURFACING or ARRIVAL ZERO TIME plus 6 hours,
or 3 hours for one-compartment submarines).

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TERM DEFINITION
This duty should be assumed automatically by the first ship or submarine
Underwater arriving in the datum area and capable of communicating with or intercepting
Communications messages from a DISSUB. A suitably fitted helicopter may temporarily assume
Guard this duty until the arrival of the first Underwater Telephone (UWT) fitted ship or
submarine.
Submarine Rescue Any asset specifically designed or used for Submarine Escape and Rescue
Element Operations.
Any Submarine Rescue Element or set of Submarine Rescue Elements to be
Submarine Rescue
employed during the Escape and Rescue phase of a SUBSAR Operation or
System
during the preparations for this phase.
Any vessel (normally civilian) potentially available to carry onboard a
Vessel of
Submarine Rescue System to the DISSUB area. When the VOO is selected to
opportunity (VOO)
wear a System, it is called MOSHIP.

0305 Responsibilities for SUBSAR Operations

1. National Authority (NA). The NA is responsible for the Sovereignty, National Administration
and National Operations outside the immediate search area and for arranging National and NATO support
to the SSRA. By reason of financial responsibility, the NA will normally initiate the request to other
nations for logistic submarine SAR support (submarine rescue vehicles, commercial submersibles, diving
equipment, SUBSUNK stores, etc). The NA may delegate the coordination of support to the SSRA
conducting the SAR operation.

2. Alerting Authority (AA). Responsible for initiating the SUBSAR Operation, using the
SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK procedures (see Annex 3B). If the position of the DISSUB is
unknown, the AA will advise the SSRA and the OSC on the extent of the Submarine Search and Rescue
Zone and, if possible, the most likely position of the submarine. The AA will normally establish the alert
on the ISMERLO web site. The ALERT can be created by any person having access to the web site as
soon as it is known that a Submarine is in distress.

3. Submarine Search and Rescue Authority (SSRA). On receipt of a SUBLOOK, SUBMISS or


SUBSUNK signal initiated by the AA, the SSRA will:

a. Nominate or confirm the OSC and other search units.

b. Establish or confirm the search datum.

c. Call upon one or more RCCs to assist with all means available.

d. On request by the NA, coordinate the logistic support for the submarine SAR operation.

e. Be responsible for the overall conduct of the search including provision of Search Forces. The
SSRA is also to coordinate the makeup of the Rescue Force, subject to overriding NA approval of
financial outlay.

f. Keep all appropriate involved authorities informed (including MODs/CHODs), about the
progress of the SUBSAR operation and any requirements for additional support.

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ATP-57(B)

g. Coordinate with the NA the release of information to the media.

4. Support Authority. In submarine accidents requiring additional facilities, other commands shall
make available to the NA and/or SSRA all requested assistance, if applicable.

5. On Scene Commander (OSC). The OSC will:

a. Assume responsibility for the SUBSAR Operation at the scene of the accident.

b. Send Situation Reports (SITREPs) which will serve to keep his own forces, the SSRA and NA
informed on the progress of the search. These SITREPs will be sent by the OSC on arrival at the
datum and at three-hourly intervals thereafter.

c. With the arrival of the Coordinator of Rescue Forces (CRF) provide overarching control of the
force and support to the CRF to execute the rescue operation.

6. International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO).

a. The ISMERLO website in an official government website hosted by Allied Submarine


Command. The website is for rescue coordination and not operational command of the rescue
operation which is the responsibility of National Authorities and Rescue Element
Commanders. However, users should be aware that using the website is for official purposes.
During actual alerts the use of the alert pages and chat is to provide information essential in a
rescue response. This office assists in coordinating the support of submarine search and rescue
efforts of the various submarine operating nations and other national organizations
b. As ISMERLO is an official government site the release of information on the site is governed
by NATO and SMERWG overarching public affairs guidance. Specifically, the content and
the record of an Alert page, including the chat pages, are available for the use of Official
Government/Military Agencies only. The further distribution of them to the public (media,
press) is subject to the Policy dictated by the Nation owning the submarine in distress, which
requires the National Authority permission for their release. In addition, alert notification,
although unclassified, should not be further distributed outside official government channels
and media queries should be referred to the Nation whose submarine is in distress without
further comment. Allied Submarine Command and ISMERLO will not release information to
the public but will refer and/or forward requests to the appropriate National Authority for
action. ISMERLO acts as the hub to facilitate rapid exchange of information in the event of an
accident.

c. ISMERLO provides invaluable assistance in any SMER operation or exercise. Expert


assistance in any rescue operation could dramatically reduce the time to get Rescue Elements
in position and thereby improve the chance of successful submarine rescues and reduce the
potential for loss of life.

d. Further information on specific use of the rescue coordination pages will be included in a
future annex.

Any ISMERLO web site member from any nation can activate an alert (real or exercise alert).
When activating a real alert, the system automatically sends an SMS to those responsible for Submarine

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Rescue Elements and SMER experts from Nations all over the world, facilitating the rapid response of
countries and people which could help during a Submarine Rescue Operation.

0306 Submarine Safety Signals

1. Sailing and Routing of Submarines. Submarines are routed by means of SUBNOTEs. The
SUBNOTE is to indicate details, when applicable, of the time at which the SUBOPAUTH will change

2. General Instructions for Check Arrival Report. A Check Arrival Report is sent by the
submarine once in port. It cancels the prior part of her SUBNOTE and has to be sent by the submarine and
received by the SUBOPAUTH before the “Arrival Zero Time” expires.
It is to be used if ports occur in a SUBNOTE and should be repeated for every port visit in the
SUBNOTE. After the Check Arrival Report the submarine will finish sending SUBCHECK messages (if
being used). Note that after a SZER Time the submarine can continue with a surfaced transit during which
a ‘SUBCHECK’ report could still be required.

3. General Instructions for Diving Signals. Except when operating in accordance with a
SUBNOTE, a Diving Signal is always to be made before a submarine dives, whether an attendant vessel is
present or not. The Submarine is not to dive until this signal has been cleared. One Diving Signal may
cover a series of dives in any specific exercise. Format for the Diving Signal is at Annex B.

4. General Instructions for Surfacing Signals. A Surfacing Signal is transmitted by a submarine to


indicate the completion of a dived period as covered by a Diving Signal or SUBNOTE. The Surfacing
Signal must be transmitted in sufficient time to ensure its receipt by the SUBOPAUTH prior to the expiry
of the Diving Signal or Surfacing Zero time given in the SUBNOTE.

5. General Instructions for SUBCHECK Reports. In order that they can be assured of the
continued safety of submarines under their control, SUBOPAUTHs will instruct submarines to make
SUBCHECK Reports at intervals specified in SUBNOTEs, Exercise or Operation orders. SUBCHECK
Reports may be waived at the discretion of the SUBOPAUTH with national approval

6. SUBCHECK Report Interval. The time interval between consecutive SUBCHECK reports. The
allowed interval is at the discretion of the SUBOPAUTH. It is measured from:

a. ETD as promulgated in the SUBNOTE; or

b. Time of diving as stated in the Diving Signal, or

c. DTG of the last SUBCHECK Report;

whichever is the latest.

7. Safety in Exercises. In advanced exercises, the Officer Scheduling the Exercise (OSE), with prior
approval of national SUBOPAUTHS, may waive requirements for Diving or Surfacing Signals and
SUBCHECK Reports. This waiver must be included in the Exercise or Operation Order.

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0307 SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK/COMCHECK procedures

1. Circumstances Indicating the Possibility of a Submarine Disaster. A submarine accident must


be considered a possibility under any of the following circumstances:

a. A submarine fails to surface or communicate promptly following a positive or possible accident


reported by any source.

b. Contact with a submerged submarine has been lost by participating units for a period of 2
hours, when such loss of contact has not been planned or anticipated as part of the exercise or
operation.

c. There is reason to believe that a submarine has suffered some form of breakdown and requires
assistance.

d. A SUBCHECK Report, Surfacing Signal or a Check Arrival Report is overdue.

2. Indication of a Submarine Accident. Initial indication of a submarine accident may be given by


one of the following:

a. A vessel reports collision with an unknown object in an area where submarine(s) operate(s).

b. Escapees or Survivors may be sighted.

c. The sighting of wreckage, diesel fuel or air bubbles on the surface in an area where a submarine
is known to have been operating.

d. The sighting of red grenades or flares. The unexpected sighting of smoke candles or grenades
(of any colour) or a patch of fluorescent green dye on the surface may also be evidence that a
submarine accident has occurred.

e. A SUBCHECK Report, Surfacing signal or a Check Arrival Report is overdue.

f. Sighting or interception of radio signal of a Submarine Indicator Buoy or Submarine EPIRB,


normally the receipt of a SAR satellite alert.

g. Emergency HF or UHF transmission from a submarine prior to sinking or if sunk from a


Communications Buoy, an Expendable Communications Buoy or Personal Locator Beacons.

h. Interception of a distress message from a submarine, on Underwater Telephone (UWT) or a


transmission of a sonar pinger.

i. Failure of a submarine to surface when ordered during specific exercises with anti-submarine
forces.

3. Submarine Safety COMCHECK Procedure. A Submarine Safety COMCHECK is to be


initiated when:

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ATP-57(B)

a. A submarine’s SUBCHECK Report, Surfacing Signal or a Check Arrival Report is due.


(Format at Annex B).

b. A SUBOPAUTH requiring urgent communication with a submarine, or in any doubt as to its


safety, may initiate a Submarine Safety COMCHECK at any time. This is not a forewarning that a
SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK operation will soon be initiated. In most cases time must be
allowed for the submarine’s ordered broadcast reception interval to pass before escalation is
considered.

c. The SUBOPAUTH initiating Submarine Safety COMCHECK is to inform the submarine by


every available means of its initiation.

4. SUBSAR procedures SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK. Specific execution of


(SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK) is conducted with due regard of three major factors: last confirmed
contact with the missing submarine, predicted onboard survivability of the submarine, and initial
estimated time to first rescue of rescue (TTFR).

a. SUBLOOK. Is intended for use when the safety of a submarine is in doubt.


SUBLOOK is to be declared as soon as such doubt arises and, in any event when a submarine’s
SUBCHECK Report, Surfacing Signal or Check Arrival Report is overdue, based on SURFACING
ZERO TIME + 1 hour.

An initial search is made of the submarine’s Exercise Area or Moving Haven, by ships in company
with the submarine and/or submarines, Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) and helicopters that might
be in close proximity. No other ships, submarines or aircraft are to divert to join the search until
ordered to do so by the authority conducting SUBLOOK.

The SUBLOOK Signal and an ISMERLO alert if initiated, will alert other rescue responders,
nations, appropriate RCC’s and other designated personnel to the possibility of a submarine
accident. The SUBLOOK will normally state the time at which it is intended to escalate to
SUBMISS, should SUBLOOK fail to establish the safety of the submarine.

During the SUBLOOK Phase the SUBOPAUTH will:

(1) Initiate a Communication Search for delayed signals.

(2) Send a signal to the submarine advising it that SUBLOOK has been initiated for it.

(3) Alert all units operating in the vicinity to submarine's expected position. Nothing should
inhibit authorities from initiating SUBMISS or SUBSUNK, without the preliminary
SUBLOOK, if circumstances dictate so. Although 5 hours (or 2 hours for single-compartment
submarines) is the normal maximum for the SUBLOOK phase, this may be extended by the
responsible authority (e.g. in the case of submarines on passage to distant waters). If possible,
the expected time of escalation to SUBMISS should be included in the SUBLOOK Signals.

(4) Provide minimum estimated survival time based on last contact, personnel onboard and
available stores and determine estimated time to first rescue.

(5) Consider the possibility/need of activating an alert on the ISMERLO web site
(www.ismerlo.org) especially if survival is potentially limited or TTFR is near or exceeds

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ATP-57(B)

survivability. During the SUBLOOK phase, an ISMERLO alert will provide rescue responders
to make initial assessment of time to first rescue and availability of potential airlifts and vessels
of opportunity. Rescue Systems will not be mobilized during SUBLOOK.

b. SUBMISS. Is intended for use when:

(1) The initial search (SUBLOOK) has failed to establish the safety of the submarine, or

(2) A SUBCHECK Report, Surfacing Signal or Check Arrival Report is 6 hours overdue or 3
hours for one-compartment submarines based on SURFACING ZERO TIME.

(3) Circumstances indicate the need for an immediate full-scale search for a submarine. It may
be appropriate to declare SUBMISS or even SUBSUNK without first declaring SUBLOOK for
a preliminary search.

The release of the SUBMISS Signal will initiate a full-scale coordinated search that will
continue until the submarine or survivors are located. At the same time an Alert should be
activated on the ISMERLO web-page and preparations are to be made for a rescue operation.
Operational commanders should consider beginning rescue mobilization during SUBMISS
procedures when the submarine in question is predicted to have limited survivability or the
predicted TTFR is extensive. In this case actions should include early pre-positioning of rescue
system deployment aircraft for loading and mobilizing rescue systems to designated rescue
ports. These actions minimize TTFR while permitting decision makers additional time to
validate distressed submarine indications in the case where clear SUBSUNK criteria (e.g.,
direct contact with a distressed submarine, SEPIRB message reception) are not met.

c. SUBSUNK. Is intended for use when there are significant positive indications or is known that
a submarine has sunk (e.g., direct contact with a distressed submarine, SEPIRB message reception).
The signal will initiate full-scale search and rescue operation if this has not already been initiated
by declaration of SUBMISS.

0308 General instructions to the OSC and Units of the Search Force

1. Command of the Search Force. The SSRA has overall responsibility for the Search and Rescue
operation. The OSC is in command of all forces at the scene of the accident and the choice of the right
unit for this task is important. The following points are also relevant:

a. The SSRA should nominate (or confirm) the OSC as soon as possible. The OSC has to inform
all concerned as soon as he assumes the responsibilities of OSC. The ship of the OSC is to be
marked by a large red flag at the mast head by day and by an all-round flashing red light at the mast
head by night.

b. The OSC should establish a datum position Search Area based on the datum and send a
SITREP to the SSRA and the rest of the Search Force.

c. Whenever possible specialists sent to the scene of the accident should be embarked in the
OSC’s ship or in other units at the scene of action

d. The OSC should take appropriate actions in accordance with the check-off list CHARLIE (see

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ATP-57(B)

Annex 3A).

2. SUBLOOK - Action by Ships and Submarines. On receipt of SUBLOOK, ships and submarines
should take the following action:

a. Ships in company with the submarine concerned should attempt to contact the submarine by all
available means. They should also initiate a visual search in the area with available naval and air
assets as ordered by OSC.

b. Submarines in company should surface, make a Surfacing Signal and act as ordered by the
OSC.

c. Other ships and submarines take no action until ordered to do so by the SSRA. Units more than
4 hours steaming from the Search Area/Datum are unlikely to be ordered to join the search unless
the incident escalates to SUBMISS.

3. SUBMISS/SUBSUNK - Action by units available at datum within 24 hours. Ships and


submarines at sea or in harbour and able to reach the Datum within 24 hours (if not otherwise ordered by
national authorities) are to take the following action:

a. Suspend all exercises immediately.

b. Proceed at full speed to the Datum.

c. Ships exercising with non-stricken dived submarines are to initiate surfacing procedures for
these submarines immediately. Ships are to remain in the vicinity until all submarines involved in
the exercise are safely on the surface. Additionally, ships are to inform the submarines of the
emergency before proceeding.

d. Submarines are to transmit a Surfacing Signal (if appropriate).

4. SUBMISS/SUBSUNK – Action by units available at datum within 72 hours. Ships and


submarines at sea or in harbour, and able to reach the Datum within 72 hours but unable to reach it within
24 hours, are to take the following action (if not otherwise ordered by national authorities):

a. Come to immediate notice for full power, and continue with their programme.

b. If appropriate, report to the SSRA the estimated time of being ready to proceed.

c. Signal requirements for any additional personnel required for a Submarine SAR operation.
They are to take no other action unless ordered by the SSRA.

5. Details of Ships in Search Force. The SSRA requires information from units and Commands to
assist in the organization of the search. All ships proceeding to the search area are to report by
PRIORITY signal addressed to the SSRA the following information:

a. Position, course and speed, and ETA Datum.

b. Estimated fuel (percent) remaining on arrival Datum.

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ATP-57(B)

c. Helicopter details as follows:


(1) Helo(s) embarked.

(2) Helo and deck operating clearance.

(3) Helo controllers on board.

d. Medical Officer on board.

e. Medical facilities on board, such as availability of Hyperbaric Chambers, hospitalization


capabilities etc.

f. Submarine Officers and Diving Officers on board.

g. Any additional equipment fitted or any defects or shortages particularly to sonar and
communications that affect the ship’s capabilities in a submarine SAR operation, including Portable
UWT and earliest launch time of UWT fitted helicopters or aircraft.

h. Time at which control of the air search could be taken over.

The SSRA will pass to the OSC details of those units who will be joining the Search Force. It is
important to keep the communication circuit as clear as possible particularly at the start of a
SUBMISS/SUBSUNK operation and, therefore, the signal is to be kept brief. Paragraphs that are NIL
may be omitted.

6. Check Off Lists. Check of lists for Search and Localisation phase are at Annex 3A.

0309 Provision of SMER Expert Advice

During the early stages of the operation, the SSRA will be coordinating the transfer of DLT to the
scene of action.

A comprehensive two-way brief should be given as soon as the specialist advisers arrive on board.
As well as operational aspects, the brief should address possible problems, especially those after the
recovery of escapees, any advice or requirements that the visiting specialists may have, and also the
geography and domestic arrangements onboard the ship.

Once the team is onboard, it is essential that the ship provides a dedicated Liaison Officer, familiar
with the ship’s capabilities and layout, especially her communications outfit.

0310 Ability of the DISSUB to signal her position

1. The crew of a DISSUB may be able to indicate her position by one or more of the following
methods:

a. Releasing one or two indicator buoys.

b. Firing Submarine Launched One Way Transmission (SLOT) buoys which transmit on VHF

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ATP-57(B)

JEZEBEL Channels 25, 27, 29 or 31.

c. Firing an expendable communications buoy (ECB) or SEPIRB, which will transmit a SARBE
DF beacon.

d. Firing yellow or white smoke candles or red or green grenades. The smoke candles may have
fluorescent dye containers attached, which produce patches of green dye in the water, and may also
carry a message.

e. Transmitting her name in voice plain language and/or in SST mode on the UWT.

f. Transmitting on sonar, echo sounder, or by using emergency location beacons.

g. Hull tapping.

h. Releasing fuel or lubricating oil.

i. Transmitting on UWT, maybe using the DISSUB bleeper if ships are thought to be close by.

j. Switching on navigation or other underwater lights.

2. If power supplies are available, the DISSUB will try to transmit continuously. If power supplies are
not available, the DISSUB crew will concentrate on using the Emergency UWT during sonar silence
periods, or at any interval, whenever the Senior Survivor believes it may attract the attention of the Search
Force. Additional information on DISSUB means of communication and other submarine specific data
are contained on the ISMERLO website www.ismerlo.org (rescue coordination pages)

3. Unless the DISSUB is observed to sink or in case she is not COSPAS/SARSAT Buoy capable, the
crew has to expect the Search Force to arrive in the vicinity well after one of her Safety signals is overdue.
Under this condition, it is possible that the DISSUB will fire smoke candles, if able to do so, in order to:

a. Attract the attention of aircrafts.

b. Attract the attention of any surface vessels that may be heard in the vicinity.

4. The submarine's crew will probably reserve a portion of smoke candles for discharge in the
following circumstances:

a. In answer to the signal charges dropped by searching ships.

b. Shortly before escape has to be started (pending on physiological conditions inside the
submarine) in the hope that any aircraft or surface ship will see them.

0311 Conduct of the search

This article aims to provide details of the likely situation at sea in a SUBSAR operation, some of
the problems likely to be encountered and guidance on the conduct of the search.

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1. Degree of urgency. The earliest possible location of the DISSUB and/or escapees is of paramount
importance to the saving of the maximum number of lives.

2. Guidance for the OSC. The OSC is to conduct a search of the area detailed by the SSRA, using
the allocated Forces. The OSC is to transmit SITREPS both to the authorities ashore, and to his own
force. These should be sent on arrival at the datum and every 3 hours thereafter.

3. Appearance of escapees/survivors on the surface. It is possible that the crew may have escaped
from the DISSUB before the arrival of the search force, or survivors were left on surface before the
submarine sank. They will probably be wearing brightly coloured submarine escape and survival suits and
may be showing lights. Escapees may also blow whistles to attract attention and may be carrying PLBs to
assist location.

4. The datum position. If the position of the submarine is unknown, it is essential that a Datum
Position for the search should be established. If surface ships are operating with the submarine when the
accident occurs, the Senior Officer of this force is responsible for establishing a Datum Position. If no
surface ships are present when the accident occurs, the responsibility for defining the Datum Position lies
with the SSRA.

5. Datum position marking. It is essential that the Datum Position is positively marked and
accurately fixed at the earliest possible moment. The presence of a local reference point is of considerable
help to aircraft and to those vessels with limited navigational aids. When the depth of water permits, one
of the searching ships (preferably a less capable search platform) should be anchored in the Datum
Position. If this is not possible, a Dan Buoy with a radar reflector should be laid. If fitted, the ship
marking the Datum Position is to utilise a vertical search-light and IFF Mode 3 to advertise her role.

6. Promulgation of Datum Position. In all cases the position of the Datum, and how it is being
marked, should be promulgated as soon as possible together with an indication of the accuracy of the fix.

7. Priority of types of search. The priorities for types of search should be visual (and ESM), passive
sonar, active sonar. The following should be noted when conducting visual or active sonar searches:

a. Visual. The main requirement is to cover the whole area as soon as possible in order to sight an
Indicator Buoy, smoke candles, other visual indications of the submarine’s position, or indeed
survivors in the water. For this reason aircraft provide an invaluable method of searching the area.

b. Active Sonar. Not all units will be capable of this type of search. Depending on the equipment
available and the prevailing climatic and bathymetric conditions, the success of this type of search
against a bottomed, zero-Doppler target is by no means assured.

8. Employment of Submarines. The search characteristics, capabilities and recommended


employment of submarines in SUBSAR Operations (Search and Localization phase) are as follows:

a. Submarines employed are to operate on surface and to fly a yellow flag.

b. Submarines should normally be employed as follows:

(1) Visual search.

(2) Underwater Communications Guard Ship.

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ATP-57(B)

(3) Datum ship if no surface ship is available.

(4) As direct UWT link when the DISSUB has been found.

0312 Communication and signals to be used during the search

Due to the overlap the Search and Localization Phase normally will have with the Rescue Phase
during SUBSAR operations, the provisions of this article may cover all phases of the operation, although
instructions contained are more focused on the Search and Localization Phase.

1. Above water communications.


a. SUBSAR signals. Standard NATO communication procedures should be used for SUBSAR
Operations. Formats for SUBSAR signals are given in Annex 3B, including addressees. The word
SUBLOOK, SUBMISS or SUBSUNK is to be included in the text of all signals relating to
SUBSAR operations.
FLASH is mandatory as the signal precedence for the signals initiating SUBLOOK, SUBMISS or
SUBSUNK, and for signals ordering any of the operations to be carried out. Other signals
concerning the operation should not normally be given precedence higher than IMMEDIATE.

b. ISMERLO Alert. Activating an alert on the ISMERLO website will automatically provide
immediate notification to registered SMER experts and rescue system capable nations world wide

c. Traffic management suggested rule. Experience has shown that SUBSAR operations can
generate a large amount of signal traffic. It may be highly desirable for the appropriate Maritime
Commander to implement MINIMIZE. In addition, as some units may not have on-line
communications facilities, traffic addressed to such ships must be kept to a minimum. Traffic
levels can also be reduced by sensible use of a policy of reporting by exception. The SSRA should
consider this whenever issuing a blanket request for information.

d. Visual communications. Table 3-2 below contains a list of distinguishing signals used by units
and Commands, during a SUBSAR Operation

Table 3-2. List of distinguishing signals used during SUBSAR Operations

SIGNAL SHOWN BY SIGNIFICANCE

Large red flag at mast head by Indicates OSC during operation


OSC
day SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK
All-round flashing red light at Indicates OSC during operation
OSC
mast head at night SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/SUBSUNK

Yellow flag by day All submarines Submarine taking part in search

Possible message can be heard.


Two black pennants by day
Anti-submarine vessels Units in vicinity to maintain sonar
and green Very light
silence

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ATP-57(B)

SIGNAL SHOWN BY SIGNIFICANCE

Possible underwater message.


Green Very light by day or
Units in vicinity to maintain sonar
night
silence
Two white flares (rockets) by Fired by first ship to sight
Searching ships
night survivors/escapees in water

Vertical searchlight Datum ship Datum position

2. Underwater (UWT) Telephone Communications

a. UWT communications may be difficult depending on conditions. Any ship in UWT


communication with the DISSUB should ensure that her most experienced operators are available
in order that no information from the DISSUB is needlessly lost. When communications are being
attempted other units in the area should be warned to stop all unnecessary noise.
To assist in overcoming problems caused by background noise, high sea states etc, a three letter
UWT code has been devised to be used only when communicating with a DISSUB (see annex 3C).

b. Underwater Communications Guard. This duty should be assumed automatically by the first
ship or submarine arriving in the area and capable of communicating with, or intercepting messages
from a sunken submarine. Subsequently the OSC is to detail the most suitable ship available and,
as the search develops, a Guard Ship should be detailed for each searching Group. A helicopter
fitted with UWT may temporarily assume the duty of Underwater Communications Guard until the
arrival of the first UWT-fitted ship or submarine.

c. Initial calling of the DISSUB. Having marked the Datum position, the first ship capable should
carry out a periodic listening watch on sonar and attempt to establish communication by UWT. A
visual or active sonar search should not prejudice this initial action.

d. Use of UWT. No ship, submarine or helicopter of the Search Force is to transmit any
underwater signal unless:

(1) Suspected UWT Communications have been received from what appears to be the
DISSUB.
(2) The initial call is being made (See paragraph 0312.2.(c) above).
The time of all calls on UWT made by searching ships is to be logged so that subsequent
reports of interception of UWT messages can be evaluated.
Throughout the entire SUBSAR operation, ship and submarine names should be used on UWT.

e. Firing of Single Charges During Search. In order to keep the stricken submarine informed of
the presence and movements of surface ships, and indicate to her that distress signals will be seen,
the Search Force is to fire a single grenade every 10 minutes. If the Search Force is split into
several groups, the OSC must decide whether more than one ship should fire the charges; if it is
decided that the spread of forces merits more than one unit firing single charges, the OSC must co-
ordinate the firings to avoid confusion and interference.

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ATP-57(B)

f. Sonar Silence Periods. To give the DISSUB the best chance of being heard, all units of the
Search Force in the probability area are to stop all sonar transmissions from minute 00 to minute
05, and minute 30 to minute 35 of every hour. If possible, ships and submarines are to stop engines
during these periods. However, if the prevailing conditions make this impracticable, the OSC
should order units to slow to below cavitation inception speed during these periods.

The OSC may allow Sonar Silence Periods to be broken if:

(1) Navigational constraints make slow speed impracticable.


(2) The effectiveness of the sonar search over a particular area is jeopardised at a critical stage.

Units in contact with an object on the seabed are also to maintain the silence periods, unless
conditions are so bad and the contact so faint that it is unlikely to be lost if transmissions are
ceased. Other units in the vicinity are to be informed.

0313 Conduct when contacting with the DISSUB

1. Actions on Hearing Transmissions from the DISSUB. The ship, submarine or helicopter
hearing UWT, sonar, echo sounder transmissions or hull tapping is to:

a. Initiate the signal for sonar silence by any available method. The visual signal during
submarine SAR operations is:

(1) By day - Ships fly two black pennants and fire a green Very light. Submarines fire a green
grenade. Helicopters fire a green Very light.
(2) By night - As by day, less the pennants.

b. Answer the call herself if capable.

(1) Assume the duties of Underwater Communications Guard, if capable, keeping the OSC
informed.
(2) Ships in the vicinity are to reduce to slow speed and maintain sonar silence while the signal
for silence is in force.

c. Special terminology. The following terminology should be noted:

(1) “In Communication With”. The expression 'in communication with' is not to be employed
unless the DISSUB has answered a call or has replied to a specific underwater morse or voice
signal, originally transmitted by one of the Search Force.
(2) ”Heard”. The term 'heard' is to be used to describe the receipt of any unusual transmissions
which do not in themselves comprise a call, answer to a call or indefinite signal.

2. Actions on Sighting a Submarine Indicator Buoy. The sighting of a Submarine Indicator Buoy
may well be the first indication of a submarine accident. Consequently, on sighting such a buoy, the
following actions are to be taken:

a. Report sighting by the fastest means available.

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ATP-57(B)

b. If possible, report the number of the buoy to enable its source to be identified by the
SUBOPAUTH.

Establishing the status of a buoy may be problematic; however, its physical state, whether or not it
is still transmitting, and any relative movement will help in evaluating whether or not there has been a
submarine accident. It is vital that the wire should not be broken. Under no circumstances should a boat
be attached to the buoy, nor turns taken on the wire once it has been established that the buoy is not adrift.
Divers should on no account to use the Indicator Buoy wire to pull them down to the DISSUB.

Full details of the Submarine Indicator buoys carried by each class of submarine are given in the
section II of this publication.

0314 action when the DISSUB has been located

1. Ending Search and Localisation phase. With the location of the DISSUB, the Search phase of
the operation is complete and Recovery and/or Rescue should follow without delay in accordance with
ATP-57 procedures.

It is possible that the DISSUB will be located prior to the arrival of the Recovery or Rescue Forces,
it is also possible to find escapees on the surface. In this eventuality the OSC should follow the procedures
for Submarine Rescue stated in ATP-57) as far as possible.

The designated Coordinator Rescue Forces (CRF) will take the lead on the Rescue Phase/Operation
on arrival at the scene, The OSC for the Search and Localisation Force is to support the CRF

2. Communications with the DISSUB. As soon as possible after the DISSUB has been found
communications should be established using:

a. Marine Sound Signals (MSS). MSS or equivalent under water signals charges are to be fired to
indicate the presence of surface vessels. This is not essential if good two-way UWT
communications have been established with the DISSUB.

b. UWT. Communications should be established with the DISSUB on UWT if possible, and the
OSC is to nominate a unit as UWT Link as soon as this had been done. Other units in the vicinity
should keep a listening watch. Full use should be made of any recording facilities that are
available.

0315 Situation reports

To ensure that SUBSAR Forces at sea receive appropriate support from shore authorities, the OSC
should send frequent, but brief, SITREPS to the SSRA. From these, the SSRA should compile a
composite signal to keep other authorities informed.

0316 Management of Search Forces

If the exact position of the submarine is not known, and the area to be searched is large, the OSC should
divide his forces into groups and decentralize the tactical command of each group. If the area of

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ATP-57(B)

probability is small (for example, if the submarine has been seen to sink) it will probably be better to keep
the force concentrated. If there is a large number of surface assets, it may be advantageous to establish a
holding area in which ships wait until they are allocated tasks. This will prevent overcrowding of the
Datum at the start of the operation.

0317 Use of Surface Assets

The employment of surface assets on particular types of search will depend on the following factors:

1. The size of the area to be searched.

2. The thoroughness of the air/visual search.

3. Number of units available

4. The capabilities and limitations of individual assets.

5. Navigational facilities in the area.

0318 Search Profiles

There are two basic alternatives for the search profile: Line abreast or Area. The choice of profile will
depend on many variables, but some points for consideration by the OSC are given in following
paragraphs.

0319 Line Abreast Search

1. This appears to provide the beast means of covering an area quickly and can be used for all three
search types. The Search Force should be split into groups before the line becomes too unwieldy.

2. Command, Control and Communication within the Force and groups is straightforward, and
coordination of UWT calls. Grenade signals and sonar silence is easily achieved.

3. This search is more likely to ensure complete coverage of a given area than an area search would
do.

4. Unless sonar-fitted helicopters are available for lengthy periods, they will not add much to the
sonar swept path.

5. There can be problems with units catching up and rejoining the line having investigated a contact.
This problem can be alleviated in shallow waters it MCMV’s are designated as “pouncers” specifically to
investigate contacts and kept in the rear.

6. The speed of the search will not necessarily be the optimum speed for all ships.

7. If navigation facilities are limited, a line abreast search will probably leave fewer gaps

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ATP-57(B)

0320 Area Search

This will normally involve the allocation of boxes or sectors to units of the Search Force:

1. This is simple for the OSC to order.

2. Newly arriving units can be deployed to their allocated areas and start searching without delay.

3. The size of the ship’s allocated area can be adjusted to suit her capabilities.

4. Units can investigate their own contacts without disrupting the overall search.

5. A sonar-fitted helicopter can be profitably allocated to a ship, even for a short time.

6. Ships can search at their optimum speed.

7. Navigation may prove difficult, and care must be taken to avoid leaving gaps.

8. The Command and Control problem is not easy to overcome as in the Line Abreast Search,
however aircraft can be used to relay messages.

0321 Guidance on Speed, the Use of Medium range Sonar

As the speed of ships in the search increases:

1. The size of the area covered in a given time increases.

2. The probability of missing a sonar contact increases

3. The distance travelled between sonar silence periods increases, so the probability of a submarine
being heard decreases.

4. Self-noise increases

Experience has shown that the maximum Visual Search speed should be 20 knots, and that the maximum
Sonar Search speed should be 15 knots.

0322 Guidance on Distance Apart

As the distance between ships in a line abreast search increases:

1. The swept path increases but;


2. The likelihood of missing a sonar contact increases and;
3. The probability of a submarine being heard decreases.

Experience has shown that the maximum distance apart for a Visual or Passive Search should be 3 miles,
and for an Active Sonar Search normal rules for stationing ASW units should be used.

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ATP-57(B)

0323 Employment of Aircraft

1. Aircraft are ideal platforms for carrying out a rapid visual search of the Area and localization of
distress beacons using ESM. In addition, helicopters can be very useful when employed as “pouncers” to
extend the swept path of individual ships, or to investigate sighting reports. The tasking of MPA under the
control of the appropriate RCC should include:

a. Visual, radar and radio watch.

b. Dropping of grenades in a 7 charge pattern as follows:

3 charges at 5 seconds interval


30 seconds pause
1 charge
30 seconds pause
3 charges at 5 seconds interval

This pattern is to be dropped in the last known position of the submarine. Upon hearing this signal the
submarine will surface if able, and communicate with the aircraft on 277.8 Mhz (Submarine SAR
reporting net). If the submarine is unable to surface it will fire a smoke candle (or grenade) to indicate its
position. If the aircraft does not establish contact with the submarine within minutes, then another
identical pattern of charges is to be dropped in the submarine’s predicted position, and repeated every 30
minutes whilst a search is carried out until contact is made, or until the OSC assumes coordination
responsibilities.

2. MPA are also often capable of providing a valuable communications relay platform.
Note: Smoke Floats. The smoke candles fired by submarines are easily confused with smoke floats
dropped by aircraft. Therefore air crews should avoid dropping smoke floats unless absolutely essential. If
smoke floats are dropped, a report is to be signalled by the aircraft giving the position of release and the
expected burn time. This report should be relayed to all ships and Authorities involved in Search
Operation.

0324 Employment of Mine Countermeasures Vessels

1 Minesweepers carry no equipment of use in finding bottomed submarines, but have the ability to
bottom sweep as a last resort. They should normally be used for visual search operations or for marking
the datum.

2 Mine hunters are equipped with a very high frequency short-range sonar which gives a detailed
visual display at the bottom. Where the bottom is uncluttered they can proceed at up to 6 knots searching
at 400 yard swept path, though a slower speed is normal. A mine hunter’s sonar normally operates only to
a depth of 70 meters, but with some restriction of capability it can be used to 100 meters. MCMV’s should
be used to identify MRS contacts in shallow waters.

3 All mine hunters carry divers capable of diving to 55 meters. HUNT class MCMV’s also carry a
Remote Control Mine Disposal System (RCMDS). This is a bottom following vehicle incorporating an
underwater TV camera and searchlight with a proven operating depth of 70 meters. The RCMDS’
manoeuvrability is limited, but it has been successful in identifying bottomed contacts of submarine size.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

4 Mine hunters can also be used to mark the position of seabed contacts with extreme accuracy
(within one metre), but the surface mark is small and may be difficult to see in high sea states. After the
primary visual search, the best role for these ships is searching relatively small areas (tipically one mile
square) around a reasonable accurate datum. They are also useful for classifying or identifying contacts
found by other means.

5 Mine hunters should be used to lay homing beacons adjacent to the DISSUB. Frequencies of such
beacons should be compatible with sonars fitted in rescue submersibles/ROVs likely to be operating in its
vicinity.

0325 Marking the Submarine’s Position

1. It is important that the DISSUB’s position is not lost, particularly in a tideway, in rough conditions or
at night. The position should therefore be marked by a Dan Buoy, or by anchoring a ship within sonar
contact range (but at least 50 yds from the DISSUB) as soon as possible. However, this should not be
allowed to interfere with the early recovery of escapers.
2. Care should be taken not to foul the submarine with the anchor or cable, either at the time of letting
go, or subsequently if the ship swings.

Table 3-3 Pyrotechnic Light Signals

One Red, or a succession of Reds By Submarine: Attempting emergency surfacing, keep clear
One Green By Submarine: Have fired exercise torpedo
Two Whites, 3 minutes apart By Submarine: I am surfacing, keep clear
One Yellow By Submarine: Ascending to periscope depth
Red Smoke By Submarine: Attempting emergency surfacing. Keep clear
Two White or two Yellow, (3 seconds By Submarine: I am surfacing. Keep clear
apart)

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

ANNEX 3A

Check Off lists


during Search and Localization phase

3A01 Check-off list ALFA:


SSRA

Operation SUBLOOK Search Phase

1. Initiate SUBLOOK Implementing Signal to Surface Forces in the vicinity of the Search Area,
nominating OSC (Annex 3B).

2. Consider Alerting the competent RCC for coordination of potential support of the maritime incident
that may be occurring in its area .

3. Establish availability of Air and Surface assets for search from appropriate authorities

4. Request Air Search through appropriate authorities

5. Establish location of expert personnel with appropriate Authorities (see ATP 57).

6. Nominate units to transport personnel to the search area.

7. Have National RCC initiate a NOTAM and a Naval Warning (Notice to Mariner)

8. Pass to OSC (when known) details of those units who will be joining the Search Force.
9.Consider activating an Alert on the ISMERLO web site (www.ismerlo.org). (Tel.: (+1) 757-836-1000.

One Hour After Initiation of SUBLOOK:

10. Initiate a SITREP to MOD of DISSUB nation, the SUBOPAUTH and any other appropriate
authorities. Include actions taken and when it is intended to escalate to SUBMISS.

ORIGINAL
I-3-A-1
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
I-3-A-2
ATP-57(B)

3A02 Check-off list BRAVO:

SSRA

Operation SUBMISS Search Phase

1. Initiate SUBMISS implementing signal and activate an Alert on the ISMERLO web site
(www.ismerlo.org) if not previously done.

2. Nominate OSC.

3. Order all suitable assets immediately available to close the datum as soon as feasible and search as
ordered by OSC

4. Alert the competent RCC of the maritime incident in its area for coordination of potential support .

5. Request Air Search through the appropriate authorities

6. Bring all suitable vessels in harbour to immediate notice for sea if they are available, and sail them
as required

7. Establish location of expert personnel with appropriate authorities

8. Nominate units to transport personnel to the search areas, and initiate the transfer

9. Re-distribute local manpower and equipment (eg helicopters) to make up any shortfalls in units of
the search force

10. Assemble additional personnel to augment units ashore and afloat involved in the search.

11. Check with the SUBOPAUTH that all other submarines in the area have surfaced and appropriate
safety signals have been received

12. Consider implementing MINIMIZE

13. Have National RCC initiate a NOTAM and a Naval Warning (Notice to Mariner)

Note: Actions in paragraph 4, 6, 7 and 12 may well have been completed if SUBLOOK preceded the
initiation of SUBMISS

ORIGINAL
I-3-A-3
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
I-3-A-4
ATP-57(B)

3A03 Check-off list CHARLIE:

OSC

Search Phase

Prior to arrival at the Datum/Search Area

1. Inform all concerned of assumption of role of OSC. Establish communications with CRF/REC
once nominated

2. Establish a Search Area plan based on Datum position.

3. Fly red flag at masthead, (all-round flashing red light by night).

4. Implement SAR COMPLAN.

5. Order Air Search of Area, ensuring aircrews are briefed on signalling and the use of smoke floats.

6. Establish priorities for type of search.

7. Consider employment of special assets, eg aircraft, MCMs and submarines.

8. Prepare to receive specialist advisers, possibly by parachute.

9. Nominate Escape and Rescue Expert’s liaison officer (ATP 57).

On Arrival at the Datum/Search Area:

10. Implement Search Plan.

11. Transmit SITREP to SSRA and the rest of the Search Force.

12. Mark the Datum position and promulgate the position, how it is being marked and an indication of
the accuracy.

13 Order suitable unit to make Initial Call to DISSUB.

14. Detail Underwater Communications Guard.

15. Institute Sonar Silence periods.

16. Co-ordinate 10 minute firings of single charges.

17. Take appropriate individual ship actions (Annex A - Check-off list DELTA).

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

On Location of the DISSUB:

18. Initiate SUBSUNK.

19. Mark the DISSUB’s position.

20. Prepare to hand over responsibility for the recovery/rescue of the DISSUB’s crew to CRF.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

3A04 Check-off list DELTA:

INDIVIDUAL UNITS OF THE SEARCH FORCE

SUBLOOK

1. Ships in company attempt to contact the submarine by all available means.

SUBMISS/SUBSUNK

Units Proceeding to the Datum:

2. Suspend all exercises.

3. Surface any submarines in company,

4. Submarines surface and send a Surfacing Signal.

5. Submarines fly a yellow flag.

6. Be prepared to take on OSC duties.

7. Change frequency to SAR COMPLAN as ordered by OSC.

8. Prepare helicopters for flying.

9. Prepare explosive charges and boats.

11. Prepare diving equipment.

12. Post extra lookouts.

13. Brief Officer of the Watch (OOW), lookouts, aircrew on visual indications of a DISSUB’s position.

14. Brief OOW and aircrew not to use of smoke markers.

15. Brief OOW and Sonar Operators on underwater communications, sonar silence periods and
reactions on detection of the DISSUB.

16. Ensure most experienced UWT operators are available for communicating with DISSUB on UWT.

17. Make physical and personnel preparations for reception of escapees.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

ANNEX 3B

Formats for SUBSAR signals


The following formats have to be used as applicable

3B01 DIVING signal

PRIORITY

FM: NAME OF SUBMARINE

TO: SUBOPAUTH (Always)


Appointed Maritime Commander (if command delegated).

INFO: PREVIOUS AND/OR NEXT SUBOPAUTH


SSRA
SENIOR OFFICER COMMANDING SHIPS IN COMPANY/EXERCISING
WITH SUBMARINE
Appointed Maritime Commander (if command not delegated).

NATO CONFIDENTIAL

SIC LGQ

1. DIVING AT (Date and Zone lime). ........ ZULU UNTIL (Date and Zone Time)
............. ZULU IN ACCORDANCE WITH (WPP) .............. AMENDED TO CHANGE
............... OR IN AREA (LATILONG) ............ FOR (exercise) ....................

2. SUBCHECK REPORT INTERVAL (optional-only if on Subcheck).

All figures quoted in the text are to be spelt out in full; lettered abbreviations should also be spelled
out using the phonetic alphabets.

ORIGINAL
I-3-B-1
ATP-57(B)

3B02 COMCHECK

The AA is to originate a signal in the following form:

FLASH:
FM: AA
TO: NAME OF SUBMARINE (Normally by separate signal)
INFO NA
AIG 5652
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA
ADDITIONAL ADJACENT COMMANDERS WHO HAVE/MIGHT HAVE SEARCH ASSETS.
SUBOPAUTH DESIGNATED IN SUBNOTE AS HOLDING NOK

NATO UNCLASSIFIED
SIC LGS/SIJ
SUBMARINE SAFETY COMCHECK. NAME OF SUBMARINE, INTERNATIONAL
CALLSIGN (IN WORDS).

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

3B03 SUBLOOK

1. The AA is to originate a signal in the following form:

FLASH
FM AA
TO AIG 5652
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA
NAME OF SUBMARINE
ADDITIONAL ADJACENT COMMANDERS WHO HAVE/MIGHT HAVE SEARCH ASSETS
(IF APPROPRIATE)
NATIONAL AUTHORITY DESIGNATED IN SUBNOTE AS HOLDING NOK
ADDITIONAL NATIONAL AUTHORITIES (IF APPROPRIATE).

NATO UNCLASSIFIED
SIC LHA
1. SUBLOOK
2. NAME OF SUBMARINE, INTERNATIONAL CALLSIGN, INDICATOR BUOY
NUMBERS ....FWD....AFT, CREW STRENGTH
3. REASON AND AREA
EG (A) SUBCHECK REPORT OVERDUE AT ....ON PASSAGE...TO..., LAST KNOWN
POSITION OR (B) CONTACT LOST SINCE....DURING EXERCISE....IN AREA....,
LAST KNOWN POSITION
4. SSRA IS....
5. IS/IS NOT FITTED WITH A RESCUE SEAT
6. INTEND TO ESCALATE TO SUBMISS AT ....

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

2. On receipt of a SUBLOOK signal from AA the designated SSRA is to initiate search operations
and originate a signal in the following form:

FLASH
FM SSRA
TO AIG 5652
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA
OTHER AIGS (IF APPROPRIATE)
ADDITIONAL ADJACENT COMMANDERS WHO HAVE/MIGHT HAVE SEARCH ASSETS
(IF APPROPRIATE)
ADDITIONAL NATIONAL AUTHORITIES (IF APPROPRIATE)
SHIPS AS APPROPRIATE
AIR BASES AS APPROPRIATE

NATO UNCLASSIFIED
SIC LHA
CARRY OUT OPERATION SUBLOOK
NAME OF SUBMARINE/INTERNATIONAL CALLSIGN INDICATOR BUOY NUMBER
...FWD ...AFT
REF: ATP 10 CHAPT 8 / ATP 57 CHAPT 3
1. THE FOLLOWING FORCES .... ARE TO PROCEED WITH ALL DESPATCH AND
SEARCH ...
2. R/V FOR PARTICIPATING FORCES
3. DUTIES AND LOCATIONS OF AUTHORITIES INVOLVED
4. AIR SEARCH DETAILS

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

3B04 SUBMISS/SUBSUNK

1. The AA is to originate a signal in the following form:

FLASH
FM AA
TO AIG 5652
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA
NAME OF SUBMARINE
NATIONAL AUTHORITY DESIGNATED IN SUBNOTE AS HOLDING NOK
ADDITIONAL ADJACENT COMMANDERS WHO HAVE/MIGHT HAVE
SEARCH ASSETS (IF APPROPRIATE)
ADDITIONAL NATIONAL AUTHORITIES

NATO UNCLASSIFIED
SIC LHA/LHN
1. SUBMISS/SUBSUNK
2. NAME OF SUBMARINE AND INTERNATIONAL CALLSIGN
3. LAST KNOWN POSITION ...AT .../ESTIMATED POSITION.....AT.....(OBSERVED TO
SINK IN POSITION...)
4. SSRA IS ....
5. SUBMARINE INDICATOR BUOY NUMBERS FWD AFT ...)(IF FITTED)
6. IS/IS NOT FITTED WITH A RESCUE SEAT

2. On receipt of a SUBMISS or SUBSUNK signal from the AA or any unit/authority reporting the
sinking of a submarine, the designated SSRA is to initiate or continue search operations by originating a
signal in the following form (including as much information as possible to minimise the need for follow
on traffic):

FLASH
FM SSRA
TO AIG 5652
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA
OTHER AIGS AS APPROPRIATE
SHIPS AS APPROPRIATE
OTHER NATIONAL AUTHORITIES

ORIGINAL
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ADJACENT MARITIME COMMANDERS

NATO UNCLASSIFIED
SIC LHA/LHN
CARRY OUT OPERATION SUBMISS/SUBSUNK
NAME OF SUBMARINE/INTERNATIONAL CALLSIGN (INDICATOR BUOYS
FWD....AFT....)
REF: ATP 10 CHAPT 8 / ATP 57 CHAPT 3
1. SHIPS: PROCEED/PROCEEDING WITH ALL DESPATCH TO START SEARCH
2. DATUM POSITION FOR SEARCH ... DEPTH (IN METRES), POSITION TO BE MARKED
BY ...
3. INITIAL AREA TO BE SEARCHED BY
(A) SHIPS:…
(B) AIRCRAFT:…
4. OSC IS ...
5. RENDEZVOUS AIR FORCES (IF NOT THE SAME AS THE DATUM)
6. DUTIES/LOCATION OF AUTHORITIES INVOLVED\
7. (NAMES OF SHIPS) EMBARK:
(A) SUBMISS STORES.
(B) RECOMPRESSION CHAMBERS.
(C) MEDICAL OFFICERS.
(D) NATIONAL LIAISON OFFICERS.
(E) MEDIA

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3B05 DISSUB LOCATED

Any unit or Authority aware that a submarine has sunk or the OSC when the DISSUB has been
located, is to originate a signal in the following form.

FLASH
FM ...
TO AIG 5652
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA
APPROPRIATE AREA COMMANDER(S)
APPROPRIATE SUBOPAUTH(S)

NATO UNCLASSIFIED
SIC LHA
SUBSUNK
1. NAME OF SUBMARINE (IF KNOWN)
2. OBSERVED TO SINK IN POSITION ......AT......(or LOCATED SUBMARINE SUNK IN
POSITION......AT......)

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3B06 Request for SMER Assistance

A nation requesting SMER assistance should use the following format:

IMMEDIATE
FM NATION
TO NATION(S) AND AIG 5652
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA
INFO SSRA
OSC

SIC LHA/LHN
REQUEST FOR SMER ASSISTANCE
REF: ATP-10 CHAPTER 8 / ATP-57 CHAPTER 3
1. SUBMARINE (NAME) MISSING/SUNK IN (APPROXIMATE) POSITION ...
2. NA IS ...
3. SSRA IS ...
4. OSC IS ...
5. NATIONS ARE REQUESTED TO REPORT TO SSRA INFO NA AND POST TO THE
ISMERLO WEBSITE THE READINESS STATUS OF THE FOLLOWING:
A. RECOMPRESSION CHAMBERS
(1) FITTED IN SHIPS
(2) PORTABLE
(3) SHORE BASED
B. LIFE/MEDICAL SUPPORT STORES
C. SUBMARINE RESCUE SYSTEMS
D. PERSONNEL
(1) SUBMARINE PARACHUTE ASSISTANCE GROUP
(2) OTHER ASSISTING PERSONNEL
(3) DIVING/MEDICAL PERSONNEL
E. OTHER

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3B07 National SMER Assistance Available

A nation replying an SMER assistance request should use the following format:

FM NATION
TO NATION REQUESTING SMER ASSISTANCE
INFO SSRA
ALLIEDSUBCOM DET NORFOLK VA

SIC LHA/LHN
READINESS STATUS OF SMER ASSETS
REF: ATP-10 CHAPTER 8 / ATP-57 CHAPTER 3
1. SUBMARINE RESCUE SYSTEMS
A. LOCATION
B. AVAILABILITY
C. ETA
D. MEANS OF TRANSPORT
2. SHOREBASED RECOMPRESSION CHAMBERS
3. SHIPBORNE RECOMPRESSION CHAMBERS (A. TO D. AS PARA 1. ABOVE)
4. PORTABLE RECOMPRESSION CHAMBERS ASHORE (A. TO D. AS PARA 1. ABOVE)
5. MEDICAL LIFE SUPPORT STORES (A. TO D. AS PARA 1. ABOVE)
6. SUBMARINE ESCAPE/RESCUE EXPERTS (A TO D. AS PARA 1. ABOVE)
7. SUBMARINE/DIVING MEDICAL EXPERTS (A. TO D. AS PARA 1. ABOVE)
8. OTHER INFORMATION

Notes:

Delete unused paragraphs.


Nations possessing submarine rescue Elements should automatically signal their availability/ readiness
status on receipt of a SMER alert message, as well as confirm their data specified in ATP-57 Part II and
on the ISMERLO web site (www.ismerlo.org rescue coordination pages).

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PART I

CHAPTER 4

Mobilization of SMER Elements


0401 Introduction

Mobilization and assembly of SMER Elements are most likely to comprise SMER capabilities
from different nations, and can be considered as a Multinational SUBSAR Response.

The SSRA, appointed by the National Authority (NA), will make the decisions on how the
operation is to be conducted and provide appropriate recommendations to the NA, for issuing a request
for SMER assistance, to meet the requirements of the operation.

Chapter 3 outlines NA and SSRA responsibilities, as well as the signal message formats for SMER
assistance and SMER facilities availability.
The logistic requirements of deploying one or more rescue elements will likely be the most
challenging aspect of the entire rescue operation. This deployment will require heavy airlift, cranes, road
transport, infrastructure needs, welders, and other labour elements.
A typical decision making flowchart is provided, as a guidance, in Table 4-1

Table 4-1 - SSRA decision making flowchart

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The ISMERLO website has been developed to quickly post information on available Rescue
Elements as well as the methods to mobilize equipment rapidly to the scene. Nations should make every
effort to keep posted information up to date so that National and Multinational Command and Control
Authorities can have a clear picture of the proper development of the rescue operation and the status of
available means. Although being the principal coordinating focal point, ISMERLO itself is not a
Command and Control Authority. The movement of equipment and orders to rescue forces will use
standard command and control circuits.
Validity at the Rescue Element Status on the ISMERLO Web Site is the key to the selection of the
preferred Rescue elements and the Mobilization Airport-Seaport Combination (MASC).

Each nation is encouraged to have their own dormant rescue plans, with recognized and approved
airport-seaport combinations and associated infrastructure capable of handling such Rescue elements.
These can be posted and integrated into the ISMERLO website to help minimize time to first rescue. It is
emphasized that this work should be coordinated with nations owning Rescue Elements, which may be
considered as systems to be received in the event of a DISSUB incident.
Information about these combinations will be displayed on the ISMERLO web site
(www.ismerlo.org).

It may also be necessary to deploy the Rescue Elements to nations that do not operate submarines
and are not familiar with this type of operation. In these cases, the Nation owning the Rescue Element(s)
liaises with the nation where its system is to be deployed.

0402 SMER Elements composition and tasks

SMER Elements can be divided into two main groups, both of them coordinated by the CRF:

1. Group 1: Recovery Forces.

a. Composition. These Forces may comprise one or more of the following main elements:

- Military Ships and Helicopters


- Civilian Ships and Helicopters
- Escape Gear Ship (EGS) with First Reaction Stores (1RS), including hyperbaric facilities
for personnel recovered from the surface,
- Submarine Parachute Assistance Group (SPAG),
- DISSUB Liaison Team (DLT),
- Submarine Escape and Rescue Advisory Team (SMERAT).

b. Tasks.

Recovery Forces main task will be to recover escapees from the surface, stabilize and triage, as
necessary, with subsequent timely transfer to the most suitable facility for definitive care. If
available, a SPAG could also be deployed to render initial medical assistance, as required.

Recovery Forces are likely to arrive at the datum in advance of the Rescue Elements.

Where there are multiple escapees requiring hyperbaric treatment, which exceeds the capacity
of chambers at the datum, the OSC will require transportation support to transfer them to shore
facilities.

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2. Group 2 : Rescue Forces.

a. Composition. These forces may comprise one or more of the following elements:

- MOSHIPS transporting Submarine Rescue Elements for both Intervention and/or Rescue,
- DISSUB Liaison Team (DLT).
- Submarine Escape and Rescue Advisory Team (SMERAT).

b. Tasks. Rescue Elements are most likely to be divided into two types of operation:

(1) Operations with Intervention Elements.

Ships with Intervention Elements will normally be the first units arriving at the scene of the
incident.

Intervention Elements main tasks may include:

- survey,
- debris removal and DISSUB preparation for SRV/SRC mating,
- transponder field preparation,
- ventilation and depressurisation operation,
- conducting ELSS POD-posting,
- providing safety redundancy for the SRV/SRC under mating operations with the
DISSUB.

(2) Operations with SRVs and/or SRCs.

SRVs and SRCs will normally be carried on board civilian or military MOSHIPS from the
MOPORT to the DISSUB’s Datum area. Rescue Forces main task will be to rescue the
DISSUB´s personnel.

3. Submarine Escape and Rescue Advisory Team (SMERAT)


This team is comprised of SMER experts, augmented by medical specialists. Its medical expertise
will conduct the treatment to rescuees. The SMERAT should be embarked on the most suitable vessel,
civilian or military deployed to the DATUM area and may transfer during the operation as the situation
demands

For more information regarding the SMERAT (organization), see ATP-57 chapter 6.

0403 Other SMER Experts and Elements available

1. General. Every SMER Element mobilized will have its own System Operators and SMER experts.

ATP-57 Part II contains national SMER data. Changes to this information should be reported to
ISMERLO as the situation demands. The latest and most reliable information reported is posted on the
rescue coordination pages of the ISMERLO web site (www.ismerlo.org).

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2. DISSUB briefing packs. These packs should include detailed and relevant information for the
OSC, CRF, pilots and operators, which are required for the Rescue, for instance:

– General drawings and dimensions of the DISSUB;


– Details of escape and rescue fittings, as well as obstacles;
– Emergency Life support Stores (ELSS) re-supply details;
– Photographs of submarine hull, fittings and rescue seats;
– Data which, because of classification or sensitivity have not been included into ATP-57 Part II

0404 Priority for assembly of forces

At the same time the SSRA is initiating the search phase, the SSRA must assemble and start the
mobilization of Recovery and Rescue Forces.

Priority for assembling the Forces will depend on the nature of the incident. Check off List (e)
through (g) (Annex 4A), act as a guide.

The SSRA should nominate Ships to carry the First Reaction Store (1RS) (particularly the
hyperbaric facilities) and call for specialist advisors. If the quickest way of delivering assistance to the
DISSUB or to the survivors already at the surface is by air, the SSRA should advise the NA to request the
call out of a Submarine Parachute Assistance Group (SPAG).

Rescue Element mobilization demands a high degree of urgency; the logistics requirements means
that there is likely to be a long lead-time from alert to first rescue. Annex 4A contains check off lists for
the SSRA during SUBLOOK and SUBMISS operations. A shift from SUBLOOK directly to SUBSUNK
can occur. The checks off lists describe the sequence on which the SSRA should focus when proceeding
with the assembly and mobilization of the SMER Elements, pending the NA formal request for assistance.

For deployment of more than one Rescue Element, there will be a requirement to de-conflict
logistic support and mobilization activities. Identification of shortfalls and de-confliction of support
requirements can be coordinated through the ISMERLO website.

Mobilization timelines for each rescue scenario are developed as a baseline and are posted on the
ISMERLO web site.

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ANNEX 4A

Check off lists during mobilization of SMER elements

4A01 Check-off list ECHO:


SSRA

Operation SUBLOOK/SUBMISS, Mobilization of Submarine Escape and Rescue Elements

1. Nominate Escape Gear Ship(s) and detail equipment/advisers to be carried.

2. Request NA and nations to instigate recall of specialist advisers.

3. Discuss with NA and other nations the deployment of specialists.

4. Warn appropriate authorities to provide air transport as required.

5. Check for available hyperbaric chambers including those located ashore in the vicinity of the
datum.

6. Consult and Initiate discussion with the NA and other appropriate authorities regarding
provision, employment and deployment of Submarine Rescue Elements.

7. Nations post availability and tracking information of rescue capabilities and required logistics
to the alert page on the ISMERLO website.

Note: The use of civilian assets should also be considered.

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4A02 Check-off list FOXTROT:


SSRA

Operation SUBSUNK, Mobilization of Submarine Escape and Rescue Elements

1. Post and coordinate requirements through the ISMERLO website.

2. Call out portable hyperbaric chambers and operators.

3. Sail Escape Gear Ships (EGSs) as soon as hyperbaric chambers and other stores (1RS)
needed for the treatment of escapees are embarked with hyperbaric chamber operators.

4. Augment EGSs' divers.

5. Call up Helo support.

6. Request NA and nations to call out specialist advisers.

7. Call out SMER Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS).

8. Request NA to issue a formal “Request for SMER Assistance” addressed to Nations


owning the Rescue Elements.

9. Consider additional medical support.

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4A03 Check-off list GOLF:

ESCAPE GEAR SHIPS

Mobilization of Submarine Escape and Rescue Elements

Note: The following is a generic guide which will be adapted depending on the type of ship being used
and national considerations and practices.

1. Embark portable hyperbaric chambers and operators.

2. Place hyperbaric chambers in hangar if available.

3. Keep flight deck clear (if appropriate).

4. Nominate junior Officer as Escape and Rescue Specialists assistant.

5. Conduct two way brief between Ship and visiting Escape and Rescue and Medical specialists.

Before arrival at the datum

6. Ascertain numbers onboard the DISSUB if not included in the SUBMISS/SUBSUNK signal.

7. Non specialist Medical Officers read ATP-57 Chapter 6.

8. Select and prepare receiving treatment and observation areas.

9. Set up Escape and Rescue Specialists position in the Operations room.

10. Prepare evacuation sites.

11. Brief:
- Detail non-medical guides, messengers, observers and log-keepers.
- Detail experienced UWT operators.
- Close up chamber operators, check out all systems.
- Recovery Boats Crews.
- All involved in reception of escapees.
- Ships Company.

On Arrival at the Datum

12. Initiate search

13. Attempt to communicate with the DISSUB on UWT at least every 15 minutes.

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Once located:

14. Ascertain conditions in the DISSUB;

15. Log all information from the DISSUB;

16. Pass all relevant information (SITREP) to SSRA and appropriate Authorities.

17. When ready to receive escapees send SSS on UWT or make the 12 charge signal.

On Arrival of Escapees on the surface

18. Recover escapees from water (horizontally if possible).

19. Leave senior medical specialist to concentrate solely on triage.

20. Debrief escapees.

21. Keep all escapees under observation.

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PART I

CHAPTER 5

The Escape and Rescue phase


SECTION I – COMMAND, CONTROL AND COMMUNICATIONS

0501 Introduction

During the Mobilization of SMER resources, the SSRA will coordinate the SMER Force and
Elements deployment. Once a decision is made regarding Rescue Elements deployment, the most
appropriate MASC will be determined. Integral to this process is the embarkation of specialist personnel,
who will advise the CRF on the employment of the Rescue Elements.

Escape and Rescue Phases may overlap but would possibly occur in the following sequence:

a. Recovery of personnel on the surface (described in Section II of this chapter).

b. Rescue of DISSUB personnel, including Intervention operations (described in Section II of this


chapter).

c. Medical treatment of escapees and rescuees (described in ATP-57 Chapter 6).

As these activities may take place at the same time, coordination between Forces described above is
essential to speed up the process of saving as many DISSUB personnel as possible.

The CRF needs to be able to concentrate entirely on the saving of life by recovery and/or rescue
without other operational distractions. Accordingly, once the OSC has handed over the above
responsibilities to the CRF, he will continue to provide assistance with other tasks such as perimeter
patrol, communications guard, helicopter operations co-ordination (including possible evacuation of
escapees/rescuees), media operations and personnel transfer.

0502 Command and Control (C2)

The Authorities involved in a SUBSAR Operation and their responsibilities are described in chapter
3. The CRF has the responsibility for coordinating and controlling the recovery of escapees on the surface
and/or the rescue of DISSUB personnel.

Once the CRF has arrived at the datum, a formal handover will be conducted by the OSC in
accordance with Check Off List India.

Each Rescue Element will be commanded by a Rescue Element Commander (REC), designated by
the providing Nation. The REC will coordinate with the CRF for the operation of their own Rescue
Element.

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0503 Command relationships

The C2 organization during the Escape and Rescue phase is represented in figure 5-1. The OSC is
the Authority normally possessing Tactical Control of allocated Forces at datum. The OSC’s main
function during this phase is to allow the CRF to concentrate on the rescue effort.

Figure 5 - 1 SMER Phase - Authorities relationship.

The OSC reports directly to the SSRA and maintains overall responsibility for the operation.

On arrival at the Datum area, the CRF will assume tactical control of those units assigned by the
OSC. A shift of CRF responsibility is possible during the course of the operation. The REC(s) will be
under the tactical control of the CRF and shall report accordingly.

Annex 5A contains check off list INDIA, for the OSC handover to the CRF.
In general terms and in accordance with military chain of command the OSC must control all non-
SMER activities in order to allow the CRF the freedom of action to affect a speedy intervention and
rescue.

During a SUBSAR operation it is possible that the OSC, SSRA and other Authorities could belong
to different nations than that of the DISSUB. The CRF will have a direct relationship with the designated
SSRA and/or DISSUB NA, focused on avoiding any public release of sensitive information. This

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relationship is recorded by the dotted lines represented in figure 5-1. The CRF may or may not copy the
reports to the OSC, depending on the sensitivity of the issues and in accordance with particular directions
received from the NA.

0504 Communications during Rescue Operations

1. General.

Communications with the submarine will normally be by UWT. However, Explosive Charge and
Hull Tap communication signals can also be used.
A significant amount of underwater noise will be present in a submarine rescue scenario and a strict
control of emission management is required to ensure efficient search and rescue operations.
Besides the communications that could be established with the submarine during the Search and
Localization phase, the following equipment and procedures can be used to communicate with the
DISSUB during the Escape and Rescue phase once the submarine has been located:

a. UWT
It is primarily used for communications between the DISSUB and the surface Forces when the
Submarine has been located. In the case of a loss of power, the DISSUB personnel can use an Emergency
UWT. This set works independently from the submarine electrical system, and it generally operates at 8
kHz.

b. TAP CODE
See related Scripts in Annex 5B

c. EXPLOSIVE CHARGES
See related scripts in Annex 5B

2. Underwater frequency management during Rescue operations

The goal of the communication management plan (COMPLAN) is to promote effective


communication. The avoidance of mutual interference between systems by distinctly separating
underwater frequencies is considered of great importance; it is the responsibility of the OSC to implement
an initial plan until the arrival of the CRF. Each unit should provide the OSC with information on fitted
communication systems. This information should be provided as far in advance as possible so that the
OSC can determine interoperability of systems.

During the Search phase, only one ship should be designated to communicate with the DISSUB.
During the Rescue Phase, only the MOSHIP conducting the rescue operation should communicate with
the DISSUB.

Example of equipment which could cause interference:


- Sonars
- UWT
- Tracking Systems.
- Homing beacons.
- Ship generated noise
- Dynamic Positioning Systems.

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3. Communication challenges

Certain problems are almost inevitable:

a. Even at the best of times, communication by UWT is less effective than hard wired
systems. In order to avoid noise, which is likely to peak at 10 kHz and below, higher frequencies (eg
27kHz) should be used, where available for communication with the DISSUB.
SRV/SRC may also be used as a relay for communication between CRF/REC and DISSUB.

b. Some classes of warship may have problems in communicating with the DISSUB due to
transducer configuration. The answer is often to stand-off further, perhaps in excess of 3500 meters,
from the DISSUB.

c. UWT interference is unlikely to degrade the performance of tracking systems. If long-life


bottom transponders are deployed, frequencies must be chosen carefully in order to avoid previously
discussed interference issues

d. Homing systems which interface with free running pingers or beacons are susceptible to
mutual interference, however they are normally able to be distinguished separately. Transponders
associated with Dynamic Positioning (DP), and other beacons, add further complications to the
choice of frequencies.

e. High frequency sonars are unlikely to be influenced by any of the above systems. Two
similar systems may interfere with each other but this is unlikely to degrade performance markedly.
However warships’ main-frame search sonars at lower frequencies could interfere with both UWT
and tracking, and once the DISSUB has been located these should be strangled.

4. Rescue and Intervention communication scripts.


Scripts for mating/de-mating, POD posting, Ventilation and General Purpose are contained in
Annex to this Chapter. The 3-letter code is used for UWT communications. When using UWT, receipt of
transmissions is to be notified with “ROGER”.

Note: 1. Meanings in the code scripts at Annexe 5B differ from AXP1. These codes are only to be
used in SUBSAR operations.
2. Ships (SRV/SRC) and Submarines names are to be used as callsigns.
3. If there are personnel both forward and aft in the DISSUB the communications should
contain the appropriate word or 3-letter group added to the DISSUB's name to indicate location
followed by the message (e.g. ALFA ALFA ALFA DISSUBNAME DELTA DELTA DELTA).
4. Some aircraft do not carry charges but drop buoys (SUS Mk 84) which transmit a 2 tone
sound like a siren that can be picked up on UWT. On hearing this signal the DISSUB should fire
a candle to indicate her position.
5. A DISSUB may use taps in Morse code in addition to UWT. In this case the dash is to be
indicated by two or three rapid taps with a reduced interval and the dot by a single tap. The
interval between individual dots and dashes should be 1 - 2 seconds and the interval between
characters 5 seconds.

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SECTION II – RECOVERY AND RESCUE OF DISSUB PERSONNEL

0505 Recovery of personnel on the surface

If the unit in charge of coordinating the recovery of personnel on the surface is different from the
designated CRF, very close coordination between units is paramount for the success of the recovery
operation. It is unlikely but possible, that an Escape and a Rescue scenario would take place
simultaneously.

See ATP-57 chapter 6 for medical treatment of escapees.

0506 Intervention prior to rescue

Prior to execution of the rescue effort, it may be necessary to assist the DISSUB in maintaining
conditions onboard by intervention. Intervention may be comprised of debris removal, preparing for
Escape or SRV/SRC operations, POD-posting ELSS, and Depressurisation/Ventilation.

0507 Conduct of the rescue

The composition of the Rescue Force will vary, depending on the availability of Rescue Elements
and the location of the DISSUB. A very likely scenario will involve the use of a SRV/SRC operating from
a MOSHIP as the major lifesaver. If time permits, it is preferable to survey a DISSUB prior to
deployment of a SRV/SRC.

Coordination of the different SMER Elements is vital both for waterspace management and
achievement of the aim. The CRF should ensure that all his RECs receive adequate and timely briefings.
The arrival brief should include the DISSUB position and its internal conditions (if known), heading,
depth, heel, trim and, if applicable, which indicator buoys have been released. Details of water conditions
observed must be briefed as detailed in Check Off List India.

Every effort must be made to comply with the DISSUB's request for stores and to obtain specialist
advice on what might be required. Providing provisions will greatly assist in sustaining morale in the
DISSUB.

The NA/DLT advisor should carefully brief operators of SRVs/SRCs before their first mating
attempt. Drawings and photographs of the DISSUB should also be available onboard the SRV/SRC, for
immediate reference. Details of Submarine Specific Data are contained in ATP-57 Part II.

See chapter 6 for medical treatment of rescuees.

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ANNEX 5A

Check off lists during Escape


and Rescue phase

5A01 Check-off list INDIA:


OSC
Handover to CRF
1. Situation in the DISSUB
a. DTG of accident
b. Depth
c. Compartments available
d. In each of these compartments:
(1) Number of personnel
(2) Absolute pressure and rate of rise
(3) O2 reading
(4) O2 Candles remaining/Amount of oxygen left (in liters)
(5) CO2 reading
(6) Total amount of CO2 scrubbing materiel (in kg)
(7) CO reading
(8) Damage report
(9) Injuries
(10) Senior Survivor's intentions/requirements.
(11) Communication capabilities
(12) In case of the DISSUB being nuclear powered all details of radiological activity
and measurements taken to date.
(13). Electrical Supplies available within DISSUB.
e. Heading
f. Aspect - heel and trim
g. Which indicator buoy(s) have been released.
2. Search Force units in area:
a. Ships
b. Fixed wing aircraft with time on task remaining
c. Helicopter airborne with time on task remaining
d. Any recompression chambers available in the area of interest.
e. Helicopters available on ships of the search force, as well as in the area of interest,
specifying both their passenger and Casualty Evacuation (CASEVAC) carrying
capacities.
3. SMER and Medical specialists available in the Search Force .

4. Local conditions that may affect the conduct of the Recovery/Rescue

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ANNEX 5B

Communication Scripts
5B01 General

Note: All communication to and from the DISSUB should indicate which compartment by using either
FOXTROT (Forward) ALFA (Aft) or CENTRE (Center)

Charge/ MEANING
UWT Code
Tap code From MOSHIP From DISSUB
ALFA
ALFA Aft escape compartment. Aft escape compartment.
ALFA
BRAVO We are searching for you.
1 Charge every
BRAVO Fire a smoke candle to indicate
10 minutes
BRAVO your Position.
CENTRE
CENTRE Centre LET position. Centre LET position.
CENTRE
CHARLIE
CHARLIE First survivor making escape now.
CHARLIE
DELTA Total amount CO2 scrubbing Total amount of CO2 scrubbing left
DELTA material left in national absorption is (national absorption units):
DELTA units? DELTA DELTA DELTA X X
You have been found.
Attempt to communicate by UWT
ECHO and/or fire a smoke candle with
ECHO 6 Charges message carrier giving full details
ECHO of the conditions in submarine and
your intentions. Ref CHECK OFF
LIST INDIA
FOXTROT
FOXTROT Forward escape compartment. Forward escape compartment.
FOXTROT
GOLF Number of personnel in this
Report number of personnel in your
GOLF compartment is:
compartment of DISSUB.
GOLF GOLF GOLF GOLF X X
Intend to Pod Post mini-pod.
Attempt to communicate by UWT.
2 Charges/ Taps
MAMA If unable to do so, fire a smoke
followed after a ELSS requirements are: (give
MAMA candle with message carrier stating
short pause by 2 details).
MAMA ELSS needed.
more.
Once acknowledged, use the Pod
Posting Script.

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Charge/ MEANING
UWT Code
Tap code From MOSHIP From DISSUB
NEGATIVE
NEGATIVE UNABLE TO COMPLY UNABLE TO COMPLY
NEGATIVE
NOVEMBER Atmospheric readings are: (O2 in
Report present atmospheric
NOVEMBER percentage, CO2 in percentage and
conditions in DISSUB.
NOVEMBER absolute pressure in bar).
OSCAR Amount of oxygen left (in national
OSCAR How much oxygen left. generation Units): OSCAR OSCAR
OSCAR OSCAR X X X
Intend to Pod Post Emergency Life
Support Stores (ELSS). Attempt to
3 Charges/Taps communicate by UWT. If unable to
PAPA
followed after a do so, fire a smoke candle with ELSS requirements are: (give
PAPA
short pause by 3 message carrier stating ELSS details).
PAPA
more. needed.
Once acknowledged, use the Pod
Posting Script.
Intend to conduct a rescue using
SRV/SRC. Estimated TTFR
(hrs):
QUEBEC QUEBEC QUEBEC
Intend waiting for rescue.
QUEBEC XX
9 charges/
QUEBEC Once acknowledged, use the
taps n.b. During Exercises the meaning
QUEBEC SRV/SRC Script (table 5B02)
is: “Ready to start the exercise”
n.b. During Exercise the meaning
is: “I am ready to commence the
exercise”
ROMEO
ROMEO Message received Message received
ROMEO
SIERRA
Standing by on the surface. Surface Intend commencing escape in (hrs):
SIERRA 12 Charges
clear SIERRA SIERRA SIERRA XX
SIERRA
A rescue operation will not be
TANGO
attempted. Estimate escape must start in (hrs):
TANGO
TANGO Report estimate of latest time TANGO TANGO TANGO XX
escape must start
Number of injured personnel
UNIFORM
How many injured personnel requiring urgent medical treatment
UNIFORM
require urgent medical treatment? is (UNIFORM UNIFORM
UNIFORM
UNIFORM XX).
4 Charges/ Taps
VICTOR Intend to proceed with Ventilation.
followed after a
VICTOR Once you acknowledge, use the Acknowledge
short pause by 4
VICTOR Ventilation Script
more.

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ATP-57(B)

Charge/ MEANING
UWT Code
Tap code From MOSHIP From DISSUB
X-RAY
Series of rapid Carrying out emergency
X-RAY Clear my position urgently
taps breakaway.
X-RAY
5 Charges/ Taps
YANKEE
followed after a I am going to abort current
YANKEE Abort current operation/exercise
short pause by 5 operation/exercise
YANKEE
more.
ZULU
ZULU DISSUB position clear
ZULU

In the national data add what the national units for CO2 scrubbing and oxygen generation are

Remarks: Transmission receipt to be notified with “ROMEO ROMEO ROMEO”

Notes: 1. If possible tap signals should be acknowledge by repeating them back loudly and clearly.
2. Ship/Submarine Telegraphy (SST). The basic procedure to be used when signalling by SST
is the same as that used for signalling by radio telegraphy. Speed of transmission should not
normally exceed 6 words a minute. It should be appreciated the DISSUB crew may not contain
anyone familiar with morse code, although a copy of the code should be in escape compartments

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ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
I-5–B-4
ATP-57(B)

5B02 SRV/SRC SCRIPT - MATING/DEMATING procedure

UWT TAP
STEP FROM TO MEANING REMARKS
CODE CODE
HOOKER To be used only
DOWNHAUL CABLE IS
01 MOSHIP DISSUB HOOKER 1*2 during operations
CONNECTED
HOOKER with SRC
WHISKEY HOLD YOU IN SIGHT.
RV identifies
02 SRV/SRC DISSUB WHISKEY PROCEEDING TO FWD/AFT
herself to DISSUB
WHISKEY HATCH
NOVEMBER
MY INTERNAL ABSOLUTE
03 DISSUB SRV/SRC NOVEMBER
PRESSURE IS (in bar)
NOVEMBER
KILO
HAVE SEAL. DRAIN HATCH
04 SRV/SRC DISSUB KILO 4*2
CAVITY
KILO
KILO
05 DISSUB SRV/SRC KILO 4* 2 DRAINING HATCH CAVITY
KILO
NOVEMBER
MY INTERNAL ABSOLUTE
06 DISSUB SRV/SRC NOVEMBER
PRESSURE IS (in bar)
NOVEMBER
LIMA
HATCH CAVITY DRAINED.
07 SRV/SRV DISSUB LIMA 3*2
OPEN UPPER HATCH.
LIMA

UWT TAP
STEP FROM TO CODE
MEANING REMARKS
CODE
Shout through the
01 SRV/SRC DISSUB SHUT HATCH AND DRAIN.
hatch
MIKE
02 DISSUB SRV/SRC MIKE 2*2 HATCH AND DRAIN SHUT
MIKE
MIKE
LIFTING OFF MOVING
03 SRV/SRC DISSUB MIKE 2*2
CLEAR.
MIKE
To be used only
during operations
with SRC, meaning
ZULU
that the downhaul
04 MOSHIP DISSUB ZULU DISSUB CLEAR
cable has been
ZULU
removed and the
SRC has been
recovered

ORIGINAL
I-5–B-5
ATP-57(B)

SRV/SRC SCRIPT - EMERGENCY procedure

Signal UWT Charge/Tap MEANING


code From SRV/SRC From DISSUB
X-RAY
SERIES OF CARRYING OUT AN EMERGENCY
X-RAY CLEAR MY POSITION URGENTLY
RAPID TAPS BREAKAWAY
X-RAY

Remarks: Transmission receipt to be notified with “ROGER”

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ATP-57(B)

5B03 POD (MINI-POD) POSTING SCRIPT procedure (1)

UWT TAP
STEP FROM TO CODE
MEANING REMARKS
CODE
HOTEL FLOOD TOWER (SSE), OPEN
01 MOSHIP DISSUB HOTEL 3 (UPPER) HATCH. I AM
HOTEL KEEPING CLEAR
TOWER (SSE)
HOTEL
FLOODED.HATCH OPEN.
02 DISSUB MOSHIP HOTEL 3
READY TO RECEIVE POD
HOTEL
OR BAG (MINI-POD)
JULIETT POD/BAG (MINI-POD) IN
03 MOSHIP DISSUB JULIETT 5 PLACE. HATCH CLEAR TO (2)
JULIETT SHUT.
INDIA CHECK YOUR ALIGNMENT
04 MOSHIP DISSUB INDIA 4 HATCH IS NOT OR WILL
INDIA NOT OPEN
ZULU
INTEND TO RELEASE POD
05 DISSUB MOSHIP ZULU
(MINI-POD)
ZULU
CLEAR TO
ZULU
RELEASE POD
06 MOSHIP DISSUB ZULU DISSUB CLEAR
(MINI-POD) IF
ZULU
NEEDED

POD (MINI POD) POSTING SCRIPT - EMERGENCY procedure

Signal UWT Charge/Tap MEANING


code From MOSHIP From DISSUB
X-RAY
SERIES OF
X-RAY CLEARING YOUR POSITION CLEAR MY POSITION URGENTLY
RAPID TAPS
X-RAY

Remarks: Transmission receipt to be notified with “ROMEO ROMEO ROMEO”

Notes:
1. Terms in parenthesis are to be taken into consideration when conducting a MINI-POD Posting
Operation.
2. For first run only to a submarine without its own pod bag, this signal means “pod receiving
equipment in tower”.

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ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
I-5–B-8
ATP-57(B)

5B04 VENTILATION SCRIPT procedure

UWT TAP
STEP FROM TO CODE
MEANING REMARKS
CODE
GREEN PREPARING TO ATTACH
2 taps
01 MOSHIP DISSUB GREEN GUIDE WIRES AND
3 times
GREEN VENTILATION HOSES
NOVEMBER
MY INTERNAL ABSOLUTE
02 DISSUB MOSHIP NOVEMBER (1)
PRESSURE IS (IN BAR)
NOVEMBER
TYPHOON
4 taps VENTILATION HOSES
03 MOSHIP DISSUB TYPHOON
2 times ATTACHED.
TYPHOON
HURRICANE
4 taps
04 MOSHIP DISSUB HURRICANE OPEN AIR VALVES
3 times
HURRICANE
HURRICANE MOSHIP increases
4 taps
05 DISSUB MOSHIP HURRICANE AIR VALVES OPENED inlet air flow
3 times
HURRICANE (Eventually)
INDIGO
5 taps SHUT AIR VALVES, ABOUT
06 MOSHIP DISSUB INDIGO
3 times TO DISCONNECT
INDIGO
INDIGO
5 taps
07 DISSUB MOSHIP INDIGO AIR VALVES SHUT
3 times
INDIGO
YELLOW
2 taps
08 MOSHIP DISSUB YELLOW DISCONNECTING HOSES
3 times
YELLOW
ZULU
09 MOSHIP DISSUB ZULU DISSUB CLEAR
ZULU

VENTILATION SCRIPT - EMERGENCY procedure

Signal UWT Charge/Tap MEANING


code From MOSHIP From DISSUB
PURPLE
WATER LEAKAGE. SHUT OFF
PURPLE 3 taps 3 times
VALVES
PURPLE
X-RAY
SERIES OF
X-RAY CLEAR MY POSITION URGENTLY
RAPID TAPS
X-RAY

Notes:
1. To be used by DISSUB each time there is a change of internal pressure. MOSHIP will regulate
inlet/outlet air flow accordingly

Remarks: Transmission receipt to be notified with “ROMEO ROMEO ROMEO”

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I-5–B-9
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
I - 5 – B - 10
ATP-57(B)

PART I

CHAPTER 6

Medical issues and Organization during SUBSAR


Operations

SECTION I – INTRODUCTION TO SUBSAR MEDICAL DOCTRINE

0601 NATO Medical Doctrine

1. NATO medical doctrine is contained in STANAG 1269 (AMedP-11) NATO HANDBOOK ON


MARITIME MEDICINE, a publication that is the responsibility of the General Medical Working Group
(NSA-Medical). Chapter 7 AMedP-11 contains information about Special Medical Services, including
Underwater Medicine and Diving Accidents as well as Shipwreck, Immersion and the Management of
Survivors doctrine, both directly related to SUBSAR medical situations.

More NATO medical doctrine can be reached in the following documents:

- STANAG 1432 ADivP-2 - Allied Guide To Diving Medical Disorders


- STANAG 2461 AMedP-6 Vol I- NATO handbook on the medical aspects of NBC
defensive operations (nuclear)
- STANAG 2462 AMedP-6 Vol II- NATO handbook on the medical aspects of NBC
defensive operations (biological)
- STANAG 2463 AMedP-6 Vol III- NATO handbook on the medical aspects of NBC
defensive operations (chemical)
- STANAG 1301 Minimum Conditions for Survival in a Distressed Submarine Prior to
Escape or Rescue
- STANAG 1320 Minimum Requirements for Atmospheric Monitoring Equipment Located
in Submarines with Escape Capability
- STANAG 1321 Minimum Requirements for Submarine Escape and Survival Personnel
Equipment (SEIE)
- STANAG 2879 Principles of Medical Policy in the Management of a Mass Casualty
Situation
- STANAG 2068 Emergency War Surgery.

Additionally, National Publications both for Diving and Submarine operations may be used for reference
on individual submarine classes and operating procedures as well as decompression tables.

2. Medical information contained in ATP-57 should be considered subordinated to NATO Medical


Doctrine contained in AMedP-11. Nevertheless, specific information related to SUBSAR operations is
better placed in MTP-57 rather than in AMedP-11, due to close coordination that is needed among all
SUBSAR operations participants. Every effort should be made to ensure that duplication of information
between NATO Handbooks is minimised by placing information only in the most appropriate publication.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

3. Medical Organization during SUBSAR Operations. This chapter contains specific information
to SUBSAR participants, and facilitates the coordination between Commands and Units participating in
SUBSAR operations, keeping in mind that the main objectives for SUBSAR operations should be to speed
up response procedures (medical and non-medical) and to save as many survivors (escapees or rescuees)
as possible.

0602 General medical guidance for SUBSAR Operations

1. SUBSAR Operations - Terms and Definitions. This chapter complements preceding chapters in
this publication. Definitions related to terms included in this chapter but not described in detail in it, can
be found either in former chapters or in the Glossary, at the end of this publication.

2. Medical considerations for survivors from submarine escape or rescue are of paramount
importance. There are a large number of medical problems that may be encountered in this mass casualty
setting, some of which are relatively unfamiliar to non-specialist medical officers. Because of the large
number of medical, environmental and submarine variables, the strategies to organise and carry out
medical management laid out in this Chapter will need to be tailored to each individual incident scenario.

3. General guidance for organisation of the Submarine Escape and Rescue Assistance Team
(SMERAT), including triage and management of submarine survivors is provided in this Chapter. Medical
guidance pertaining to problems likely to be encountered in survivors of a DISSUB scenario is also
provided for specialist and non-specialist medical officers.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

SECTION II – SUBSAR MEDICAL ORGANIZATION

0603 The medical component of the Submarine Escape and Rescue Assistance Team
(SMERAT)

The SMERAT consists of experts in the field of Submarine Escape and Rescue Operations and medical
specialists who are available to provide advice and assistance to the SSRA, OSC and CRF. The Officer in
Charge of the SMERAT (OCSMERAT) is an expert in the field of submarine escape and rescue
operations.

The Senior Medical Officer to SMERAT (SMO(S)) is in charge of the medical personnel allocated to the
SMERAT, and reports to OCSMERAT for an escape and to the CRF for rescue operations.

The SMO(S) is alerted by either National SMER Authorities or via OCSMERAT who will also initiate the
callout of all other designated SMERAT personnel in the event of a SUBSUNK.

The SMERAT should be capable of deploying at short notice to the scene of a DISSUB usually by
embarking on an Escape Gear Ship (EGS) together with First Reaction Stores (FRS). As information
about the condition of the DISSUB becomes available members of the team may need to embark on a
MOSHIP (such as that appointed CRF), MOSUB or any other participating unit in the SUBSAR
operation.

Officer Commanding SMERAT

Senior Medical Officer


(SMERAT)

Medical Headquarters &


Medical Admin Officer

Senior Casualty
Clinician

Triage Officer Area 1 MO Recompression Area 2 MO Area 3 Area 4 MBR


Area MO MO / MBR

Uninjured Holding Area

Figure 6 – 1 Organization of the medical component of the SMERAT for Escape

Figure 6-1 above describes the general organization for the medical component to the SMERAT used
during escape operations. The following articles in this section detail responsibilities for the key medical
elements of the SMERAT. Later sections of this Chapter and Annex 6C contain information regarding the
rest of the medical manpower as well as treatment areas and equipment.

ORIGINAL
I-6-3
ATP-57(B)

Commander Rescue
Forces (CRF)

SMO(SMERAT)
DISSUB Medical Admin
Medical Officer and MHQ
Triage Team
(DMTT)
Senior Diving MO /
SCC

DDC Medical Personnel Post DDC Care

DCC Supervisor and


Diving Personnel

Note: - - - Liaison and provision of medical advice.

Figure 6 – 2 Generic C2 diagram for rescue operations.

Figure 6-2 shows a generic organisation for Rescue operations. This is for guidance only as each rescue
system has its own manning requirements as laid down in their deployment orders. Section VIII into this
chapter contains further information on Rescue operations. Annex 6D deals with DISSUB Medical Triage
Team (DMTT) selection, deployment and equipment.

0604 Senior Medical Officer to SMERAT (SMO(S)).

The Senior Medical Officer to SMERAT (SMO(S)) is in charge of the medical personnel allocated to the
SMERAT. He is responsible for:

a. The deployment of medical personnel to the scene.


b. Advising the OCSMERAT / CRF / OSC on the medical aspects of the DISSUB situation.
c. Advising the OSC / CRF of the numbers and types of casualties to be expected, and the assets
required for management of survivors recovered from the DISSUB.
d. Liaison with the appropriate land-based authorities who may be required to participate in the
treatment of survivors evacuated from an Escape Gear Ship.
e. Advising on deployment of a DISSUB Medical Triage Team (DMTT).

0605 The Senior Casualty Clinician (SCC).

The SCC reports directly to the SMO(S) and is responsible for the co-ordination of the medical resources,
both manpower and materiel, onboard the Escape Gear Ship (EGS) or Rescue Gear Ship (RGS). The SCC

ORIGINAL
I-6-4
ATP-57(B)

will usually be the Medical Officer most experienced in treatment of diving casualties. (The SCC may
also be known as the Senior Diving MO (SDMO))

0606 Medical Headquarters (MHQ) and the Medical Administration Officer (MAO)

The MHQ is the focal point for Casualty State administration and, as such, must remain manned at
all times. Location and personnel composition may vary depending on operational limitations. Normally,
the Medical Headquarters (MHQ) is composed by the following personnel and equipment:

a. Medical Administration Officer (MAO).

b. Sufficient writers and runners to cover all casualty management areas (minimum of 3 runners).

c. Communications equipment.

The MAO is responsible for the collation and management of casualty information in the MHQ.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
I-6-6
ATP-57(B)

SECTION III – MEDICAL MOBILIZATION AND RESPONSE ACTION LISTS

0607 General

This section deals with the action list of the following medical personnel:
- The Senior Medical Officer to SMERAT (SMO(S))
- The Senior Casualty clinician (SCC) / Senior Diving MO
- The Medical Administration Officer (MAO).

0608 Senior Medical Officer to SMERAT (SMO(S)) Action Lists

1. General.

Prior to the deployment, the Senior Medical Officer SMERAT (SMO(S)) should assimilate as
much information as possible to allow full manning of the medical team, make sensible judgements on the
likely casualties and the requirements for their treatment. The Action lists below provide guidance on the
areas to be considered.

2. Pre-deployment:

a. Check local emergency orders.


b. Contact the SSRA or National equivalent. It is important for the SMO(S) to familiarize himself
with all the facts known about the DISSUB as soon as they become available. Discuss the medical
situation and requirements with the Medical Advisor of the DISSUB Nation or point of contact if no
Advisor exists.
c. Initiate a recall and muster of all appropriate Undersea, Submarine and Diving Medicine
qualified staff ready to deploy with the SMERAT in accordance with local orders.
d. Arrange collection of SUBMISS / SUBSMASH publications, response plans, stationery, and
equipment listed as contents for a SMERAT Emergency Case at Annex 6L.
e. Contact the following, (either directly or through the appropriate chain of command depending
on National Policy):

(1) The Duty Senior Medical Officer of the Medical Centre or Hospital of the Naval Base
nearest to the departure base of the EGS. They may be able to supply qualified staff to assist in
manning the EGS or to provide assistance with CASEVAC of survivors.

(2) The Duty Senior Medical Officer at the Military Establishment or Hospital (Civilian or
Military) nearest to the sunken submarine. A casualty evacuation (CASEVAC) plan should be
developed with the shore based medical support and communicated to the OSC / CRF as soon
as possible to ensure that he is fully aware of SMO(S)'s intentions and is able to plan
accordingly.

Note: The SMO(S) must not assume that shore-based authorities local to the incident will take charge of the situation
or provide advice unless specifically asked to do so. The SMERAT is likely to be isolated and SMO(S) should seek sources
of advice from national and international technical or medical authorities as appropriate, by phone or through the
ISMERLO website. Early communication with these authorities whilst ashore or still in cell phone range is recommended
to ensure that communications can be achieved once deployed.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

3. Information Gathering:

Either in the pre-deployment phase or whilst en-route to the rescue site the SMO(S) should
ascertain the availability of additional resources including:

- Hospital and decompression facilities ashore


- number, capacity and specialists facilities, e.g.: burns, ITU and neurosurgery
- medical and decompression facilities afloat
- capacity, medical personnel and specialist facilities
- Transport availability: helicopters, ships and small craft (and landing points)
- Medical support for casualty transportation
- available medical personnel and equipment
- Distances and transit times to potential medical receiving facilities.

This information will direct the production of a medical evacuation plan for casualties and
survivors from the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP. SMO(S) should use either national medical authorities or the
ISMERLO web site to gain such information.

Chambers and medical facilities that may be of use during the rescue should be alerted to the
potential requirement for the transfer of casualties to them through national maritime or Foreign Ministry
routes. When en-route to the scene, communication methods to these facilities will need to be worked out
and links established.

4. On board an EGS

a. Request that an officer is detailed to act as the ‘Ship’s Recovery Coordinator’ to facilitate the
work of the medical SMERAT members. The ops officer or an officer of similar status and
experience is recommended. In addition to liaison tasks this officer should be responsible through
the command for the provision of recovery boat crews, stretcher bearers, communications numbers,
escorts and any other manpower which is required (see Chapters 1, 3 and 5).

b. Establish working location in the Operations Room or on the Bridge with a close line of
communications to the OCSMERAT and OSC.

c. Delegate the responsibility for the hands-on management of the medical manpower to the
Senior Casualty Clinician. Direct him to establish Triage and Treatment areas. Depending on
nations and vessels there may be pre-determined DISSUB casualty plans for the class of ship.

d. Establish contact and an agreed medical communications protocol with outside medical
facilities.

e. Liaise with the Nuclear Emergency Monitoring Team if appropriate and co-ordinate their
activities with those of medical treatment personnel.

f. The OCSMERAT and the SMO(S) brief the OSC on the relevant aspects of DISSUB survival,
escape and rescue as soon as possible after embarkation. The proposed treatment regimens and
casualty evacuation requirements must be fully explained to enable the OSC to request the
appropriate assistance, e.g. helicopters etc. See Annex 6A for points to be highlighted in the brief to
an OCS.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

g. Remain aware of the developing situation and the potential need to transfer medical staff and
equipment from the EGS onto Rescue Vessels. This will occur as the scenario dictates a need to
support rescue rather than escape. In this case SMO(S) will need to make early contact with the
CRF to discuss appropriate arrangements and give early advice about the potential use of, and need
to prepare, a DISSUB Medical Triage Team (DMTT) (see Annex 6D).

5. Onboard a RGS.

a. As a RGS (also known as MOSHIP) is likely to be a civilian vessel with limited crew, berthing
for rescue personnel and rescuees, identify any requirements for additional personnel for casualty
monitoring and transfers (e.g. stretcher bearers), administrative duties or logistic work. These
requirements should be presented to the CRF for resolution.

b. On arrival on the MOSHIP, areas should be identified for the Administration point and for
general patient regulating. Space may be extremely limited aboard the MOSHIP due to rescue
equipment. Areas and routes should be provided for movement of rescuees through the medical
areas including decontamination and a holding area post decompression. Transfer of rescuees either
by boat or helicopter from the vessel may be impacted by weather conditions and must be planned
for early.

c. Additional vessels carrying medical personnel and recompression facilities should be identified
and contact made through the CRF to ascertain what facilities are available and best methods of
transfer from the MOSHIP.

d. If more than one rescue system is deployed the SMO of each system should make contact with
each other and discuss medical equipment availability, personnel, rescue capacity of their systems
within the SRV, recompression facilities and medical facilities.

e. Brief the CRF on the relevant points from the OSC brief (see Annex 6A).

f. Other actions should be as for deployment to an EGS as above.

0609 Senior Casualty Clinician Action Lists

1. Pre-deployment:

a. Ensure that the First Reaction Stores including the recompression chamber and oxygen stores
have been correctly unpacked, stowed onboard and prepared for use.

b. Recompression chamber readiness: It is essential that the embarked recompression chamber is


fully functioning and capable of completing a NATO Table VI (RN Table 62/USN Table 6) with
extensions. Divers available to the hyperbaric treatment team should be trained in diving first aid
and able to assist the treatment and monitoring of survivors who require recompression.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

2. During transit to DISSUB:

a. Identify, with the aid of the ship’s medical staff, suitable sites for the triage and treatment areas,
holding area and mortuary. Ensure that there is free passage from the point at which survivors will
be brought onboard to the triage area and then to the relevant treatment areas.

b. Where practical, all casualty routes should be under cover, on the same deck and casualty
landing or triage areas should be weather protected by use of portable awnings or weather proof
containers. The medical staff on board may already have a mass casualty handling plan which may
be adapted and consideration should be given to modifying the plan to accommodate the submarine
escape scenario. (In planning the routes and sitting treatment areas in and around the hanger,
consideration must be given to access when the EGS is at Flying Stations).

c. Where possible the primary and secondary treatment areas should be in the same geographical
situation, usually the helicopter hangar, to best facilitate the logistics of emergency medical care.

d. The SCC although having a responsibility for all areas will in all probability spend most of his
time close to the primary and secondary treatment areas. The SCC must remain flexible and be
prepared to re-evaluate and modify the plan to meet changing circumstances.

e. Allocate personnel, including stretcher and first aid personnel, and medical supplies to the triage
and treatment areas. Separate stretcher parties will be required to move casualties from the reception
area onboard to Triage and from Triage to the treatment areas. The minimum personnel and
equipment recommended for the triage and treatment areas are listed at Annex 6C.

f. Fully brief all medical teams about DISSUB hazards, triage and treatment of survivors.
Emphasise the manifestations and treatment of Decompression Illness (DCI). Ensure that a brief on
the management of casualties with radioactive contamination is given, if required.

g. Brief ship’s boat recovery crews and divers in accordance with Annex 6B.

3. Upon receiving escapees:

a. Provide expert assistance to the medical teams in the treatment areas as required.

b. Ensure optimal use of on board oxygen supplies. Prophylactic use of high flow oxygen for all
escapees should be considered if adequate on board oxygen stores are available.

c. Supervise the recompression of casualties onboard the EGS. Recompression facilities will most
likely be quite limited and their use must be optimised. The SCC should apply the principles of
chamber operation found in Section 0619 to managing the treatment of escapees.

d. Ensure maintenance of clinical notes, casualty state boards and a flow of information, including
CASEVAC and recompression requirements, to SMO(S) and MHQ.

e. Ensure additional information regarding the DISSUB is obtained from survivors collated and
briefed to SMO(S) accordingly.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

4. On a MOSHIP: Additional considerations for a rescue scenario include:

a. Plan the most appropriate use of the available chambers with the CRF, SMO(S) and SRV
operating team.

b. Ensure the most effective use of the limited facilities for triage and treatment of rescuees in the
DCC.

c. Whilst not directly responsible for the safety of the SRV operators or chamber attendants, take
due cognisance of these requirements in planning rescuee decompression schedules, work rosters
and the use of these staff under pressure.

0610 Medical administration Officer (MAO) action list.

1. Establish the MHQ in a suitable area in close proximity to the treatment areas.

(Note: however information from the triage point on the disposal of survivors to particular treatment
areas onboard is crucial to allow the SCC to have oversight about how his resources are being used. The
MAO must ensure that this communication link with the triage point works effectively. Exercise
experiences have shown that if information is lost at this stage, the overall command and control of
casualty management will often fail.)

2. Establish communications with the medical teams and the SMO(S) in the Operations room by the
use of telephones, radio or messengers

3. Maintain an accurate Master Casualty State Board (see Annex 6H).

4. Inform SMO(S) of the status of all survivors as required.

5. Provide the Recovery Co-ordinator (Escape) or CRF Communications Co-Ordinator (Rescue) with
the information required for Casualty Reporting (CASREP) and Casualty Evacuation (CASEVAC) signals
(Templates at Annexes 6J and 6K).

(Notes: 1. Shore authorities require early information regarding casualties to prepare for casualty
reception, for informing the next of kin and for public relations. Therefore, the first and subsequent casualty
signals should be sent as soon as reasonably practicable. The precedence to be used for Casualty Reporting
is IMMEDIATE.

2. Early casualty evacuation by helicopter may be required and due to the rapidly changing
condition of some of the casualties, priorities for CASEVAC may change at very short notice. Last minute
changes to the evacuation plan must not result in inaccurate or incomplete CASEVAC signals being sent. To
ensure against this a runner should accompany the Senior Casualty Clinician when the final decision is made
to load which casualties).

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

SECTION IV – MEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS AND LOGISITCS.

0611 Internal Communications.

In any escape or rescue situation the SMERAT medical members will be widely distributed
throughout units participating in the operation. Accurate and adequate communications within the
SMERAT are essential to the smooth running of the response.

The SMO(S) (or deputy) is responsible for communications to the OSC, CRF and the CO / Master
of the RGS or MOSHIP. SMO(S) is also responsible for passing information back to the other members
of the SMERAT, particularly on casualties expected, operational matters or changes in the DISSUB
scenario.

Administrative communications (casualty numbers, logistic requirements, and requests for


additional manpower) should be passed through the MAO. Clinical communications should be passed via
the Senior Casualty Clinician or Senior Diving Medical Officer.

Whenever possible, communications should be by fixed telephones. In the absence of fixed


telephones, and for personnel such as the SMO(S) who are mobile around the vessel, then portable radios
should be sought and used. Key points for radios to be available are with the SMO(S), Senior Casualty
Clinician, MAO and at the triage point on an EGS or chamber control centre on an RGS.

All internal communications should be logged so that information can be checked and retransmitted
if necessary. Messages that may be particularly prone to transmission errors should be sent in a written
form by runner.

0612 External Communications:

All external communications should be passed via the approved communications routes set up by
the OSC or CRF. This includes the release of signals, use of e-mail and chat areas on the ISMERLO
Website and the use of VHF for local contacts.

When more than 2 EGS or RGS / MOSHIPs are being used a formal communications programme
should be set up between the medical team leaders on each vessel and the SMO(S). This should allow co-
ordination of the use of resources and ensure that one vessel is not overloaded by casualties when the
other vessels have spare facilities.

When mobile phone / satellite phone or Internet communications are available these may be used
for ship to ship and ship to shore communications with the approval of the CO / Master (to avoid
interference with ship’s systems). All communications should be logged in the main communications log.
Care should be taken with the classification of information passed by this method, especially when
medically sensitive information is being transmitted.

When a Submarine Parachute Assistance Group (SPAG) has been deployed then the SMO(S)
should make contact with the OC and MO SPAG as soon as the EGS enters communication range. The
SPAG should be able to provide a list of escapees already recovered and a priority list for their evacuation
to the EGS. If no escapees have been recovered then the SPAG team themselves will require recovery

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before they become subject to environmentally related problems such as hypothermia. Further
information on the medical aspects of SPAG are available in the Medical Supplement.

The SMO(S) should remain in contact with a deployed DISSUB Medical Triage Team using
messages sent via the SRV or, if necessary, by use of an underwater telephone, if available.

0613 Logistics.

The initial deployment to an EGS or RGS / MOSHIP should include enough stores to commence
treatment of the expected number of escapees or rescuees. However, due to the bulk and weight of items,
particularly Oxygen supplies, it may not be possible to deploy the full requirements for the operation
during the initial phase. There will, therefore, be a need to re-supply the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP.

Logistic provision is the responsibility of the OSC or CRF. Logistic requirements should be
collated by the MAO and passed to the SMO(S). The SMO(S) should then brief the OSC / CRF on the
requirements and, where possible, provide guidance on where the materials required may be sourced. It
will be necessary to use national authorities and the SSRA to provide not only the required materials but
also transportation to the scene.

The supplies of Oxygen available may become a limiting factor on the ability to treat, decompress
and recompress survivors of a DISSUB. Before deployment the SMO(S) and his Senior Diving Medical
Officers should estimate the amount of O2 required for the number of survivors and the DISSUB pressure
scenario. This information should be passed early to the authority organising the DISSUB response to
ensure that an adequate supply of O2 is available to be transferred to the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP,
preferable before the vessel sails to reduce the risks and problems of loading heavy O2 cylinders or
‘QUADS’ at sea.

Dependant upon the location of the DISSUB, re-supplying may be difficult due either to the
distance from the nearest shore facilities or to the paucity of available stores. Therefore the SMO(S)
should know how to access additional equipment and supplies from their own nation, or other major
SMER nations and arrange for them to be transported to the scene. This should include any special
arrangements necessary for the transport of analgesic drugs controlled under national or international
legislation.

Limited supplies of clothing for DISSUB survivors should be included in the deployed stores. Due
to the possibility of chemical or radiological contamination of the survivors the stores should also include
over-suits to allow transfer of casualties without spreading the contamination.

Survivors of a DISSUB are likely to be significantly dehydrated and arrangements should be made
on the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP for adequate supplies of drinking water or hot drinks. Feeding requirements
will depend on how long the survivors will remain on board, the effects of DISSUB requirement (e.g.
starvation diarrhoea) and clinical condition.

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SECTION V – SUBMARINE DISASTER SURVIVAL.

0614 Factors affecting crew survival time.

1. General: Within a DISSUB both survival and the decision to escape (if possible) are influenced by
many factors, including both physical and psychological factors. The major determinants are laid out below.

2. Multiple types of atmosphere contaminants are possible in a DISSUB. A catastrophe which results in
a DISSUB is likely to produce supplementary casualties and damage such as fires, flooding, and system
ruptures or leaks. It is imperative that additional casualties and damage are quickly contained to minimize
toxic atmosphere levels and the subsequent need for the survivors to use EABs.

Pressure and Atmosphere

An increase in DISSUB pressure significantly raises crew morbidity and mortality risk from
decompression illness (DCI). DCI becomes a problem from prolonged exposure (saturation) to atmospheric
pressures of greater than 7 msw (1.7 ATA). Once saturated, safe escape by buoyant ascent may not be
possible. Without Transfer Under Pressure (TUP) capability, rescued crew may be severely affected.

Atmosphere control considerations can be divided into two areas:

a. Control of toxic atmosphere contaminants to prevent donning Emergency Air Breathing (EAB)
systems. If EABs are required, survival time in the DISSUB will be reduced due to limited air
supplies and pressure will increase resulting in an increased risk of crew injury following escape or
rescue due to decompression illness.

b. Control of carbon dioxide and oxygen levels. Rest significantly reduces oxygen consumption
and carbon dioxide production. Conversely, hypothermia and the onset of shivering can lead to
increases in both. Efficient control of carbon dioxide and oxygen levels are critical to maximizing
survival time in a DISSUB.

The ability to survive and remain onboard will depend on the accuracy and the reliability of the
atmosphere monitoring equipment. To prolong the stay time in the submarine, the oxygen level can be
allowed to drop to 17 kPa, (17% at 101.3 kPa / 1 bar) and maintained at that level and the CO2 allowed to
rise to 2,5 kPa, (2.5% at 101.3 kPa / 1 bar) 3. These are extreme limits, and a certain percentage of the
survivors may not tolerate them easily, however, escape can be conducted from these levels. Other gases
in the DISSUB atmosphere may affect the decision to escape e.g. Chlorine from batteries that have been
contaminated with salt water, Carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) caused by combustion.
High partial pressures of Oxygen may also constitute a potential health risk to survivors. (Further
information on atmosphere control in the DISSUB can be found in the Medical Supplement).

3
Standard Atmospheric Pressure 1 atm = 101,325 x 103 Pa = 760 mmHg = 1,013 Bar, 14,6959 psi
2
1 litre = 1.057 quarts = 1.76 pints
3
4186,8 kJ = 1,000 kCal

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Hypothermia and Hyperthermia.

Hypothermia occurs when the core body temperature is lowered. Hypothermia impairs the judgment
and performance of the victim. Water temperature in deep oceans or cold climates is frequently below 5 oC.
Cold of this magnitude could be a significant factor in the survival of the DISSUB crew, depending on the
heat transfer characteristics of the boat and the number of survivors. Hyperthermia occurs when the core
body temperature is above normal. Heat stress conditions, posing the risk of heat casualties, may occur in
well-insulated submarines, in engineering spaces or to escapees on the surface in hot climates. See the
Medical Supplement for further information.

Whilst not always confirmed by trials, it is predicted that the temperature within the submarine will
gradually fall and reach equilibrium with the surrounding water. In order to prevent hypothermia and
shivering, personnel should attempt to remain dry and wear extra clothing. If escape and/or survival suits
are available, they will provide excellent insulation. However, if they are damaged, they will fail to
provide adequate protection after escape. Alternatively, a rising DISSUB temperature may lead to the
requirement to provide extra water to survivors and methods of cooling such as hand and arm immersion
is sea-water.

0615 Other factors affecting survival.

1. Psychological aspects. As with any disaster the psychological damage to both survivors and
responders must be considered. Careful follow-up will be required. Cases of post-traumatic stress
disorder (PTSD) are likely to be encountered. Additionally acute psychiatric reactions are possible in the
survivor group and Nicotine withdrawal may also be a problem on the DISSUB.

2. Radiation. If a nuclear-powered submarine is involved in a SUBSUNK situation, the crew may be


exposed to gamma radiation that can penetrate bulkheads and irradiate survivors within the escape
compartment. Other radioactive fission products may enter the escape compartment. This radiation will
contaminate the survivors both externally and internally. A total dose of 1 to 2 Gray is considered
acceptable in relation to the other hazards imposed by a SUBSUNK situation. A rapidly rising dose rate
or a rate of around 200 milli-Grays per hour should initiate escape.
The handling of contaminated casualties by the response forces is dealt with in Section IX. The treatment
of irradiated casualties is covered in the Medical Supplement.

3. Hydration and nutrition. Under simulated DISSUB conditions, survivors performed escape and
rescue procedures after seven days on a daily ration of one pint of water and 400 calories (kilogram
calories). Subjects existing solely on survival rations tend to become dehydrated and energy deficient.
Dehydration occurs sooner than starvation, making the need for water more important. Although
dehydrated, they may not feel thirsty and might therefore need to be forced to drink water. The research
indicated that each submarine survivor requires at least one (1) litre of water and around 1000 to 1200 Cal
per day. Extra food supplies will be required if survivors suffer with hypothermia. Hydration is even more
critical in hyperthermic DISSUB conditions, which may mandate several litres of water per man per day.

While resting, the survivors should be able to maintain their blood glucose levels. However,
minimal exercise may result in hypoglycaemia. In the cold, hypoglycaemia can lead to failure in
thermoregulation, with survivors cooling much more quickly and becoming hypothermic. Pod posting can
provide hot food and fluid replacement when rescue assets arrive. Eating foods high in fat content and
low in carbohydrates results in less carbon dioxide production. If the survivors choose to escape, at least
1000 cal should be eaten just prior to escape.

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4. Hygiene. The appropriate disposal of urine and faecal material is essential to prevent
gastroenteritis. Survivors should properly dispose of waste material. An outbreak of gastroenteritis will
increase survivor susceptibility to other hazards.

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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SECTION VI – ESCAPE.

0616 Risks associated with the Escape procedure.

1. There are 2 methods to escape from a DISSUB these are Tower Escape and Compartment Escape
(sometimes called Rush Escape).

2. The Tower Escape procedure is essentially a very rapid bounce dive. As such, there are 2 main
hazards, decompression illness (DCI) and barotrauma. The increase in pressure during this ‘dive’ will
cause nitrogen to be absorbed into the body tissues - hence increasing the risk of developing DCI as the
pressure is reduced. The very rapid pressure transients may induce barotrauma to sensitive body organs.

3. There are national variations in the size and shape of escape towers but all are designed to facilitate
the rapid flooding up and pressurisation of the escapee within the escape tower followed by a rapid exit
from the DISSUB and a controlled rise to the surface. The escaper dons the SEIE and climbs into the
escape tower. The lower hatch is shut and the tower is flooded up and pressurised to the outside seawater
pressure. As the pressure inside and outside the tower equalise the upper hatch opens and the buoyancy
within the SEIE carries the escaper to the surface at a controlled rate. The SEIE is fitted with a hood to
enable the escaper to breathe normally, thus reducing the likelihood of pulmonary barotraumas.

4. Compartment Escape entails flooding the entire escape compartment up to the bottom of the escape
tower. The whole escape compartment is then pressurized to sea pressure, the lids of the escape tower are
opened and the survivors then proceed to escape in an orderly manner. This method entails the survivors
spending considerably more time under pressure with a consequent increase in the risks of DCI.
Additionally, given that the tower does not have to be drained down between escapes, escapees will arrive
at the surface in quick succession.

5. Thus, there are 3 main parameters affecting the safety of the escape procedure:

a. The depth of the DISSUB - hence the depth down to which the escaper must be pressurised. A
significant nitrogen load can be acquired over a very short time during exposures to deep escape
depths and the pressure transients are severe.

b. The time it takes to complete the procedure - the more time at increased pressure the greater the
risk of DCI. Therefore, once the escape process has commenced it should be completed as
smoothly and expeditiously as possible.

c. The ambient pressure within the DISSUB. If this is greater than 1 ATA the escaper will
already have an increase in tissue nitrogen loading and the chances of developing DCI are thus
increased. This is particularly relevant if the survivor has spent a long period of time at pressure.
All body tissues will become saturated with nitrogen after about 24 hours.

6. From an internal pressure of 1ATA escapes have been performed down to a depth of 180 metres
(during controlled exercises) and some nations have routinely exercised escapes from 90 metres in open
water condition. Thus the systems are well proven. A simulated escape pressure profile for a 180-metre
escape is shown in the figure below:

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E s c a p e t o w e r f lo o d s B ou y an t A s e n t (3 m etre/s)

200 P r e s s u re d o u b le s e v e r y 4 s e c o n d s E s c a p e le a v e s t o w e r
u n ti l e q u a l w i th s e a p r e s s u r e

Depth (metres)
150

100

50

0 50 100 150 200 250


L a p s e ti m e in s e c o n d s

Figure 6 – 3. Simulated escape pressure profile for a 180 metre escape.

7. Experimentation using a submarine escape simulator has been conducted to define the depth /
DISSUB internal pressure relationship - termed the ‘Safe to Escape Curve’. The research is has defined
the curve that has a 5 - 10% incidence of DCI at different depths and DISSUB internal pressures. This
curve is shown below. Other curves for different DCI risks are available but due to the interpretation
required should only be used by an experience submarine or diving MO.

S a fe to E s c a p e C u r v e

200

A
Submarine Escape Depth (MSW)

(1 8 0 )

150

100

50

1 .0 1 .5 B 2 .0

P re s su re w ith in D is su b (A T A )

Figure 6 – 4. Safe to escape curve.

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Notes:
1. The Safe to Escape Curve is based on experimental work and actual sea trials.
2. It only applies where the compartment 'air' is composed of 21% Oxygen and 79% Nitrogen.
3. Point A is the maximum depth from which escape has been performed during sea trials.
4. Point B (1.7ATA) represents the pressure within the DISSUB from which rapid
depressurisation back to 1ATA gives a 5% incidence of DCI. (assuming saturation at 1.7ATA).
5. The shape of the escape curve has been defined to demonstrate DCI incidence of between 5 -
10%. Below this curve escape would be considered 'relatively' safe.
6. The information will only apply to an escape system with the following characteristics:
- provides a doubling of pressure every 4 seconds during the compression phase
- has a 'bottom time' not exceeding 4 seconds
- has an ascent rate of 2.75 meters per second

0617 Decompression illness.

Decompression Illness (DCI) is a complex series of signs and symptoms initiated by gas bubbles in
the blood stream and/or tissues during or following decompression. DCI may present as a wide range of
symptoms. Although symptoms may begin soon after surfacing, it is possible for the onset to be delayed
for some hours.

The incidence, rapidity of onset and the severity of the illness among the survivors will tend to
increase the greater the depth from which escape is made. With all methods of escape, the risk of DCI
may increase with each successive escape. With most escape systems, each escape sequence increases the
internal pressure of the submarine as water from the escape tower is drained into the internal volume of
the submarine. Thus those who escape later will have spent a longer time at increased pressure and will
have acquired a higher inert gas load.

Compartment escape requires longer periods under pressure and is thus more likely to cause DCI,
particularly for later escapees. Survival is unlikely below 70m and compartment escape should be
considered a method of last resort for most DISSUB situations.

0618 Barotrauma.

1. General. Conditions of increasing or decreasing atmospheric pressure may create unequal


pressures across closed air-containing body spaces. This may result in medical problems for DISSUB
survivors.

2. Pulmonary Barotraumas. Pulmonary barotraumas may occur in escapers as a result of


pulmonary over pressurisation during rapid ascent to the surface. Air may then infiltrate to any or all of
the following:

a. interstitial spaces to cause interstitial emphysema


b. the pleural space to cause a pneumothorax
c. the pulmonary vasculature to cause arterial gas embolism.

3. Interstitial Empyhsema. Air from mediastinal emphysema may migrate to cause subcutaneous
emphysema of the neck or upper chest. This presents with swelling and crepitus on palpation.

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The condition is not usually painful or dangerous in itself unless the upper airway is compromised
by excessive tissue swelling, but it should alert the examiner to the possibility of coexistent simple or
tension pneumothorax or arterial air embolism.

4. Pneumothorax. Symptoms will usually be shortness of breath and one-sided chest pain. Standard
medical treatment and close observation is indicated, with needle thoracostomy only if tension
pneumothorax develops. Recompression therapy for isolated non-tension pneumothorax is not required,
but a careful neurological screening examination is necessary to rule out the possibility of coexistent
arterial air embolism.

5. Arterial Gas Embolism. The rapidly progressive focal neurological signs and symptoms of
neurological arterial gas embolism, including decreasing level of consciousness, would typically arise
within minutes after completing a submarine escape. The symptoms and signs themselves are effectively
indistinguishable from rapid onset neurological DCI and, as such, the term DCI includes illness caused by
arterial gas embolism and treatment is described under the heading of Decompression Illness.

6. Otic Barotrauma. Otic barotrauma may occur with rapid pressurisation during the escape
procedures. The following problems and symptoms may occur.

a. Tympanic membrane injury - Injury or rupture of the tympanic membrane may occur resulting
in decreased hearing, pain, and bleeding. Only symptomatic treatment is required for this problem.

b. Round or oval window rupture - Forceful ear clearing during escape tower pressurisation may
cause this. In addition to ear pain, vertigo, hearing loss, and/or nausea may be seen as presenting
symptoms. These symptoms may make it difficult to distinguish this condition from neurological
DCI. If in doubt, treat for DCI while placing the patient in a semi-recumbent position, minimising
patient movement, and seeking consultation.

7. Tooth Barotrauma. A loose or cracked filling or crown may allow pressurised air to enter the
nerve root area during escape procedures. Severe jaw or tooth pain will result as this gas expands during
ascent. Despite the severity of symptoms, only symptomatic treatment is necessary after recovery aboard
the DISSUB.

8. Sinus Barotrauma. Blockage of a sinus opening into the nasal cavity may cause barotrauma
during either compression or decompression. If the orifice is blocked during compression, the sinus will
be at lower pressure than the rest of the body including the vasculature, and bleeding will occur into the
sinus cavity resulting in a nose bleed and residual sinus pain upon surfacing. If the sinus(es) become
blocked during ascent to the surface, pressure will build up in the sinus during ascent, resulting in sinus
pain and headache persistent on the surface. In either instance, neurological symptoms will not be present.
Tapping or applying digital pressure over the affected sinus(es) will confirm the aetiology of these
symptoms. Either condition requires only symptomatic management.

9. Oesophageal/Abdominal Barotrauma. Swallowed air may cause the lower portion of the
oesophagus to rupture during rapid ascent due to expansion of trapped gas. Anterior chest pain, usually
left-sided, will occur and subcutaneous emphysema may develop. Survivors in whom oesophageal
rupture is suspected should be medically stabilised, closely observed, and given a high priority for early
CASEVAC. Bowel rest, administration of intravenous fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics if available, and
mask oxygen are indicated for this problem while awaiting CASEVAC.

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Gastric or small bowel rupture can also occur with rapid ascent for the same reasons. In this event,
symptoms would include abdominal pain and possible abdominal distension. A high degree of suspicion
and thorough abdominal examination for sign of ruptured viscus is indicated. The treatment is similar to
that of oesophageal rupture, with the additional recommendation for placement of a nasogastric tube for
gastric decompression. Similar priority should be given for early CASEVAC.

0619 Treatment of Escapees.

1. Differential diagnosis

Survivors may be suffering from more than one condition. Those who are diagnosed or suspected
of serious or life-threatening DCI (either traditional decompression illness or arterial gas embolism) and
therefore categorised C1 (see Section X) should be treated by recompression immediately if practicable,
since any delay in such treatment will significantly reduce their chances of survival. Concurrent medical
conditions will not normally be affected by recompression and can be treated within the chamber.
Differential diagnosis may be difficult under these conditions, but the principle still applies: When in
doubt regarding serious DCI, recompress, providing chamber space can be made available and
operational limitations allow.

Evidence supporting the differential diagnosis of survivors should be available from other features
of the incident. Unconsciousness may be a consequence of a head injury suffered during escape, an
embolism occurring during ascent, hypoxia from near drowning, or from cold or heat exposure on the
surface.

However all survivors from submarine escape who lose consciousness within a few minutes of
surfacing must be treated by recompression, unless categorised as expectant (T4 (see Section X)). One
must assume the likelihood of pulmonary barotraumas with arterial gas embolism with this presentation.
(Cold or heat will normally affect persons after some interval on the surface. The interval will be related
to ambient conditions and the use of the submarine escape and immersion equipment.)

2. Diving related conditions. Reference: NATO publication ADivP-2; Allied Guide to Diving
Medical Disorders is the definitive document on diving related conditions.

3. Decompression illness principles.

The medical officer may have to cope with multiple cases of DCI and/or multiple survivors who
have a decompression obligation but at the time of assessment have not developed symptoms of DCI. The
casualties may present over several hours; triage and treatment will depend on the number and types of
recompression chambers available. If escape occurs before recovery forces arrive, the medical officer
may also have to cope with co-morbid medical conditions in addition to DCI although priority should be
given to the treatment of serious cases of DCI (i.e. those with pulmonary or neurological symptoms or
signs).

In managing multiple cases of DCI/decompression obligation with limited resources, in order to ‘do
the most for the most’, a number of important principles need to be considered:

a. In a pressurised DISSUB where the survivors have not had time to become saturated or the
pressure is rising, the more severe DCI cases can be expected in those last to leave the submarine

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b. Recompression to provide hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the gold standard treatment for
decompression illness. Available oxygen stores will limit the number of chamber treatments that
can be supported. If re-supply will not be possible before the oxygen stores are exhausted, it may be
necessary to conserve oxygen to treat more severe cases of DCI in order to do the most for the
most. Even if hyperbaric oxygen is not available or practical for all patients, recompression on air
for the remainder is generally the second best option and should be considered. Where this is not
possible, treatment with high concentration oxygen at surface pressure and fluid replacement can be
used for treatment of DCI and for prophylaxis against DCI in those with a decompression
obligation until recompression facilities become available.

c. Only shallow oxygen tables (no tables in excess of a NATO Table VI with extensions) should
be used whenever multiple DCI casualties may exist with a single on board recompression
chamber. Consider procedures for shortening decompression times if the requirement for
immediate standard treatments is likely to exceed the recompression facilities immediately
available.

d. Recompression and treatment on tables deeper than 18 metres should only be done if absolutely
necessary with due consideration of the logistical requirements. Eighteen meter tables can be
swiftly interrupted, allowing more flexibility than deeper tables.

e. Although shipboard recompression chambers have a nominal rated capacity based upon
ambulatory patients, in practice only 1-3 serious cases with an attendant and MO can be
accommodated in most of these chambers.

f. It may be appropriate to accept and perform incomplete, but life saving, recompression therapy
on some survivors to make chamber space available to save other lives. Repeat follow up
treatments could then be performed when additional recompression facilities have become
available.

g. Do not be misled by survivors with mild or absent symptoms. AGE is usually symptomatic
upon surfacing or within minutes of surfacing, but there may be a lucent interval when the patient
appears well before suddenly worsening. Decompression sickness can develop immediately or
have no symptoms for many hours after ascent. Treat DCI or omitted decompression early before
symptoms develop.

Based on these principles, the following paragraphs give notes of guidance:

4. Prophylactic Treatment for Potential DCI in those with a Decompression Obligation.


Prophylactic treatment of DCI should be given to all DISSUB survivors whose pressure exposure may
lead to DCI or if any survivors have symptoms of DCI. Recompression is the gold standard treatment for
omitted decompression and this should be organised and performed whenever available and appropriate
while recognising that symptomatic survivors and those with severe DCI have higher priority.
Recompression guidelines for omitted decompression may be found in AdivP-2; Allied Guide to Diving
Medical Disorders (Chapter 6), or in National diving manuals.

5. Treatment of DCI or omitted decompression when a Recompression Chamber is not


available. Treatment with oxygen at the highest concentration possible should be given to all cases of
suspected DCI or omitted decompression where chamber treatment is not immediately available, but
adequate oxygen supplies do exist. Casualties should be re-hydrated – (for C1 casualties this should
preferably be by the intravenous route). If transport to a treatment centre is necessary and feasible, it is

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preferable to use low flying (<1000 ft/300m) or aircraft pressurised to these levels. Unconscious patients
should be put in the recovery position during transport, with continuous use of high flow oxygen and care
of skin pressure areas. Intensive care may be required during transport. Transportation risks must be
weighed against delays in reaching a definitive care facility.

6. Treatment of DCI when a Recompression Chamber is available. A single recompression


chamber, such as one provided on an Escape Gear Ship as part of First Reaction Stores, may be the only
recompression chamber initially available. Backup chambers and evacuation support must be requested at
an early stage if circumstances indicate the possibility of multiple DCI/arterial gas embolism casualties.
The single on deck recompression chamber should be used for treating the most severe cases immediately
available until adequate transport or backup recompression chambers are available. If chambers are full,
survivors with less severe DCI or omitted decompression should be placed under observation and given
high concentrations of oxygen and fluid replacement until recompression when chambers become
available or they can be rapidly evacuated to other facilities.

7. Guidance on recompression therapy.

a. Consider delegation of this responsibility to the MO in charge of the recompression area if this
MO has been trained in diving casualty management. No survivor should be recompressed unless
authorised by the SCC or an MO to whom the SCC has delegated responsibility.

b. The sooner DCI or arterial gas embolism is treated, the better the prognosis. Time must not be
wasted in detailed evaluation prior to treatment. A detailed neurological examination can be
completed in the chamber under pressure following initial recompression in the case of survivors
with serious neurological findings on the preliminary screening examination.

c. If in doubt regarding symptoms resembling DCI, it is recommended to treat with


recompression, provided chamber space is available.

d. The recompression chamber should be fully utilized immediately for patients that may be at risk
of DCI. After initial pressurisation, keep the recompression chamber inner lock pressurised to 18
metres (2.8 bar) and lock any additional cases in, if possible. Upward excursions during treatment
should be brief and avoided when possible. Casualties whose DCI becomes less serious with
treatment may be removed from the recompression chamber inner lock to the outer lock and then
surfaced after partial treatment to make room for more serious cases. Re-treatments can be
performed in due course.

8. Utilisation of Diving Medical Officers. If only one diving medical officer is present he/she
should not enter the chamber, as he/she must remain available to triage new casualties for treatment. An
attendant should remain in the chamber to monitor and care for survivors. If more than one diving medical
officer is present, one remains outside to continue triage and evaluate support requirements. The second
diving medical officer may be called upon to provide therapeutic support either in or outside the chamber
as necessary.

9. Medical Treatment in the Recompression Chamber. Treat for tension pneumothorax if


necessary with needle or tube thoracostomy, and other supportive medical care as required. If
thoracostomy is carried out, care must be taken during the decompression phase to monitor the one-way
Heimlich valve to ensure that it continues to function properly. Other types of specific treatment that may
be required or helpful adjuncts include:

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a. Catheterisation and turning of the paralysed patient with attention to pressure points.

b. Hydration with a crystalloid solution such as Ringer's Lactate (Hartman’s) Solution or Normal
Saline (recommended for serious DCI).

10. Other Specific Conditions.

Within the Medical Supplement there is further guidance on the recognition and treatment of the
following specific injuries:

a. Hypothermia, heat stroke and heat exhaustion treatment


b. Cold and heat injuries,
c. Injuries due to Irradiation

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SECTION VII – SURVIVAL HAZARDS ON THE SURFACE AFTER SURFACE


ABANDONMENT OR ESCAPE

0620 General considerations

Fire, flooding, atmosphere contamination, and reactor emergencies are some of the major casualties
that could result in the need for surface abandonment of the crew. Conditions leading to abandonment
will likely develop rapidly and result in a hurried evacuation from the vessel. Once egress is
accomplished from the stricken submarine, survivors face numerous adverse conditions. Although the
surface survivor faces many hazards they can be broadly categorized into 2 major areas; the baseline
physical condition of the survivor upon arrival to the surface and environmental conditions encountered
on the surface. . All surface hazards compound one another and are further exacerbated by the time spent
on the surface prior to rendezvous with rescue forces.

0621 Underlying medical issues.

The survivor will likely arrive on the surface in a deteriorated state of physical or mental capacities
as a result of the initial incident itself, the DISSUB experience and the escape experience. They may
present to the surface already demonstrating signs of trauma, respiratory compromise, barotrauma,
Decompression Syndromes, hypo/hyperthermia, and mental exhaustion. Surface abandonment in high sea
states also places the crew at risk for orthopaedic injuries with poorly timed jumps from the sail of the
submarine. Debris and petrochemicals may pose hazards upon immediately exiting the submarine.

0622 Environmental considerations.

Environmental conditions encompass a wide range of factors such as sea state, water temperature,
air temperature, radiant heat, and marine hazards. An immersion suit, such as the SEIE, is designed to
prolong surface survival by providing protection from environmental hazards. There are national
variations in Submarine Escape and Survival Personnel Equipment design. Some employ the free-floating
method whereby the survivor lies in the water. Others employ a small one-man life raft to raise the
survivor out of the water such as the MK 10 Submarine Escape and Immersion Equipment (SEIE).
Properly outfitted, the MK 10 SEIE has increased the projected surface survival time in cold waters to
about 24 hours with concurrent cold injury as likely presentation. Assuming that the submariner survives
the initial cold shock in response to entering cold water, survival time without an immersion suit is
considerably less than 24 hours: approximate times are shown in Table 6 – 1 below:

Table 6-1 Life expectancy times for immersion temperatures without SEIE

Water Temperature Time


21.0-15.5° C (70-60° F) 12 hours
15.5-10.0° C (60-50° F) 6 hours
10.0-4.5° C (50-40° F) 1 hour
4.5° C (40° F) and below less than 1 hour

Note: The use of a properly outfitted SEIE with life raft will increase immersion
times to roughly 24 hours in 3-4° C water temperatures.

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The use of SEIE does not guarantee complete environmental protection; various shortcomings may
still put the survivor at risk of environmental hazards. Improper donning of undergarments, loss of the
raft, or damage of the immersion equipment during egress compromises thermal protection of the SEIE.

Free-floating SEIE have several reported shortcomings including unfavourable flotation angle
increasing aspiration risk, severe low back pain, excessive suit flexion, inability to urinate, and decreased
circulation to limbs. The buoyancy and suit flexion of a large percentage of immersion suits negates the
self-righting ability of approved lifejackets. Splash guards to protect the face have been fitted to some
systems in efforts to reduce aspiration. Possible modifications to the MK 10 SEIE include addition of a
streamer or global positioning equipment to aid in search and recovery efforts.

0623 Marine animal hazards.

The main animal hazard faced by survivors will be pelagic sharks. These animals may abrade
exposed areas or bite causing extensive injury.

0624 Physiological/Psychological consequences.

1. Aspiration. Drowning or near-drowning of survivors may be encountered. Salt water or vomitus


aspiration may induce respiratory distress.

2. Cold Water Immersion- unprotected in hypothermic conditions.

Fatalities may occur in four stages:


- Stage 1: Cold shock (3 -5 minutes)
- Stage 2: Swimming failure (3-30 minutes)
- Stage 3: Hypothermia (after 30 minutes)
- Stage 4: Post rescue collapse (during or hours after rescue).

The rate of heat loss of individual floating in the water depends on the following: water
temperature, air temperature, wind speed, insulation provided by immersion suit and clothing, rate of
agitation of the water, metabolic heat production (produced by shivering and exercise), ratio of body mass
to surface area, subcutaneous fat thickness, state of physical fitness, physical behaviour, and body posture
in the water.

3. Hypothermia and Hyperthermia. See the Medical Supplement.

4. Dehydration. Dehydration results from inadequate fluid intake, insensible fluid loss, seasickness,
or osmotic diarrhoea 2° salt water ingestion. Fluid loss in excess of 5 percent body weight may be
associated with headache, irritability, and pre-syncope symptoms. With losses of 8 - 10 percent,
performance declines significantly. Further losses lead to hallucinations and delirium. Death usually
occurs with acute losses in the range of 15 - 20 percent of body weight. Survival expectancy without
water is on average 3 days (or less in hot weather) and no more than about 5-6 days. Death from
starvation occurs in excess of a month.

5. Skin/soft tissue injury. Prolonged immersion leads to skin breakdown and ulcer formation.
Severe sun and wind burn may occur over unprotected skin. Cold induced injuries include freezing or non

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ATP-57(B)

freezing injuries (frostbite or chilblains). SEIE mitigates some of these conditions. Even with this
equipment, in waters of 5° C (41° F) or colder, non-freezing cold injury of the extremities may still occur.
Effects may be seen after 10-15 hours of exposure.

Eye exposure to petrochemicals, salt water, and ultraviolet light may impair vision by chemical or
solar conjunctivitis.

0625 Medical considerations.

Rescued survivors may suffer from traumatic or exposure-related conditions- near drowning,
significantly impaired peripheral neuromuscular (nerve and muscle) function, blood volume alterations,
cardio-vascular function impairment, hypothermia, and electrolyte imbalances. The prolonged immersion
may leave soft tissue friable and subject to secondary injury during extraction efforts. Those not at risk
for aspiration should be extracted from the water with care, preferably horizontally, and handled as if they
were critically ill. Unconscious individuals or those at risk for aspiration should be removed in haste.
Rapid medical assessment of ABC’s should occur and near-drowning victims should receive oxygen as
soon as possible.

Cold survivors must be protected from further heat loss and placed in medical observation.
Severely hypothermic persons require extensive medical intervention and may overwhelm medical
capabilities if multiple casualties present. Core temperature re-warming should be done slowly and only
with critical care capability because of the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiovascular
collapse. Re-warming hypothermic rescuees may be limited to blankets, warm showers, or heated PO
fluids.

Thorough evaluation of soft tissue cold injury cannot be made before thawing and does not
influence first aid treatment.

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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SECTION VIII – RESCUE

0626 Introduction.

There are a variety of rescue systems; each of them is operated by a different nation or group of
nations with their own Standing Operating Procedures. Therefore this chapter gives general guidance and
should be read in conjunction with the SOPs for the relevant system.
(Note: Where the term SRV is used in this section it covers both rescue vehicles and rescue chambers)

0627 Potential problems during Rescue.

In addition to the problems of survival in a DISSUB there are some specific risks pertaining to the
rescue process between the DISSUB and arrival at shore facilities. Routine transport between vessels and
ashore are normal risks and are not considered.

1. Access to the SRV. The SRV will mate with the DISSUB via an escape tower or trunk. To access
the SRV there is a requirement to climb through the tower and then over a series of gaps through the tower
hatch, over the casing and into the SRV. This will be taxing for able-bodied rescuees but may be
impossible to debilitated survivors or those with injuries to one or more limb. Assistance to move
survivors through the submarine to the tower should be planned by the senior survivor and DMTT (if
deployed). Assistance with strops and winching should be provided by the SRV.

2. Immobile Patients. Rescuees who can not climb through the tower, even with assistance, may be
transferred to an SRV using a stretcher and winch arrangement. Due to the limits on access and turning in
the vehicle it is normal for only a half-back stretcher to be available. For lower limb injuries this will
mean that additional splinting will be required. Once in the SRV these casualties occupy space for at least
6 to 8 seated casualties and access to undertake interventions (airway manoeuvres, ventilation, IV access
e.t.c) is very limited. With similar difficulties in extracting these rescuees into the MOSHIP / MOSUB
and into a DCC careful planning will be required to retrieve these casualties.

3. CO2 Off Effect. The change from a contaminated submarine atmosphere, especially if the CO2
level is high (>3%) to a clean atmosphere can lead to sudden collapse. This may occur in the SRV or deck
reception area.

4. Vehicle Constraints. SRVs are small vehicle with limited space. On-board monitoring or
treatment for rescuees may be very limited until arrival on the MOSHIP deck and unloading. Therefore
rescuees with medical problems may worsen during transit in the SRV.

5. Transfer Under Pressure. Not all SRVs are capable of transferring rescuees directly to a
decompression system. These rescuees will need to be decompressed to surface and then placed in
chambers and taken back to depth. As the DISSUB pressure increases the time between surfacing and
onset of DCI shortens and these rescuees may be at significant risk of DCI during this period with
consequent requirement for prolonged decompression and therapeutic treatment.

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0628 Rescue mission planning

En-route to the DISSUB the SMO (S), Senior Diving MO and the CRF should undertake a mission
planning exercise with the SRV operators to maximise chamber usage, decide on decompression tables
and ensure that injured survivors are brought out of the DISSUB at an appropriate point in the rescue
process. This plan will then form the basis for rescue cycles modified by further information received on
arrival at the DISSUB location. Guidance on the choice of decompression tables is in Annex 6G.

0629 Co-Ordination of Rescue Assets.

When more than 1 rescue asset is being used the medical teams supporting each SRV require to co-
ordinate casualty management. Unless the OSC has the facilities to co-ordinate the casualty response,
chamber availability and casualty information then 1 rescue system shall be nominated as the lead to co-
ordinate the rescue response, for compiling casualty details and collating rescue force store and
replenishment requirements.

Selection of the co-ordinating rescue system will depend upon the availability of administrative
staff and communications facilities on the MOSHIP to undertake this task.

0630 Equipment supply to the DISSUB:

The DMTT may require additional medical equipment to support the DISSUB survivors. This
should be supplied via the next available SRV trip. If multiple vehicles are being used this will require
co-ordination between the two medical teams to ensure the right equipment is provided in an appropriate
timescale.

0631 Resupply.

Additional medical supplies and oxygen, both for the chambers and for direct patient use, may be
needed during a rescue. The SMO(S) should feed these requirements to the CRF who will arrange for
resupply via the OSC. If poor weather or sea conditions are expected at the DISSUB location then
consideration should be given to loading additional stores before deployment from the MOPORT.

0632 Casualty transfers:

Guidance on off-loading casualties to shore is in Section XII.

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SECTION IX – THE MANAGEMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL AND OTHER


CONTAMINATION

0633 General considerations.

Survivors within the DISSUB are highly likely to have been exposed to a variety of potential
contaminants during the survival phase before escape or rescue. Contaminants vary depending on the
class of the submarine, and nature of the accident. These include: diesel fuel, lubricating oils and grease,
hydraulic oil, pyrolysis products, human excreta and in the case of nuclear submarines they may have
been exposed to radioactive contamination.

All forms of contamination represent a threat to the health of the survivors. Therefore all survivors
should be assumed to be contaminated until proven otherwise. All survivors from a nuclear DISSUB
should be assumed to be radiological contaminated until they have been adequately monitored and shown
to be uncontaminated. Furthermore it is highly probable that most survivors will have been exposed to
more than one sources of contamination.

If the contamination is not adequately managed and contained it could also represent a potential
hazard to rescue forces; this is true both for rescue forces on the surface and the DMTT. Furthermore the
flammability of flammable contaminates such as diesel fuel and lubricating oils will be increased in a
hyperbaric environment, thus there may be a significant fire hazard in the event of TUP being necessary
or, in the case of escapees, therapeutic recompression being required. These hazards can be reduced if
contaminated individuals are decontaminated as soon as reasonably practical and rescue forces follow a
few basic principles.

Contamination can be expected to be present both on survivors clothing and on their skin and hair.
Up to 80% of contamination can be removed by the simple process of undressing the individual.

If the conditions and supplies permit, every effort should be made for early decontamination of
escapees and rescuees. Escapees from a DISSUB are likely to arrive on the surface in some form of SEIE
suit, which will likely be worn over their clothes. Once they have been recovered to the EGS and have
undergone initial medical triage ambulatory escapees should undress and shower as soon as practically
possible. This process should be supervised by a medical trained individual since delayed decompression
illness may occur.

In the case of rescue decontamination should if at all possible start aboard the DISSUB. Clothing
should be removed and left in the DISSUB. The DMTT can assist where needed in decontamination and
dressing of rescuees on board the DISSUB. This procedure should reduce the amount of contamination
transferred to the rescue vessel. In addition it will also reduce the critical loss of time devoted to extensive
decontamination procedures on the MOSHIP.

If TUP is not required, ambulatory rescuees should be decontaminated as soon as practical after
initial triage. This process should be observed by a medically trained individual.

Non-ambulatory individuals should be assisted with decontamination by members of the medical


team. Disposable garments worn during the transfer should be bagged and disposed of in accordance with
national guidelines. If TUP is required individuals should wash as best able within the TUP complex.
This will vary depending on the rescue system in use. Once again disposable garments should be removed
from the TUP complex via an airlock and bagged for disposal in accordance with national guidelines.

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Every effort should be made by casualty receiving & caregivers to wear personal protective
equipment (PPE) to avoid cross-contamination. Contaminants likely to be encountered are most unlikely
to present a significant health hazard to rescue force personnel. Simple precaution such as wearing a
disposable plastic apron and surgical gloves should provide more than adequate protection. Respiratory
protection outside the DISSUB will unlikely be required for chemical contamination.

ESSENTIAL MEDICAL CARE SHOULD NEVER BE DELAYED WHILST


DECONTAMINATION IS PERFORMED.

0634 Chemical contamination.

In most DISSUB scenarios it is highly likely that the survivors will be exposed to a number of
chemical contaminants. Damage to submarine systems may result in the release of diesel fuel, lubricating
oil, hydraulic oil, MEA, sulphuric acid and a number of other chemical contaminants. A further source of
chemical contamination is from pyrolysis products following a fire. Additionally it is inevitable that
during the survival phase the survivors will have to have deployed some means of carbon dioxide
scrubbing. This is most likely to have taken the form of either lithium hydroxide or soda lime; both have
the potential to release extremely caustic dust into the DISSUB.

Whilst survivors can be expected to have attempted to remove gross contamination they are still
likely to have residual contamination on their clothing, skin and hair. The presence of contamination on
the skin can be expected to cause skin irritation especially if has been present for several days.

0635 Biological contamination.

Conditions within the DISSUB are likely to have been very primitive. Freshwater is likely to have
been in very short supply and thus it is most probable that survivors will be unwashed and potentially
contaminated with human excreta. Additionally injured survivors may have blood stained clothing as may
their colleagues who have rendered first aid. As with chemical contamination individuals should be
afforded every opportunity to shower or wash as soon as possible on the EGS or MOSHIP. Assistance
should be provided to injured survivors as required. Contaminated clothing again should be bagged for
disposal in accordance with national guidelines.

0636 Radiological contamination.

In the event of the DISSUB being nuclear powered there is a very real possibility that some or all of
the survivors will have been exposed to radiological contamination. This could result from a primary
coolant spill or, exposure to fission products if the incident has been of such severity that it leads to a loss
of core integrity. In both situations the radioactive isotopes involved will be Beta/Gamma emitters, which
have the potential to cause burns to the skin if not removed.

Individuals with skin contamination are at increased risk for internal contamination through
ingestion or inhalation. If internal contamination is suspected then this can be assessed by taking nose
blows from survivors collecting samples of urine and faeces. If there remains a persistent concern about
internal contamination, then this can be assessed once the individuals concerned have been transferred
ashore by whole body monitoring.

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The DISSUB atmosphere may also be contaminated, and thus will represent a hazard to members
of the DISSUB entry team. Therefore if a radiological release is suspected members of the DMTT or
DET should wear respiratory protection prior to and during DISSUB entry.
Radiological contaminated individuals represent a potential hazard to rescue forces, particularly
those engaged in medical triage, decontamination and medical care. The risk can be ameliorated if
personnel engaged in these operations wear simple PPE; this should include: surgical type mask and hood,
waterproof apron, latex gloves and plastic overshoes.

It must also be remembered that any area were a contaminated individual is treated or is otherwise
held is at risk of becoming contaminated. Access to these areas must be controlled to individuals wearing
appropriate PPE and individuals leaving the area should undress and be monitored before being allowed to
enter any clean area. On completion of the rescue operation it will be necessary to monitor and
decontaminate any area where contaminated individuals had been held.

Rescuees from a nuclear DISSUB should be considered as radiological contaminated until proven
otherwise. Prior to entry into the rescue vehicle they should disrobe and don disposable identifiable
garments. On arrival at the MOSHIP they should undergo monitoring as soon as practical, the location
where this is conducted will depend on the design of the individual system. Contaminated individuals
should undergo decontamination as described above taking into account the limitations of the rescue
system if TUP is required.

Escapees from a nuclear DISSUB must be considered to be radiological contaminated until they
have been monitored and been shown to be uncontaminated. Given that they will have ascended from the
DISSUB through the water it is most unlikely that the exterior of the SEIE itself will be contaminated
however, contamination of the escapees clothing worn under the SEIE can’t be excluded. Able bodied
escapees should remove their SEIE prior to monitoring. SEIEs should be bagged as radiological waste in
accordance with national guidelines. Following monitoring areas of contamination and its severity should
be recorded.

Decontamination of able bodied escapees will best conducted in a designated decontamination area.
If available, this ideally would include a washroom equipped with showers as close as possible to the area
where the escapees are monitored. This avoids extending contamination into treatment areas. Non-able
bodied escapees should have their SEIE suits removed by medical staff prior to monitoring. If still
contaminated after removal of clothing they should be washed by medical staff using soap and water and
wash cloths. Irrigation run-off should be contained.

The route to the washroom should ideally be covered in absorbent paper to prevent the deck
becoming contaminated; access through this area should be restricted to escapees and rescue workers
wearing appropriate PPE. In the washroom the contaminated individual should undress themselves and
place their own clothes in bags which again should be treated as radiological waste in accordance with
national guidelines. They should then shower and wash using soap and water. The process should be
repeated till contamination is removed or reduced to twice the background reading. Scrubbing using a
scrubbing brush is not recommended, since it has the potential to abrade the skin and increase the
risk of internal contamination. Contaminated wounds should be irrigated with sterile normal saline,
with care being exercised to contain the irrigation fluid. Once they have showered they should be re-
monitored ideally in an area that has been kept clear of contaminated individuals. If clean they should
dress and leave the washroom.

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ESSENTIAL MEDICAL CARE SHOULD NEVER BE DELAYED WHILST


DECONTAMINATION IS UNDERTAKEN.

If urgent recompression therapy is indicated this again should not be delayed by the need to
radiologically decontaminate an individual however, the SEIE and the patient’s clothing should be
removed, if at all possible, prior to the patient being placed in the chamber. However, it should now be
remembered that the chamber itself is now potentially contaminated and it should be treated as a
controlled contamination area.

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SECTION X – TRIAGE

0637 Introduction.

The aims of triage are to deliver the right patient to the right place at the right time so that they
receive the optimum treatment and also to ‘do the most for the most 4. The principles of triage should be
used whenever the number and severity of casualties exceeds the resources available. It is a dynamic
process since the appropriate triage category allocated to any individual will change with time and
treatment.

The triage system given in this section assigns each casualty a composite triage category consisting
of a medical ‘T’ component and a recompression ‘C’ component. This system is used to direct the
management of casualties as they arrive onboard an EGS or MOSHIP and also to direct their evacuation to
other facilities. A ‘triage sieve’ (based on mobility for example) should be used to rapidly allocate
survivors to treatment areas onboard an EGS or MOSHIP and a more complex ‘triage sort’ should be used
for the movement of casualties between areas onboard and for evacuation.

A proposed triage sieve is reproduced at Figure 1. This modifies the sieve proposed in the
Reference2 but includes the NATO definitions for T 1 – 3 laid out in STANAG 2879 MED (Edition 3) –
‘Principles of Medical Policy in the Management of a Mass Casualty Situation’. The STANAG uses
‘DELAYED’ for T2 (instead of urgent) and MINIMAL for T3 (instead of delayed). To avoid
communications difficulties the T category should be used supplemented by the NATO definition if
required.

This sieve may be useful in some DISSUB casualty scenarios but alternative strategies may be
preferable in others. For example this sieve is not designed to prioritise escapees for recompression
therapy; this recompression needs assessment could occur as part of a triage sort as opposed to a sieve but
in the case, for example, of an escapee who is witnessed surfacing then losing consciousness it would
unnecessarily delay recompression. Also it may not be able to separate cold exhausted uninjured
casualties from those that are cold, exhausted and have injuries. In situations like this the ability to
communicate or other assessments of conscious level may represent more appropriate decision thresholds.

0638 Conduct of Triage.

Triage will ideally be conducted in an area shielded from the weather and readily accessible to
oncoming survivors that provides adequate space for medical care, depending on the class of the EGS or
MOSHIP. The area need not be large but there should be sufficient space to evaluate up to 5 casualties
prior to them being moved to the treatment or holding areas.

The Triage Medical Officer (TO) is responsible for the rapid assessment of survivors and their
placement into the relevant triage categories which will, in turn, determine which treatment area they are
initially taken to. If rescue has been carried out using a submarine rescue vehicle (SRV), or if escape took
place prior to the arrival on scene of the EGS, survivors may arrive in small or large groups. In the event of
a Compartment Escape the TO will have to assess a greater number of survivors and will require
assistance.

4
Major Incident Medical Management and Support The Practical Approach. 2nd Ed. Advanced Life Support Group.
2002 BMJ Publishing Group. London.

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The TO requires a supply of triage cards, preferably either cruciform or folding triage cards.

yes
PRIORITY 3
(NATO Minimal)
WALKING

no

no
DEAD

AIRWAY

yes
Below 10 or
above 29
PRIORITY 1
RESPIRATORY (NATO Immediate)
RATE
120 or
10-29 more

<120
PRIORITY 2
PULSE RATE (NATO Delayed)

Figure 6 - 5: Medical Incident Medical Management and Support Triage Sieve

The TO will allocate each survivor a unique casualty identification number. This is to be written in
indelible ink on the forehead and on the Casualty Report Form. One or more fit survivor(s) should be
retained in Triage to assist with the identification of unconscious casualties. Immediate use of high-flow
oxygen should be considered for all unconscious patients as well as any patients in whom the suspicion of
DCI exists. A physical description of unconscious survivors is to be written in their notes to facilitate and
confirm identification. As soon as the TO has allocated a triage category and written brief clinical notes,
survivors are to be taken to the appropriate treatment areas. The clinical notes must accompany each
survivor at all times. (See Casualty Handling Algorithm - Annex 6F).

The Area Casualty Report Log (Annex 6I) is to be kept up to date at all times and the information
passed to the MAO as soon as possible. The MAO is to be informed of all casualty movements in or out
of triage area by telephone or written message and the destination and time of transfer is to be recorded in
the Triage Casualty Log and Master Casualty State Board (Annex 6H).

The standard NATO medical triage categories (T1, T2, T3, T4) are to be used to indicate medical
treatment priorities. In addition, it must be determined which survivors need immediate recompression
(C1) or non-urgent recompression (C2) in order to allocate them to recompression chamber spaces on the

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EGS / RGS and in receiving shore facilities. (See Medical and Recompression Triage Categories Grid -
Table 6-6).

0639 Triage categories:

1. T1. This category should only be applied to casualties who require immediate life saving medical
and/or surgical treatment which is not overly time-consuming, and who have a high probability of
survival. Examples of medical conditions in this category include haemorrhagic shock, tension
pneumothorax and other respiratory emergencies, and the finding of an acute surgical abdomen.
Casualties in the T1/C1 category require both lifesaving immediate medical treatment and stabilisation
prior to immediate recompression; whereas those in the T1/C2 category require non-urgent decompression.
Depending upon severity of injury and availability of resources, certain survivors that initially appear to be
in the T1/C1 category may be determined to be effectively unsalvageable with available resources (T4).

2. T2. This category should be applied to casualties requiring time-consuming major medical and/or
surgical treatment, and whose general condition permits delay in said treatment without unduly
endangering life. Examples of these medical conditions include: <20% second degree burns, open
fractures, inhalation pulmonary injuries, major lacerations, and moderate hypothermia. Category T2/C1
indicates the additional requirement for urgent recompression, and T2/C2 the need for non-urgent
recompression.

3. T3. This category will include both casualties with relatively minor injuries that may be managed
by First Aid trained personnel and casualties with no obvious injuries. Examples of these medical
conditions include: closed bony fractures without vascular compromise, minor lacerations, first degree
burns, and mild hypothermia. Casualties categorized as T3/C2 require non-urgent decompression as well
as medical/surgical treatment. Those individuals categorised as T3/C1 should be sent to the recompression
chamber for immediate treatment.

4. T4. This group comprises patients who have injuries so severe (serious and/or multiple injuries)
that even if they were treated under the best possible conditions, their probability of survival would be
extremely low. This categorisation is based both upon injury severity and availability of medical and
recompression resources. These casualties should not be abandoned, but receive simple palliative
treatment and made comfortable including use of opiod analgesics. They must be monitored by assigned
medical personnel, and their condition reviewed periodically. If sufficient medical and/or recompression
resources become available, these patients may be re-categorised.

0640 Recompression treatment categories.

Recompression treatment categories will be established to facilitate priorities for decompression


treatment of DISSUB casualties. This is essential considering the limited on board resources for
recompression therapy and the high risk of serious complications for delay in recompression treatment of
serious DCI.

1. C1. Patients in this category have symptoms of serious or life-threatening DCI and require
immediate treatment in the on board recompression chamber. To delay their treatment would entail a
significant increased risk of death or subsequent permanent injury.

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2. C2. Patients in this category have minor and non life-threatening DCI symptoms at the time they
are assessed. If the scenario involves rescuees from a DISSUB saturated at a DISSUB pressure above
1.7 bar, all rescuees have a decompression obligation and are at some risk of DCI. These rescuees by
definition fall into the C2 category and require close monitoring for the development of DCI symptoms.
If sufficient oxygen is available, they should receive prophylactic surface high flow mask oxygen
treatment until they can be recompressed and treated on a saturation decompression table.
Note: Escapers from any DISSUB or rescuees from a pressurised DISSUB (> 1.5 bar) with
no obvious symptoms should be considered C2 and should be held in the tertiary area for
medical observation due to the risk of late development of symptoms of DCI.

3. C0. Patients in this category have no current indication that recompression is required.

0641 Radiation casualties.

Radiation exposure must be taken into consideration in the emergency treatment and disposition
of casualties. Those survivors who are known or suspected to have received a high radiation dose (> 2
Gy) will require hospitalisation within 24 hours or after treatment of serious or life-threatening DCI. In
this case, they should be considered at least T2, with priority for early CASEVAC (See: AMedP-6 Vol
1).

0642 Allocating survivors to the appropriate treatment areas.

Once allocated a triage category survivors are to be taken to the appropriate treatment area as
follows:
Table 6-2. Allocation of treatment area by triage category

TRIAGE CATEGORY TREATMENT AREA

All T1, T1/C1 Area 1 (Primary Treatment)

T2/C1 (See Note), T3/C1 Recompression Chamber

All T2, T2/C2,T3/C2 (symptomatic) Area 2 (Secondary Treatment)

All T3, T3/C2 (asymptomatic) and uninjured Area 3 (Tertiary Treatment and Observation)
survivors

T4 Area 4 (Palliative Care)


Note: T2/C1 casualties may receive urgently required non-life saving medical treatment prior
to recompression if that treatment can be accomplished in a short period of time (less than 20
minutes) prior to recompression.

Those casualties who do not require immediate recompression therapy, i.e. the T1, T2 and T3
groups, will be treated on board or be evacuated to other receiving hospitals or sick bays. Casualties who
require immediate or urgent recompression therapy, i.e. the C1 group, will be treated aboard the EGS /
RGS, in another nearby shipboard chamber, or immediately evacuated to a shore-based chamber

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(transferred under pressure if and whenever possible). (See Annex 6E - Triage Algorithm and Annex 6F
- Casualty Handling Algorithm).

Casualties in the T3 triage category asymptomatic for DCI (T3/C2) could receive surface oxygen
in the tertiary treatment area in order not to overcrowd the secondary treatment area. Category T3/C2
casualties that develop symptoms suspicious of DCI should be moved to the secondary treatment area
(nearer the decompression chamber) and be observed until they can either receive therapeutic
recompression treatment or be CASEVACed to a shore facility for treatment.
Once it is ascertained that all survivors have been recovered and Triage is complete, the Triage
Medical Officer is to report to the Medical Controller who will reallocate him to one of the treatment
areas.
Table 6-3 - Medical and recompression triage and treatment grid

C1 C2 C0
T1 Require lifesaving Require lifesaving Require lifesaving immediate
immediate medical immediate medical medical treatment
treatment treatment
No indication that
Require immediate Require non-urgent recompression is required
recompression recompression
T2 Require immediate Require non-lifesaving Require non-lifesaving major
recompression major medical treatment. medical treatment

Require non-lifesaving Require non-urgent No indication that


major medical treatment recompression recompression in required
(*medical treatment prior
to decompression must be
accomplished in less than
20 minutes)
T3 Require immediate Require minor general Require minor general
compression medical care/observation medical care/observation
Require non-urgent
Require minor general recompression No indication that
medical care/observation recompression is required
T4 Unsalvageable with available treatment resources - palliative treatment only.
Key:
T1-T4 categories are NATO standard for surgical/medical treatment
C1 Requires urgent or immediate recompression
C2 Requires non-urgent recompression
C0 Does not require recompression

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SECTION XI – CASUALTY RECORDING PROCESS

0643 Introduction.

Casualty recording is essential in both the escape and rescue scenarios. The guidance outlined is to
be followed for either escape or when a Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) is used to rescue personnel
from a DISSUB.

The Medical Administration Officer (MAO) is responsible for co-ordination this information and
will require a series of assistants who can be used in the various triage and holding areas to collect
information from patients and medical staff. These personnel may need to be from the DISSUB nation to
avoid language difficulties with the rescuees.

0644 Casualty identification.

1. General. To avoid confusion over casualty numbers, locations and identities each casualty should
be allocated a Unique Casualty Identifying Number (UCIN) at the earliest possible opportunity. The first
chance to do this will vary depending on whether escape or rescue is being conducted. This UCIN should
be used to follow the casualty through the whole process until returned to shore.

The UCIN should be marked prominently on the casualty (e.g. on the forehead), and on the
casualties triage documents. The use of wrist bands or numbered tabards should also be considered.

The MAO will collect the following information on each casualty and update it as the casualty
moves through triage, treatment, holding and transfer ashore:

- Unique Casualty Identification Number (UCIN)


- Surname
- Forenames
- Rank
- Service Number
- Date of Birth
- Triage category and main injuries
- Location
- (Radiological contamination / irradiation status if appropriate)

2. Escapees. Once aboard an EGS each escapee should have their UCIN allocated by the Triage
Officer. The additional information in paragraph 1 above should be collected in the treatment areas and
forwarded to the MAO at the co-ordination point.

By prior agreement if SPAG is deployed to recover casualties the UCIN may be allocated by the
SPAG medical personnel to ease communication between SPAG and the EGS.

3. Rescuees. Where the UCIN is allocated to rescuees will depend on whether a DISSUB Medical
Triage Team (DMTT) is deployed. If a DMTT is deployed then they should allocate UCINs to each
rescuee before they leave the DISSUB, and issue casualty cards listing any injuries or treatment given in
the DISSUB. If not, then the following routines should be followed:

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a. TUP Not Required. If the internal DISSUB pressure is such that there in no need to transfer
casualties to the decompression chambers then the casualties will be depressurised to the deck. On
emerging from the Submarine Rescue Vessel (SRV) or Deck Reception Chamber (DRC) each
casualty should be triaged and allocated a UCIN. The casualty’s details listed in paragraph 1 above
should be taken in the treatment area and forwarded to the MAO at the co-ordination point.

b. TUP Required. If TUP is required then casualties will pass from the SRV via the DRC to the
Deck Decompression Chambers (DDC). Once in the DDC they will remain there until their
decompression to the surface is complete before being released onto the MOSHIP deck. The
following routine should be used to record casualty details and control casualty location:

(1) The UCIN should be given to each rescuee as they pass through the DRC.
(2) Once in the DDC and commencing decompression then the surname and service number
should be collected from each rescuee and transmitted, along with the UCIN , to the outside of
the chamber.
(3) Once removed from the DDC the casualty should be triaged and referred to the appropriate
treatment area. On arrival the casualties details listed in paragraph 1 above should be taken and
passes to the MAO at the co-ordination point:

0645 Information handling.

The MAO is responsible to the SMO(S) for maintaining accurate information on all escapees or
rescuees onboard the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP. The MAO is to maintain a running log of this information
and update the log on changes in the patient status (e.g. change of triage category or location).

The MAO is responsible to the SMO(S) for producing casualty signals and reports from the
information received on the escapees and rescuees. Signals shall be in the standard NATO format and
released by the Communications team.

All information on casualties is to be prefixed with the casualties UCIN whatever other forms of
identification are used. This will avoid confusion over surnames and incorrect service numbers.

Mobile casualties should be identified by the use of tabards, t-shirts or similar clothing so that they
can be differentiated from the ship’s company and rescue personnel.

Once transfer to another vessel or ashore is agreed the MAO will ensure that each casualty
transferred is logged off the MOSHIP and that they take their medical record / triage card with them to
their next point of care. Copies of medical records should be taken and retained on the MOSHIP if
possible.

On transfer from the MOSHIP the MAO shall keep a record of the location of the next point of care
and passed to the national authority of the DISSUB to allow them to make arrangements for continuing
follow up and appropriate repatriation of casualties / survivors.

0646 Casualty identification when using multiple vessels.

When multiple EGS are used UCINs should be allocated so as not to duplicate numbers. The
SMO(S) should allocate numbers beginning at 100 to the first vessel, 200 to the next and so on.

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When using multiple SRVs the numbering of casualties will depend upon whether a DMTT has
been deployed. If a DMTT is deployed they should issue UCINs to each rescuee before they leave the
DISSUB. If no DMTT is deployed then the lead SRV should use UCINs beginning from 100, the second
SRV from 200, the third from 300 and so on.

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SECTION XII – TRANSFER OF CASUALTIES FROM ESCAPE AND RESCUE SHIPS


TO FURTHER MEDICAL CARE

0647 General considerations.

All current Safe to Escape Curves, Decompression and Therapeutic treatment schedules have a risk
that the escapees or rescuees will subsequently develop DCI. The risks of DCI following an Accelerated
Decompression schedule may be as high as 30%. These risks may be elevated in DISSUB survivors by
their general debilitation, dehydration, hypothermia and because of their prolonged saturation to DISSUB
pressure. Therefore DISSUB survivors being transferred ashore may require access to therapeutic
recompression facilities or treatment during transfer.

Therefore all escapees or rescuees should be observed for a minimum of 1 hour on the EGS / RGS /
MOSHIP before transfer to another vessel or ashore. Should helicopter transfer to another ship or shore-
side medical facilities be undertaken then similar precautions to flying DCI cases should be applied to
these casualties, with flight height limited to 300m whenever possible.

In case escapees / rescuees develop DCI whilst in transit they should be accompanied by medically
qualified persons who can recognise the onset of DCI and prioritising the use of available oxygen, as well
as informing receiving medical staff of the case(s) and their requirement for assessment and treatment. O2
equipment should supply surface high flow O2 via a reservoir mask. Oxygen supply equipment should be
carried sufficient to support 1 or 2 DCI cases per 10 rescuees for the duration of the journey and into an
appropriate medical facility. If the helicopter is using another ship for refuelling stopovers during its
journey then there may be access to medical review and further medical treatment on this vessel.

If the receiving hospitals or vessels are not from the same country as the DISSUB the provision of
interpreters or medical staff from the DISSUB country should be a priority requirement. Rescuees will
need the reassurance of being able to deal with rescue personnel speaking their own language in the
immediate post-rescue phase.

Should rescuees need to be returned to their country of origin by air then the risk of DCI for flying
at reduced cabin pressure should be assessed by a senior diving medicine specialist. It may be necessary
to hold personnel in area for several days or to arrange for aircraft to maintain a higher cabin pressure than
normal.

0648 Specific requirements:

1. General. The SMO(S) should use information acquired during deployment and from the SSRA to
locate appropriate facilities ashore to transfer both conventional and decompression casualties. These
facilities should be alerted early and kept regularly informed of the likelihood of their use and the types of
casualties that may be transferred.

2. Casualty transfer. Whether the MOSHIP is offloading direct to shore facilities, to shore facilities
via a transit vessel or airhead or to another ship then the general considerations listed in Section 1 above
should be used for transfer planning. Distance, method of transfer, transfer duration and availability of
receiving facilities will all affect the decision on evacuation from the MOSHIP.

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Whilst the minimum holding time on the EGS / MOSHIP should be 1 hour if there are better
facilities on the EGS / MOSHIP to treat decompression casualties than ashore them C1 casualties
requiring immediate recompression should be treated on-board. If experience of treating decompression
casualties is limited ashore then the transfer of an experienced Diving MO with the casualties should be
considered.

3. Triage Categories. Specific consideration of the casualty’s triage categories will affect their
disposal:

a. T1 Casualties (requiring immediate life-saving medical treatment) should be stabilised as much


as possible on the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP and transferred rapidly to an appropriate receiving
facility. If they also have an urgent decompression obligation (C1) then normally the medical
intervention should take place before resolution of the decompression problem unless access to
highly specialised hyperbaric ITU facilities exist.

b. T2 casualties (require urgent medical treatment) should be stabilised on board and transferred to
an appropriate receiving facility preferably within 6 hours. If they have an immediate or urgent
decompression obligation (C1 or C2) then consideration should be given to resolving the
decompression obligation before medical intervention.

c. T3 casualties should be held on the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP until other facilities have the
capacity to cope with them. Transfer of large numbers of T3 casualties to a limited receiving
facility should be avoided to stop the facility becoming overloaded. T3 casualties with immediate
or urgent decompression obligations should be fit for decompression after first aid treatment.

d. Uninjured casualties without an immediate or urgent decompression obligation (C3) should be


transferred to a holding facility where they can be observed in case of the development of DCI or
medical problems.

4. MOSHIP unable to off-load. Due to location, absence of other vessels and aircraft or weather
conditions it may be impossible to off-load rescuees from the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP once decompressed.
In this situation the rescuees will have to be accommodated and cared for on the EGS / RGS / MOSHIP.
If this is seen as a likely scenario then urgent consideration should be given to augmenting the SMERAT
with surgical and anaesthetic trained personnel prior to deployment.

SMO(S) and the Senior Diving MO should assess the likely requirement for chambers to provide
therapeutic decompression for surfaced survivors and agree with the CRF and the diving officer
controlling the chambers whether to retain a specific chamber for therapeutic decompression. This may
affect the number of personnel that can be rescued on each SRV trip.

Patients showing early symptoms of DCI, particularly skin and joint pain effects only, should
initially be treated by use of 100% oxygen at surface pressure and only transferred to the chambers if
space becomes available between treating more serious cases.

Assuming no re-supply, Oxygen supplies (both medical and chamber) will be a limiting factor on
the ability to decompress and to treat rescuees. This may limit the ability to use accelerated
decompression schedules, therapeutic tables and either slow the rescue process or increase the risk of
being unable to treat emergent DCI.

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Escapees and rescuees who remain on-board should be monitored by medical personnel for 4 hours
post their initial decompression and the by their own colleagues (buddy aid) for a further 12–24 hours.
Those requiring therapeutic decompression should be monitored for 12 hours by medical staff post their
treatment.

Annex 6F contains algorithms for casualty handling and transfer through the process to shore.

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ANNEX 6A

OSC Briefing points

6A01 OSC Briefing points.

The different ways for getting the crew out of the distressed submarine are recorded in Chapter 2
into this publication. Rescue is normally the preferred method of extraction because it is inherently safer.
However, escape is more likely in a number of circumstances (see article 0203 for more details).

Decompression illness (DCI), including pulmonary barotraumas, may be the major medical
condition requiring treatment. Its occurrence will be dependent on the depth of the DISSUB, the pressure
in the DISSUB, and time of exposure to the pressurized atmosphere.

When the DISSUB’s crew is using Tower Escape (Hooded Ascent), it is expected that one to five
escapees will surface as rapidly as every 4-5 minutes, depending on the size, type, and number of escape
towers being operated.

When DISSUB’s crew is using Compartment or rush Escape, the SMO(S) has to expect all of the
survivors to arrive on the surface at a rate of up to 1 - 2 per minute. In this case, note that:
- A large number of survivors will surface in a short period of time. These survivors have a much
higher probability of serious injuries and DCI.
- The medical organization may be overwhelmed and there will be an urgent requirement for
additional asset such as medical personnel, equipment and CASEVAC facilities.
- If delay to scene: crew may be scattered over a wide area.

If the survivors have already escaped prior to the arrival of the rescue forces, they may have already
been in the water for several hours. Locating and recovery of escapees may be complicated by prevailing
current and wind direction.

In the event of known or suspected radioactive contamination, arrangements must be made to treat,
monitor and decontaminate survivors as well as minimizing the spread of contamination throughout the
ship.

The SMO(S) will make recommendations to the OSC for provision of necessary assets to support
triage and treatment of survivors. Oxygen supplies are vital for decompression casualties and trauma
casualties as well as recompression chamber operation. Oxygen re-supply may be required and should be
planned for early in the response.

The SMO(S) will brief the OSC on the requirements to transfer ashore escapees, including medical
support for them onboard and during the transfer.

Remember the potential need to transfer medical staff and equipment onto a MOSHIP or other
vessels to support rescue or further escape.

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ANNEX 6B

Medical Check off list HOTEL

6B01 Check off list HOTEL: Medical brief for Recovery Boat's Crews

1. Submarine escapees may be suffering from one or more types of injury. Basic life support is the
same for all casualties:

a. Remember ABC:

A- AIRWAY - Check the airway - clear and support open.

B- BREATHING Check for breathing - begin resuscitation if necessary.

C- CIRCULATION Check for pulse - if absent, begin chest compressions

b. Once ABCs are complete, consider:

D- DISABILITY Determine the level of consciousness.

E- EXPOSURE Expose injuries - examine for fractures/bleeding etc.

2. The following types of problem may be seen:

CONDITION TREATMENT

A. HYPOTHERMIA Remove from cold, warm if possible, keep covered.

B. HEAT EXHAUSTION Remove from heat, cool if possible, give fluids

C. PHYSICAL TRAUMA First Aid, stop bleeding, support fractures, protect spine.

D. SEASICKNESS Reduce stimulus, rest, consider decompression sickness.

E. CEREBRAL Coma position, Oxygen recompress


ARTERIAL GAS
EMBOLISM (CAGE)

F. DECOMPRESSION Oxygen, recompress


ILLNESS (DCI)

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ANNEX 6C

Treatment areas, equipment and personnel

6C01 Medical Management Areas for Escape.

1. General. Triage should be conducted close to the point that the escapees are brought onboard the
EGS. For rescue triage may be conducted either in the DRC or after coming out of the DCC.

2. Triage Area

The requirements for this area are:

a. Personnel: Triage Medical Officer (TMO), (who should ideally be a Diving Medical Officer),
Medical assistant, writer, and messenger.
b. Material: Basic resuscitation and airway management equipment and supplies, including
oxygen.
c. Space for several stretchers.

The TMO reports to the SCC and is responsible for the rapid assessment of survivors and their
placement into the relevant triage categories (see Section X).

3. Triage Medical Officer (TMO) action list.

a. Prepare triage area, considering the following:


- Make accessible to oncoming survivors
- Weather protection
- Sufficient space to evaluate up to 5 casualties prior to being moved to the treatment or
monitoring areas
- Basic resuscitation equipment (airways, O2)
- Casualty handling algorithm (Annex 6F)
- Triage algorithm (Annex 6E)
- Area Casualty Report Log (format at Annex 6I).
- Triage cards
- Brief staff

b. Reception of survivors. Allocate each survivor a unique casualty identification number. Record
this:
- in indelible ink on his forehead
- in clinical notes/casualty card to accompany casualty
- on a Triage Area Casualty Report Log (format at Annex 6I)

c. Allocate a triage category. Record this:


- In clinical notes/casualty card to accompany casualty
- On the a Triage Area Casualty Report Log (format at Annex 6I)

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d. Direct stretcher bearers to transfer casualty to appropriate treatment area

e. Consider immediate use of high-flow oxygen for:


- All unconscious patients
- Any patients at risk of DCI

f. Ensure MAO is given regular updates of information from the Triage Area Casualty Report Log
(format at Annex 6I)

4. Area 1 (T1). Immediate treatment area.

The requirements for this area are:

a. Personnel: One Medical Officer (MO), preferably with casualty or surgical training, Ships First
Aid Personnel, two medical assistants or ratings, writer, and messenger.
b. Equipment: resuscitation equipment and advanced life support equipment, including drugs,
oxygen, chest drains, intravenous infusion sets and fluids, and basic dressings and emergency
medications.
c. Characteristics: Area 1 will have adequate space for stretchers (estimate minimum of six), and
will be in the immediate vicinity of the recompression chamber.

Area 1 should be sufficiently large to hold all the casualties who are undergoing immediate
treatment and ideally be adjacent to, or within easy access of the Casualty Receiving Area and to the
Recompression Chamber Area (on warships with a helicopter hangar, this space is usually ideal). A clear
evacuation route between the triage and treatment area should be designated which avoids, as far as
possible, ladders and other obstacles that will hinder the movement of stretcher-borne casualties.

5. Recompression Chamber Area (RCA).

a. The requirements for this area are:

- One Diving Medical Officer on each ship for every two to three chambers (a minimum of
one Medical Officer for every 20-30 recompressed casualties), medical assistant, writer,
and messenger.
- Sufficient Diving Technicians/Supervisors to operate the chamber(s) - 1-2 per chamber per
shift.
- Sufficient diving medical assistants or divers with basic medical training to act as inside
chamber assistants for each chamber - one per chamber.
- Standard recompression chamber medical supplies and medications.

b. The Medical Officer (MO) allocated to the Recompression Chamber Area reports to the SCC
and is responsible for reception and treatment of casualties sent there. The following actions are to
be undertaken by the RCA MO:

- Brief staff allocated to the Area.


- Ensure equipment listed is available and operational.
- Receive and treat of casualties sent to the treatment area by the TMO.
- Supervise the care of casualties in the RCA if delegated the authority to do so by the SCC

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- Ensure accurate record keeping (use writer). A Recompression Area Casualty Report Log
(Format as in Annex 6I) is to be kept up to date and updated information is to be passed by
telephone or messenger to the MAO as frequently as possible for inclusion on the Master
Casualty State Board (format at Annex 6H).

6. Area 2 (T2)

a. The requirements for this area are:

- One (or more) Medical Officer(s) and medical assistant(s) - one for each five stretchers,
Ship’s first aid personnel, writer, and messenger.
- Resuscitation equipment, oxygen for at least fifteen casualties for six hours, chest drains,
intravenous infusion sets and fluids, standard dressings, medications, and first aid supplies.
- Space for a minimum of 10% of submarine crew.

b. Area 2 is for the treatment of less serious cases and should be physically close to Area 1. It is
important to designate an access route these areas that is clear of obstructions.

c. The Medical Officer (MO) allocated to Area 2 reports to the SCC and is responsible for
reception and treatment of casualties sent to the treatment area by the TMO. The action list below
should be completed by the T2 Area MO:

- Brief staff allocated to the Secondary Treatment area


- Ensure equipment listed is available and operational.
- Receive and treat casualties sent to the treatment area by the TMO.
- Monitor casualties for change in triage status. Be especially vigilant for deterioration in the
condition of casualties with Decompression Illness (DCI). Report changes in triage status to
SCC via the MAO
- Ensure accurate record keeping (use designated non-medical personnel). An Area 2
Casualty Report Log (format as in Annex 6I) is to be kept up to date and updated
information is to be passed by telephone or messenger to the MAO as frequently as possible
for inclusion on the Master Casualty State Board (format at Annex 6H).

7. Area 3 (T3)

a. The requirements for this area are:

- Personnel: Medical Assistant (preferably with experience in diving medicine), ship’s first
aid personnel, writer, and messenger.
- Equipment: Basic resuscitation equipment including oxygen, first aid supplies, and
medications.
- Size: this area should have adequate space for seated or supine casualties (estimate
minimum of 20% of submarine crew)

b. Area 3 is where casualties who have undergone or who do not need primary or secondary
treatment can rest, receive first aid treatment, receive prophylactic oxygen therapy (if sufficient
supplies are available and allocated) and be monitored. This area should be separate but reasonably
close to the triage and other treatment areas.

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c. The Medical Branch Rating in charge of this area is responsible for the treatment and
monitoring of all survivors placed in his care. Some of these survivors may have traditional injuries.
Some may not but will be at risk of DCI either because of a decompression obligation from a
pressurized DISSUB or because of the risk of DCI following an escape. There may also be rescuees
who are uninjured and not at risk of DCI but who may be wet, cold and/or exhausted. These
survivors can be grouped together in an “uninjured holding area”.

d. The action list of the Medical Branch Rating in charge of this area includes:

- Brief staff allocated to the Area


- Ensure that they are fully conversant with the signs and symptoms of DCI.
- Ensure equipment listed is available.
- Receive and treat casualties sent to the treatment area by the TMO.
- Monitor casualties for change in triage status. Make patients aware of the need to translate
any unusual symptom to medical staff. Be especially vigilant for the development of DCI in
casualties at risk. Immediately report changes in triage status to SCC via the MAO.
- Supervise the movement of survivors. Do not allow survivors to leave the area without
escort.
- Ensure accurate record keeping (use designated non-medical personnel). An Area 3
Casualty Report Log (format as in Annex 6I) is to be kept up to date and updated
information is to be passed by telephone or messenger to the MAO as frequently as possible
for inclusion on the Master Casualty State Board (format at Annex 6H).

8. Area 4 (T4)

a. The requirements for this area are:

- Personnel: Medical Assistant, first aid personnel and messenger


- Material: Body bags, and basic medical supplies for palliative care
- Size: Adequate space for stretcher cases

b. A compartment or space near, but screened or isolated from the Area 3, should be identified for
the accommodation of T4 casualties.

c. The Medical Branch Rating in charge of the Area 4 (T4 Area Controller) is responsible for the
palliative care and monitoring of casualties placed in his care.

d. T4 Area Controller action list:

- Brief staff allocated to the T4 area


- Ensure that they fully understand the role (and rationale) for use of the ‘expectant’ category
(assisted by a senior MO)
- Ensure equipment listed is available.
- Receive and care for casualties sent to the area by the TMO.
- Monitor casualties for change in status. Report deaths and/or any other significant changes
in casualty’s condition to SCC via the MAO.

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6C02 Medical Management Areas for Rescue.

Each national / multinational rescue system has its own manning and operating procedures. The
information below is for guidance only and should be modified to fit with those standard operating
procedures and the capabilities of the vessel to which the equipment has been deployed

1. Deck reception chamber personnel.

There should be sufficient diving medical assistants, hyperbaric trained nurses or divers with basic
medical training to act as inside chamber assistants for transferring casualties between the SRV and DRC.
The number may vary with the composition of each SRV load.

Normally, at least one Diving Medical Officer should be able to be locked into the chamber at short
notice to assist with casualty triage or treatment.

2. Recompression chamber(s).

The following are the typical composition and material to operate recompression chambers:

a. One Diving Medical Officer for every one or two chambers (a minimum of one Medical Officer
for every 20-30 recompressed casualties) plus an MO available to be locked into the chamber if
required. Medical assistant, writer, and messenger.
b. Standard recompression chamber medical supplies and medications.
c. Sufficient Diving Technicians/Supervisors to operate the chambers in accordance with SOPs.
d. Sufficient diving medical assistants or divers with basic medical training to act as inside
chamber assistants for each chamber – at least one per chamber.

3. Triage area personnel and equipment.

a. Triage Medical Officer (preferably a Diving Medical Officer), medical assistant, writer, and
messenger.
b. Basic resuscitation and airway management equipment and supplies, including oxygen.
c. Triage cards and recording forms.
d. Space to triage the maximum number of rescuees which can be held in each decompression
chamber.

4. Rescuee holding area medical personnel.

a. One or two Medical Officers or Senior Medical Assistants capable of providing care to recuees
and observing for signs of DCI whilst transfer off the MOSHIP is arranged.
b. Personnel to escort the rescuees as necessary around the ship and stretcher bearers.
c. Writer and messenger.

5. Medical headquarters personnel and equipment.

a. Medical Administration Officer.


b. Sufficient writers and messengers to cover all casualty management areas.
c. Necessary communications equipment as authorised by OSC.

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ANNEX 6D

DISSUB Medical Triage Team selection, deployment


and equipment

6D01 General.

The DISSUB Medical Triage Team may be deployed to assist survivors who require medical care due
to injury, illness, and effects of atmospheric constituents or where multiple rescue systems are to be used and
casualties need to be triaged to the appropriate system. The team may form part of a larger group including
engineering support for the DISSUB.

6D02 Manpower:

1. Composition. The following personnel comprise the DMTT:


- One Submarine or Diving Medical Officer, preferably with experience in emergency care.
- One Senior Medical Assistant, with submarine experience.

2. Augmentees. This minimum team may be supplemented by:


- MBRs / First Aid Personnel with submarine experience
- Interpreter (if necessary) fluent in language of submarine crew.

3. Selection. The team should be drawn from personnel who are experienced in working either with the
class of DISSUB submarine or the rescue system. The DISSUB nation may be requested to provide the
DMTT personnel if language challenges make this appropriate. The selected DMTT personnel must be able
to communicate with the SRV personnel, an important consideration when multiple SRVs/SRCs are used.

6D03 Deployment.

The deployment and composition of a DMTT will be decided upon by the CRF advised by the
SMO(S). The potential gains from their specialist knowledge and expertise must clearly justify the additional
risk of placing personnel into a hazardous environment. Factors to be considered by the CRF and SMO(S)
include:
- Submarine engineering stability
- Submarine atmosphere and toxic contaminants (including radiological)
- Submarine pressure and decompression risks to DMTT
- Types of casualties reported
- Available DISSUB medical support and equipment
- Available medical resupply to the DISSUB

Depending on the scenario the DMTT may deploy and remain on the DISSUB throughout the rescue
or undertake a series or trips to make assessments and necessary treatments for the survivors. It is most
likely that the DMTT will be committed for the full duration of the rescue unless the DISSUB pressure is
below the requirement for decompression on the MOSHIP.

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6D04 Role.

The functions of the DMTT could include:


- Initial assessment of the DISSUB situation including a survey of the medical and life support
situation.
- To provide accurate situation reports for the CRF, OSC and casualty reports to SMO(S).
- To transport necessary additional life support and medical supplies to the DISSUB.
- To triage casualties and assist in prioritisation of survivors for evacuation.
- To arrange movement of casualties to the escape trunk for collection by the SRV.
- To provide emergency stabilisation and treatment of the DISSUB medical casualties in order to
allow them to be evacuated to the SRV.
- To provide an interpreter for non English speaking submarine crews to ensure effective
communications to facilitate the rescue process.
- To provide medical recommendations to the Senior Survivor.
- To assist with / direct on-board decontamination where indicated.

6D05 Equipment and supplies for DMTT.

Medical emergency equipment and supplies, appropriate for the particular circumstances on the
DISSUB, should be transferred on board in easily portable bags or vests.. Recommended items include:

Stethoscope Pen torch Guedel airways Drugs:


BP cuff Knife Ambu bag Opiates and naloxone
Battery powered pulse Scissors Portable oxygen Salbutamol
Oximeter / monitor Suture kit Heimlich valve Ketamine
Half-back stretcher and Surgical tape Nasogastric tube Glucose tablets/oral
head protection for solution
casualty

Other equipment that may be required by the DMTT includes:

- Respiratory protection and atmospheric monitoring equipment, to include breathing sets if


necessary.
- Lighting - headlamps for personal lighting, DC lamps and Cyalume light sticks for compartment
illumination.
- Triage cards / Medical Cards / Record Forms for survivors.
- Radiation dosimetry and monitoring equipment as appropriate.
- Additional life support supplies for the DISSUB.
- Communications equipment permitting contact with SRV/SRC.

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ANNEX 6E
6E01. Triage algorithm for Escape

TRIAGE

Unsalvageable / overwhelm resources?

T1 Severe, life-threatening injury?


T4 T4 Area
yes
no
Minor Injuries /
Severe DCI? Major injury? uninjured?
(CNS or progressive) no no

yes
yes T3
T1 / C2
T2 T2 / C2
T1 / C1
Severe DCI?
no
Severe DCI? Secondary
Tx Area yes
Recompression Primary T3 / C2
Therapy Tx Area yes T3 / C1

T2 / C1 Tertiary
Dependant upon resources Tx Area

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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ANNEX 6F

6F01. Casualty handling algorithm for Surface Abandonment

CASUALTY RECEIVED ON BOARD RESCUE SHIP

Stretcher and O2 (if necessary / available)

TRIAGE
TO assess casualty and allocate category:
T1-T4
Allocate each survivor a unique casualty number Inform MAO of
casualty details

TREATMENT AREAS
Inform MAO of casualty details

Monitoring and decontamination in cleansing


station (as appropriate)

PRIMARY SECONDARY TERTIARY T4 AREA


T1 T2 T3 and Uninjured T4

Life saving Major medical Minor medical Symptomatic


interventions interventions interventions and treatment only to
observe. Re-triage make comfortable.
regularly. Reprioritise if
more resources
arrive
Monitoring and decontamination if necessary
and clinical condition allows.

PRIORITY CASEVAC RETAIN ABOARD EGS


Inform MAO/MC/SMO(S) (CASEVAC when resources available)

CHANGE IN CONDITION
Reassess, re-triage and re-prioritise
Move casualty to appropriate treatment area
Inform receiving area and MAO

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ATP-57(B)

6F02. Casualty handling algorithm for Escape

CASUALTY RECEIVED ON BOARD ESCAPE GEAR SHIP

Stretcher and O2 (if necessary / available)

TRIAGE
TO assess casualty and allocate category:
T1-T4 / C1-C2
Allocate each survivor a unique casualty
number Inform MAO of casualty details

TREATMENT AREAS
Inform MAO of casualty details

Monitoring and decontamination in cleansing


station (as appropriate)

PRIMARY SECONDARY TERTIARY T4 AREA


T1, T2, T3 / C1 T2 / C2, T3 / C2 T3 / C2 Non Injured
Recompress on (symptomatic) High flow Oxygen Observe and re-
EGS High flow Oxygen and and minor medical triage regularly
+ medical major medical interventions
interventions interventions T4
T3 Symptomatic
T1 or T1 / C2 T2 Minor medical treatment only to
Life saving Major medical interventions and make comfortable.
interventions and interventions observe Reprioritise if more
oxygen resources arrive

Monitoring and decontamination if necessary


and clinical condition allows.

PRIORITY CASEVAC RETAIN ABOARD EGS


Inform MAO/MC/SMO(S) (CASEVAC when resources available)

CHANGE IN CONDITION
Reassess, re-triage and re-prioritise
Move casualty to appropriate treatment area
Inform receiving area and MAO

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6F03. Casualty handling algorithm for Rescue

Submariners
Rescued by
SRV

Transfer TUP Perform


to TUP yes Required no Triage
T1-T4

Perform Reassess
Medical yes need for
Triage in recompression
Chamber

Recompression
Complete needed?
decompression
procedures
Hold for a
minimum of no
1 hour

Arrange transport with sufficient medical


escorts and equipment for safe transfer of
survivors

Transfer to an appropriate shore or ship-


board facility for further medical care,
observations and treatment of any
decompression illness

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ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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ATP-57(B)

ANNEX 6G

Selection of decompression tables


6G01 Tables for Escape:

See Sections 0619.

6G02 Tables for Rescue:

1. Each Rescue system is expected to have a selected a series of decompression tables available to
use depending upon circumstances. Factors affecting the choice of tables include:

a. The number of casualties to be rescued


b. The number of available chamber places (including stretcher cases)
c. The cycle time for the rescue vehicle
d. Internal submarine pressure and equivalent air depth
e. Changes in submarine internal pressure (especially if rising)
f. Submarine stability and internal status (is there a chance of the SM becoming
uninhabitable)
g. Submarine atmosphere constituents and potential effects on the lung
h. Volume of Oxygen available to the chambers
i. Availability of Oxygen rebreathers to deploy to the DISSUB
j. Availability of additional chambers to support the RGS and conduct
therapeutic decompression post return to surface.
k. The safety of the rescue personnel manning the chambers / SRV and going
through the decompression schedule with the rescuees.

2. There are a wide variety of table available. None of these tables have been fully validated for use
in bringing rescuees to the surface, and most have been derived from basic diving theory and therapeutic
tables or are extensions of old air-saturation tables.

Research conducted into submarine escape indicates that decompression to the surface from saturation at
up to 1.6 bar can be conducted safely with a minimum risk of DCI. Therefore transfer to DDC and
subsequent decompression in the chambers is unnecessary for rescuees saturated at up to 1.6 bar.
However, these personnel should be monitored closely for signs of developing DCI and chambers should
be available to undertake therapeutic recompression should this occur. The RAN allow direct
decompression to the surface from up to 1.75 bar with the understanding that there may be a significant
risk of DCI. This limit may be of use in cases where a large number of submariners require to be
evacuated rapidly from a DISSUB.

Where the DISSUB internal pressure is greater than 2.8 bar then rescuees can not be placed on 100% FiO2
due to the risks of cerebral pulmonary Oxygen toxicity. Therefore initial decompression must be
commenced on Air, unless the chambers are fitted for mixed gas supply and a mixed gas table has been
agreed for use with the rescue system.

The USN has developed a protocol for use of oxygen pre-breathing at saturation depth prior to rescue
accelerate the decompression process. This protocol has been tested at equivalent air depths between 40

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

and 60 feet of seawater (approx. 13 to 18 msw). The protocol is laid out in the medical supplement to this
document.

As part of the UK response to the sinking of the KURSK a modified RN table was produced to allow for
decompression of personnel without access to TUP. This table, Table 66, is a 100 minute table based on
holding rescuees at 14 msw (2.4ATA) for Oxygen breathing before a 10 min return to the surface. The
table can be extended as the DISSUB pressure increases. The tables can be found in the medical
supplement to this document.

In preparation for the introduction of the NATO Submarine Rescue System a review has been conducted
of the available tables to allow decompression from saturation at 5 or 6 bar absolute. This has led to the
development of a series of NSRS tables including long air tables based on the NOAA air saturation tables
to allow decompression from high DISSUB pressures. The NSRS tables are laid out in the medical
supplement.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

3. Selection Algorithm:

DISSUB Pressure
>1.6 bar < 2.8 bar (Equivalent Air Depth) < 1.6 bar

Less than available


No. of rescuees chamber space Decompress
directly to
surface and
monitor
Exceeds available Use Air Tables > 2.8 bar
chamber space

Assess available Limited or no re-


Oxygen supplies supply available

Use air tables or


Adequate or re- Likely POT or exposure to tables with reduced
supply available other toxic gases FiO2

Assess submarine Rapid evacuation Short tables


situation required e.g. RN 66

O2 re-breathers
available
Monitor for DCI post surfacing
with chambers on standby for
USN Accelerated therapeutic recompression
Decompression Tables

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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ANNEX 6H

Master Casualty state board


6H01 Master Casualty state board.

Table 6H – 1. Master Casualty state board

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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ANNEX 6I

Area Casualty state board


6I01 Area Casualty state board.

Table 6I – 1. Area Casualty state board

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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ANNEX 6J

SUBSUNK Casualty reporting (CASEREP)


6J01. Signal format

Precedence IMMEDIATE

Class RESTRICTED - MEDICAL

SIC PQV

From UNIT IDENTIFIER. . . . .

To OPCON AUTHORITY
DESIGNATED SUBMARINE COMMAND AUTHORITY
DESIGNATED MEDICAL AUTHORITY

INFO FLEET OFFICE, SUBMARINES


DESIGNATED MEDICAL RECEIVING CENTRE(S)
DESIGNATED DECOMPRESSION TREATMENT CENTRE(S)
(Depending on area of DISSUB)

CASREP

1. Following personnel recovered from DISSUB

A. Name/Inits/Rank/Service No/Triage category/Description of Injuries


B.
C.
D.
E.

2. More to follow

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ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
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ANNEX 6K

SUBSUNK Casualty evacuation (CASEVAC)


6K01. Signal format

Precedence IMMEDIATE

Class RESTRICTED - MEDICAL

SIC PQV

From UNIT IDENTIFIER. . . .

To OPCON AUTHORITY
DESIGNATED SUBMARINE COMMAND AUTHORITY
DESIGNATED MEDICAL AUTHORITY

INFO FLEET OFFICE, SUBMARINES


DESIGNATED MEDICAL RECEIVING CENTRE(S)
DESIGNATED DECOMPRESSION TREATMENT CENTRE(S)
(Depending upon area of DISSUB)

CASEVAC

1. Following personnel CASEVACED to.................via ...........................

A. Name/Inits/Rank/Service No/Triage category /Description of Injuries


B.
C.
D.
E.

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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ANNEX 6L

SMERAT Medical emergency case and contents

6L01 SMERAT Medical emergency case contents

1. Local Emergency Orders

2. NATO Publications.

a. ATP-57 Submarine Search and Rescue Manual

b. AMedP – 11 Handbook on Maritime Medicine.

c. ADIVP-2 Allied Guide to Diving Medical Disorders’

d. AMedP-6 NATO Handbook on Medical Aspects of NBC Defensive Operations’

3. National Publications (when applicable)

a. National Reference: Submarine Escape and Rescue Handbook

b. National Reference for Air Purification in Submarines

c. National Reference: Diving Manual

d. National Reference for Radiological Controls in Nuclear

e. National Submarine Guard Books (All Classes)

4. Stationery Equipment

a. Reporters Notebooks x8
b. Pens x 24
c. Indelible Marker Pens x 12
d. Pencils x 24
e. Paper Clips x 1 box
f. Stapler x1
g. Staples x 1 box
h. Hole Punch (single) x1
i. Casualty Log sheets x 40 (of each)
j. Case Contents List x1

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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ANNEX 6M

Reference values and conversion factors

6M01 General.

ATA stands for Atmosphere Absolute. At sea level the atmosphere exerts a pressure of 1 ATA.
(Historically, ATA has been used within the NATO Submarine Escape and Rescue Working Group).

One ATA is approximately equivalent to:

- 1 Bar
- 100 kPa
- 10 msw
- 33 fsw
- 760 mmHg
- 760 Torr.

6M02 PRESSURE UNIT CONVERSION TABLE.

Table 6M – 1. Pressure unit conversion table

Unit ATA Bar KPa mmHg psi msw Fsw

Atmospheres ATA 1 1.0132 101.32 760 14.696 10.079 33.066


Absolute
Bar Bar 0.9869 1 100 750.06 14.504 9.9472 32.633

Kilo-Pascal KPa 9.8692 1 x 10 –2 1 7.5006 0.14504 0.99472 3.2633


x 10 -3
Millimetres mm 1.3158 1.3332 0.13332 1 0.01934 0.01326 0.04351
of Mercury Hg x 10 –3 x 10 –3
Pounds per psi 0.06805 0.06895 6.8948 51.7149 1 0.6858 2.25
square inch
Meters of msw 9.9216 0.10053 1.0053 75.404 1.4581 1 3.2807
seawater x 10 –2
Feet of fsw 3.0243 3.0644 0.30644 22.984 0.4444 0.3048 1
seawater x 10 –2 x 10 –2

1. Instructions for use. Start at the left hand side of the table with the unit you wish to convert from
and read along the row to the column headed by the unit you wish to convert to. Multiply the original
value by the number at the intersection.

Example: to convert 1.8 atmospheres absolute (ATA) to metres of seawater (msw), read along the
‘ATA’ row to the ‘msw’ column to get the conversion factor of 10.079. Multiplying 1.8 by 10.079 gives
18.142 msw.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)
Note: Standard Temperature & Pressure (STP): 0 0C and 760 Torr

2. Normal constituent of air at 1 ATA.

Constituents Volume % Approx. p.p. at 1 ATA


Nitrogen 78 0.78
Oxygen 21 0.2
Carbon dioxide 0.03 0.0003

3. Partial Pressure (p.p.): the pressure a gas would exert if it alone occupied the same volume as the
whole gas mixture. The sum of the partial pressures of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide in air make
up the total ambient pressure of the air.

4. High concentrations are normally expressed in volume percent (Vol.%) i.e. 1 part of a substance
in 100 parts of air. Air consists of 21Vol.% oxygen. (i.e. 100 parts of air contain 21 parts of oxygen).

5. In smaller concentrations the engineering unit 'parts per million' is used (ppm). The concentration
ppm means 1 part of a substance in 1 million parts of air. 1Vol.% = 10,000 ppm.

6. DISSUB oxygen usage: 27 litres /man / hour at STP

7. DISSUB carbon dioxide production: 23 litres / man / hour at STP.

ORIGINAL
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GLOSSARY

Terms and definitions from AAP-6 are in italics

Alerting Authority (AA). The military commander who first raises the alert for a possible
SUBSAR incident. Typically this is the SUBOPAUTH who is responsible for initiating
Submarine Safety COMCHECK procedure and operation SUBLOOK/SUBMISS/ SUBSUNK
Arrival Report. A signal transmitted by a submarine immediately upon its arrival in port. This
signal may be required by the SUBOPAUTH.

Atmospheric Diving System (ADS) . A one person hardsuit and associated Launch And Recovery
System (LARS), that allows the occupant to work underwater while still in a one atmosphere self
contained environment. The ADS is tethered to a surface ship from which it is launched and
recovered.

Articulated-Frame (A-Frame). A lifting device that allows movement through as many as three
separate axis and allows for the launch and recovery of equipment – typically submarine rescue
vehicles and associated equipment – from a platform on a ship into the ocean. Such devices are
commonly permanently fitted, although they may also be portable. Dependent on the size of the
platform and the capability of the A-frame, launch and recovery activity may be possible in higher
sea states than would otherwise be the case with less sophisticated systems.

COMCHECK. The signal originated by SUBOPAUTH when the safety of a submarine is in doubt.

Coordinator Rescue Forces (CRF). The Officer with responsibility for coordinating and controlling the
recovery of escapees and/or the rescue of the crew from the DISSUB. The most appropriate person
will be nominated as CRF by the SSRA.

Cospas-Sarsat System. A satellite system designed to detect distress beacons transmitting on the
frequencies 121.5 MHz and 406 MHz.

Datum. Any numerical or geometrical quantity or set of such quantities which may serve as reference or
base for other quantities. For SAR purposes, a geographic point, line, or area used as a reference in
Submarine search planning.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

Datum Area. Area in where it is estimated that the search object is most likely to be located.

Datum Line. A line, such as the distressed craft’s intended track line or a line of bearing, that defines the
center of the area where it is estimated that the search object is most likely to be located.

Datum point. Any reference point of known or assumed coordinates from which calculation or
measurements may be taken.

Dead Reckoning (DR). Determination of position of a vessel by adding to the last fix the distance based
on the craft’s course and speed for a given time.

Distressed Submarine (DISSUB). A submarine in distress on the seabed unable to surface. It may also
include a surfaced submarine requiring assistance following an incident.

DISSUB De-pressurization System (DSDS). A system designed to connect a DISSUB to the surface, via
hose(s) and specially designed fittings, such that ambient pressure within the DISSUB may be
relieved in controlled manner. Such a system serves to reduce or eliminate the requirement for
extensive decompression when rescuees arrive on the surface.

DISSUB Depressurization and Ventilation System (DSVDS). A surface-supplied system designed to


simultaneously supply breathing-quality air to intact compartments within the DISSUB, while at
the same time allowing for a controlled adjustment of ambient pressure within those same
compartments. Such systems, which connect to the submarine via special hoses and hull-
penetrating fittings, serve to reduce or eliminate the requirement for extensive decompression when
rescuees arrive on the surface and provide survivors inside the submarine with air.

Diving Signal. A signal transmitted by a submarine before it dives, indicating the date and time of dive,
date and time of completion, position and reason for diving. Some nations do not send a diving
signal when operating on a subnote.

Element. Any asset able to carry on an Intervention or a Rescue.

Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS). Items of stores for use by the personnel in the DISSUB to
enable them to survive whilst awaiting rescue. Stores include such items as carbon dioxide
absorbent, oxygen candles and medical stores for emergency treatment of casualties. The ELSS are
pre-stored on board the submarine and may be re resupplied to the DISSUB by Pod-posting.

Escape. Any method by which a person leaves a DISSUB and makes his way to the surface without
direct assistance from outside agencies.

Escapee. Escapee – a person who makes their way to the surface by some buoyant means which has
already been incorporated into the DISSUB

Escape Gear Ship (EGS). Any ship nominated by the SSRA to carry the search area medical stores and
equipment to facilitate the recovery and treatment of escapees on reaching the surface.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB). A device, usually carried aboard maritime
vessel, that transmits a signal that alerts search and rescue authorities and enables rescue units to
locate the scene of the distress.

Expendable Communications Buoy (ECB). A communications buoy which can be released by a


DISSUB.

First Reaction Stores (1RS). Those SUBMISS/SUBSUNK stores deployed in the EGS and used by
the SMERAT in the recovery and treatment of escapees. It includes recompression facilities

Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS). A global communications service based on
automated systems, both satellite-based and terrestrial, to provide distress alerting and
promulgation of maritime safety information for mariners.

International Submarine Escape & Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO). Multinational coordinating
office for Submarine Escape and Rescue related issues. The office provides coordination through
its web site management system on Internet at www.ismerlo.org

Intervention. The external provision of survivability to a DISSUB. It also indicates any


survey/preparatory activities prior Rescue Operations.

Launch and Recovery System (LARS). A system designed to launch, handle and recover rescue
assets.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

MEDEVAC. Evacuation of a person for medical reasons.

MASC. MOSHIP/Airport/Seaport combination used for delivery and embarkation of SMER Elements.

MOPORT. Any port from which submarine escape and rescue systems and equipment are dispatched,
either aboard dedicated vessels or vessels of opportunity, to the DISSUB location.

MOSHIP. A ship used to carry a Submarine Rescue Element to the scene of the submarine accident.
When the Element carrier is a submarine, the ship is called MOSUB (mother submarine).

Moving Havens (MHN). The normal method by which submarines are routed. The standard MHN is an
area 20 Nautical Miles (NM) ahead, 30 NM behind, and 5 NM on either side of the submarine’s
planned track position. The size of the MHN is stated in the SUBNOTE. 5

National Authority (NA). The State or Command Authority that sovereignty overe the DISSUB.

On-scene Commander (OSC). Is the military authority designated to Command assigned units either
during the Search and Localisation phase or during the Rescue Operation. The On-Scene
Commander may or may not be the same for both phases (Search and Localisation – Escape and
Rescue Ops), as well as may be changed any time as the situation demands. The Commander of the
unit which first reaches the vicinity of an accident or datum is to act as OSC. In the event that the
first unit on the scene is an aircraft, the Aircraft Commander will retain control of SAR operations
until the arrival of a surface unit to assume the duties of OSC. In all other cases, in order to
maintain continuity of Command, the Officer who subsequently may arrive on the scene is not to
assume Command by reason of seniority unless or until:
(1) Ordered to do so by the SSRA, or
(2) In his judgment, a change of Command is essential.
(3) The OSC will be nominated or confirmed by the SSRA.
The OSC will be nominated/confirmed by the SSRA.

Personal Locator Beacon (PLB). An emergency radio locator beacon, which may have a two-way speech
capability, carried by some crew members, either on their person or in their survival equipment,
and capable of providing homing signals to assist search and rescue operations.

5
MTP-1 Definition: A moving area of specified dimensions established about a submarine or surface ship, extending
about the ordered position along the track, and which is designated for use in transit by the unit to prevent attack by
friendly forces in wartime and to prevent or minimize submerged interference among friendly forces in peacetime.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

Pod Posting. The function of delivering ELSS to the DISSUB normally by pressure tight Pods
“posted” via Escape Towers by divers or other rescue assets.

Recovery. The process of retrieving an escapee from the water for subsequent
treatment/management and the process of retrieving a rescue element.

Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). An unmanned underwater vehicle normally powered and controlled
via an umbilical from a surface vessel from which it is launched and recovered. ROVs can be used
for damage assessment of the DISSUB. If fitted with appropriate tools an ROV can also clear an
escape hatch for a Rescue Vehicle and Pod Post ELSS.

Rescue. Rescue is the act of saving life in which personnel are transferred from the DISSUB to a place of
safety by a SRV or an SRC.

Rescuee. A DISSUB crewmember who is being or has been rescued.

Rescue Element Commander (REC). The Officer in charge of a rescue element.

Search and Rescue Plan. A general term used to describe documents that may exist at all levels of the
national and international SAR structure to describe goals, arrangements, and procedures which
support the provision of SAR services.

Search and Rescue Region (SRR). An area of defined dimensions , associated with an RCC, within
which SAR services are provided.

Senior Survivor. The senior submarine qualified member of the ship’s company in the DISSUB escape
compartment.

SUBCHECK Report. The signal transmitted by a submarine at specified intervals to ensure the
SUBOPAUTH of her continued safety.

SUBLOOK. The Codeword of the procedures initiated by the SUBOPAUTH when the safety of a
submarine is in doubt, or by a SUBOPAUTH when a Surfacing Signal, Arrival Report or
SUBCHECK Report from a submarine under his operational control becomes one hour overdue.

Submarine Escape Suit (SEIE/SPES). A suit that aids escape from a submarine, which meets the
requirements of STANAG 1321

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)
Submarine Launched One-way Tactical (SLOT) Buoy. A communications buoy that can be fired by a
DISSUB.

Submarine Escape and Rescue Assistance Team (SMERAT). A team of Submarine Escape and
Rescue experts augmented by medical specialists who are available to provide advice and
assistance.

Submarine Notice (SUBNOTE). A message report originated by a submarine operating authority


providing operational and movement instructions for submarines in peace and war, including
transit and patrol area information.

Submarine Operating Authority (SUBOPAUTH). The naval commander exercising OPCON of


submarines.
It is the Authority responsible for its safe routing and for the release of SUBNOTES. He will be the
Alerting Authority.

Submarine Parachute Assistance Group (SPAG). A team of escape and rescue experts, augmented by
medical specialists, available at short notice to parachute into the water.

Submarine Search and Rescue Authority (SSRA). The Naval Authority responsible for the
planning and conduct of a SUBSAR operation. The SSRA may be a national or NATO Naval
Area/Subarea Commander or appointed maritime commander, depending upon the wishes of the
OPCON authority of the submarine or the wishes of the submarine’s NA. The SSRA will operate in
coordination with the relevant RCC. The submarine’s NA should seek prior agreement with
national or NATO Commands concerned. The SSRA is to be nominated in an OPORD.
Note: Bearing in mind the area within which the DISSUB was operating, the nature of the
operation/exercise and the wishes of the NA, the responsibilities of the SSRA may be passed to or
from the relevant national/NATO authorities. However, experience has shown that such changes
can lead to confusion.

Submarine Rescue Element. Any equipment or asset specifically designed or used for Submarine
Interventions or Rescue Operations.

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC). A bell that can mate with the NATO common rescue seat but in
addition has to be fitted with special securing arrangements.

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV). Any submersible craft which may be used for the rescue of
personnel from a DISSUB.

SUBMISS. The Codeword of an operation which will be executed in order to initiate a fully co-ordinated
search for a submarine that is believed to be missing.

SUBSUNK. The Codeword of an operation which will be executed in order to initiate a fully co-
ordinated search for a submarine that is known to have sunk.
The Codeword of the signal originated by any unit or authority who has positive
information that a submarine has sunk or by the OSC when the DISSUB has been located.

Support Authority (SA). Any authority who provides assistance for the NA and/or the SSRA.

ORIGINAL
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ATP-57(B)

Surfacing Signal. A signal transmitted by a submarine to indicate the completion of a dived period as
covered by a Diving Signal or to conclude a Subnote or portion thereof.

SURFACING/ARRIVAL ZERO TIME. The time at which the SUBOPAUTH must have received the
Surfacing Signal or CHECK ARRIVAL Report from a Submarine.

Time to first Intervention (TTFI). The estimated time taken from alertment until the first on-scene
intervention activity.

Time to first Rescue (TTFR). The estimated time calculated from alertment to the transfer of the first
rescuee, into the SRV/SRC.

Transfer Under Pressure (TUP). The ability to transfer rescuees, who have been previously evacuated
from a pressurized DISSUB compartment, from a pressurized condition within the rescue vehicle
directly into a decompression facility without exposure to normal atmospheric pressure.

Triage. The assignment of a degree of medical urgency to each rescuee/escapee need for treatment so as
to decide the order in which they should be treated.

Vessel of opportunity (VOO). Any vessel (normally civilian) potentially available to carry on board a
Submarine Rescue Element to the DISSUB area. When the Rescue Element is installed/embarked,
the VOO is then designated as a MOSHIP.

ORIGINAL
I - Glossary - 7
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

ORIGINAL
I - Glossary - 8
ATP-57(B)

PART I

ANNEX A

Abbreviations/Acronyms used in SUBSAR

Abbreviations/acronyms listed in table A-1 below are normally used during SMER operations.

Table A-1. SAR abbreviations/acronyms.

Abbreviation /
Meaning
Acronym
1RS First Reaction Stores
AA Alerting Authority
ADS Atmospheric Diving System
BIBS Built-in Breathing System
BU Breathing Unit
CASEVAC Casualty Evacuation
CCTV Closed Circuit Television
CDAU Carbon Dioxide Absorption Unit
CHOP Chop Operational Control
COMPLAN Communications Plan
COSPAS Comicheskaya Sisttyma Poiska Avariynych Sudov (Space System for Search of
Vessels in Distress)
CRF Coordinator Rescue Forces
DCI Decompression Illness
DCC Decompression Chamber
DCS Decompression Sickness
DISSUB Distressed Submarine
DP Dynamic Positioning
DSDS DISSUB Depressurization System
DSRV Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle
DSV Dive Support Vessel
DSVDS DISSUB Ventilation and Depressurization System
EBS Emergency Breathing System
ECB Expendable Communications Buoy
EGS Escape Gear Ship
ELSS Emergency Life Support Stores
HIS Hood Inflation System
HP - LP High Pressure – Low Pressure
IAMSAR International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue
ICAO International Civil Aviation Authority
ISMERLO International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Office
LARS Launch and Recovery System
LIVEX Live Exercise
MASC MOSHIP Airport/Seaport Combination

ORIGINAL
I–A-1
ATP-57(B)
Abbreviation /
Meaning
Acronym
MCASB (NATO) Military Committee AIR Standardization Board
MCMSB (NATO) Military Committee Maritime Standardization Board
MEDEVAC Medical Evacuation
MOSHIP Mother Ship (for a SMER Element)
MOSUB Mother Submarine (for a SMER Element)
NA National Authority
NSA Nato Standardization Agency
NSRS NATO Submarine Rescue System
OSC On Scene Commander
PLARS Portable Launch and Recovery System
PLB Personal Locator Beacon
RCC Rescue Co-ordination Centre
REC Rescue Element Commander
RHIB Rigid-Hulled Inflatable Boat
RIB Rigid Inflatable Boat
ROV Remotely Operated Vehicle
SAR Search and Rescue
SEIE Submarine Escape Immersion Equipment
SEPIRB Submarine Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon
SITREP Situation Report
SLOT Submarine Launched One-way Transmission
SMER Submarine Escape and Rescue
SMERAT Submarine Escape and Rescue Advisory Team
SPAG Submarine Parachute Assistance Group
SRC Submarine Rescue Chamber
SRDRS Submarine Rescue Diving and Recompression System
SRS Submarine Rescue System
SRV Submarine Rescue Vehicle
SSE Submarine Signal Ejector
SSRA Submarine Search and Rescue Authority
SUBLOOK The code word of the procedures initiated by the Subopauth when the safety of a
submarine is in doubt
SUBMISS The code word of an operation which will be executed in order to initiate a fully
coordinated search for a submarine that is believed to be missing. It also identifies
the related signal.
SUBSUNK The code word of an operation which will be executed in order to initiate a fully
coordinated search for a submarine that is known to have sunk. It also identifies
the related signal.
SUPSUB Support Submarine
TTFI Time To First Intervention
TTFR Time To First Rescue
TUP Transfer Under Pressure
UWT Underwater Telephone
VOO Vessel of Opportunity

ORIGINAL
I–A-2
ATP-57(B)

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES

Effective Pages Page Numbers


Original I thru XXII
Original 1, 2
PART I
Original I-1-1 through I-1-4
Original I-1-A-1, I-1-A-2
Original I-2-1 through I-2-8
Original I-3-1 through I-3-24
Original I-3-A-1 through I-3-A-8
Original I-3-B-1 through I-3-B-10
Original I-4-1 through I-4-4
Original I-4-A-1 through I-4-A-6
Original I-5-1 through I-5-6
Original I-5-A-1, I-5-A-2
Original I-5-B-1 through I-5-B-10
Original I-6-1 through I-6-50
Original I-6-A-1, I-6-A-2
Original I-6-B-1, I-6-B-2
Original I-6-C-1 through I-6-C-6
Original I-6-D-1, I-6-D-2
Original I-6-E-1, I-6-E-2
Original I-6-F-1 through I-6-F-4
Original I-6-G-1 through I-6-G-4
Original I-6-H-1, I-6-H-2
Original I-6-I-1, I-6-I-2
Original I-6-J-1, I-6-J-2
Original I-6-K-1, I-6-K-2
Original I-6-L-1, I-6-L-2
Original I-6-M-1, I-6-M-2
Original I-Glossary-1 through I-Glossary-8
Original I-A-1, I-A-2
Original I-LEP-1, I-LEP-2
PART II
Original II-1, II-2
Original II-1-1 through II-1-6
Original II-1-AUS-1 through II-2-AUS-8
Original II-1-BEL-1 through II-1-BEL-4
Original II-1-BGR-1 through II-1-BGR-6
Original II-1-CAN-1 through II-1-CAN-6
Original II-1-FRA-1 through II-1-FRA-6

ORIGINAL
I – LEP - 1
ATP-57(B)
Original II-1-FRA-I-1, II-1-FRA-I-2
Original II-1-FRA-II-1, II-1-FRA-II-2
Original II-1-FRA-III-1, II-1-FRA-III-2
Original II-1-FRA-IV-1 through II-1-FRA-IV-6
Original II-1-DEU-1 through II-1-DEU-6
Original II-1-GRC-1 through II-1-GRC-6
Original II-1-ISR-1 through II-1-ISR-6
Original II-1-ITA-1 through II-1-ITA-8
Original II-1-NOR-1 through II-1-NOR-4
Original II-1-NSRS-1 through II-1-NSRS-6
Original II-1-POL-1 through II-1-POL-6
Original II-1-PRT-1 through II-1-PRT-6
Original II-1-ESP-1 through II-1-ESP-8
Original II-1-SWE-1 through II-1-SWE-8
Original II-1-NLD-1 through II-1-NLD-4
Original II-1-TUR-1 through II-1-TUR-10
Original II-1-GBR-1 through II-1-GBR-8
Original II-1-USA-1 through II-1-USA-8
Original II-2-1 through II-2-6
Original II-2-AUS-1 through II-2-AUS-8
Original II-2-BGR-1 through II-2-BGR-8
Original II-2-CAN-1 through II-2-CAN-8
Original II-2-FRA-1 through II-2-FRA-14
Original II-2-DEU-1 through II-2-DEU-8
Original II-2-GRC-1 through II-2-GRC-10
Original II-2-ISR-1 through II-2-ISR-8
Original II-2-ITA-1 through II-2-ITA-16
Original II-2-NOR-1 through II-2-NOR-8
Original II-2-POL-1 through II-2-POL-14
Original II-2-PRT-1 through II-2-PRT-16
Original II-2-ESP-1 through II-2-ESP-8
Original II-2-SWE-1 through II-2-SWE-14
Original II-2-NLD-1 through II-2-NLD-14
Original II-2-TUR-1 through II-2-TUR-20
Original II-2-GBR-1 through II-2-GBR-26
Original II-2-USA-1 through II-2-USA-36
Original II-3-1 through II-3-44

ORIGINAL
I – LEP - 2
ATP 57(B)

PART II

GENERAL
THIS IS A NON RATIFIABLE PART

Based on SMERWG Terms of Reference (see also SMERWG yearly RAL) Nations are requested to provide
the Custodian with updates to their data on a regular basis, keeping NSA informed.
Nil responses are required.

Data not provided, because of their classification or because of national policy, will be made available to the
appropriate Rescue Elements by the DISSUB National Authority on a case by case basis, through the
DISSUB Liaison Team.

National data are also available on the ISMERLO WEB-site (password protected area) to accredited SMER
Nations.

Columns/rows with data may be added should a Country have more than one of a kind asset.

II-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND


AFLOAT TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

GENERAL TEMPLATE

II-1-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact


Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS
NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
SPAG
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification
Location
SRV (rescue capacity)
SRC (Rescue capacity)
Rescue depth
Transfer under pressure Yes/No
Deep Diving capabilities
ROV Yes/No
ADS Yes/No
Ventilation Yes/No
SPAG capable Yes/No
Dedicated MOSHIP / Yes/No
VOO
VOO Specifications
needed

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification
Location
Tethered Yes/No
Manipulators Yes/No
Rescue capacity
Transfer under
pressure
II-1-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Maximum Rescue
depth
Minimum Rescue
depth
Maximum sea state
Maximum current
Endurance
Mating angle (roll,
pitch)
Main dimensions
(length, weight, height
etc.)
Air portable

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification
Location
Rescue capacity
Maximum Rescue depth
Minimum Rescue depth
Maximum sea state
Maximum current
Mating angle (roll,
pitch)
Main dimensions
Air portable

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification
Numbers
Location(s)
Maximum depth
Maximum current
Air portable
Features

ADS REMARKS
IdentificatIon
Numbers
Location(s)
Maximum depth
Maximum current
Air portable:
Features:

II-1-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification:
Numbers:
Location(s):
Specifications:
Dedicated Moship Yes/No
STANAG 1450 Yes/No
interfaces available

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification:
Location(s):
Rescue elements
embarked
TUP Capability
Diving capability
Decompression
Chamber capabilities
Helicopter capable
Maximum Speed of
Advance
4 points mooring/DP
(Class)
Other Specifications:

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification
Total amount
Location
Max. capacity (Persons)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure
Air portable
Built into ships
Ships name / Class
Total amount of ships
Max. Capacity (Persons)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure
Maximum SOA

Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification
II-1-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Location
Max capacity (Persons)
Max. working pressure
Transfer under pressure
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification
Location
Max. Capacity (Persons)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification
Airport capability e.g. AN 124 compatible, crane capacity, forklift
capacity, Atlas/K-loader
Seaport identification
Seaport capability e.g. depth, max pier load, crane capacity,
forklift capacity
Road distance in-between
(km)
Road limitations e.g. bridges height, maximum axel weight,
critical turning radius etc.

II-1-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

AUSTRALIA

II-1-AUS-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-AUS-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact


Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS
NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone Commander Australian Fleet
number, fax, PLA) Fleet Headquarters
14-18 Wylde St
Potts Point NSW 2011
Australia
+61 2 9359 4609
+61 2 9359 4634
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone HMAS PENGUIN
number, fax, PLA) Submarine and Underwater Medicine Unit- East
Middle Head Road
MOSMAN NSW 2088
Telephone: + 61 2 9960 0572
Facsimile: + 61 2 9960 4435

HMAS STIRLING
Submarine and Underwater Medicine Unit- West
Rockingham, WA 6168
Telephone: + 61 8 95532561
Facsimile: + 61 8 95532600
C/- HMAS STIRLING
PO Box 2188
Rockingham DC
Western Australia, 6958
Australia
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Submarine Escape and Rescue Manager
number, fax, PLA) Office Telephone: +61 (0)8 9553 3091
Mobile Telephone: +61 (0)417 932 537
Office Facsimile: +61 (0)8 9553 2487
SUBMARINE ESCAPE and RESCUE
CENTRE
C/- HMAS STIRLING
PO Box 2188
Rockingham DC
Western Australia, 6958
Australia

II-1-AUS-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SPAG
Contact Details (phone NIL
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification Submarine Escape and Rescue Service(SERS)


Location Osborne Park
Western Australia 6017
Tel: +61 8 9446 9988
Fax: +61 8 9242 7966
SRV (rescue capacity) 6
SRC (Rescue capacity) NIL
Rescue depth 540 metres
Transfer under pressure Yes
Deep Diving capabilities
ROV No
ADS No
Ventilation No
SPAG capable No
Dedicated MOSHIP / Yes
VOO
VOO Specifications DP 2, clear deck space min 400m²,
needed Beam 9m min for LARS
Min deck strength – 5 tonnes per m²

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification ASRV Remora
Location Osborne Park
Western Australia 6017
Tel: +61 8 9446 9988
Fax: +61 8 9242 7966
Tethered Yes
Manipulators Yes
Rescue capacity 6
Transfer under pressure Yes
Maximum Rescue depth 540 metres
Minimum Rescue depth 15 – 20 metres
Maximum sea state 5
Maximum current 3
Endurance 72 hour battery life
Mating angle (roll, 60°
pitch)

II-1-AUS-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Main dimensions 16.5 tonnes


(length, weight, height
etc.)
Air portable Yes

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification NIL
Location
Rescue capacity
Maximum Rescue depth
Minimum Rescue depth
Maximum sea state
Maximum current
Mating angle (roll,
pitch)
Main dimensions
Air portable

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification Not at this time As with VOO,
Availability to be
determined
Numbers
Location(s)
Maximum depth
Maximum current
Air portable
Features

ADS NIL REMARKS


IdentificatIon
Numbers
Location(s)
Maximum depth
Maximum current
Air portable:
Features:

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: NIL
Numbers:
Location(s):
Specifications:
II-1-AUS-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Dedicated Moship
STANAG 1450
interfaces available

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: Seahorse Standard, Seahorse Spirit
Location(s): Western Australian, South Australian
Exercise Areas
Rescue elements No.
embarked SERS to be embarked as required
TUP Capability SERS to be embarked as required
Diving capability No
Decompression SERS to be embarked as required
Chamber capabilities
Helicopter capable No Helo deck, Transfer capable only
Maximum Speed of >12 Knots
Advance
4 points mooring/DP Yes
Other Specifications:

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification SUBSUNK triple lock RCCs

Total amount 2
Location Osborne Park
Western Australia 6017
Tel: +61 8 9446 9988
Fax: +61 8 9242 7966
Max. capacity (Persons) 36 persons (seated), 11 stretcher

Max. Working pressure 7 Bar

Transfer under pressure Yes


Air portable Yes
There are seven Series 35 Recompression
Built into ships
Chambers in service. One for each MHC and one
at RAN Diving School.
Uses an Air/Oxygen/Mixed gas supply system
Ships name / Class Huon Class
Total amount of ships 6 + 1 Shore based (HMAS PENGUIN)
Max. Capacity (Persons) 4
Max. Working pressure Working pressure: 50 msw
Transfer under pressure Yes
Maximum SOA 12.5 Knots

II-1-AUS-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification There four 10 Man Recompression Chambers
in service,
RAN Diving School (HMAS Penguin) x 1
AUSCDT FOUR x 1 (In Lay Up).
SERC - SUBMARINE ESCAPE and
RESCUE CENTRE (HMAS Stirling) x 2
Location HMAS PENGUIN
Submarine and Underwater Medicine Unit- East
Middle Head Road
MOSMAN NSW 2088
Telephone: + 61 2 9960 0572
Facsimile: + 61 2 9960 4435

HMAS STIRLING
Submarine and Underwater Medicine Unit- West
Rockingham, WA 6168
Telephone: + 61 8 95532561
Facsimile: + 61 8 95532600

Max capacity (Persons) 10


Max. working pressure Design pressure: 220 msw
Operational pressure: 90 msw
Uses an Air/Oxygen/Mixed gas supply system
Transfer under pressure Yes
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification
Location New South Wales
Prince of Wales Hospital
Hyperbaric Medicine Unit
High Street
RANDWICK NSW 2031
Switchboard: + 61 2 9382 2222
HMU Sec: + 61 2 9382 3880
Staff: + 61 2 9382 3883/3884
Facsimile: + 61 2 9382 3882

Victoria
Alfred Hospital
Hyperbaric Medicine Unit
Commercial Road
PRAHRAN Vic 3181
Switchboard: + 61 3 9276 2000
HMU: + 61 3 9276 2269/2323
Facsimile: + 61 3 9276 3052

II-1-AUS-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Tasmania
Royal Hobart Hospital
Hyperbaric Medical Unit
GPO Box 1061 L
HOBART Tas 7001
Switchboard: + 613 6222 8308
HMU: + 61 3 6222 8322
Facsimile: + 61 3 6222 8322

Northern Territory
Royal Darwin Hospital
PO Box 41326
CASUARINA NT 0810
Switchboard: + 618 8922 8888
Telephone: + 618 8922 8230
Facsimile: + 61 8 8922 8286

Queensland
Townsville General Hospital
Eyre Street
TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810
Switchboard: + 61 7 4781 9211
HMU: + 61 7 4781 9455/9456
Facsimile: + 61 7 4781 9582
Western Australia
Fremantle Hospital
Hyperbaric Medicine Unit
PO Box 480
FREMANTLE WA 6959
Switchboard: + 61 8 9431 3333
HMU Telephone: + 61 8 9431 2233/2235
Facsimile: + 61 8 9431 2819

Broome District Hospital


PO Box 62
BROOME WA 6725
Telephone: + 61 8 9192 1401
Facsimile: + 61 8 9192 2322

South Australia
Royal Adelaide Hospital
Hyperbaric Medicine Unit
North Terrace
ADELAIDE SA 5000
Switchboard: + 61 8 8222 4000
HMU: + 61 8 8222 5116
Facsimile: + 61 8 8232 4207

Max. Capacity (Persons) Unknown


Max. Working pressure Unknown
Transfer under pressure Unknown

II-1-AUS-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

BELGIUM

II-1-BEL-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-BEL-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone ARBEIDSGENEESHEER HYPERBARIST – Tel;: (+32) 50-558689
number, fax, PLA) MARINEBASIS ZEEBRUGGE – GRAAF
JANSDIJK1 – 8380 ZEEBRUGGE
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
SPAG
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification N/A

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification DECOMPACK
Total amount 5 -
Location NAVLOG – MARINEBASIS - ZEEBRUGGE GRAAF JANSDIJK 1
8380 ZEEBRUGGE
Max. capacity (Persons) 3 -
Max. Working pressure 5 ATA -
Transfer under pressure NO -
Air portable NO -
Built into ships
Ships name / Class N/A

II-1-BEL-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification HYPERBARIC CENTER
Location NAVCENHYP – MARINEBASIS - ZEEBRUGGE GRAAF JANSDIJK 1
8380 ZEEBRUGGE
Max capacity (Persons) 14 patient sitting - 5 patients lying
Max. working pressure 11 ATA
Transfer under pressure No
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification N/A
Transfer under pressure

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification
Airport capability
Seaport identification
Seaport capability
Road distance in-
between (km)
Road limitations

II-1-BEL-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

BULGARIA

II-1-BGR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-BGR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone Commander in Chief Bulgarian Navy
number, fax, PLA) P.O. Box 9000
16 Preslav str.
Varna, Bulgaria
Tel.: +359 52 552622/+359 52 552018
Fax: +359 52 603259/+359 52 552648
Duty Officer:
Tel.: +359 52 552040/+359 52 633021
Fax: +359 52 552327
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone -
number, fax, PLA)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone -
number, fax, PLA)
SPAG
Contact Details (phone -
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification -
Location PROTEO
SRV (rescue capacity) -
SRC (Rescue capacity) 6 survivors
Rescue depth 120 m
Transfer under pressure No
Deep Diving capabilities No
ROV No
ADS No
Ventilation Yes
SPAG capable No
Dedicated MOSHIP / No
VOO
VOO Specifications -
needed

II-1-BGR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification McCANN
Location PROTEO
Rescue capacity 6 survivors
Maximum Rescue depth 120 m
Minimum Rescue depth -
Maximum sea state 3
Maximum current -
Mating angle (roll, 5°
pitch)
Main dimensions 3,90x2,23 m
Air portable No

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: -
Numbers: 1
Location(s): PROTEO
Specifications: -
Dedicated Moship No
STANAG 1450 No
interfaces available

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: PROTEO
Location(s): Varna
Rescue elements SDC, SRC
embarked
TUP Capability No
Diving capability Yes Down to 60 m
Decompression Yes
Chamber capabilities
Helicopter capable No
Maximum Speed of 16 kn
Advance
4 points mooring/DP Yes
Other Specifications: -

II-1-BGR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable No

Built into ships Yes


Ships name / Class PROTEO/Diving cutters(2)
Total amount of ships 3
Max. Capacity (Persons) 4/1(2)
Max. Working pressure 12/10 bar
Transfer under pressure No
Maximum SOA -
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification -
Location Varna Naval Base
Max capacity (Persons) 6
Max. working pressure 10 bars
Transfer under pressure No
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification -
Location Varna Naval Hospital
Max. Capacity (Persons) 6
Max. Working pressure 10 bars
Transfer under pressure No

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification Bourgas airport
Airport capability C5, AN 124 compatible, capacity - up to 7,5 t,
Seaport identification Seaport Bourgas
Seaport capability Depth - 10 m, crane capacity - 25 t, forklift
capacity - 15 t
Road distance in-between 15 km
(km)
Road limitations No road limitations
Airport identification Varna airport
Airport capability C5, AN 124 compatible, capacity - up to 3 t,
Seaport identification Seaport Varna
Seaport capability Depth - 12 m, crane capacity - 25 t, forklift
capacity - 15 t
Road distance in-between 10 km
(km)
Road limitations No road limitations

II-1-BGR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-BGR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

CANADA

II-1-CAN-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-CAN-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL DEFENCE COMMAND CENTRE
Contact Details (phone 613-945-5551 Manned 24/7
number, PLA) NDHQ OTTAWA//NDCC//
ATLANTIC SUBOPAUTH
Contact Details (phone 902-427-2517 Working Hours Only
number, PLA) MARLANTHQ HALIFAX//N32//
REGIONAL JOINT OPERATIONS CENTRE ATLANTIC
Contact Details (phone 902-427-2501 Manned 24/7
number)
PACIFIC SUBOPAUTH
Contact Details (phone 250-363-4633 Working Hours Only
number, fax, PLA) MARPACHQ ESQUIMALT//J3 MAR 2//
PACIFIC OPERATIONS CENTRE
Contact Details (phone 250-363-5848 Manned 24/7
number)
FLEET SUPPORT MEDICAL OFFICER - ATLANTIC
Contact Details (phone 902-427-3744
number, PLA) MAROPSGRU FIVE HQ HALIFAX//SICK BAY//
FLEET SUPPORT MEDICAL OFFICER – PACIFIC
Contact Details (phone 250-363-7066
number) MARPACHQ ESQUIMALT//N02 MED//
CONSULTANT IN SUBMARINE AND DIVING MEDICINE
Contact Details (phone 902-427-6609
number) MAROPSGRU FIVE HQ HALIFAX//SICK BAY//
CANADACOM Joint Command Centre Watch Officer
Contact Details (phone 613-944-8888
number)

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification Phantom S4
Numbers 2
Location(s) 1) Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) 12 Wing Shearwater,
Nova Scotia
2) Fleet Diving Unit (Pacific) CFB Esquimalt,
British Columbia
Maximum Depth 300 m
Maximum Current
Air Portable Yes

II-1-CAN-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Features 1.0m X 0.7m X 0.6m, 120kg. Fitted with 3 function


manipulator

Identification Phantom HD2+2


Numbers 1
Location DRDC Atlantic, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Maximum Depth 300m
Maximum Current
Air Portable Yes
Features 1.0m X 0.6m X 0.5m, 100kg. No manipulator fitted Normally used for research
and inspection purposes.
Not a regular Naval asset.

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification SN 338A NSN 4220-21-871-7307
Quantity 2
Location 1) Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) 12 Wing
Shearwater, Nova Scotia
2) Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) CFB Esquimalt,
British Columbia
Max. capacity (Persons) 6
Max. Working pressure 68 msw (225 fsw) 100 psig
Transfer under pressure Yes
Air portable Yes

Identification Containerized Diving System (CDS)


Total amount 2
Location 1) Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) 12 Wing
Shearwater, Nova Scotia
2) Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) CFB Esquimalt,
British Columbia
Max. capacity (Persons) 6
Max. Working pressure 68 msw (225 fsw) 150 psig
Transfer under pressure Yes
Air portable Yes

Identification DUO-COM
Total amount 4
Location 1) Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) 12 Wing
Shearwater, Nova Scotia
2) Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) CFB Esquimalt,
British Columbia
3) DCIEM EDU, Toronto, Ontario
Max. capacity (Persons) 2
Max. Working pressure 72 psig

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ATP 57(B)

Transfer under pressure Yes


Air portable Yes
Built into ships
Ships name / Class YDT 11 / YDT 12 - Diving Tender
Total amount of ships 2
Max. Capacity (Persons) 6
Max. Working pressure 68 msw (225 fsw) 100 psig
Transfer under pressure Yes
Maximum SOA 10 kts, 1000 nm range
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification Main Chamber – Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic)
Location Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic) 12 Wing
Shearwater, Nova Scotia
Max capacity (Persons) 12
Max. working pressure 150 psig Subsystem design limits
chamber to max 300 fsw
Transfer under pressure Yes

Identification Main Chamber – Fleet Diving Unit (Pacific)


Location Fleet Diving Unit (Pacific) CFB Esquimalt,
British Columbia
Max capacity (Persons) 10
Max. working pressure 150 psig
Transfer under pressure Yes
Contact Atlantic/Pacific
Ashore Major Civilian
Operations Centres for
Facilities
complete details on
civilian facilities in their
areas.

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification Halifax International Airport (CYHZ), Nova
Scotia
Airport capability Contact Atlantic Operations Centre at 902-427-
2501 for complete details
Seaport identification HMC Dockyard Halifax, Nova Scotia
Seaport capability Contact Atlantic Operations Centre at 902-427-
2501 for complete details
Road distance in-between 35 kms
(km)
Road limitations Contact Atlantic Operations Centre at 902-427-
0550 ext 2501 for complete details

Airport Identification Victoria International Airport (CYYJ), British


Columbia

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ATP 57(B)

Airport Capability Contact Pacific Operations Centre at 250-363-


5848 for complete details
Seaport Identification HMC Dockyard Esquimalt, British Columbia
Seaport capability Contact Pacific Operations Centre at 250-363-
5848 for complete details
Road distance in-between 30 kms
(km)
Road limitations Contact Pacific Operations Centre at 250-363-
5848 for complete details

Airport identification 19 Wing Greenwood, Nova Scotia


Airport capability Contact 19 Wing at 902-568-5457 for complete
details
Seaport identification HMC Dockyard Halifax, Nova Scotia
Road distance in-between 140 Kms
(km)

Airport identification SYDNEY Airport


Airport capability Contact SYDNEY Airport at 902-564-7720 for
complete details
Seaport capability Contact SYDNEY Harbour Authority at 902-
564-8452 for complete details
Road distance in-between 20 Kms
(km)

Airport identification St John’s Airport


Airport capability Contact St John’s Airport Authority at 709-
772-2595 for complete details
Seaport identification St John’s Harbour
Seaport capability Contact St John’s Harbour Authority at 709-
772-2083 for complete details

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ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

FRANCE

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II-1-FRA-2 ORIGINAL
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DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT TO


SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

REQUEST of SMER ASSISTANCE REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone Submarine fleet HQ
number, fax, PLA) CC Frederic Zitta
+33298229810 Office
+33672910854 Mobile
+33623441173 Mobile
E-mail : n42.alfost@marine.defense.gouv.fr
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Submarine fleet medical centre
number, fax, PLA) MC Jean-Laurent Cayla
+33298229312 Office
+33688877031 Mobile
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone + 33494022352 Office Chief of submarine rescue
number, fax, PLA) + 33674897733 Mobile ( main ) team
+ 33674897734 Mobile Details up to date on
E-mail : Cephismer@yahoo.fr ISMERLO website

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification NSRS See NSRS annex.

Submarine Intervention System REMARKS

Identification FR Intervention System


Location Toulon (FR)
SRV (rescue capacity) No
SRC (Rescue capacity) No
Intervention depth Up to 1000 m
Transfer under pressure No
Deep Diving Up to 80 m
capabilities
ROV Up to 1000 m ROV Ulysse
ADS Up to 300 m FR ADS
Ventilation Up to 250 m FR SVDS
SPAG capable No
Dedicated MOSHIP / No All systems operated onboard
VOO French chartered ships

II-1-FRA-3 ORIGINAL
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VOO Specifications Two specifications needed :


needed - dynamic positioning system
- deck more than 260m²

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification Achille Survey class ROV
Numbers 1
Location(s) Toulon Harbour
Maximum depth 400 mt
Maximum current 0.5 Knots
Air portable Yes 5 m3
Features

Identification Ulisse (FR ROV) Work class ROV


Numbers 1
Location(s) Toulon Harbour
Maximum depth 1000 mt
Maximum current 2.5 Knots
Air portable Yes 72 m3, 17400 Kg
Features 1 sonar
Acoustic positioning
2 working arms ( payload 15 Kg in sea water )
Color and white/black video record capability
SURVEY capable
POD POSTING capable
HATCH CLEARING capable
Cutter capable ( 19mm iron wire )
SEARCH capable
ADS rescue capable

(See annex II for more details about french ROV (military and ROV) )

ADS REMARKS
Identification NEWTSUIT (FR ADS)
Numbers 1
Location(s) Toulon harbour
Maximum depth 300 mt
Maximum current 0.5 knt
Air portable: Yes 128 m3, 37305 Kg
Features: SURVEY capable
POD POSTING capable
HATCH CLEARING capable
VENTILATION capable
Simple underwater engineering

II-1-FRA-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: Cybernetix ventilation system (FR SVDS) SVDS : submarine


ventilation and
decompression system
Numbers: 1
Location(s): Toulon harbour
Specifications: Inlet hose : 30 bars, diam : 65 mm Max depth : 250m
Outlet hose : 30 bars diam : 65 mm
Air portable: Yes 147 m3, 32500 Kg
Dedicated Moship No systems operated onboard
French chartered ships
STANAG 1450 Yes
interfaces available

(See annex I for more details about French ventilation / depressurisation system )

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS

(See annex III for details about French rescue ship )

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification CML
Total amount 2
Location 1 Toulon harbour, 1 Brest harbour
Max. capacity (Persons) 3 2 injured and 1 DMT
(diving medical technician)
Max. Working pressure 5 bars
Transfer under pressure Yes
Air portable Yes
Built into ships
Ships name / Class MCMV’s (Eridan class)
Total amount of ships 13 3 Toulon harbour, 10 Brest
harbour
Max. Capacity (Persons) 3 2 injured and 1 DMT
Max. Working pressure 5
Transfer under pressure No
Maximum SOA 12 Knots

Ships name / Class Principal Diving support ships ( EOD Team )


Total amount of ships 4 2 Toulon harbour, 1 Brest
harbour, 1 Cherbourg
harbour
Max. Capacity (Persons) 4 3 injured and 1 DMT

II-1-FRA-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Max. Working pressure 5 bars
Transfer under pressure Yes
Maximum SOA 12 knots (Vulcain class)

Ships name / Class Diving tenders ( EOD Team )


Total amount of ships 6 2 Toulon harbour, 2 Brest
harbour, 2 Cherbourg
harbour
Max. Capacity (Persons) 3 2 injured and 1 DMT
Max. Working pressure 5 bars
Transfer under pressure No
Maximum SOA 9 knots ( very small navigation range )
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification Diving school
Location Toulon
Max capacity (Persons) 4 3 injured and 1 DMT
Max. working pressure 5 bars
Transfer under pressure Yes
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification HIA
Location Toulon
Max. Capacity (Persons) 5 4 injured and 1 DMT
Max. Working pressure 5 bars
Transfer under pressure No
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification
Location Antibes
Max. Capacity (Persons) 4 3 injured and 1 DMT
Max. Working pressure 5 bars
Transfer under pressure No

(See annex IV for more details about hyperbar caisson (military and ROV))

II-1-FRA-6 ORIGINAL
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ANNEX I

Details of Intervention Assets


EXTERNAL VENTILATION (SVDS)
1. Purpose
Once the DISSUB is located and the support ship is girt, fresh air and foul air must be connected to
maintain sufficient ventilation inside the submarine refuge compartment.

2. Equipment to be embarked
1 One compressed air generation module
2 One process control module
3 One submarine link module
4 One reel bearing two 300-meter long air hoses
5 One electricity-generating module

3. Operation of the ventilation equipment


1 The guide line is fixed onto the submarine deck then tightened from the support ship.
2 The deck plugs are removed.
3 The ventilation hoses with their flanges, supported by the hemp rope, slide along the guide line
using safety hooks.
4 The hose flanges are screwed to replace the deck plugs.
5 The hemp rope is secured to the submarine deck.
6 The hose wrench bleed valves are opened.
7 The water inside the hoses is drained by the air from the MP air compressor or the HP air cylinder
rack.
8 The hose wrench bleed valves are closed.
9 The fresh air and foul air hoses are vented using the bleed valves of the process control module.
10 The container bleeders are closed, the submarine can be ventilated.
11 The fresh air and foul air hull valves of the submarine are opened by the crew or the rescue team.
12 The internal submarine pressure is displayed on the pressure gauge of the process control module.
13 When the air compressor is functioning, the fresh air discharge valve and the foul air return valve of
the process control module are opened.
14 Submarine ventilation is in progress.

4. Description
4.1 Process control module
Can be transported by sea, air, rail or road. It contains the whole air distribution and analysis installation.
Dimensions: length 3.00m x width 2.44m x height 2.13m
Volume: 15.53m3
Weight: 2500kg

4.2 Electricity-generating module


Can be transported by sea, air, rail or road. It provides the electricity for the whole installation.
Dimensions: length 6.06m x width 2.44m x height 2.40m
Volume: 35.45m3
Weight: 6000kg

4.3 Compressed air generation module

II-1-FRA-I-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Can be transported by sea, air, rail or road. It provides 475Nm3/h @ 10 bars for
ventilation/decompression and 57Nm3/h @ 30 bars for draining air hoses after connexion on the
submarine.
Dimensions: length 6.06m x width 2.44m x height 2.62m
Volume: 38.70m3
Weight: 8000kg

4.4 Submarine link module


Can be transported by sea, air, rail or road. It contains the hydraulic winches for air hoses and guide rope
management.
Dimensions: length 6.06m x width 2.44m x height 2.40m
Volume: 35.45m3
Weight: 9000kg

4.5 Reel of two 300 meters long air hoses


Can be transported by sea, air, rail or road. It bears the air hoses for the ventilation of the submarine.
Dimensions: length 3.50m x width 2.44m x height 2.52m
Volume: 21.52m3
Weight: 7000kg

4.6 Hose flanges


Hose flanges are interfaces between fresh air hoses, foul air hoses and the submarine, they are equipped
with air discharge systems.

4.7 Rigging
The rigging includes a standing rigging and a running rigging.
The standing rigging is a nylon cable tightened between the ship and the submarine deck.
The running rigging includes all the fresh air and foul air hoses supported by a hemp rope.
The running rigging slides along the standing rigging by using safety hooks.

5 Diagram

II-1-FRA-I-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ANNEX II – FR

REMOTELY OPERATED VEHICULES (ROV)

1- Military means
MARINE Characteristics Maximum Equipment Capacities
NATIONALE depth
ACHILLE Length 720 mm 300 metres - 1 colour camera To be used for
Width 600 mm - sounder and sonar surveillance of the
Height 510 mm -1 articulated arm (3 divers and the
Weight 70 kg functions) atmospheric diving
suit
ULISSE Length 1340 mm 1000 metres - 1 articulated arm (4 To be used for AEM
Width 1090 mm functions) action and ADS
Height 1000 mm - 1 articulated arm (5 surveillance
Weight 526 kg functions)
- sounder and sonar
- black and white camera
- color camera

2- Civil means
List of civil organisation using ROVs which can be sollicited by the French Navy

COMEX Characteristics Maximum depth Equipment Capacities

SUPER Length 720 mm 700 metres -1 color camera - assistance to divers or


ACHILLE Width 600 mm - sounder and sonar manned sub-marine
Height 510 mm -articulated arm (3 - intervention in polluted
Weight 120 kg functions) waters
- preliminary
investigation

IFREMER Characteristics Maximum depth Equipment Capacities

VICTOR 6000 Length 720 mm 6000 metres -Colour cameras - speed 1.5 knots
Width 600 mm -sounder and sonar - intervention and
Height 510 mm articulated arms investigation on wrecks
Weight 4000 kg type "slave master" and and manned
(7 functions) submarines
-2

II-1-FRA-II-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

2-CIVIL MEANS
List of civil organisations using ROVs which can be solicited by the French Navy.

COMEX Characteristics Maximum depth Equipment Capacities


REMORA 2000 Length 3400 mm 610 meters - colour/B&W cameras - speed 2.5 knots
Width 2400 mm - panoramic sonar - autonomy 9hours
Height 2150 mm - exterior camera - survival 72 hours
Weight 5300 kg - mechanical arm for
Crew 2 adjustment to 6°
Vision 360°

IFREMER Characteristics Maximum Equipment Capacities


Depth
NAUTILE Length 8000 mm 6000 metres - cameras - speed 1,7 knots
Width 2700 mm - acoustic transmission - range 7,5 NM
Height 3810 mm of images and data - autonomy 5 h
Weight 19300 kg - mechanical arm for - safe autonomy 120
adjustment to 7° h
- prehension arm
manouverable up to 5°

II-1-FRA-II-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ANNEX III – FR

SUBMARINE RESCUE SHIPS


1 –Military means
List of carriers used by the French Navy for submarine rescue

Nota bene: for submarines in distress, fresh-air ventilation is activated pending the arrival of a rescue vehicle,
either by human intervention up to 80 metres (GPD) or by atmospheric diving module up to 250 metres
immersion (SIE cell manufactured by CEPHISMER)

FRENCH NAVY SUBMARINE CRAFT ZONE CARRIER

ATLANTIQUE BSAD ARGONAUTE


ATLANTIQUE BSAD ALCYON
Atmospheric diving suit ATLANTIQUE POURQUOI PAS ?
CEPHISMER
ROV
MEDITERRANEE BSAD AILETTE
MEDITERRANEE BSAD CARANGUE
ALFAN / CDF PAP and deep PAP ATLANTIQUE ET Minehunters
MINES MEDITERRANEE

2 –CIVIL MEANS
List of carriers run by civil organisations which can be _olicited by the French Navy

ORGANISATION SUBMARINE CRAFT CARRIER


MINIBEX
COMEX Submarine REMORA 2000
JANUS
VICTOR 6000 NOROIT et SUROIT
IFREMER
Submarine NAUTILE NADIR
TRAVOCEAN- CANOCEAN ROV PHANTOM NADIRSANS PORTEUR
SERRA MARINE CASTOR 02
BOURBON

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-FRA-III-2 ORIGINAL
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ANNEX IV – FR

MILITARY HYPERBAR CAISSON

1 CHANNEL COAST

1.1. Operational unit equipped with hyperbar caisson but not providing medical assistance

UNITES MOYENS OBSERVATIONS


1 multiplace caisson with single
GPD MANCHE (EOD team) – airlock
support ship VULCAIN 2 patients lying down, I seated
50115 CHERBOURG Armées 4 inhalers
tél. : 02 33.92.61.06 - Poste : maximum pressure for use 5 bar
71.23.787 Nato crown

GPD MANCHE (EOD team) - light multiplace caissons (2)


50115 CHERBOURG Armées - 2 patients lying down
- 4 inhalers ( 3 in room, 1 in airlock)
- maximum pressure 5 bar
- NATO crown

2. ATLANTIC COAST

2.1. Unit in charge of victims of military diving, and providing medical assistance

UNITS OBSERVATIONS

II-1-FRA-IV-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

2.2. Operational units equipped with hyperbar caisson but not providing medical assistance

UNITS MEANS OBSERVATIONS

GPD ATLANTIC (EOD team) – - 1 multplace caisson with single


support ship STYX airlock
29240 BREST Armées - 2 patients lying down, 1 seated
Tél : 02 98 80 80 80 - 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock
poste : 72 23 568 - maximum pressure for use 5 bar
- NATO crown
- 1 multiplace light caisson
GPD ATLANTIC (EOD team) - 2 patients lying down, I seated
29240 BREST Armées - 4 inhalers
- maximum pressure for use 5 bar
- Nato crown
- light multiplace caisson
GPD ATLANT - 2 patients lying down
AUTONOMOUS CONTAINER . 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock
29240 BREST Armées -maximum pressure for use 5 bar
tél : - NATO crown
- light multiplace caisson (1O) - 1 male nurse
ALFAN BREST - 2 patients lying down - gas available: O2 ans N2/O2
29240 BREST Armées - 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock) 60% and 40%
Caissons on board minehunters - maximum pressure 5 bar
(10) - NATO crown
Tél: 02 98 22 84 29

3. MEDITERRANEAN COAST

3.1. Unit in charge of the treatment of victims of diving accidents and providing medical
assistance

UNITES MOYENS OBSERVATIONS


Multiplace trimodular caisson - doctors from SMHP
HOPITAL STE.ANNE - EMERGENCY CAISSON ( PS: 5 - 4 male nurses
83800 TOULON ARMEES bar - 2 mechanics
Tél : (JOUR) 04 94 09 91 50 4 patients seated or 2 lying down (4 - gas available: O2 and N2/O2 50%
(NUIT): 04 94 09 92 76 inhalers) and He/O2 50%
Fax : 04 94 09 96 98 Biplace adaptation possible, no
NATO crown
- CHRONIC CAISSON (PS: 3 bar), 8
patients seated (8 inhalers)
- AIRLOCK (PS 5 bar) 2 inhalers

II-1-FRA-IV-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

3.2. Operational units equipped with hyperbar caissons but not providing medical assistance

UNITES MOYENS OBSERVATIONS


- light multiplace caissons (2) - 1 doctor
ALFAN TOULON – - 2 patients lying down - 2 male nurses (hyperbar
CEPHISMER – Autonomous - 4 inhalers ( 3 in room, 1 in airlock) specialists)
container - maximum pressure in use 5 bar - gas available: O2 and N2/O2 60%
BP 84 – 83800 TOULON Armées - NATO crown and 40%
Tél : 04 94 02 11 02
Fax : 04 94 02 17 95

ALFAN TOULON – BBPD - gas available: O2 and N2/O2 60%


ACHERON - 1 multiplace caisson with single and 4O%
BP airlock
83800 TOULON Armées - 2 patients lying down, 1 seated
Tél : 04 94 24 90 00 - 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock
Poste 23 352 - maximum pressure 5 bar
- NATO crown

-light multiplace caissons (2) - gas available: O2 an N2/O2 6O%


ALFAN TOULON – BSP ALIZE - 2 patients lying down and 40%
BP 700 - 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock
83800 TOULON Armées - maximum pressure 5 bar
- NATO crown

- light multiplace caissons ((3) - 1 male nurse


ALFAN TOULON - 2 patients lying down - gas available: O2 an N2/O2 60%
83800 TOULON Armées - 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock and 40%
Caissons embarked on - maximum pressure 5 bar
minehunters type CML - NATO crown

GPD MEDITERRANEE (EOD - 1 multiplace caisson with single


team) – support ship PLUTON airlock
83800 TOULON Armées - 2 patients lying down, 1 seated
- 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock)
Tél. : 04 94 02 08 57 (alerte GPD) - maximum pressure 5 bar
- NATO crown
- light multiplace caissons (2)
GPD ATLANTIC (EOD team) - 2 patients lying down
83800 TOULON Armées - 4 inhalers ( 3 in room, 1 in airlock
- maximum pressure 5 bar
- NATO crown

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ATP 57(B)

3.3. Vocational training units equipped with hyperbar caissons but not providing medical
assistance

UNITES MOYENS OBSERVATIONS


DIVING SCHOOL - 1 multiplace caisson with 2 airlocks - 1 doctor
Medical Service - room: 1 patient lying down + 2 seated - 2 male nurses
83800 TOULON Armées - airlocks: 2 inhalers - gas available: O2 and N2/O2
- maximum pressure 5 bar 50%
Tél : 04 94 11 49 00 - NATO crown

VIP - VIPD DIVING SCHOOL - light multiplace caissons (2)


(VIPD : light support diving - 2 patients lying down
vessel) - 4 inhalers (3 in room, 1 in airlock)
83800 TOULON Armées - maximum pressure 5 bar
- NATO crown
Tél : 04 94 11 49 00

ANTIBES - 1 mobile multiplace caisson (carried


Centre d'Instruction Nautique de by truck)
la Gendarmerie - room: 4 inhalers: 1patient lying down
Caserne Gazan + 2 seated
06604 ANTIBES Cedex - airlock: 2 inhalers (patient lying
down)
Tél. : 04 93 34 78 05 - pressure in use: 5 bar

4. INTERIOR ZONES

UNITES MOYENS OBSERVATIONS


PARIS:VAL DE GRACE - 1 multiplace caisson with single - 3 doctors
MILITARY HOSPITAL airlock - 1 male nurse
HIA du Val-de-Grâce - 1 berth - gas available: pure O2 only
74, Bd Port-Royal - 75013 - 5 inhalers (4 in room + 1 in airlock)
PARIS - maximum pressure 6 bar
Tél : 01 40 51 40 00
01 40 51 45 09 (Réa)
Fax : 01 40 51 46 08

METZ: MILITARY - 1 multiplace hyperbar caisson - intensive care service


HOSPITAL - 1 berth and 3 inhalers in room - 1 doctor and 1 male nurse
METZ - 2 inhalers in airlock - gas available: O2 and N2/O2
Hôpital d’Instruction des Armées - maximum pressure 5 bar 50%
LEGOUEST
57998 METZ ARMEES

II-1-FRA-IV-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

UNITES MOYENS OBSERVATIONS


Tél : 03 87 75 49 15

5. ENGINEERING UNITS EQUIPPED WITH HYPERBAR CAISSONS

UNITES MOYENS OBSERVATIONS


ESAG - 1 multiplace caisson - no off-duty service
- 1 berth and 2 inhalers in room - 2 doctors, 1 specialist nurse
- 1 inhalers in airlock - gas available: - air
- maximum pressure 5 bar - oxygen
- O2/N2 60%
- O2/N2 40%

CIVIL THERAPEUTIC CAISSONS


website: http//www.medsubhyp.com

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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PART II

CHAPTER 1

GERMANY

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INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-DEU-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone Phone: +49 - 4631 - 666 - 3231 Duty Officer Submarines
number, fax, PLA) E-Mail: DOSUBMHQ@Bundeswehr.Org at CINCGERFLEET
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Phone: +49 - 431 - 5409 - 1441 Naval Medical Institute
number, fax, PLA) alt. POC: DOSUB (MHQ)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Phone: +49 - 4631 - 666 - 3231 Duty Officer Submarines
number, fax, PLA) E-Mail: DOSUBMHQ@Bundeswehr.Org at CINCGERFLEET
SPAG
Contact Details (phone - not available -
number, fax, PLA)

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Military:
Identification "Pinguin B3" minehunting ROV carried onboard
Numbers 10 FGN minehunters
Location(s) Kiel, naval base class "MJ 332"
Maximum depth 300 m
Maximum current 2 - 3 kts
Air portable ---
Features foreward looking sonar, video-camera

Identification "Seefuchs" minehunting ROV carried onboard


Numbers 5+5 FGN minehunters class
Location(s) Kiel, naval base "MJ 333" and "352"
Maximum depth 300 m
Maximum current 2 - 3 kts
Air portable ---
Features foreward looking sonar, video-camera

Civilian:
Identification ROV Kiel 6000 carried onboard
Numbers 1 IFM-GEOMAR
Location(s) Kiel, Institute of marine sciences IFM-GEOMAR research vessel(s)

II-1-DEU-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Maximum depth 6000 m


Maximum current 2 kts
Air portable 4x 20 ft ISO container
Features forward looking sonar, laser-video-ranging
Submersibles, civilian: REMARKS
Identification JAGO (crew: 2 PX) carried onboard
Numbers 1 IFM-GEOMAR
Location(s) Kiel, Institute of marine sciences IFM-GEOMAR research vessel(s)
Maximum depth 400 m
Maximum current 1 kts
Air portable 1x 20 ft ISO container
Features vertical & horizontal sonar, UWT, digital video

Compression Chambers REMARKS

Portable
Identification Type HAUX-1300
Total amount 3
Location Eckernfoerde , Neustadt (AZS), Warnemuende
Max. capacity (Persons) 3+1
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---
Air portable 1x 20 ft ISO container each

Identification Type HAUX-1600


Total amount 3 SE
Location Eckernfoerde (WTD 71)
Max. capacity (Persons) 8+2
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---
Air portable 2x 20 ft ISO container each
Built into ships
Ships name / Class "Main" / submarine support ship class 404
Total amount of ships 1
Max. Capacity (Persons) 8+1 Type DRAEGER
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---
Maximum SOA 14 kts

Ships name / Class "Baltrum", "Juist", "Langeoog", "Fehmarn" navy tugs


Total amount of ships 4
Max. Capacity (Persons) 8+1
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---
Maximum SOA 13 kts

II-1-DEU-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ships name / Class "Bad Bevensen", "Bad Rappenau", "Datteln", minehunter class "MJ
"Dillingen", "Fulda", "Grömitz", "Homburg", 332"
"Rottweil", "Sulzbach-Rosenberg", "Weilheim"
Total amount of ships 10
Max. Capacity (Persons) 3+1 HAUX Spacestar 1300
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---
Maximum SOA 18 kts

Ashore Facilities Military


Identification HAUX HYDRA 2000
Location Kiel-Kronshagen at Naval Medical Institute
Max capacity (Persons) 8 + 2 // 3 + 1 (treatment)
Max. working pressure 11 ATA // 21 ATA (treatment)
Transfer under pressure Yes

Identification Type DRAEGER


Location Neustadt, Wilhelmshaven, Eckernfoerde
Max capacity (Persons) 8+1
Max. working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification HAUX
Location Island of Heligoland (North Sea)
Max. Capacity (Persons) 6+2
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---

Identification HAUX Starmed 2200


Location Hyperbaric Centre Bremen (Weser river)
Max. Capacity (Persons) 9
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure ---

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification Rostock - Laage (military / civilian)
Airport capability C-5-/ C-17-/ AN-124-compatible, K-loader
Seaport identification Rostock seaport, container terminal
Seaport capability deep-water port, container cranes, forklifts
Road distance in-between 35 km using highway "A 19" direct access to seaport
Road limitations no limits for container-trucks

II-1-DEU-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Airport identification Hamburg-Fuhlsbuettel (civilian)


Airport capability C-5-/ C-17-/ AN-124-compatible, K-loader
Seaport identification Hamburg seaport, container terminal
Seaport capability deep-water port, container cranes, forklifts
Road distance in-between 30 km through Hamburg on highway "A 7"
Road limitations no limits for container-trucks

Airport identification Nordholz (military)


Airport capability C-5-/ C-17-/ AN-124-compatible, K-loader
Seaport identification Cuxhaven "Cuxport", container terminal
Seaport capability deep-water port, container cranes, forklifts
Road distance in-between 15 km on "L 135" (standard road) and "A 27" direct access to seaport
Road limitations no limits for container-trucks

II-1-DEU-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

GREECE

II-1-GRC-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-GRC-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact


Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS
NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone NATIONAL AUTHORITY
number, fax, PLA) HELLENIC NAVY GENERAL STAFF
A Branch / Directorate A3
Stratopedo Papagou 229, Mesogeion Avenue
P.O.Box 15561
Athens
Phone : +30-210-6551111
Fax : +30-210-6551090
e-mail : gen_a3-iii@hellenicnavy.gr
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone SUBMARINE / HYPERBARIC MEDICAL
number, fax, PLA) SPECIALIST
HELLENIC NAVY GENERAL STAFF
Medical Department / 2nd Directorate, Sector II
Stratopedo Papagou 229, Mesogeion Avenue
P.O.Box 15561
Athens
Phone : +30-210-6551169
Fax : +30-210-6551579
e-mail : gen_dyg1@hellenicnavy.gr
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
number, fax, PLA) HELLENIC SUBMARINE COMMAND
Salamis Naval Base
Salamis – Greece
Phone : +30-210-4648759 / +30-210-4649500 /
6947159682 (mobile)
Fax : +30-210-4648768
e-mail : comhelsub@hellenicnavy.gr
SPAG
Contact Details (phone UNDERWATER DEMOLITION COMMAND
number, fax, PLA) UNIT
Leoforos Palaskas Skaramagas
P.O.Box. 10040
Athens
Phone : +30-210-5531803 / +30-210-5531815 /
6947159082 (mobile)
Fax : +30-210-5531836
e-mail : com_hel_udt@hellenicnavy.gr

II-1-GRC-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification A. PAP 104 MK I
B. PLUTO PLUS
C. AN/ SLQ 48(V)
Numbers A. 4
B. 4
C. 2
Location(s) A. ONBOARD MHC HUNT CLASS
B. ONBOARD MHC HUNT CLASS
C. ONBOARD MHC OSPREY CLASS
Maximum depth A. 100m
B. 300m
C. 600m
Maximum current 3kts
Air portable NO
Features Underwater inspection/ search

Compression Chambers REMARKS


- -
Portable
Identification - -
Total amount 4 -
Location Underwater Demolition Group, Skaramagas – -
Athens HN
Max. capacity (Persons) 2 -
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA -
Transfer under pressure Yes -
Air portable - -
Built into ships
Ships name / Class HS EVROPI, KALLISTO/ MHC HUNT CLASS Each ship has 1 ROV
Total amount of ships 2
Max. Capacity 2
(Persons)
Max. Working pressure 5.5 ATA
Transfer under pressure NO
Maximum SOA 13kts
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification Haux-hydra 2500 3 connected each other
Location Naval Hospital Athens Chamber
Max capacity (Persons) 24 + 9 + 4
Max. working pressure 6.5 ATA – 26 ATA – 26 ATA
Transfer under pressure No

II-1-GRC-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ashore Major Civilian


Facilities
Identification Haux Haux Haux
Location Athens Thessaloniki Kalimnos Island
Max. Capacity 9 9 9
(Persons)
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA 6 ATA 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure NO NO NO

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification
Airport capability
Seaport identification
Seaport capability
Road distance in-
between (km)
Road limitations

II-1-GRC-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-GRC-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

ISRAEL

II-1-ISR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-ISR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT
TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact


Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS
NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone Tel: +972 3 6064198
number, fax, PLA)
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Tel: +972 4 8693040
number, fax, PLA)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Tel: +972 4 8693124
number, fax, PLA) +972 57 8132592
SPAG
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification
Location
SRV (rescue capacity)
SRC (Rescue capacity)
Rescue depth
Transfer under pressure
Deep Diving capabilities
ROV Yes
ADS No
Ventilation No
SPAG capable No
Dedicated MOSHIP / No
VOO
VOO Specifications
needed

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification N/A

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification N/A

II-1-ISR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS
Identification SCORPIO 7
Numbers 1
Location(s) Haifa naval base
Maximum depth 600 mt
Maximum current
Air portable
Features

ADS REMARKS
IdentificatIon N/A

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification:
Numbers:
Location(s):
Specifications:
Dedicated Moship Yes
STANAG 1450 Yes
interfaces available

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: I.N.S. BAT-YAM and I.N.S. BAT GALIM Auxiliary ships type 745
(formally “BANT” and “
KALGRUND” owned by
the German BWB
Location(s): Haifa naval base
Rescue elements ROV
embarked
TUP Capability No
Diving capability Yes
Decompression Yes
Chamber capabilities
Helicopter capable No
Maximum Speed of 12 knots
Advance
4 points mooring/DP No
Other Specifications: LOA – 38.6 mt
LBP – 34.6 mt
Width – 9.2 mt
Deck Size: 16 mt x 9 mt
Max Displacement – 528.8
Tons
Speed – 12 Knots
Crew - 12 Persons

II-1-ISR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification PERRY
Total amount 2
Location Haifa Naval Base Transportable via truck or
ship
Max. capacity (Persons) 6
Max. Working pressure 13.3 Bar
Transfer under pressure No
Air portable Yes
Built into ships
Ships name / Class
Total amount of ships
Max. Capacity (Persons)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure
Maximum SOA
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification DREGER Total amount: 1
Location Haifa Naval Base Not transportable
Max capacity (Persons) 22
Max. working pressure 11 Bar
Transfer under pressure Yes Compatible with A-Div 1

Identification

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification Ben Gurion airport
Airport capability
Seaport identification Haifa seaport
Ashdod seaport
Seaport capability
Road distance in-between
(km)
Road limitations .

Additional Information REMARKS


Diving capabilities and
depth limits
Independent in air diving device (SCUBA) Max 40 mt
Independent in Nitrox diving device Max 44 mt

II-1-ISR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Diving with surface supply using air (k&m) Max 50 mt


A diving device 55-DC independent in a mixture of Max 40 mt
60% oxygen / 40% nitrogen
Trimix dive – a dive in a mixture of Max 90 mt
oxygen/nitrogen/helium
Open Bell – surface supply using air Max 50 mt
Open bell – surface supply using heliox Max 90 mt

II-1-ISR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 1

ITALY

II-1-ITA-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-ITA-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone MARISTAT MARISTAT
number, fax, PLA) +390636806000
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone +390187789193 Office
number, fax, PLA) +393487781291 Mobile
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone +390187789231 Office G.O.S. - COMSUBIN
number, fax, PLA) +393357253496 Mobile
Contact Details (phone +390187789081 Office SUBMARINE RESCUE
number, fax, PLA) +393357723871 Mobile CENTER C.O.
SPAG
Contact Details (phone +390187789082 Office IT SPAG C.O.
number, fax, PLA) +393358318391 Mobile

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification
Location LA SPEZIA Aboard ITS ANTEO
SRV (Rescue capacity) 300 metres – 12 survivors
SRC (Rescue capacity) 120 metres – 6 survivors
Rescue depth SRV 300 mt / SRC 120 mt
Transfer under pressure NO (SRV up to 5 bar -
no transfer connection
once aboard the MOSHIP)
Deep Diving 250 METRES (saturation dvr) ITS ANTEO
capabilities
ROV up to 300 mt ITS ANTEO/COMSUBIN
ADS up to 300 mt COMSUBIN
Ventilation Yes
SPAG capable Yes
Dedicated MOSHIP ITS ANTEO
/VOO
VOO Specifications
needed

II-1-ITA-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification SRV 300
Location ITS ANTEO Based in La Spezia
Tethered No
Manipulators Yes
Rescue capacity 12 survivors
Transfer under pressure Up to 5 bar No transfer interface
available aboard the
MOSHIP
Maximum Rescue depth 300 metres
Minimum Rescue depth 15 metres
Maximum sea state 3 (1,25 m)
Maximum current 2 knt
Endurance 12 hours
Mating angle (roll, 45°
pitch)
Main dimensions Length overall: 8.46 m (27’9’’)
(length, weight, height Width overall: 3.13 m (10’3’’)
etc.) Height without mating skirt: 3.17 m (10’5’’)
Height with mating skirt: 4.04 m (13’3’’)
Displacement: 27.5 tons

Air portable Yes AN124 Freighter

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification
Location ITS ANTEO Based in La Spezia
Rescue capacity 6 survivors per cycle
Maximum Rescue depth 120 metres
Minimum Rescue depth 15 metres
Maximum sea state 3 (1,25 m)
Maximum current 2 knt
Mating angle (roll, 15°
pitch)
Main dimensions Height: 4 m,
Diameter: 2,20 m,
Displacement: 9,5 tons
Air portable No

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification Falcon
Numbers 1 (one)
Location(s) LA SPEZIA
Maximum depth 300 meters

II-1-ITA-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Maximum current 2 knt


Air portable Yes 1 pallet standard Nato
HCU-6/E 108”x 88”
Features VEHICLE 75 KG
POWER SUPPLY 46 KG
SURFACE CONTROL UNIT 3 KG
HAND CONTROL 3 KG
MOTORPOWER SUPPLY 173 KG
UMBILICAL 60 KG

ADS REMARKS
Identification
Numbers 3 (three)
Location(s) LA SPEZIA
Maximum depth 300 metres
Maximum current 2 knt
Air portable: Yes 4 pallet standard Nato
HCU-6/E 108 in x 88 in
for 2 ADS
Features: SUPERIOR SIDE 150 KG
INFERIOR SIDE 110 KG
ARM 200 KG
THUSTER 100 KG
UCM 160 KG
COMPUTER 80 KG
POWER SUPPLY 100 KG
COMUNICATIONS 80 KG
SONAR 80 KG
VIDEO 80 KG
UMBILICAL 300 KG
TRANFORMER 50 KG
MOTORPOWER SUPPLY 800 KG
MAINTENANCE 300 KG
UNDERPINNING 80 KG

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification:
Numbers: 1
Location(s): LA SPEZIA Aboard ARS ANTEO
Specifications: INLET HOSE: 30 bar Ø 12 mm
OUTLET HOSE: 15 bar Ø 50 mm
Dedicated Moship Yes ARS ANTEO
STANAG 1450 No
interfaces available

II-1-ITA-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: ITS ANTEO
Location(s): LA SPEZIA
Rescue elements -SRV 300
embarked -SRC
-ADS with LARS
-Ventilation system
-ROV Falcon
TUP Capability No
Diving capability Yes Up to 300 metres
Decompression 1 x 12
Chamber capabilities 2x6+3
Helicopter capable Yes AB 212 – HotRef
Maximum Speed of 14 Knots
Advance
4 points mooring/DP 4 point mooring
(Class)
Other Specifications: 6t crane for subsea lift down to 600 m, 12 t crane for
subsea lift down to 15 m, multi beam sonar hull
mounted , Konsberg Simrad EH 1002

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification NA Standard Container (40 ft)
Total amount 6 (six)
Location 2 La Spezia, 1 Ancona, 1 Taranto, 1 Cagliari,
1 Augusta
Max. capacity (Persons) 12 + 2 each
Max. working pressure 5 bar
Transfer under pressure Yes Nato standard adaptor set
female coupling ref.
(ADivP-1(A)/MDivP-1(A)
Air portable Yes (40 ft) 27 t

Portable
Identification NA On open trailer
Total amount 6 (six)
Location 2 La Spezia, 1 Ancona, 1 Taranto, 1 Cagliari,
1 Augusta
Max. capacity (Persons) 2 + 2 each
Max. working pressure 5 bar
Transfer under pressure Yes Nato standard adaptor set
female coupling ref.
(ADivP-1(A)/MDivP-1(A)
Air portable Yes 2,6 t

II-1-ITA-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Built into ships


Ships name / Class Lerici MHC class (6 unit)
Gaeta MHC class (6 unit)
Max. Capacity (Persons) 4+2
Max. working pressure 5 bar
Transfer under pressure Yes Nato standard adaptor set
female coupling ref.
(ADivP-1(A)/MDivP-
1(A)
Maximum SOA 12 Knots Lerici class
15 Knots Gaeta class

Ships name / Class ANTEO/RS


Max. Capacity (Persons) 1 x 12
2x6+3
Max. working pressure 1 x 10 bar
2 x 30 bar
Transfer under pressure Yes Nato standard adaptor set
female coupling ref.
(ADivP-1(A)/MDivP-
1(A)
Maximum SOA 15 Knots

Ships name / Class ELETTRA/AUSILIARY


Max. Capacity (Persons) 8
Max. working pressure 8 bar
Transfer under pressure No
Maximum SOA 16 nots

Ships name / Class PEDRETTI


Max. Capacity (Persons) 4+2
Max. working pressure 5 bar
Transfer under pressure Yes Nato standard adaptor set
female coupling ref.
(ADivP-1(A)/MDivP-
1(A)
Maximum SOA 25 Knots

Ashore Facilities Military


Identification OTI Temporarily in
maintenance
Location COMSUBIN LE GRAZIE (SP)
Max capacity (Persons) 10
Max. working pressure 5 bar
Transfer under pressure NO

II-1-ITA-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ashore Major Civilian Facilities


Identification Data will be provided in due time
Location
Max. Capacity (Person)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification BRINDISI (Certified)
GENOVA (Cristoforo Colombo) Department of the Navy
NAPOLI (Capodichino) Protocol 4920 Ser
395A3T/413 DEC 18 2001
SMM N. 45/61175/T/2/1
14 LUG 2003
ALGHERO, ANCONA, AVIANO, BERGAMO, Minimum Runway Lenght
CAGLIARI, ROMA, GROSSETO, (2628 m) (8622 ft)
AMENDOLA, GIOIA DEL COLLE, WWW.LANDINGS.COM
DECIMOMANNU, NOVARA, CERVIA, A.ELLE CARGO Srl
UDINE, BRESCIA, TREVISO, GRAZZANISE,
MILANO, PALERMO, PISA, PIACENZA,
TORINO, TRIESTE, VENEZIA, VERONA
Airport capability
Seaport identification TARANTO (Certified)
GENOVA Department of the Navy
NAPOLI Protocol 4920 Ser
395A3T/413 DEC 18 2001
SMM N. 45/61175/T/2/1
14 LUG 2003
Seaport capability
Road distance in-between
(km)
Road limitations

II-1-ITA-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 1

NORWAY

II-1-NOR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-NOR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone Phone: +47 51343834/ 35
number, fax, PLA) Fax: +47 51343819
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Phone: +47 55502160
number, fax, PLA) Fax: +47 553792
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Phone: +47 55503376
number, fax, PLA) Fax: +47 553326
SPAG
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification NSRS 1/3 of the NSRS

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification 1/3 of the NSRS

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification
Total amount 3
Location HAAKONSVERN
Max. capacity (Persons) 4/2 Sitting/ lying
Max. Working pressure 6
Transfer under pressure
Air portable NO

Built into ships


Ships name / Class Oksøy Class
Total amount of ships 3
Max. Capacity (Persons) 4/2 Sitting/ lying

II-1-NOR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Max. Working pressure 6
Transfer under pressure
Maximum SOA
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification
Location Diving School Haakonsvern
Max capacity (Persons) 19 (O2) 39/15 Sitting/ lying
Max. working pressure 10
Transfer under pressure
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification NUI Contact Coordinator
Submarine Escape and
rescue for other facilities
Phone: +47 55503376
Location Bergen
Max. Capacity (Persons) 24/24 Sitting/ lying
Max. Working pressure 6
Transfer under pressure

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification NSRS Database
Airport capability
Seaport identification
Seaport capability
Road distance in-between
(km)
Road limitations

II-1-NOR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 1

NATO Submarine Rescue System

(NSRS)

II-1-NSRS-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-NSRS-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone CTF 311 Duty Controller
number, fax, PLA) +44 1923 846366
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone See FRA, NOR, GBR Sections
number, fax, PLA)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Lt Cdr Stewart LITTLE
number, fax, PLA) +44 7740 579083 Mobile/Cell
+44 11791 35111 Office
+44 1579 350395 Home
SPAG
Contact Details (phone See GBR Sections
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification NSRS
Location HM Naval Base Clyde, Faslane
SRV (rescue capacity) Up to 15 rescuees
SRC (Rescue capacity) -
Rescue depth 610 metres
Transfer under pressure Yes
Deep Diving capabilities
ROV Yes
ADS No
Ventilation No
SPAG capable Yes
Dedicated MOSHIP / No
VOO
VOO Specifications At least 400m2 deck space, 10 metre width at
needed transom, 5 te/m2 deck strength

II-1-NSRS-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS
Identification SRV
Location HM Naval Base Clyde, Faslane
Tethered No
Manipulators Yes
Rescue capacity Up to 15 rescuees
Transfer under Yes
pressure
Maximum Rescue 610 m
depth
Minimum Rescue 40 m
depth
Maximum sea state SS 6 (5 m SWH)
Maximum current 2.5 kts
Endurance Unlimited
Mating angle (roll, 60 degrees
pitch)
Main dimensions Length 10.3 m, Width 3.3 m, Height 3.8 m, Weight
(length, weight, height 29 te
etc.)
Air portable C-17, C-5, AN-124

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification NO

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification IROV
Numbers 1
Location(s) HM Naval Base Clyde, Faslane
Maximum depth 900 m
Maximum current 2.5 kts
Air portable Yes, C-130 and bigger
Features Survey, debris clearance, Radiological analysis,
ELSS Pod Posting

ADS REMARKS
IdentificatIon NO

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: NO

II-1-NSRS-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS
Identification: NO

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification TUP
Total amount 1 system
Location HM Naval Base Clyde, Faslane
Max. capacity (Persons) 72 (plus 30 additional in Deck Reception and
SRV)
Max. Working pressure 6 bar
Transfer under pressure 6 bar
Air portable Yes – C-17 and bigger
Built into ships
Ships name / Class NO
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification See FRA, NOR, GBR Sections
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification See FRA, NOR, GBR Sections

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification See FRA, NOR, GBR Sections

II-1-NSRS-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-NSRS-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 1

POLAND

II-1-POL-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-POL-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT
TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact


REQUEST of SMER ASSISTANCE REMARKS
NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone POC – PLN Duty SAR Officer
number, fax, PLA) phone number: +48 58 6263660
fax number: +48 58 6202056
mail: arsc@mw.mil.pl
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
PLN HQ SAR DEPARTMENT
Contact Details (phone Phone: +48 58 626 3363
number, fax, PLA) + 48 603 776 732
Fax: +48 58 626 3720
Email: witoldk@mw.mil.pl

ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST


Contact Details (phone Phones: +0048 58 6266886
number, fax, PLA) +00 48 58 626 36 60;, (OOD)
Fax: +0048 58 626 66772
Email: wof3fo@mw.min.pl

SPAG
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification No

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification No

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification No

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification ACHILLE / SAAB SEAEYE FALCON
Numbers 1/1

II-1-POL-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Location(s) On board ORP PIAST
Maximum depth 100 m./ 300m
Maximum current 1 kn/ 3kn
Air portable Yes / yes
Features 1 camera, 1 manipulator, 1 sonar/ camera 2,
manipulator 1, sonar 1
Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS
Identification BENTHOS MK 2/ SAAB SEAEYE FALCON
Numbers 1/1
Location(s) On board ORP LECH
Maximum depth 300 m / 300m
Maximum current 1 kn/3kn
Air portable Yes / yes
Features 1 camera, 1 manipulator, 1 sonar/ camera 2,
manipulator 1, sonar 1

ADS NO REMARKS

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: NO

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: ORP LECH, ORP PIAST
Location(s): GDYNIA
Rescue elements ROV, POD, Ventilation – 100m
embarked
TUP Capability no
Diving capability 90m
Decompression Yes 6 persons
Chamber capabilities
Helicopter capable no
Maximum Speed of 16.0 knots
Advance
4 points mooring/DP 4 points mooring
(Class)
Other Specifications: UT- 2000

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Yes 1
Portable
Identification Built into lorry
Total amount 1
Location GDYNIA POLAND
Max. capacity (Persons) 2

II-1-POL-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Max. Working pressure 10 MPa
Transfer under pressure Yes
Air portable No
Identification Containerized Chamber System
Total amount 2
Location GDYNIA POLAND
Max. capacity (Persons) 14
Max. Working pressure 10 MPa
Transfer under pressure YES
Air portable Yes
Built into ships
Yes 4
Ships name / Class ORP PIAST / ORP LECH/ 281 / 282
ORP ZBYSZKO / ORP MACKO R – 14 / R – 15
Total amount of ships 4 1/1/1/1
Max. Capacity 18 6/6/3/3
(Persons)
Max. Working pressure 10 MPa Any ship
Transfer under pressure No
Maximum SOA
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification Polish Naval Academy
Location Gdynia POLAND
Max capacity (Persons) 10
Max. working pressure 12 MPa
Transfer under pressure No
Identification Military Diving School Gdynia
Location Gdynia POLAND
Max capacity (Persons) 4
Max. working pressure 7 MPa
Transfer under pressure No
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification National Centre for Hyperbaric Medicine www.hiperbaria.gdynia.pl
Location Gdynia POLAND
Max. Capacity 8/10/12
(Persons)
Max. Working pressure 20 / 6 / 3 MPa
Transfer under pressure YES

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification EPOK, OKSYWIE TOWER – 128,500 kHZ,
phone number (048) (058) 6268032
ARP : 54034’46,67’’N ; 018031’01,77’’E
RUNWAY 13 / 31 ( 2500 m x 60 m )
concrete PCN 46 / R / B / W / T

II-1-POL-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Airport capability Airport can protect landing e. g. AN-124, C-


130. Capacity of crane – 6,3t
Capacity of forklift- 2t
Seaport identification Gdynia Port
http://www.port.gdynia.pl/a_index.php
Gdańsk Port
http://www.portgdansk.pl/en
Seaport capability
Road distance in- Oksywie – Gdynia – 10 km
between (km)

II-1-POL-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

PORTUGAL

II-1-PRT-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-PRT-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone COMANDO NAVAL (NAVAL COMMAND) PHONE +351 214 401 919
number, fax, PLA) PHONE +351 214 401 950
FAX +351 214 401 954

SUBOPAUTH (SUBMARINE SQD) PHONE +351 212 768 214


(DELEGATED FROM NAVAL COMMAND) FAX +351 212 768 228

To address formal signal:


TO RPFNB/COMNAV
INFO RPFOD/DRISUB
RPFNA/MAIORMAR
RPFM/HOSPITALMAR
RPFNB/MRCC LISBOA
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone HOSPITAL DE MARINHA (NAVAL HOSPITAL) PHONE +351 218 840 821
number, fax, PLA) FAX +351 218 840 802

SUBMARINE SQUADROM (NAVAL BASE) PHONE +351 212 768 233


FAX +351 212 768 228
SUBOPAUTH DUTY OFFICER PHONE +351 919 760 699
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA) Commander of Portuguese Submarine Force M1A23735@marinha.pt
SPAG
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA) No

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification No
Location
SRV (rescue capacity)
SRC (Rescue capacity)
Rescue depth
Transfer under pressure No

II-1-PRT-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Deep Diving capabilities Yes Divers team equipped with
semi-closed breathing
apparatus CARLETON
VIPER+, HELIOX
autonomous diving.
ROV Yes
ADS No
Ventilation Yes Submarine Squadron
equipped with one
BAUER
KOMPRESSOREN (High
Pressure Breathing Air
Compressor) from
UTILUS CAPITANO
MARINER and 70 air
lines of 10 mts each
interconnectable. All
necessary gear to assemble
to submarines is available.
SPAG capable No
Dedicated MOSHIP / No
VOO

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification No

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification No

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification Phantom S2, Deep Ocean Engineering
Numbers One equipment
Location(s) Navy Hydrographic Institute, Lisbon
Maximum depth 100 m
Maximum current 3 knots
Air portable Yes – total weight 720 kg to 970 kg (with generator)
Features Two command and control racks with: joy-stick,
video monitor, sonar display monitor, command and
control unit to acoustic positioning, giro, computer;
Umbilical cable with 100 m; Vehicle with two
vertical and two horizontal motors, rotating arm,
lights, colour video camera and high definition black
and with camera, varied sensors (pressure, turn
counter, fluxgate), high resolution circular sonar;
Acoustic positioning.

II-1-PRT-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
ADS REMARKS
Identification No

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: BAUER KOMPRESSOREN Associated with 70 air


lines/10 mts each
Numbers: One equipment
Location(s): Lisbon Naval Base
Specifications: All necessary gear available
Dedicated Moship No
STANAG 1450 Under evaluation
interfaces available

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: No

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Yes
Identification COMEX CX1500 Container:6.05x2.44x2.59
mts; Weight 9800Kgs
Total amount One
Location Lisbon Naval Base PHONE: +351 212 768 233
Max. capacity (Persons) 5 persons
Max. Working pressure 6 bar Details of gas mixture: Air
/ Oxygen / Nitrox
Transfer under pressure No
Air portable Yes Means of transport: Air,
truck, ship
Built into ships
Ships name / Class No

Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification HAUX STAMED 2200/10
Location Lisbon Naval Hospital
Max capacity (Persons) 12 persons
Max. working pressure 11 bar Details of gas mixture: Air
/ Oxygen / Nitrox
Transfer under pressure No
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification COMEX PRO CX 2000

II-1-PRT-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Location Lisbon Naval Hospital
Max capacity (Persons) 10 persons
Max. working pressure 6 bar Details of gas mixture: Air
/ Oxygen / Nitrox
Transfer under pressure No

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification Several studies being developed Under study the Airport
and Seaport combination
as follows: Lisbon
Internacional Airport /
Lisbon Seaport, Lisbon
Internacional Airport /
Setubal Seaport, Beja Air
Base / Oporto
Internacional Airport /
Leixoes Saeport, Madeira
Internacional Airport /
Funchal Seaport and Lajes
Airbase / Praia da Victoria
Seaport.
Airport capability Several studies being developed
Seaport identification Several studies being developed
Seaport capability Several studies being developed
Road distance in-between Several studies being developed
(km)
Road limitations Several studies being developed

II-1-PRT-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

SPAIN

II–1–ESP-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II–1–ESP-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone AJEMA/Spanish Navy Staff/ Submarine If necessary, more spanish
number, fax, PLA) Department +34 913725182 POC's can be found in
Duty Officer +34 913795187/913124177 ISMERLO web page
(National Contacts)
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Spanish Navy Diving Center (CBA), Estación
number, fax, PLA) Naval La Algameca 30209 (Cartagena). Phone
Number +34-968127170/fax 9687175
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone COMSUBMAR (SUBOPAUTH), Flotilla de
number, fax, PLA) Submarinos, Arsenal de Cartagena (Cartagena).
Phone Number +34 968127533
SPAG
Contact Details (phone Special Combat Divers
number, fax, PLA) Unit (UEBC) could be
-----
deployed if requested and
authorised.

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS


Identification ------

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification ------

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification ------

II–1–ESP-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification SCORPIO-03 (75HP)
Numbers 1
Location(s) On board SPS “NEPTUNO” (A-20)
Maximum depth 600 mts
Maximum current 2,5 knots
Air portable NO
Features Sonar SIMRAD-971, Pinger HPR-400
(Kongsberg), cameras: 2 colour/1 B/W, Flasher: 4,
Steel cable cutter (∅ 25 mm), net shears (∅15mm),
rope cutter (∅75 mm), ELSS POD posting grab

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification NAVAJO
Numbers 1
Location(s) On board SPS “NEPTUNO” (A-20)
Maximum depth 300 mts
Maximum current 1 knots
Air portable yes
Features Sonar Tritech Miniking, Cameras: 1 colour, 1 B/W, Used for inspections
flasher, weight: 55 Kg.

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification PLUTO PLUS
Numbers 7
Location(s) On board SPS MHC (“SEGURA” class)
Maximum depth 200 mts
Maximum current 4/2 knots
Air portable yes
Features Navigational Sonar Max. range 60mts,
identification sonar 8 mts, Cameras: 1 colour,
flasher, weight: 400 Kg.

ADS REMARKS
Identification ------

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS


Identification:
Numbers: 1
Location(s): O/B SPS “NEPTUNO” (A-20)
II–1–ESP-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS
Specifications: Max depth 200 mts
Dedicated Moship Yes (SPS “NEPTUNO”)
STANAG 1450 Yes
interfaces available

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: SPS “NEPTUNO” (A-20) Rescue support ship
Location(s): Estación Naval La Algameca 30209 (Cartagena)
Rescue elements ------
embarked
TUP Capability YES From diving chamber to
decompression chamber.
Diving capability Up to 90 mts
Decompression Chamber 2 (4 persons per chamber) One with NATO coupling
capabilities
Helicopter capable NO
Maximum Speed of 11
Advance
4 points mooring/DP YES (max bottom depth 150 mts)
(Class)
Other Specifications:

Compression Chambers REMARKS

Portable
Identification 01, 02, 03, 04, 05
Total amount 5
Location See Note 1 and 2.
Max. capacity (Persons) 3 to 4 + 1
Max. Working pressure 5 to 7,5 atm
Transfer under pressure YES
Air portable YES
Built into ships
Ships name / Class “SEGURA” class (MHC)
Total amount of ships 6
Max. Capacity (Persons) 3+1
Max. Working pressure 7,5 atm
Transfer under pressure YES
Maximum SOA 14.5 knots Homeport: Cartagena

Ships name / Class “HESPERIDES”


Total amount of ships 1
Max. Capacity (Persons) 3+1

II–1–ESP-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Compression Chambers REMARKS
Max. Working pressure 7,5 atm
Transfer under pressure YES
Maximum SOA 15 knots Homeport: Cartagena

Ships name / Class “NEPTUNO” (Escape and Rescue support ship)


Total amount of ships 1
Max. Capacity (Persons) 2/4 + 2
Max. Working pressure 20 atm/10 atm
Transfer under pressure YES
Maximum SOA 11 knots Homeport: Cartagena
Ashore Military Facilities
Identification See Note 2
Location Spanish Navy Diving Center (CBA), Estación
Naval La Algameca 30209 (Cartagena).
Max capacity (Persons) 6+2
Max. working pressure 10 atm
Transfer under pressure YES
Ashore Major Civilian Facilities
Identification See Note 2
Location
Max capacity (Persons)
Max. working pressure
Transfer under pressure

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification BARCELONA (LEBZ) 41º17’.8N/002º04’.7W
Airport capability Runway 3552 mts.
Seaport identification BARCELONA
Seaport capability
Road distance in- 18 Km
between (km)
Road limitations

Airport identification MURCIA/SAN JAVIER (LELC) 37º46’.5N/000º48’.7W


Airport capability RUNWAY 2300 mts
Seaport identification CARTAGENA
Seaport capability
Road distance in- 65 Km
between (km)
Road limitations

II–1–ESP-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification ROTA NAVAL BASE (LEFA/LERT) 36º38’.7N/006º20’.95W
Airport capability Runway 3690 mts.
Seaport identification ROTA NAVAL BASE
Seaport capability
Road distance in- 2 Km
between (km)
Road limitations

Airport identification STA CRUZ DE TENERIFE (GCXO) 28º29N/016º20’.5W


Airport capability Runway 3400 mts.
Seaport identification STA CRUZ DE TENERIFE
Seaport capability
Road distance in- 18 Km
between (km)
Road limitations

Airport identification SANTIAGO (LEST) 42º53’.8N/008º24’.9W


Airport capability Runway 3200 mts.
Seaport identification CORUÑA
Seaport capability
Road distance in- 70 Km
between (km)
Road limitations

Note 1. Portable chambers 01 to 05 are based in following places:

- 01 and 02: Cartagena, Spanish Navy Diving Center (CBA) Estación Naval La Algameca 30209
(Cartagena). Phone Number +34-968127170/fax 9687175;
- 03: Las Palmas, Diving Unit, C/ León y Castillo, 300. Arsenal Militar 35060 Las Palmas. Phone
number +34 928443129/fax 928443113;
- 04: Cádiz, Diving Unit, E.N. Puntales, 11011, Cádiz. Phone number: +34 956599390/fax
956599385;
- 05: Ferrol, Diving Unit, E.N. La Graña, Ferrol, (La Coruña), Phone Number: +34 981346206/fax.
981.336206

Note 2. More decompression chambers are available, but, in order to reduce this annex, information has
been focused on main chambers.
Spanish Navy Diving Center (CBA) personnel establish periodically contacts with civilian organisms for
updating a database with all military and civilian decompression chambers that could be used for
treatment of decompression diseases.

II–1–ESP-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II–1–ESP-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

SWEDEN

II-1-SWE-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-SWE-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

REQUEST of SMER ASSISTANCE REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone SWEDISH ARMED FORCES
number, fax, PLA) JOINT FORCES COMMAND
DUTY OFFICER
+46-8-7888111
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Ref ISMERLO homepage
number, fax, PLA)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Ref ISMERLO homepage
number, fax, PLA)
SPAG
Contact Details (phone N/A
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification Swe SRS


Location Karlskrona
SRV (rescue capacity) 35 rescuees
SRC (Rescue capacity) N/A
Rescue depth 450 m
Transfer under pressure 6 bar
Deep Diving capabilities Wetbell (60 m) Onboard HSwMS BELOS
ROV Yes Onboard HSwMS BELOS
and portable system on 20
ft container skid
ADS No
Ventilation No
SPAG capable No
Dedicated MOSHIP / HSwMS Belos
VOO
VOO Specifications For portable ROV system, space for 20 ft For towing URF: normal
needed container skid tug (see also datasheet on
ISMERLO homepage)

II-1-SWE-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification URF
Location Karlskrona
Tethered No
Manipulators No
Rescue capacity 35 rescuees
Transfer under 6 bar ATA
pressure
Maximum Rescue 450 m
depth
Minimum Rescue 20 m Depending on Sea-state
depth
Maximum sea state 4 (for launch and recovery with MOSHIP)
Maximum current 2,5 knots
Endurance 40 hrs as specified below: During towing to and from
Towing to site: 10 hrs site: external power
Search and operation phase: 10 hrs supply, no battery charging
Towing from site: 10 hrs
Safety margin: 10 hrs
Mating angle (roll, Maximum roll: 45 degrees
pitch) Maximum pitch 30 degrees
Main dimensions Length overall: 13.9 m
(length, weight, height Width overall: 3.2 m
etc.) Height without “mating“ skirt: 3.47 m
Draught (surfaced): 3.1 m
Height including “mating“ skirt: 4.06 m
Weight: 52000 kg in air

Air portable AN-124 and AN-225

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification N/A
Location
Rescue capacity
Maximum Rescue depth
Minimum Rescue depth
Maximum sea state
Maximum current
Mating angle (roll,
pitch)
Main dimensions
Air portable

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification ARGUS, Bathysaurus
Numbers 1
Location(s) HSwMS Belos (Karlskrona)

II-1-SWE-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Maximum depth 1000 m
Maximum current 3 knots Depending on depth and
conditions
Air portable No
Features 1 Schilling grabber Cutter, grinder, drill,
1 Schilling Orion 7 function manipulator suction/flushing pump

Identification ARGUS, Rover MK 2


Numbers 4 1 portable. Mounted on 20
ft container skid.
1 permanently installed
onboard HSwMS BELOS
Location(s) HSwMS Belos, Karlskrona and Stockholm
Maximum depth 1000 m
Maximum current 3 knots Depending on depth and
conditions
Air portable 1 portable Mounted on 20 ft container
skid.
Features 2 Hydrolek manipulators Grabber, cutter

ADS REMARKS
IdentificatIon N/A

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: N/A

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: HSwMS BELOS
Location(s): Karlskrona
Rescue elements SRV URF, ROV’s, Decompression system,
embarked adapter for UK SRS LR-5
TUP Capability 6 Bar ATA
Diving capability 60 m
Decompression 40 persons (in total incl med staff asf)
Chamber capabilities
Helicopter capable Sikorsky S 61 N Helipad: Ø = 22,2 m
Max rotor: Ø=18,90 m
Max weight: 9 300 kg
Maximum Speed of 12 knots
Advance
4 points mooring/DP DP class 2
Other Specifications: ROV capability: 1000m BELOS Class: DNV +1A1
Submarine search equipment: Tow fish sonar ICE-C SUPPLY VESSEL
Under water telephone: Slingsby 126 SF DSV-1E0
Cranes: 100 ton / 500 m wire DYNPOS-AUTR
10 ton / 150 m wire

II-1-SWE-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification MK-chambers
Total amount 4
Location Stockholm, Karlskrona, Eksjö, Boden
Max. capacity (Persons) 4
Max. Working pressure 6 ATA
Transfer under pressure Yes
Air portable Yes, installed in 20 ft containers
Built into ships
Ships name / Class HSwMS BELOS
Total amount of ships 1
Max. Capacity (Persons) 40
Max. Working pressure 35 ATA
Transfer under pressure Yes
Maximum SOA 12 knots
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification Royal Swedish Navy Compression Chambers
ashore are situated in Karlskrona.
Location Karlskrona,
Max capacity (Persons) Karlskrona: Lower DCC: 6 +3 persons 3 in lock
Upper DCC: 4 + 2 Persons 2 in lock
Max. working pressure Karlskrona: Lower DCC: 6 ATA
Upper DCC: 8 ATA
Transfer under pressure Yes
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification Karolinska universitetssjukhuset
Location Stockholm
Max. Capacity (Persons) Approx 20
Max. Working pressure 4 ATA
Transfer under pressure Yes With DUOCOM only

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification Kallax (LLA), Lulea
Airport capability AN-124
Seaport identification Lulea hamn
Seaport capability Maximum depth in meters: 12,0 m
Number of quays/length: 6 / 1 700 m.
Number of cranes/capacity: 4 / 18 - 40 tonnes
LoLo container crane capacity: - tonnes
RoRo facilities, depth: 9,0 m, length 120 m
Road distance in-between 3 km
(km)
Road limitations

II-1-SWE-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification Skavsta (NYO) Stockholm/Nykoping
Airport capability AN-124
Seaport identification Oxelosund
Seaport capability Maximum depth in meters: 16,5 m Mobile cranes with
Number of quays/length: 11 / 1 382 m capacity over 100 tonnes is
Number of cranes/capacity: 6 / 36 tonnes available in the area.
LoLo container crane capacity: 36 tonnes
RoRo facilities: 2 / 8 m depth

Road distance in-between 21 km


(km)
Road limitations

Airport identification Sturup (MMX), Malmoe


Airport capability AN-124
Seaport identification Malmoe ports
Seaport capability Maximum depth in meters: 13,5 m Mobile cranes with
Number of quays/length: >50 / 16,5 km capacity over 100 tonnes is
Number of cranes/capacity: 18 / 120 tonnes available in the area.
LoLo container crane capacity: 5 / 50 tonnes
RoRo facilities: >10 / 10 m depth

Road distance in-between 31 km


(km)
Road limitations

Airport identification Landvetter (GOT) Gothenburg


Airport capability AN-124
Seaport identification Ports of Gothenburg
Seaport capability Maximum depth in meters: 19,6 m Mobile cranes with
Number of quays/length: 60 / 10 km capacity over 100 tonnes is
Number of cranes/capacity: 10 / 6 – 72 tonnes available in the area.
LoLo container crane capacity: 40 - 70 tonnes
RoRo facilities, depth: 12 m, length 2,150 m

Road distance in-between 30 km


(km)
Road limitations

II-1-SWE-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-SWE-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

THE NETHERLANDS

II-1-NLD-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-NLD-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT
TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone KLTZT H.C. de Weerd tel: 0223652338 / HC.deWeerd@Mindef.nl
number, fax, PLA) 06-53378971
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone KLTZAR R.A. v Hulst tel: 0223653214 RA.v.Hulst@Mindef.nl
number, fax, PLA)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone LTZT 2OC J.J.M. Bogaert tel: 0223653709 / JJM.Bogaert.01@mindef.nl
number, fax, PLA) 06-44904969
SPAG
Contact Details (phone N/A
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification N/A

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification N/A

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification N/A

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification N/A

ADS REMARKS
IdentificatIon N/A

II-1-NLD-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: N/A

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: N/A

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification Decom Pack
Total amount 15
Location S&B Sewaco KBW Den Helder
Max. capacity (Persons) 4
Max. Working pressure 6 bar
Transfer under pressure NO
Air portable Yes
Built into ships
Ships name / Class Cerebus class diving vessel, Homeport: Den Helder
Total amount of ships 4
Max. Capacity (Persons) 4
Max. Working pressure 6 bar
Transfer under pressure No
Maximum SOA 1200
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification Medusa
Location Diving Technical Centre Den Helder
Max capacity (Persons) 8+4
Max. working pressure 10 bar Gas Mixture (O2 / Heliox)
Transfer under pressure No

Ashore Facilities Military


Identification
Location DDS Den Helder
Max capacity (Persons) 8
Max. working pressure 6 bar
Transfer under pressure No
Max. Working pressure 6 bar
Transfer under pressure NO

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification ------------

II-1-NLD-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 1

TURKEY

II-1-TUR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-TUR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone TU NAVY OPERATION CENTRE
For all requests for Turkish
number, fax, PLA) Tel: +90 312 403 2222 (Operation Officer) Navy assistance in a
Tel: +90 312 403 3093 (Watch Officer) submarine escape and
Fax: +90 312 417 3065 rescue scenario a signal
Signal Message Address: CINCTURNAV request should be sent to:
TU NAVY SUBMARINE OPERATING
AUTHORITY: CINCTURNAV
Tel: +90 262 414 6601 (Ext. 1507) (Operation
Officer) INFO
Tel: +90 262 414 6601 (Ext. 1515) (Watch COMTURSUBGROUP
Officer) COMSUBBLACK
Fax: +90 262 412 4901 COMTURRESGROUP
Signal Message Address: COMTURSUBGROUP
UNDERWATER AND SALVAGE COMMAND
Tel: +90 216 424 1480 (Ext. 5907 – 5903 - 5601) Phone requests should be
Fax: +90 216 424 1378 made to Turkish Navy
Signal Message Address: COMTURRESGROUP Operations Centre at +90
312 403 2222 to be
TURKISH NATIONAL HQ IN BLACK SEA followed by a signal as
(COMSUBBLACK) soon as possible. The
Tel: +90 262 413 5224 (Commercial) (Operation Operation Center will
Office) coordinate the TU
Tel: +90 262 414 6601 (Ext. 1547) response.
Fax: +90 262 413 5224
Signal Message Address: COMSUBBLACK
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Diving and Submarine Medical Officer, Submarine
number, fax, PLA) Fleet
Tel: +90 262 414 6601 (Ext. 1780 – 1764)
Fax: +90 262 412 4901
Signal Message Address: COMTURSUBGROUP

II-1-TUR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Diving Medical Officer, Underwater and Salvage
Command
Tel: +90 216 424 1480/81
Fax: +90 216 424 1378
Signal Message Address: COMTURRESGROUP
Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Physician,
GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital
Tel: +90 216 542 2020 (Ext. 2970)
Tel: +90 216 542 2738 – 2739
Fax: +90 216 542 2609
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone SUBMARINE SEARCH AND RESCUE
number, fax, PLA) COORDINATION BOARD

Tel: +90 262 414 6601 (Ext. 1770 - 1780)


Fax: +90 262 412 4901
Signal Message Address: COMTURSUBGROUP
UNDERWATER AND SALVAGE COMMAND

Tel: +90 216 424 1480 (Ext. 5907 – 5903)


Fax: +90 216 424 1378
Signal Message Address: COMTURRESGROUP

TURKISH NAVY SUBMARINE ESCAPE


TRAINING TANK

Tel: +90 (0) 262 414 6601(Ext. 1779) (Head of


SETT)
Tel: +90 (0) 262 414 6601 (Ext. 1780)
(Submarine Medical Officer)
Fax: +90 (0) 262 412 4901
Signal Message Address: COMTURSUBGROUP
SPAG

Contact Details (phone SEARCH AND RESCUE PARA TEAM


number, fax, PLA)
Tel: +90 216 424 1480 (Ext. 5907 – 5903)
Fax: +90 216 424 1378
Signal Message Address: COMTURRESGROUP

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS


Identification: Turkish Navy Rescue System
Location: Beykoz / ISTANBUL
SRV (Rescue Capacity): N/A
SRC (Rescue Capacity): 6
Rescue Depth: 183 m
Transfer Under Pressure: No

II-1-TUR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Deep Diving
Capabilities: HEO2
ROV: Yes
ADS: Yes
Ventilation: Yes
SPAG Capable: Yes
Dedicated
MOSHIP/VOO: No
VOO Specifications
Needed: -

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


No

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification: Mc-Cann Bell
Location: Beykoz / ISTANBUL (Onboard TCG AKIN) ASR Type Ship
Rescue Capacity: 6 persons
Maximum Rescue Depth: 183 m
Minimum Rescue Depth: -
Maximum Sea State: 5
Maximum Current: 2,5
Mating Angle (roll, pitch) 30
Main Dimensions: Radius : 7 feet Height : 11 feet 6 inches
Air Portable: No

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification: SEA LION
Numbers: 1
Location(s): Beykoz / ISTANBUL Onboard TCG KEMER
Maximum Depth: 1000 m
Maximum Current: 3
Air Portable: Yes

Features: Lift Bag Inflator


Manipulator
Water Jet-Pump
Cable Cutter and Rotator (20 mm wire rope)
Emergency Beacon
Navigation Tracking System
25 Kg Lift Capacity
Depth Sensor
Sector Scanning Sonar
Close up Zoom Color TV Camera
Silicon Intensified Target (SIT)
Low Light Camera
II-1-TUR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification: SEA STAR
Numbers: 1
Location(s): Beykoz / ISTANBUL Onboard TCG KEMER
Maximum Depth: 300 m
Maximum Current: 3
Air Portable : Yes
Features: Depth Sensor
Sector Scanning Sonar
Silicon Intensified Target (SIT)
Low Light Camera
Color TV Camera

ADS REMARKS
Identification: ADS-1200
Numbers: 1
Location(s): Beykoz / ISTANBUL
Maximum Depth: 365 m
Maximum Current: 3
Air Portable: Yes
Features: Depth Sensor
Sonar
Emergency Beacon
SIT, Pan and Tilt Coloured Camera
Integrated Positioning System

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS


Identification: Ventilation System
Numbers: 1
Location(s): Beykoz / ISTANBUL Onboard TCG AKIN
Specifications: Working Depth : 365 m
Dedicated Moship: No
STANAG 1450
interfaces available: No

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: TCG AKIN ASR Type Rescue Ship
Location(s): Beykoz / ISTANBUL
Rescue Elements
Embarked: Mc-Cann Bell
TUP Capability: No
Diving Capability: SCUBA - HEO2 up to 100 m

II-1-TUR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Decompression Chamber
Capabilities: 2 Double-lock Recompression Chambers
Helicopter Capable: No
Maximum Speed of
Advance: 12 kts
4 Points Mooring/DP 4 Points Mooring
(Class)
Other Specifications: Diving Medical Officer onboard (A designated
Medical Department),
Underwater work tools and salvage equipments
onboard.

Compression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification: Double-Lock Chamber
Total Amount: 3
Underwater and Salvage
Beykoz / ISTANBUL Command (2 of 3)
Location(s):
Marmaris / MUGLA
Max. Capacity (Persons): 2
Max. Working Pressure: 5,5 kg/cm²
Aksaz Naval Base
Transfer Under Pressure: Yes
Command (1 of 3)
Air Portable: Yes

Identification: One-Lock Chamber


Total Amount: 1
Location(s): Iskenderun / HATAY
Max. Capacity (Persons): 1 Iskenderun Naval Base
Max. Working Pressure: 5,5 kg/cm² Command
Transfer Under Pressure: Yes
Air Portable: Yes

Identification: One-Lock Chamber


Total Amount: 5
Location(s): Mayin Filosu Komutanligi Erdek / BALIKESIR All One-Lock
Recompression Chambers
Max. Capacity (Persons): 2 are located onboard Mine
Max. Working Pressure: 5,5 kg/cm² Hunting Ships.
Transfer Under Pressure: No
Air Portable: Yes

II-1-TUR-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Identification: Double-Lock Chamber All Double-Lock


Recompression Chambers
are located onboard AYDIN
CLASS Mine Hunting Ships.
Total Amount: 5
Location(s): Mayin Filosu Komutanligi Erdek / BALIKESIR
Max. Capacity (Persons): 2
Max. Working Pressure: 5 kg/cm²
Transfer Under Pressure: Yes
Air Portable: Yes

Built into Ships


Ship’s Name / Class: TCG AKIN (ASR)
Total Amount of Ships: 1
Max. Capacity (Persons): 2 RC 8 Each, Total 16
Max. Working Pressure: 6.8 kg/cm², 225 fsw
Transfer Under Pressure: No
Maximum SOA: 12 Kts.

Ship’s Name / Class: TCG AG-6 (ABU)


Total Amount of Ships: 1
Max. Capacity (Persons): 3
Max. Working Pressure: 6.8 kg/cm², 225 fsw
Transfer Under Pressure: No
Maximum SOA: 12 Kts.

Ship’s Name / Class: TCG ISIN (ARS)


Total Amount of Ships: 1
Max. Capacity (Persons): 8 Each, Total 16
Max. Working Pressure: 6.8 kg/cm², 225 fsw
Transfer Under Pressure: No
Maximum SOA: 12 Kts.

Ship’s Name / Class: TCG AG-5 (ABU)


Total Amount of Ships: 1
Max. Capacity (Persons): 2
Max. Working Pressure: 6.8 kg/cm², 225 fsw
Transfer Under Pressure: No
Maximum SOA: 11 Kts.

Ship’s Name / Class: TCG AKBAS (ATS)


Total Amount of Ships: 1
Max. Capacity (Persons): 3
Max. Working Pressure: 6.8 kg/cm², 225 fsw
Transfer Under Pressure: No
Maximum SOA: 12 Kts.

II-1-TUR-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification: Double-Lock Chamber
Location(s): Narlidere / IZMIR Southern Sea Area
Max. Capacity (Persons): 8 Command
Max. Working Pressure: 6.8 kg/cm², 225 fsw
Transfer Under Pressure: No

Identification: Double-Lock Aluminum Chamber (IGLOO)


Location(s): Beykoz / ISTANBUL
Underwater and Salvage
Max. Capacity (Persons): 8
Command
Max. Working Pressure: 10 kg/cm², 225 fsw
Transfer Under Pressure: No

Identification: Double-Lock Aluminum Chamber


Location(s): Akdeniz Bolge K.ligi, MERSIN
Mediterranean Sea Area
Max. Capacity (Persons): 8
Command
Max. Working Pressure: 6 kg/cm²
Transfer Under Pressure: No

Identification: Double-Lock Aluminum Chamber


Location(s): Golcuk / KOCAELI Submarine Training
Max. Capacity (Persons): 6 Center, Submarine Escape
Max. Working Pressure: 8 kg/cm² Training Tank
Transfer Under Pressure: No

Identification: Double-Lock Aluminum Chamber


Location(s): Golcuk / KOCAELI Submarine Training
Max. Capacity (Persons): 6 Center, Submarine Escape
Max. Working Pressure: 6 kg/cm² Training Tank
Transfer Under Pressure: No

Identification: Double-Lock Three-Doors HBO Treatment


Chamber GATA Haydarpasa
Location(s): Kadikoy / ISTANBUL Training Hospital,
Max. Capacity (Persons): 12 Undersea and Hyperbaric
Max. Working Pressure: 6 kg/cm² Medicine Clinic
Transfer Under Pressure: No

Ashore Major Civilian


Facilities
Identification: One-Lock Chamber
Location(s): Capa / ISTANBUL Hyperbaric Department,
Max. Capacity (Persons): 1 Faculty of Medicine,
Max. Working Pressure: 5 kg/cm² University of Istanbul
Transfer Under Pressure: No

II-1-TUR-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Significant Airport / Seaport Combinations REMARKS
Airport Identification: (1) ATATURK Airport (civilian) /
ISTANBUL
(2) SABIHA GOKCEN Airport (civilian) /
ISTANBUL
Airport Capability: C-17, C-130 J, A-400 M, ANTANOV
Seaport Identification: a. Haydarpasa Port / ISTANBUL
b. Derince Port / KOCAELI
Seaport Capability: Not available yet
Road Distance
in-between (km): 1-a: 40 km; 1-b:120 km; 2-a:30 km; 2-b:50 km
Road Limitations: Not available yet

Airport Identification:
(1) ADNAN MENDERES International
Airport / IZMIR
(2) Cigli Military Airfield / IZMIR

Airport Capability: (1) C-17, C-130 J, A-400 M, ANTANOV


(2) C-17, C-130 J, A-400 M
Seaport Identification: Izmir Port
Seaport Capability: Not available yet
Road Distance (1) 20 km
in-between (km): (2) 10 km
Road Limitations: Not available yet*

Airport Identification: DALAMAN Airport / MUGLA


Airport Capability: C-17, C-130 J, A-400 M, ANTANOV
Seaport Identification: Aksaz Naval Base
Seaport Capability: Not available yet
Road Distance 90 km
in-between (km):
Road Limitations: Not available yet

Airport Identification: (1) ADANA Airport/ADANA


(2) INCIRLIK Airbase/ADANA
Airport Capability: C-17, C-130 J, A-400 M, ANTANOV
Seaport Identification: Mersin Port
Seaport Capability: Not available yet
Road Distance 80 km
in-between (km):
Road Limitations: Not available yet

II-1-TUR-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 1

UNITED KINGDOM

II-1-GBR-1
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-GBR-2
ATP 57(B)
DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT
TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact


Request of SMER Assistance REMARKS
NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone CTF311
number, fax, PLA) Tel: 0044 (0)1923 846366; …846371; …846375
Fax: 0044 (0)1923 846392
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone Institute of Naval Medicine
number, fax, PLA) Tel: 0044 (0)2392 584255
Fax: 0044 (0)2392 504823
Mobile: 0044 (0)7831 151523 Duty Diving Medical
Officer
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone SUBIPT SMERAS
number, fax, PLA) Tel: 0044 (0)11791 33301; …33302; …33274
Fax: 0044 (0)11791 32950
Mobile: 0044 (0)7740 579082
SPAG
Contact Details (phone SPAG
number, fax, PLA) Tel: 0044 (0)2392 765108; …765777
Fax: 0044 (0)2392 765393
Mobile: 0044 (0)468 163595 (OCSETT)
Mobile: 0044 (0)468 163594 (DOCSETT)
24Hr Pager: 0044 (0)1426 245100; …245101

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification UKSRS
Location UKSRS HQ, Renfrew, Glasgow
SRV (rescue capacity) 16 Rescuees at 5 bar
SRC (Rescue capacity) n/a
Rescue depth 400m
Transfer under pressure Yes
Deep Diving capabilities
ROV Yes
ADS No
Ventilation No
SPAG capable Yes
Dedicated MOSHIP / No
VOO
VOO Specifications Generally 350 m2 for VOO’s with own handling
needed system, 450 m2 for VOO’s which require UKSRS
PHS. Min width for PHS 12m.

II-1-GBR-3
ATP 57(B)

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification SRV LR5
Location UKSRS HQ, Renfrew, Glasgow
Tethered No
Free swimming manned rescue submersible
Manipulators Yes
Pod-posting claw, TA9 multi function manipulator,
plus other cutters/guillotines/secateurs etc.
Rescue capacity 16 Rescuees at 5 Bar
Transfer under pressure Full transfer under pressure capability via Universal
Deck Reception Chamber (UDRC), One Man
Transfer Chambers (OMTC) and Type B
Recompression Chambers. Also TUP capability
onboard Belos via specific Deck Reception Chamber
(DRC).
Maximum Rescue depth 400m
Minimum Rescue depth 15m (dependant on sea conditions and current)
Maximum sea state Sea state 5
Maximum current 1.5 Knots (bottom current)
1 Knot (mating)
Endurance 6 – 10 hrs
Mating angle (roll, 60 degrees (bow up or bow down).
pitch)
Main dimensions Length – 9.3metres
(length, weight, height Width – 3.0metres
etc.) Height – 3.5metres
Weight – 22.5tonnes
Air portable Yes
C5, C17 or AN124 only

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification n/a n/a

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) REMARKS


Identification RN Scorpio (No. 45)
Numbers 1 in number
Location(s) UKSRS HQ, Renfrew, Glasgow
Maximum depth 1000m umbilical length
Maximum current 3 knots
Air portable Yes
C130, under slung from Chinook helicopter or
anything bigger

II-1-GBR-4
ATP 57(B)
Features Vehicle:
Length – 2.25m
Width – 1.75m
Height – 1.64m
Weight – 1.6tonnes
Container (tracking system) – weight 6 tonnes
Container (spares) – weight 4.5 tonnes
EFFER overboarding knuckle-boom crane
Sonars/Homers:
AMETEK 250A – 107 & 122 KHz
Homing 27KHz
TRITECH SEAKING 325 Hz & 675 Hz
Cameras:
1 x SIT pan/tilt
1 x SIT fixed
1 x colour pan/tilt
Fitted radiation monitor and UWT transducer 10KHz
& 27 Khz
Pod Posting Claw
TA9 Multi-function manipulator
35mm Hydraulic Cutter

ADS REMARKS
IdentificatIon N/A

Ventilation / Depressurisation System REMARKS

Identification: n/a

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: n/a

Compression Chambers REMARKS

Portable
Identification Type B First reaction stores at 6 Hrs Notice to Deploy
Total amount 6 x 10 person Length – 3.2m
Width – 2.0m
Height – 2.1m
Weight – 1565kg
Location 3 x 10 man – Northern Diving Group, Clyde
Submarine Base, Faslane, Dumbartonshire, Scotland.
3 x 10 man – Southern Diving Group, SDGHQ, HM
Naval Base, Plymouth, Devon.
Max. capacity 10 persons
(Persons)

II-1-GBR-5
ATP 57(B)
Max. Working 7 Bar
pressure
Transfer under Yes
pressure
Air portable Yes
Built into ships
Ships name / Class
Total amount of ships
Max. Capacity
(Persons)
Max. Working
pressure
Transfer under
pressure
Maximum SOA
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification Type A
Location 1 x 15 person – Southern Diving Group, HM Naval
Base, Plymouth, Devon, England
1 x 15 person – Northern Diving Group, Clyde
Submarine Base, Faslane, Scotland.
1 x 15 person – SDU 2, HMS EXCELLENT, Whale
Island, Portsmouth
Max capacity 15 Person
(Persons)
Max. working pressure 8 Bar
Transfer under Yes
pressure

Identification Type A
Location QinetiQ, Alverstoke, Gosport, England, Hants
Max capacity 15 on BIBS
(Persons)
Max. working pressure 35.5 Bar
Transfer under No
pressure

Identification Type A
Location QinetiQ, Alverstoke, Gosport, England, Hants
Max capacity 10 on BIBS
(Persons)
Max. working pressure 130 Bar
Transfer under No
pressure

II-1-GBR-6
ATP 57(B)
Ashore Facilities
Military
Identification Type A
Location Haslar Hospital, Alverstoke, Gosport, England, Hants
Max capacity 8
(Persons)
Max. working pressure 7.5 Bar
Transfer under No
pressure

Identification Type A
Location Queen Alexandra’s Hospital, Cosham, Portsmouth,
England, Hants
Max capacity 11
(Persons)
Max. working pressure 7 Bar
Transfer under No
pressure

Identification Type A
Location Submarine Escape Training Tank, Fort Blockhouse,
Gosport, England, Hants, PO12 2AB
Max capacity 10
(Persons)
Max. working pressure 7 Bar
Transfer under No
pressure

Identification Type A
Location Northern Diving Group, Clyde Submarine Base,
Faslane, Dumbartonshire, Scotland
Max capacity 10
(Persons)
Max. working pressure 7 Bar
Transfer under No
pressure

Ashore Major
Civilian Facilities
Identification
Location Aberdeen – National
Hyperbaric Centre
Max. Capacity
(Persons)
Max. Working
pressure
Transfer under
pressure

II-1-GBR-7
ATP 57(B)

REMARKS
Significant Airport / Seaport combinations
Airport identification Data to be supplied by
Stuart Little NSRS
Airport capability
Seaport identification
Seaport capability
Road distance in-
between (km)
Road limitations

II-1-GBR-8
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 1

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

II-1-USA-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-USA-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DETAILS OF NATIONAL FACILITIES ASHORE AND AFLOAT


TO SUPPORT SUBSAR OPERATION

National Points of Contact

REQUEST of SMER ASSISTANCE REMARKS


NATIONAL AUTHORITY
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
SUBMARINE/HYPERBARIC MEDICAL SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
ESCAPE AND RESCUE SPECIALIST
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)
SPAG
Contact Details (phone
number, fax, PLA)

Submarine Rescue System REMARKS

Identification Submarine Rescue Diving and Recompression


System (SRDRS)
Location San Diego, California
SRV (rescue capacity) 16
SRC (Rescue capacity) 6 (1600 lbs total)
Rescue depth SRV - 2000 FSW/SRC – 850 FSW
Transfer under pressure No SRS-TUP configuration is
currently under
development and IOC is
expected FY12.
Deep Diving capabilities Yes Maximum rescue depth is
2000 ft.
ROV No
ADS Intervention Yes 2000 FSW capability
System
Ventilation No
SPAG capable No
Dedicated MOSHIP / No
VOO
VOO Specifications • Minimum deck point loading capacity of 1,025
needed pounds per square foot (5.0 tonnes per square
meter).
• Minimum deck load capacity of 500,000 lbs (227
tonnes).
• Bulkhead with minimum scantlings of 7/16” (11.1
II-1-USA-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
mm) thickness and 6”x4”x0.375” (152.4mm x
101.6mm x 9.525mm) vertical angle stiffeners.
Center to center spacing shall be no more than 24”
(609.6mm) or structural equivalent. The bulkhead
shall be at a distance of between 3 to 4 ft forward of
the transom.
Deck deflection must be greater than 6” in the
vicinity of the SRS installation.
• Structural bulkhead with minimum scantlings of
7/16” (11.1 mm) thickness and 6” × 4” × 0.375”
(152.4 mm × 101.6 mm × 9.525 mm) vertical angle
stiffeners center to center spacing shall be no more
than 24” (609.6 mm), or structural equivalent. The
bulkhead shall be at a distance of between 20 to 31
ft (6.7 to 9.5 meters) forward of the transom.
• Capable of entering and maintaining a 4-point
moor, or be equipped with a dynamic positioning
system with an ABS classification of DPS-2 or
IACS equivalent.
• Allow for system operations in sea conditions up to
and including Sea State 4, for recovery of the PRM
in sea conditions up to and including Sea State 4,
and for system survivability in sea conditions up to
and including Sea State 6.
• Capable of deploying the SRDRS from the ship’s
stern and should have a maximum freeboard
(distance from the waterline to the main deck) of 10
feet.
Clear deck area of 98 feet (29.9 meters) in length
and 34 feet (10.4 meters) in width in SRS
configuration. Area of 88 feet (26.8 meters) in
length and 33 feet (10.1 meters) in width in the SRS-
RCS configuration.

Submarine Rescue Vehicle (SRV) REMARKS


Identification Pressurized Rescue Module (PRM)
Location DSU, San Diego, CA
Tethered Yes
Manipulators No
Rescue capacity 16 rescuees—including stretcher-bound rescuees Two (2) attendants
Transfer under pressure No SRS-TUP configuration is
currently under
development and IOC is
expected FY12.
Maximum Rescue depth 2000 FSW
Minimum Rescue depth Shallow water operations are limited by See the Safe Mating
environmental conditions. Envelopes (SMEs)
Maximum sea state The SRS-RCS elements, when installed on the VOO The SRS-RCS elements
with the system populated with rescuees, attendants when installed on the deck
and operators, is capable of operations in, up to and of the VOO are capable of
II-1-USA-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
including Sea State 4 for the following operational surviving Sea State 6 when
mission states: the LARS is inboard and
• PRM launch and descent the PRM is secured and
• PRM submerged transit unoccupied with all
• Locate DISSUB hatches closed during the
• Dock and mate PRM/ DISSUB following operational
• Evaluate DISSUB conditions mission states:
• Transfer of personnel—submerged • VOO transit
• Demate and undock PRM/ DISSUB • Localization at DISSUB
• PRM ascent and recovery • VOO return to port.
• Dock and mate PRM/ DTL
• Transfer of personnel—surface
• Resupply—surface.
Maximum current 0-853 fsw - 2.5 knots
854-1509 fsw - 2.3 knots
1510-2000 fsw - 2 knot
Endurance N/A: tethered system
Mating angle (roll, 45° list and 45° trim
pitch)
Main dimensions Transport dimensions: 25’ x 8’ x 8’
(length, height, weight Operational dimensions with skirt: 25’x 8’x 14.5’
etc.)
Air portable Yes

Submarine Rescue Chamber (SRC) REMARKS


Identification 8 & 21
Location DSU, San Diego, CA
Rescue capacity 6 (1600 lbs total)
Maximum Rescue depth 850 fsw
Minimum Rescue depth 0 fsw
Maximum sea state 2-3 (depending upon wind and moor status) Safe
lifting practices apply and could reduce operational
capability. Main concern is for the motion on
overhead lift and recovery.
Maximum current 2.8 kt steady on the bottom
Mating angle (roll, 30° list and 30° trim
pitch)
Main dimensions 12 ft h – 7 ft d – 21,000 lbs
Air portable Yes

Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) – None REMARKS

ADS REMARKS
Identification Hard Suit 2000
Numbers 1-4
Location(s) DSU San Diego, CA
Maximum depth 2000 FSW LARS mode/950 FSW Hand Tended mode

II-1-USA-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Maximum current 0-853 FSW 2 knots
853-1509 FSW 1.2 knots
1509-2000 FSW 1 knot
Air portable: Yes
Features: Sonar, constant speed variable pitch 2 ¼ horse power
thrusters, lights, digital camera

Ventilation / Depressurisation System – None REMARKS

Diving and Submarine Rescue Support Ship / Dedicated MOSHIP REMARKS


Identification: None identified.

Recompression Chambers REMARKS


Portable
Identification
Total amount
Location
Max. capacity (Persons)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure
Air portable
Built into ships
Ships name / Class
Total amount of ships
Max. Capacity (Persons)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure
Maximum SOA
Ashore Facilities Military
Identification
Location
Max capacity (Persons)
Max. working pressure
Transfer under pressure
Ashore Major Civilian
Facilities
Identification
Location
Max. Capacity (Persons)
Max. Working pressure
Transfer under pressure

II-1-USA-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Significant Airport / Seaport combinations REMARKS


Airport identification
Airport capability
Seaport identification
Seaport capability
Road distance in-between
(km)
Road limitations

II-1-USA-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-1-USA-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS

Drawings to be inserted here as applicable


They will have to be provided in JPEG (preferred) or BPMAT format.

Drawings (Side view, Top view, etc.) will display submarine’s SMER equipment/devices location/salvage
points, towing attachment points including “rip-out” towing bridal (if equipped) and contain related
dimensions (heights, distances, length, width etc.) of the submarine hull and fin/sail.

Special attention should be given to distances/dimensions between any obstructions and rescue seats.

GENERAL TEMPLATE

II-2-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class:
Number of Compartments:
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment:
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with
connection to Rescue / Escape
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: Yes/no
Two man escape trunk: Yes/no
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes/no
Escape Suites: Yes/no (mention type and available
number aboard)
Maximum number of crew:
Number of Rescue Seats
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes/no
SRC capable: Yes/no
POD Capable / possible limitations:
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes/no
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurisation Yes/No
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes/No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes/No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments:
Type:
Frequency Transmitting:
Automatic Emergency Mode:
Emergency UWT
Compartments:
Type:
Frequency Transmitting:
Automatic Emergency Mode:

II-2-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment:
Remotely operated: Yes/no
Frequency:
Type:
Endurance:
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable:
Frequency:
Endurance:
Indicator light: Yes/no
Combined life raft/indicator buoy Yes/no
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency:
Compartment:
Endurance:
SEEPIRB
Compartments:
Type:
Endurance:
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments:
Frequency:
Type:
Endurance:
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment:
Type:
Colors:
Endurance:
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments:
Mini POD Capable: Yes/no

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:

II-2-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Number of National Units CO2


scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type:
Gases:
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type:
Gases:
Endurance:
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure:

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T):
Overall Length (m):
Max surfaced Drafts (m):
Beam (m):
Max Casing Height (m):
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft:

Rip Out Tow Yes/No


Length of Wire (m):
Max Load (T):
Fin Capability
Length (m):
Width (m):
Height above Casing (m):
Location from Fwd Perpendicular
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T):

II-2-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular
(m):
Number of Bollards:
Height of raised Bollard above
Casing (mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T):

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm):
Location:
Max Loading (T):

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm):
Length of Cable (m):
Max Loading (T):

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans:
Number of Bullrings:

II-2-6 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 2

AUSTRALIA

II-2-AUS-1 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-AUS-2 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

3.2M

II-2-AUS-3 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

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II-2-AUS-4 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Collins
Number of Compartments: 2
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: Tunnel 3100 litres
Escape tower 800 litres
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 33.6 million litres
connection to Rescue / Escape 27 – 29 Mpa
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: Yes
Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes Fwd only
Escape Suites: Yes (67 SEIE Mk 10 Modern)
Maximum number of crew: 55
Number of Rescue Seats 1
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: No
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Yes
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization No
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Yes
Compartments: FWD
Type: SCYLLA
Frequency Transmitting: 8.0875
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Yes
Compartments: FWD / AFT
Type: Slingsby A046
Frequency Transmitting: 10, 25, 37.5, 43, 45 KHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No

II-2-AUS-5 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Yes
Compartment: Fwd / Aft
Remotely operated: Yes
Frequency: 9.25± 0.5 KHz / 37± 0.5 KHz
Type: LYNDA U2
Endurance: 10 Days
Indicator buoy tethered
NIL
Length of cable:
Frequency:
Endurance:
Indicator light:
Combined life raft/indicator buoy
SEEPIRB
SERB Mk 2
Frequency: 121.5, 243.0, 406.025 MHz
Compartment: 8 x Fwd, 8x Aft
Endurance: 48 Hrs Min
Expendable Communication Buoy
NIL
Compartments:
Type:
Endurance:
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: 4x Fwd, 4x Aft
Frequency: 121.5, 243.0 MHz
Type: Fastfind Plus
Endurance: 24 Hrs Min
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fwd, Aft
Type: FSS Mk N3 Mod 2,
WS Mk N6 Mod 3
Colors: Red, White Smoke
Endurance:
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Fwd, Aft
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 216 hours


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal

II-2-AUS-6 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 440 units FWD
scrubbing material referred in kg: 440 units AFT
Based on stores held onboard each S/M
Number of National Units O2 112 units FWD 3000 Litres per SCOG
bottles/candles referred in liters: 112 units AFT
Based on stores held onboard each S/M

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Gas Tech
Gases: CO, CO2, HCN, HCL, O2, CL, NO,
HF, CG, Otto Fuel
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Draeger
Gases: CO, CO2, HCN, HCL, O2, CL, NO, Escape – O2, CO2
HF, CG 9 days
Endurance: 9 days
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 33.6 million litres
27 - 29 Mpa

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 2500
Overall Length (m): 78 m
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 8 metres
Beam (m): 7.8 metres
Max Casing Height (m): 1.5 metres
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: Yes

Rip Out Tow No


Length of Wire (m): N/A for CCSM
Max Load (T): N/A
Fin Capability N/A
Length (m): At Casing: 14.64m
At Top: 11.87m
Width (m): At Casing: 2.75m
At Top: 4.66m
Height above Casing (m): 5.64m

II-2-AUS-7 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): 21.85m
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load Not recommended for Towing
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load (T): Not recommended for Towing

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): Stbd: 15.04m to the Fwd of pair Stbd: 47.94m to fwd of pair
Port: 12.95m to centre bollard of 3 Port: 47.94m to centre bollard
of 3
Number of Bollards: Stbd: 1 group of 2 bollards Stbd: 1 group of 2 bollards
Port: 1 group of 3 bollards Port: 1 group of 3 bollards
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 270mm
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability (T): 20T(200KN)
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 20T(200KN)

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 320mm x 109mm 120mm x 40mm
Location: 4.1m from Fwd Perpendicular 55.26 from Fwd Perpendicular
Max Loading (T):

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 20mm
Length of Cable (m): 228m (+/- 2m)
Max Loading (T): 30T (295.3KN)

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1
Number of Bullrings: 1 1

II-2-AUS-8 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 2

BULGARIA

II-2-BGR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-BGR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

II-2-BGR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-BGR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: ROMEO
Number of Compartments: 7
Volume Rescue Compartment: 3 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles inside No
rescue compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suites: Yes
Maximum number of crew: 60
Number of Rescue Seats 1 Non fitted with NATO Common
(STANAG 1297): Rescue Seat (1600x1420 mm)
Seat Certification: No
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: No
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks POD Trunk (650x1130 mm)
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization Yes
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT Yes
Compartments: 1
Type: -
Frequency Transmitting: 14,7 kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT No

Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise Pinger No

Indicator buoy tethered Yes


Length of cable: 345 m
Frequency: -
Endurance: -
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
No

II-2-BGR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
SEEPIRB
No

Personal Locator Beacon


No

Pyrotechnics (Flares) Yes


Compartment: 3
Type: -
Colors: Green, Red
Endurance: -
Submarine Signal Ejector Yes
Compartments: 3
Mini POD Capable: Yes

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 190 hrs


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 -
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 -
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring Yes
Type: -
Gases: H2, CO2, O2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring No
Type: -
Gases: -
Endurance: -
Fixed Emergency Breathing System No
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: -

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1333 t
Overall Length (m): 76,60 m

II-2-BGR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5,40 m
Beam (m): 6,70 m
Max Casing Height (m): 6,70 m
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: -

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 50 m
Max Load (T): -
Fin Capability
Length (m): -
Width (m): -
Height above Casing (m): -
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 7m
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load -
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load -
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 3m 65 m
(m):
Number of Bollards: 4 4
Height of raised Bollard above 0,3 m 0,3 m
Casing (mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability - -
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): - -

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 150 mm -
Location: - -
Max Loading (T): - -

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 28 mm
Length of Cable (m): 175 m
Max Loading (T): -

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 -
Number of Bullrings: - -

II-2-BGR-7 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-BGR-8 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 2

CANADA

II-2-CAN-1 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-CAN-2 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

II-2-CAN-3 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-CAN-4 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA
DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: VICTORIA Former UPHOLDER (UK)
Number of Compartments: Two
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: Fwd: 361939L Aft: 767088L
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with Fwd Aft
connection to Rescue / Escape 3 bottles @ .258cu m 3 bottles @ .258cu m
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: Yes
Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): No
Escape Suits: Yes
Maximum number of crew: Fifty-five
Number of Rescue Seats Two
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes USN certified for DSRV/SRC.
Compatibility with LR5/NSRS
is assumed.
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes, receive only. Certified for POD posting to
180 metres due to Escape
Tower Hatch limitations.
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 660.4 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurisation No Project underway to establish
capabilities (STANAG 1450) DP&V capability and fittings
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Control Room / Sonar Cabinet
Space
Type: 2008NG
Frequency Transmitting: 8.0875Khz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Weapon Stowage Compartment /
Motor Room
Type: 2073

II-2-CAN-5 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
Frequency Transmitting: 43Khz / 27Khz / 10Khz
Automatic Emergency Mode: Pinger only
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Weapon Stowage Compartment /
Motor Room
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: 10Khz / 43Khz
Type: 2073
Endurance: 5hrs HF Ping / 7 Days LF Ping
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 1000M
Frequency: 406.025Mhz / 243Mhz
Endurance: 72 Hrs
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: 168Mhz – 310 Mhz Alert Mode 243Mhz
Compartment: Weapon Stowage Ccompartment /
Motor Room
Endurance: 1-240Min set time
SEEPIRB
Compartments: Weapon Stowage Ccompartment /
Motor Room
Type: Type 1
Endurance: 48 Hrs
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: Weapon Stowage Ccompartment /
Motor Room (3 each)
Frequency: 121.5Mhz & 243 Mhz
Type: TR 125
Endurance: 24 Hrs @ 20NM
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Weapon Stowage Ccompartment /
Motor Room
Type: ADI / MK121
Colors: Red Flare / White Smoke
Endurance: 15-45 Sec / 55 Sec
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Weapon Stowage Ccompartment /
Motor Room
Mini POD Capable: No

II-2-CAN-6 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)
REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal 168 Hrs
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 125 LiOH Curtains / 7 days
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 130 Candles / 1900 L each
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Nil
Gases: Nil
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Analox II / Draeger
Gases: O2,CO2 / CL2,H2/CO
Endurance:
Fwd Escape After Escape
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: EBS,3 bottle @ .258cu m, 7 Bar EBS,3 bottle @ .258cu m, 7 Bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 2168
Overall Length (m): 70.3
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5.5
Beam (m): 7.6
Max Casing Height from water line
(m):
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 7.0/7.2

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 110
Max Load (T): 88.5
Fin Capability Towing from the fin not
recommended
Length (m): 11.4
Width (m): 2.0
Height above Casing (m): 5.85

II-2-CAN-7 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): N/A
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load N/A
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load (T): N/A

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): N/A N/A
Number of Bollards: 3 3
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 203 203
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability (T): 20 20
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 20 20

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): N/A nil
Location: Each end of towing Hawser
Max Loading (T): N/A

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 25.4
Length of Cable (m): 165 6 Shackles X 27.5 M
Max Loading (T): 28.3

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1
Number of Bullrings: 1 1

II-2-CAN-8 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 2

FRANCE

II-2-FRA-1 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-FRA-2 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

LE TRIOMPHANT CLASS (SSBN)

Escape panel (aft) Escape tower Escape panel (forward)


Emergency buoy
HP air connector

17.00 12.60

32.75
73.80
80.98
111.75

21.30

138.00

II-2-FRA-3 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-FRA-4 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Triomphant
Number of Compartments: 3
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: 1800 m3 (forward) 2080 m3 (aft)
2900 (mid)
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 38 m3 / 250 bar (max.)
connection to Rescue / Escape
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: Yes
Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): No
Escape Suites: Yes, Mk 10 (130)
Maximum number of crew: 111
Number of Rescue Seats 1
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: No (UFN)
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 600 mm φ
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurisation No (UFN)
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Aft
Type: TUUM 4A
Frequency Transmitting: 8,8 kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Aft and forward
Type: TUUM 5
Frequency Transmitting: 8,8 kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise Pinger
Compartment: Forward
Remotely operated: Yes/no
Frequency: 8,8 and 35 kHz
II-2-FRA-5 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Type: ESUG 2A
Endurance: 90 days
NO
Indicator buoy tethered

Expendable Communication Buoy


Frequency: 143 and 406 MHz
Compartment: Forward
Endurance: 30 days
NO
SEEPIRB

NO
Personal Locator Beacon

Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Forward
Type:
Colors: Red, green, white
Endurance:
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments:
Mini POD Capable:

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


DATA REMARKS
Survivability of a standard crew, in 168 hours
hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 4000
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 1,000,000
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Permanent
Gases: O2, CO2, CO, CFC, H2, Cl2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Dräger tubes
Gases: O2, CO2, CO, Cl2, H2S…

II-2-FRA-6 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Endurance:
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Both compartments, 38 m3 max,
250 bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 12680
Overall Length (m): 138
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 10,65
Beam (m): 12,60
Max Casing Height (m): 13,65
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 0°
Rip Out Tow NO

Fin Capability NO

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m):
Number of Bollards: 8 8
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 400 400
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability (T): 40 40
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 40 40
Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Size of Eye (mm): 1 retractable roller fairlead Removed before departure
Location: 10 m from forward perpendicular
Max Loading (T):
Anchor Facility and location NO

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1
Number of Bullrings:

II-2-FRA-7 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-FRA-8 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

RUBIS CLASS

Escape tower Emergency buoy Escape tower (forward)


Ventilation (plug) Ventilation (plug)

10.00 7.60

14.15

73.10

II-2-FRA-9 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-FRA-10 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: RUBIS
Number of Compartments: 3
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: 850 m3 (forward) 400 m3 (aft)
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 9750 l max at 250 bar
connection to Rescue / Escape
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: Yes
Two man escape trunk: no
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): no
Escape Suites: MK 10 (92)
Maximum number of crew: 75
Number of Rescue Seats 2
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: No
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: No
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 600 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurisation Yes
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Forward
Type: TUUM 3A
Frequency Transmitting: 8,8 kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Aft and forward
Type: TUUM 5
Frequency Transmitting: 8,8 and 35 kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise Pinger
Compartment: Aft
Remotely operated: Yes/no
Frequency: 8,8
Type: ESUG 2A
II-2-FRA-11 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Endurance: 60 days
NO
Indicator buoy tethered

Expendable Communication Buoy


Frequency: 243 MHz
Compartment: Forward
Endurance: 76 hrs
NO
SEEPIRB

NO
Personal Locator Beacon

Yes
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Forward
Type:
Colors: Red, white, green
Endurance:
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Forward
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


DATA REMARKS
Survivability of a standard crew, in 168 forward (68 men)
hours, per compartment, based on the 312 hrs aft (7 men)
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 1740
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 282 000
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Permanent
Gases: O2, CO2, CO, HFC, H2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Dräger tubes
Gases: O2, CO2, CO, Cl2, H2S,…
Endurance:

II-2-FRA-12 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Aft and forward, 9750 l / 250 bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 2415
Overall Length (m): 73,60
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 6,80
Beam (m): 7,60
Max Casing Height (m): 8,25
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 0
Rip Out Tow Yes
Length of Wire (m): 120
Max Load (T): 50
Fin Capability NO

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


NO
Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Size of Eye (mm):
Location:
Max Loading (T):
Anchor Facility and location
Size of cable (mm): 27 mm
Length of Cable (m): 145
Max Loading (T): 25
Other Information Fwd Aft
Number of Capstans: 1
Number of Bullrings:

II-2-FRA-13 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-FRA-14 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

GERMANY

II-2-DEU-1 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-DEU-2 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

SUBMARINE CLASS : U 206 A ("U-15" - "U-18", "U-22" - "U-24")

II-2-DEU-3 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-DEU-4 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

SUBMARINE CLASS : U 212 A ("U-31" - "U-34")

II-2-DEU-5 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-DEU-6 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA
Submarine Class: U 206 A U 212 A
Number of Compartments: 1 1
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes Yes
Escape Suites: 30 SPES Mk 3 41 SPES Mk 3
Maximum number of crew: 28 34

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT
Main UWT U 206 A U 212 A
Type: ELAC DSQC - 11B ELAC DSQC - 12
Frequency Transmitting: 8,0875 kHz (carrier) 1 kHz - 60 kHz
8,8 kHz (CW-morse) 8,0875 kHz pre-selected)
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 180 m 600 m
Frequency: 406,025 MHz & 121,500 MHz 406,025 MHz & 121,500 MHz
Endurance: > 48 hrs > 48 hrs
Indicator light: Yes Yes
Combined life raft / indicator buoy Yes Yes
EPIRB
Number on board: 1 x inside liferaft / 1 x inside boat 1 x inside liferaft / 1 x inside boat
Type: ACR GlobalFix 406 ACR GlobalFix 406
Endurance: > 48 hrs > 48 hrs
Personal Locator Beacon
Number on board: 30 41
Frequency: 121,5 / 243,0 / 406,025 MHz 121,5 / 243,0 / 406,025 MHz
Type: Becker SAR MR 509 Becker SAR MR 509
Endurance: > 24 hrs > 24 hrs
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Number on board: 3/3 3/3
Type: DM403A2 / DM13A2 DM403A2 / DM13A2
Colors: red smoke / red flare red smoke / red flare
Endurance: 4 min. / 7 sec. 4 min. / 7 sec.
Submarine Signal Ejector
Number on board: 1 1
Dimensions: 100 x 560 mm 100 (76) x 1050 mm

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT
Atmosphere Regeneration U 206 A U 212 A
CO2 scrubbing material referred in kg: 450 x 4 kg LiOH 765 x 4 kg LiOH
O2 bottles referred in liters: 9 x 50 ltr./ 200 bar O2-supply by O2-tanks
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring

II-2-DEU-7 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
Types: Rosemount (H2), SICK Maihak
Zellweger System 57 (O2, CO2) S 700 - system
Gases: H2, O2, CO2 H2, O2, CO2, CO, R134A
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Breathing air: 4 x 65 ltr./ 250 bar 2 x 400 ltr./ 250 bar
Breathing gas (35% / 65 %): 6 x 65 ltr./ 250 bar 1 x 400 ltr./ 250 bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT
Submarine Particulars U 206 A U 212 A
Surfaced Displacement (T): 500 T 1500 T
Overall Length (m): 48 m 56 m
Max surfaced Draft (m): 4,2 m 6,5 m
Beam (m): 4,4 m 7,0 m
Max Casing Height (m): 1,3 m 2,0 m
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 1° aft 0°
Rip Out Tow Yes Yes
Length of Tow (m): 26 m 42 m
Max Load (T): 14,5 T 20 T
Bollards (if fitted) Fwd / Aft Fwd / Aft
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): 2 m / 27 m 12 m / 41 m
Number of Bollards: 2/2x2 2x2/2x2
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 300 mm 300 mm
(mm):
Max Load Capability (T): 13 T 13 T
Anchor Facility and location (N/A for towing) (N/A for towing)
Size of cable (mm): 12 mm 19 mm (chain)
Length of Cable (m): 150 m 200 m
Max Loading (T): 5T 30 T
Other Information Fwd / Aft Fwd / Aft
Number of Capstans: -- / -- 1/1
Number of Bullrings: -- / -- 1/1

II-2-DEU-8 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

GREECE

II-2-GRC-1 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

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II-2-GRC-2 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

II-2-GRC-3 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

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II-2-GRC-4 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: TYPE 209
Number of Compartments: 1 One - Compartment Submarine
Volume Rescue/Escape Compartment: 700 m3 Volume of the pressure hull
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 1. 20 Bottles O2 – 50lts Volume – -
connection to Rescue / Escape Pressure 200ATU
compartment(s): 2. 4 Bottles Breathing air - 340lts Consisting of 1 bottle dry air
Volume – Pressure 250ATU and 3 bottles mixture 35% O2
65% N2
Not compatible to any rescue
Single Escape trunk: Yes
vehicle
Two man escape trunk Yes
Not compatible to any rescue
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
vehicle
Escape Suites: Yes 46 items BEAUFORT MK-10
Maximum number of crew: 40 -
Number of Rescue Seats -
-
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: No -
SRC capable: No -
POD Capable / possible limitations: No -
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: No -
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks -
-
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization -
No
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing GLAFKOS CLASS: No -
capabilities: POSSIDON CLASS: Yes
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No -

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: CIC -
Type: GLAFKOS CLASS: ELAC UT-
2000 -
POSSIDON CLASS: ELAC UT-12
Frequency Transmitting: Voice 8,3-11KHZ/Keyed 8,8KHZ -
Automatic Emergency Mode: - -
Emergency UWT
Compartments: CIC -

II-2-GRC-5 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

Type: GLAFKOS CLASS: PSU 83-90 UT


MOD -
POSSIDON CLASS: CSU 3-2 UT
Frequency Transmitting: GLAFKOS CLASS:
VOICE 8,3-11KHZ-Κeyed 8,8KHZ
POSSIDON CLASS: VOICE 8,08
KHZ
Automatic Emergency Mode: - -
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: - -
Remotely operated: - -
Frequency: - -
Type: - -
Endurance: - -
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: - -
Frequency: - -
Endurance: - -
Indicator light: - -
Combined life raft/indicator buoy - -
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: - -
Compartment: - -
Endurance: - -
SEEPIRB
Compartments: - -
Type: - -
Endurance: - -
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: CIC/TORPEDO ROOM -
Frequency: BECKER MR 509:
121,5/243,0/406,025MHZ (COMSPSAS/SARSAT)
SEAMARSHAL PLB8-MS: -
121,5MHZ -
BE/310A: 243/282,8MHZ
Type: BECKER MR 509 9 items
SEAMARSHAL PLB8-MS 6 items
BE/310A(INSIDE LIFERAFTS) 2 items
Endurance: - -
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: TORPEDO ROOM -
Type: MK 65 -
Colors: RED -

II-2-GRC-6 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
Endurance: - -
Submarine Signal Ejector -
Compartments: TORPEDO ROOM -
Mini POD Capable: No -

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
- -
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2
4378 Kgr Soda lime 1095 Cadridges
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2
190000 lts O2 -
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: GLAFKOS CLASS:
ICARE Ox83101 A.1
(INSTALLED)
ICARE F1722 (INSTALLED)
ICARE BG 33103 A1-1
(INSTALLED)
DRAGER (PORTABLE)
-
POSSIDON CLASS:
DUCAUX BG 33103
(INSTALLED)
ANALOX SUB MK IIP
(PORTABLE) DRAGER
(PORTABLE)
Gases: GLAFKOS CLASS:
ICARE Ox83101 A.1: O2
ICARE F1722: CO2
ICARE BG 33103 A1-1: H2
DRAGER: CO2-CO-CL2-O2
-
POSSIDON CLASS:
DUCAUX BG 33103: H2
ANALOX SUB MK IIP: CO2-O2
DRAGER: CO2-CO-CL2-O2

II-2-GRC-7 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring


Type: - -
Gases: - -
Endurance: - -
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: CONTROL ROOM – 4 BOTTLES Consisting of 1 bottle dry air
OF 340 LITRES VOLUME – 250 and 3 bottles mixture 35% O2
ATU PRESSURE 65% N2

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT
Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): GLAFKOS CLASS 1125
(1236 submerged)
POSSIDON CLASS 1180
(1280 submerged)
Overall Length (m): GLAFKOS CLASS: 54
POSSIDON CLASS: 56
Max surfaced Draft (m): GLAFKOS CLASS: 5,4
POSSIDON CLASS: 5,6
Beam (m): GLAFKOS CLASS: 6,2
POSSIDON CLASS: 6,2
Max Casing Height (m): GLAFKOS CLASS: 11,75
POSSIDON CLASS: 11,34
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft:
Rip Out Tow Yes
Length of Tow (m): 30
Max Load (T): 23
Fin Capability
Length (m):
Width (m):
Height above Casing (m):
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load (T):
Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): 2,1 31
Number of Bollards: 4 4
Height of raised Bollard above Casing
250 250
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability (T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T):

II-2-GRC-8 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)
EQUIPMENT
Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Size of Eye (mm): - -
Location: - -
Max Loading (T): - -
Anchor Facility and location
Size of cable (mm): 19 -
Length of Cable (m): 200 -
Max Loading (T): 9,53 -
Other Information Fwd Aft
Number of Capstans: 1
Number of Bullrings:

II-2-GRC-9 ORIGINAL
ATP-57(B)

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II-2-GRC-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

ISRAEL

II-2-ISR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

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II-2-ISR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

DOLPHIN CLASS

Drawing

Aft MBT
‫ילכימל ריוא ירי‬
emergency Pressure hall-
‫ריוא ירי‬ ‫ללחל‬aft
‫ הלילצ‬1,2 -‫תללוצה‬
blowing ventilation‫ירוחא‬connector

‫ריוא תניעט רוביח‬ ‫ללחל ריוא ירי‬


HP air
‫ףוחהמ‬ Pressure
-‫תללוצה‬hall- Fw.
charging ventilation
‫ימדק‬ connector
connection

Fw. MBT
‫ריוא ירי‬ ‫ילכימל‬
‫ הלילצ‬3,4
emergency
blowing

25 per. Life raft

II-2-ISR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-ISR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: DOLPHIN
Number of Compartments: Single Compartment
Volume Rescue / Escape Compartment: 1000 cubic meter
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 1200 l * 250 bar
connection to Rescue / Escape
compartment:
Two Man Escape Trunk: Yes
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes From 3 different points
Escape Suites: MK-8 Jerkin BEAUFORT
Maximum number of crew: 50
Number of Rescue Seats 1
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification:
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes
POD bags & ropes pre-stored on board: Y
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks: 650 mm

Ventilation / Depressurization Yes


capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
YES
Main UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment
Type: U.S.B.
Frequency Transmitting: NATO- 8.0875 KHZ
Automatic Emergency Mode: NATO- 8.0875 KHZ S.O.S. mode
YES
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment
Type:
Frequency Transmitting: 9.58 KHZ
8.0875 KHZ
Automatic Emergency Mode:
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Single Compartment

II-2-ISR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Remotely operated:
Frequency: NATO- 3.5 KHZ Pinger
12 KHZ
Type:
Endurance:
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: N/A
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: N/A
SEEPIRB
YES (2)
Compartments: Single compartment
Type: T-1630
Endurance:
Personal Locator Beacon
YES
Compartments: Single Compartment
Frequency: UHF
Type:
Endurance:
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Single Compartment
Type:
Colors: Green, red
2 SSE
Submarine Signal Ejector
Yes (2)
Compartments: Single Compartment
Mini POD Capable:

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
144 hr.
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2
scrubbing material referred in kg: 570 kg. lioh (curtains)/ soda lime
canisters
Number of National Units O2
bottles/candles referred in liters: 120000 l in bottles (600 l * 200 bar)

II-2-ISR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Dragger + Maihak
Gases: H2, O2, CO2, CO, HCN, CL2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: ANALOX
Gases: CO2, O2
Fixed Emergency Breathing System YES
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 1200 l * 250 bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1560 T
Overall Length (m): 67 m
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 7m
Beam (m): 6m
Max Casing Height (m): 2m
2m
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft:

Rip Out Tow


Length of Wire (m): 30 m
Max Load (T): 31 T
Fin Capability
Length (m): 11.8 m
Width (m): 1.5 m
Height above Casing (m): 6m
Location from Fwd Perpendicular
20.2 m
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular
4.3 m
(m):
Number of Bollards:
4 4

II-2-ISR-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Height of raised Bollard above
270 mm 270 mm
Casing (mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability
58 T
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 58 T

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted)


Size of Eye (mm):
Location:
Max Loading (T):

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm):
Length of Cable (m): 150 m
Max Loading (T):

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1

II-2-ISR-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 2

ITALY

II-2-ITA-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-ITA-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ITALY
SAURO CLASS III BATCH

Note: all distances are in meters.

1. UWT 10. Emergency H.P. air to main manifold


2. Emergency air to blow MBT1 11. UW light
3. Emergency air to blow MBT2 12. Aft compartment emergency ventilation valve
OUT
4. Signal ejectors (fore signal on PRT – aft signal on STB) 13. Aft compartment emergency ventilation valve IN
5. individual escape trunks (SRV seat only at fore) 14. QRUX 1B buoy
6. Fore compartment emergency ventilation valve IN 15. Emergency air to free MBT3
7. Fore compartment emergency ventilation valve OUT 16. Emergency air to free MBT4
8. watertight bulkhead resistant up to 80 mt 17. RS 100 (Emergency Sonar Beacon)
9.Emergency air to free Emersion Tank 18. ESUG 1 A Pinger

II-2-ITA-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-ITA-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ITALY
SAURO CLASS IV BATCH

Note: all distances are in meters.

1. UWT 10. Emergency H.P. air to main manifold


2. Emergency air to blow MBT1 11. UW light
3. Emergency air to blow MBT 2 12. Aft compartment emergency ventilation valve IN
4. Signal ejectors (fore signal on PRT – aft signal on STB) 13. Aft compartment emergency ventilation valve
OUT
5. Individual escape trunks (SRV seat only at fore) 14. ESUG 1 A Pinger
6. Fore compartment emergency ventilation valve IN 15. Emergency air to blow MBT3
7. Fore compartment emergency ventilation valve OUT 16. Emergency air to blow MBT4
8. Watertight bulkhead resistant up to 150 mt. 17. RS 100 (Emergency Sonar Beacon)
9.Emergency air to free Emersion Tank 18. QRUX 1B buoy

II-2-ITA-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-ITA-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ITALY
TODARO CLASS

11

12

Note: all distances are in meters.

1. Emergency air to blow MBTs 3 - 4 – 5 6. Signal ejector (on STB)


2. Hatches for Rush Escape (SRV seat only at fore) 7. UW light
3. Liferaft (life saving system) 8. UWT (port and stardboard side)
4. Emergency ventilation valve OUT 9. Emergency H.P. air to main manifold
5. Emergency ventilation valve IN 10. Emergency air to blow MBTs 1 – 2
11 Pinger sonar beacon –HF transducer
12. Pinger sonar beacon –LF transducer

II-2-ITA-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-ITA-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Subamarine Class: SAURO class III and IV Batches
Numbers of Compartments: 2 (two)
Volume Rescue / Escape Fore compartment: 210 m3
Compartment: Aft compartment: 800 m3
Volume/Pressure HP Air bottles with Fore compartment: 3120 lt/280 bar
connection to Rescue / Escape Aft compartment: 2760 lt/280 bar
compartment(s)
Single escape trunk Yes One per compartment
Two men Escape trunk NO
Compartment Escape Yes
Escape suites: Yes
* 55 suites in each compartment
Type: BEAUFORT SEIE MK 10 plus 10%
Number aboard: 110 plus 10% *
Maximum number of crew: 55
Number of Rescue Seats
1 (one) Fore hatch (fore compartment)
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable/possible limitations: No
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on No
board:
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Hatches Ø: 650 mm. No POD capability
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation/Depressurisation Yes (independent per compartment) IN connection = 1 ¼ “ NPT
capabilities (STANAG 1450) Stanag 1450 only ratified OUT connection = 2 “ NPT
Surface assisted emergency blowing One hose for each MBTs
Yes Connection = 1 ¼ “ NPT
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes (HP air to main manifold) Only in aft compartment
Connection = 1 ¼ “ NPT

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: 1 (one)
Type: ISUS 90-20
Frequency Transmitting: 8087,5 Hz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: 1 in fore and 1 in aft compartments
Type: ERUS III
Frequency Transmitting: 8087,5 Hz

II-2-ITA-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Automatic Emergency Mode: Yes
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Detection and localization
Pinger
Compartment: 1 (one)
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: 8800 Hz +/- 50 Hz
Type: ESUG 1A using GS-231A pinger It is a part of QRUX 1B system
Endurance: 2 (two) months 2 (two) months
Emergency Sonar Beacon Homing
Type: Acoustic transponder RS-100
6850 Hz
± 2% on transmission
Frequency: 8200 Hz
± 8% on reception
10000 Hz
Endurance > 150 hours
Indicator buoy tethered NO

Indicator releasable buoy QRUX 1 B system


Type: EM 104 buoy Device can be release either
manually or automatically.
Indicator light : YES
Frequency: UHF - 243 MHz
COSPAS-SARSAT UHF 406,025 MHz
Endurance > 100 hours
Expendable Communication buoy NO

SEPIRB
Devices are released through the
Compartment: 2 in Fore and 2 in Aft compartment
Signal Ejector tube
Type: T 1630 SRT
Endurance: > 48 hours
Frequency: - 406.025 MHz (COSPAS-SARSAT
message)
- 121.5 MHz (Beacon – 6 hours delay)

Personal Locator Beacon NO

Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fore and Aft 12 (twelve) red lights and smoke
signals in each compartment
Type: STA or PIC The maximum launching depth is 600
mts
Colors: Light and smoke signals in each
Red – Yellow – Green compartment
Endurance: 120 sec. 60 sec smoke + 60 sec light

Submarine Signal Ejector

II-2-ITA-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Compartments: 1 in fore and 1 in aft compartments
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVAVIBILITY/ Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS
Survivability of a standard crew, in
hours, per compartment, based on
the aboard availabilities of O2, CO2 120 hrs In each compartment
removal capabilities and emergency
food / water:
Number of National Units CO2
390 In each compartment
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2
223600 In each compartment
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring

Type: No (*) (*) Hand pump for each escape


compartment
Gases: No (*) (*) Tubes for O2-CO2-CO-Cl
Emergency Atmospheric
Monitoring:
Type: Analox MK II P
1 in each compartment. It also
Gases: CO2 – O2 monitors absolute pressure and
temperature
Endurance: 125 hrs
Fixed Emergency Breathing
System:
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: No

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
III Batch IV Batch
Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1508.01 1683
Overall Length (m): 64.36 66.36
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5.131Fwd/6.4Aft 6.32
Beam (m): 6.83 6.83
Max Casing Height (m): 4.47 4.5
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: From 0 to 0.5° Aft From 0 to 0.5° Aft
Rip Out Tow Yes
Length of Wire (m): 50 50
Max Load (T): 24.57 24.57

II-2-ITA-11 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Fin Capability No capability

Fwd Aft
Bollards (if fitted) III Batch IV Batch III Batch IV
Batch
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 7.5 7.5 39.55 45
(m):
Number of Bollards: 2x2 2x2 2x2 2x2
Height of raised Bollard above 300 300 300 300
Casing (mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability // // // //
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): // // // //

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 300 300 No
Location: Fwd Fwd No
Perpendicular Perpendicular
Max Loading (T): 5 5 No

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 24 24
Length of Cable (m): 163 163
Max Loading (T): 33.8 33.8

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 (hydraulic) 1 (hydraulic) 1 (hydraulic) 1
(hydraulic)
Number of Bullrings: // //

II-2-ITA-12 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Todaro class submarine (U212A)
Number of Compartments: One compartment submarine
Volume Rescue Compartment: 800 mc
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles No bottles inside the hull 6 external bottles
inside escape compartment(s): 600 liters x 250 bar each one
Single Escape trunk: No
Compartment Rush escape: Yes
Escape Suites: Yes Beaufort MK10 VSD 34 escape suites plus 10%
Maximum number of crew: 34 (thirty four)
Number of Rescue Seats 1 around fore hatch
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible No
limitations:
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on No
board:
Dimensions Hatches and POD Upper Hatch: 1.0 meter when closed Trunk no fitted for POD
Trunks 0.64 meter when opened
(Transferred from STANAG
1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization Yes (connection quick release type) IN ND 25mm
capabilities (STANAG 1450) STANAG 1450 only ratified OUT ND 50mm
Surface assisted emergency Yes 1 for each MBT
blowing capabilities: Connection ND 20 – M36x2
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air Yes Connection ND 20 – M36x2
capability:

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: One compartment submarine
Type: ELAC - DSQC – 12 (UT 2000)
Frequency Transmitting: 1 ÷ 60 KHz STEP 50 Hz
Automatic Emergency Mode: TXA 8087,5 Hz 3 S.O.S. – 5 sec pause – 3 S.O.S. – 10
sec listening

Emergency UWT NO

Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise


Pinger
Compartment: One compartment submarine
Remotely operated: No

II-2-ITA-13 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Frequency: 5 KHz and 35 KHz
Type: SBE1 – 20 ELAC - Nautik
280 hrs
1200 hrs
Endurance: at high and low Automatic TX when sensors wet
at low frequency
frequency
Indicator buoy tethered EPIRB
Length of cable: 600 meters
Frequency: 406 MHz ACR–GLOBAL FIX 406 MHz
Endurance: //
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy Yes
Expendable Communication
Buoy No

SEEPIRB
Compartment: One compartment submarine 4 (four) signals
Type: SRT 1600 406 MHz
- 406.025 MHz ( Cospas –Sarsat
satellite message)
Frequency:
- 121.5 MHZ (beacon – 6 hours
delay)

Endurance: 48 hrs
Personal Locator Beacon No

Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: One compartment submarine
Type: PIC or STA Releasable up to 600 meters
Colors: Yellow – Green and RED
Endurance: ≥ 5 minutes
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: One compartment submarine
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
5 DAYS
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2
136.5 35 LiOH RPC
scrubbing material referred in kg:

II-2-ITA-14 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Number of National Units O2


46.800 18 Oxigen candles
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: MAYAC 4677 0101/I1
Gases: CO; CO2; H2; O2; It monitories also refrigerant gas

Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring


Type: hand pump
Gases: CO; CO2; O2; Cl
Endurance: 5 days 100 tubes for each gas

Fixed Emergency Breathing System


Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 3 external bottles 2 breathing air
600 liters each one x 250 bar 1 breathing gas (65% N+35%O2)

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1507.696
Overall Length (m): 57.150
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 6.0
Beam (m): 7.61
Max Casing Height (m): 2.64
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: From 0.5 aft to 0°

Rip Out Tow Yes/No


Length of Wire (m): 42
Max Load (T): 20.1
Fin Capability No capability

Bollards (if fitted)


Fwd Aft
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): 12.35 42.45
Number of Bollards: 2x2 2x2
Height of raised Bollard above Casing (mm): 270 270
Max Longitudinal Load Capability (T): 25 (break) 25 (break)
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 25 (break) 25 (break)

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): No No

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 19

II-2-ITA-15 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Length of Cable (m): 200
Max Loading (T): 21.1 (30.1 break)

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 (hydraulic) 1 (hydraulic)
Number of Bullrings: // //

Note: inside the fin there are 400 meters of synthetic wire (Ø 36 mm)

II-2-ITA-16 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

NORWAY

II-2-NOR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-NOR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ULA CLASS SUBMARINE

II-2-NOR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-NOR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Ula
Number of Compartments: 2
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: 430 m3 Aft/ 240 m3 Fwd
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with Aft 8 bottles à 340 litres 250 bar |
connection to Rescue / Escape
compartment(s): Fwd 3 bottles à 340 litres 250 bar
plus 7 bottles à 149 litres 250 bar

Single Escape trunk: Yes


Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suites: Yes (SEIE MK 10 2x26)
Maximum number of crew: 26 (32) Up to 32 with a dispensation
from Captain Submarine
Service
Number of Rescue Seats 2
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes Not Navsea certified
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 600 mm x 2220 mm Fwd
(Transferred from STANAG 1391): 550 mm x 1950 mm Aft
Ventilation / Depressurisation No
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Aft
Type: UT-2000
Frequency Transmitting: 3-60 kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: Yes 3 x SOS 5sec locating sound 3 x
SOS 10 sec pause
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Fwd
Type: UT-2100

II-2-NOR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Frequency Transmitting:
Automatic Emergency Mode:
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Aft
Remotely operated: No
Frequency:
Type: Scanmatic SM2500 Noise pinger
Endurance:
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 600 meter Line attached to life raft
Frequency: 406 MHz and 121.5 MHz
Endurance: 48 Hours
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy Yes
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency:
Compartment:
Endurance:
SEEPIRB
Compartments: 1 Aft/ 1 Fwd
Type: SEEPIRB 406
Endurance: 48 Hours
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: 5 Aft/ 5 Fwd
Frequency: 406 MHz and 121.5 MHz
Type: MR 509
Endurance: 24 Hours
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: 4 Aft/ 4 Fwd
Type: UNR ADI
Colors: Red
Endurance: 700 M
Compartment: 4 Aft/ 4 Fwd
Type: Poseidon Will be replaced by ADI
Colors: White
Endurance: 100 M
Compartment: 3 Aft/ 3 Fwd
Type: Poseidon Will be replaced by ADI
Colors: Yellow smoke
Endurance: 100M

II-2-NOR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Submarine Signal Ejector


Compartments: 1 Aft/ 1 Fwd
Mini POD Capable: Yes

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 168 Hours


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 32 x 18 Kg Each compartment
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 60 Each compartment
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Haakon Rygh
Gases: CO/ CO2/ O2/ H2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Analox
Gases: O2/ CO2
Endurance: 168 Hours
Type: Dräger pump and tubes
Gases: O2/ CO2/ CO/ Cl/ H2

Fixed Emergency Breathing System


Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Aft 340 l 250 Bar/ Fwd 340 l 250
Bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1040
Overall Length (m): 59.45
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5.1
Beam (m): 5.3
Max Casing Height (m): 1.1
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 1 degree Aft

II-2-NOR-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Rip Out Tow Yes
Length of Wire (m): 30
Max Load (T): 30 kN
Fin Capability
Length (m): 10.9
Width (m): 1.6
Height above Casing (m): 3.9
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 20.8
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load -
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load -
(T):
Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 3.000 38.000
(m):
Number of Bollards: 4 4
Height of raised Bollard above 269 269
Casing (mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability 115 kN 115 kN
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 115 kN 115 kN
Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Size of Eye (mm): - -
Location:
Max Loading (T):
Anchor Facility and location
Size of cable (mm): 16
Length of Cable (m): 150
Max Loading (T): 154 kN
Other Information Fwd Aft
Number of Capstans: 1
Number of Bullrings: -

II-2-NOR-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

POLAND

II-2-POL-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-POL-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

KILO Class

II-2-POL-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-POL-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Refurbished “KOBBEN” Class


Ex/HNoMS STORD, SKOLPEN, SVENNER, KUNNA

II-2-POL-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-POL-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: KOBBEN
Number of Compartments: 1
Volume Rescue / Escape Compartment: 333 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with ---
connections to Rescue / Escape
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: NO
Two man escape trunk NO
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): YES
Escape Suites: YES
Mk-10 – 28 pcs
Maximum number of crew: 26
1
Number of Rescue Seats
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: YES
SRC capable: YES
POD Capable / possible limitations: YES
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: YES
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 0,68 m
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurisation NO
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing YES
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: YES

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: ---
Type: UT-2000
Frequency Transmitting: 3-60 kHz
3 x SOS, 5 sec. locating sounds, 3 x
Automatic Emergency Mode:
SOS, 10 sec. pause (reception)
Emergency UWT
NO
---
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
NO
---

II-2-POL-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 400 m
Frequency: 406,025 MHz
Endurance: ---
Indicator light: YES
Combined life raft/indicator buoy YES
Expendable Communication Buoy
NO
---
SEEPIRB
NO
Compartments: ---
---
Type:
Endurance: ---
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: ---
Frequency: 121,5 / 243 / 406,025 MHz
Type: MR-509 and SARBE-10
Endurance: ---
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment:
Type: Mk-3
Colors: Green and red star, white candle,
yellow smoke
Endurance:
Submarine Signal Ejector YES
---
Compartments:
Mini POD Capable: YES

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
180
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2
1 200
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2
120 000
bottles/candles referred in liters:

II-2-POL-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
OLDHAM MX 42A
Type:
Gases: O2, CO2, H2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: OLDHAM MX-2100
Gases: O2, CO2, H2
Endurance: ---
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 2x345,250 bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 520 546 (296)
Overall Length (m): 47,24 48,74 (296)
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 4,80
Beam (m): 4,68
Max Casing Height (m): 4,80
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: AFT

Rip Out Tow NO


Length of Wire (m): 20
Max Load (T): ---
Fin Capability
Length (m):
Width (m):
Height above Casing (m):
Location from Fwd Perpendicular
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 3,4 and 8,5 24,3
(m):
Number of Bollards: 3 4
Height of raised Bollard above 200 200
Casing (mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability --- ---
(T):
II-2-POL-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): --- ---

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): --- ---
Location: --- ---
Max Loading (T): --- ---

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 15
Length of Cable (m): 150
Max Loading (T): ---

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: ---
Number of Bullrings: ---

II-2-POL-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: KILO
Number of Compartments: 6
Volume Rescue / Escape Compartment: 231, 114 and 309 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with ---
connection to Rescue /Escape
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: YES
Two men escape trunk NO
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): YES
Escape Suites: YES
ISP-60 (IDA-59) – 70 pcs
Maximum number of crew: 62
1
Number of Rescue Seats
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: NO pending
SRC capable: YES
POD Capable / possible limitations: YES
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: YES
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 0,614 m
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurisation YES
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing YES
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: YES

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: ---
Type: UT-2000
Frequency Transmitting: 3-60 kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: 3 x SOS, 5 sec. locating sounds, 3 x
SOS, 10 sec. pause (reception)
Emergency UWT
Compartments: ---
Type: MGK-400
Frequency Transmitting: 8200 or 4200 Hz
Automatic Emergency Mode: ---

II-2-POL-11 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: ---
Remotely operated:
Frequency: 3200 OR 6700 Hz
Type: MGS-30
Endurance: ---
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 200 m
Frequency: 121,5 / 243 / 406,025 MHz
Endurance: ---
Indicator light: YES
Combined life raft/indicator buoy NO
Expendable Communication Buoy
NO
---
SEEPIRB
NO
---
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: ---
Frequency: 121,5 / 243 / 406,025 MHz
Type: MR-509
Endurance: ---
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment:
Type: KSP
Colors: Green and Red
Endurance:
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: ---
Mini POD Capable: YES

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
317
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2
3000
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 ---
bottles/candles referred in liters:

II-2-POL-12 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: TP 1132 M and MH-5122
Gases: H2 and O2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: AZH
Gases: H2
Endurance: ---
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
---
Compartment, Volume and Pressure:

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 2325
Overall Length (m): 74,26
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 6,7
Beam (m): 9,9
Max Casing Height (m): 14,76
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: Fwd
Rip Out Tow YES
Length of Wire (m): 80 + 21
Max Load (T): 59 and 61
Fin Capability
Length (m):
Width (m):
Height above Casing (m):
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load (T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load (T):
Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): 12,6 and 13,2 48 and 48,6
Number of Bollards: 4 4
Height of raised Bollard above Casing
260 260
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability (T): --- ---
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): --- ---
Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft
Size of Eye (mm): 180 ---

II-2-POL-13 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Location: Fwd ---
Max Loading (T): 61 ---
Anchor Facility and location
Size of cable (mm): 31
Length of Cable (m): 175
Max Loading (T): ---
Other Information Fwd Aft
Number of Capstans: 1 1
Number of Bullrings: --- ---

II-2-POL-14 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

PORTUGAL

II-2-PRT-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-PRT-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ALBACORA CLASS SUBMARINE

II-2-PRT-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-PRT-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

II-2-PRT-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-PRT-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

II-2-PRT-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-PRT-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

II-2-PRT-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-PRT-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: ALBACORA CLASS TYPE “DAPHNÉ”
Number of Compartments: 5 Not Resistant
Volume Rescue Compartment: 35 m3 Considered the Aft
compartment. None of them is
Pressure Resistant.
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles inside 3200 LT / 250 BAR Considering total of air bottles
rescue compartment(s): inside the submarine.
Single Escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suites: No Exists 60 Beuchat lifejacket
type M.N. P.97 aboard for rush
escape
Maximum number of crew: 60
Number of Rescue Seats One
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes LR5
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes Via Signal Ejector. Restricted to
the 100mm diameter and 100m
depth.
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: No
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Aft Hatche: 700 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391): Fwd Hatche: 750 mm
Torpedo Hatche: 750 mm
Tower Trunk (2): 600 mm
Signal Ejector: diameter 100 mm,
length 400 mm, maximum operation
depth 100 m
Ventilation / Depressurization Yes
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: CIC
Type: TUUM 2 A/B

II-2-PRT-11 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Frequency Transmitting: 8087 Hz 8087+/- 2Hz, Omni-directional
reception and transmission,
Acoustic power delivery 50W,
Modulation in the lower single
side band (400-3500 Hz),
possibility of operation of an
800 Hz audio frequency with
possibility of Doppler
avoidance, range 4000 m.
Automatic Emergency Mode: No The underwater telephones
fitted on “Albacora” class
submarines (TUUM 1A-TUUM
2A/B) may operate in automatic
transponder mode, under the
characteristics mentioned in
para. 1.
Emergency UWT
No

Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise


Pinger
Compartment: Aft Compartment
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: 8800 +/- 100 Hz Tx Length 50ms +/- 10ms,
Interval Tx 50s +/- 5s, Nominal
Power >=20W, Emission
Level>=83dB, Surface Ships
expected range 7000-10000 m,
Submarine expected range
20000 m.
Type: ESUG-1A Using a GS 231A sonar beacon
Endurance: 3 months
Indicator buoy tethered
No

Expendable Communication Buoy


Frequency: 243Mhz / 406Mhz (SARSAT) Power delivery 140 mW,
2Hz on flashing light Amplitude modulation 300-
3000 Hz, Range 100NM at
20000 feet.
Compartment: Buoy on deck fwd fin tower Control box inside submarine.
Two “dead man” devices, one
CO cabinet and one in aft
compartment.
Endurance: 60 hours flashing light. 100 hours
RF emitter.
SEEPIRB
No

II-2-PRT-12 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Personal Locator Beacon


No
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fwd Compartment
Type: Type A, B, C
Colors: Type A: 2 green, 4 red
Type B: 6 green
Type C: 6 white
Endurance: 20 minutes
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Aft Compartment
Mini POD Capable: Yes Via Signal Ejector. Manoeuvred
by inside.

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 72 hours


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 2475 Kg Two electric powered CO2
scrubbing material referred in kg: absortion units (CDAU) which
draw air from the compartment
through the absorbent (soda
line), returning after the air
(with reduced CO2) into the
compartment. Each CDAU is
filled up with 20Kg of
absorbent, from the 2475Kg
available (canisters of 10 and
16.5Kg). The medium
absorbent consumption is
160gr./persons/hour. If the
CDAUs are not available the
only emergency way of
reducing CO2 is by spreading
the absorbent along the
submarine´s floor and over
other flat surfaces available
(poor effectiveness).
Number of National Units O2 174 candles French mod. 1958, 2 ignition
bottles/candles referred in liters: units, 2 burning units.

II-2-PRT-13 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Barometer (absolute pressure) Salt water resistant,
Independent of external energy
source, continuous information
available, scale 0.7-1.3 bar,
accuracy 2.5mbar.
Gases:
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: PARAMAX OX93 101/A1 Salt water resistant, dependent
on external energy source, scale
0 to 25% (oxygen percentage),
accuracy +/- 0.5% at 24ºC, the
information given is
independent of absolute
pressure, but it is slightly
affected by the temperature.
Operation range between 18
and 30º C.
Gases: Oxygen meter
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: MALHAK UNOR 6NM Salt water resistant, dependent
on external energy source, scale
+/- 0 to 5% (carbon dioxide
percentage), accuracy <= +/-
2%, the information given is
independent of the absolute
pressure and the temperature,
effects are automatically
corrected.
Gases: Carbon Dioxide meter
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: DUCALIX BG 33 103/A1 Salt water resistant, dependent
on external energy source, scale
0 to 5% (hydrogen percentage),
accuracy +/- 0.05%, the
information given is
independent of absolute
pressure and effects of the CO2,
O2 and humidity are
despicable.
Gases: Hydrogen meter

II-2-PRT-14 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring


Type: DRAGER MOD.21/31 DB Salt water resistant,
independent of external energy
source, scale 5 to 150 and 100
to 700 ppm, temperature 10º to
90º, humidity below 50mg
H2O/liter, the information is
affected by absolute pressure
and must be rectified. The main
purpose of this equipment is to
measure the carbon monoxide
concentration but can also be
used as alternative equipment to
measure the oxygen, carbon
dioxide and hydrogen
concentrations in a wither
bracket of accuracy.
Gases: CO,O, CO2, H2
Endurance:
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: No

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 869 ton
Overall Length (m): 57,78 m
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5,27 m
Beam (m): 6,762 m
Max Casing Height (m): 0,5 m
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 25º

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 55 m Thickness 26 mm
Max Load (T): 26 ton

Fin Capability
Length (m): 7,0 m
Width (m): 1,5 m
Height above Casing (m): 4,4 m
Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): 24,30 m
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load Unknown
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load (T): Unknown

II-2-PRT-15 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular (m): 11 m 44 m (4) and 55,75 m (2)
Number of Bollards: 4 6
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 360 mm 360 mm
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability (T): NA NA
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): NA NA

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 220x180 mm Qt=2 220x180 mm Qt=3
Location: 8,75 m 42,75 m (2) and
Max Loading (T): NA NA

Anchor Facility and location Weight 100 Kg

Size of cable (mm): Thickness 24,7 mm


Length of Cable (m): 200 m
Max Loading (T):

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 -
Number of Bullrings: - -

II-2-PRT-16 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 2

SPAIN

II-2-ESP-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-ESP-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

GALERNA (AGOSTA) CLASS SUBMARINES

II-2-ESP-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-ESP-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: GALERNA French AGOSTA type
Number of Compartments: 3 Fwd and aft are escape
compartments
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: Fwd: 226 m3 / Aft: 180 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with Fwd: 7600 m3/ 250 Kg/cm2
connection to Rescue / Escape Aft: 1200 m3/ 250 Kg/cm2
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: Yes Escape trunk in fwd and aft
compartments
Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes Rush escape is possible from
fwd and aft comp.
Escape Suites: 120 MK-10 (60 in each escape
compartment)
Maximum number of crew: 60
Number of Rescue Seats 2
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes Using fwd escape trunk
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: No
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 600 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization Yes
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Center
Type: TUUM 2C/TUUM-4 French type
Frequency Transmitting: 8087,5 Hz
Automatic Emergency Mode: Tx 3 secs every 17 secs
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Fwd/aft
Type: TESUBMAR-M
Frequency Transmitting: 8087,5 Hz
Automatic Emergency Mode: Tx 3 secs every 5 mins
II-2-ESP-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise


Pinger
Compartment: Center
Remotely operated: No Manually and automatically
operated
Frequency: 8,8 Khz
Type: GS 231A French type
Endurance: 3 months
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: ---
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: ---
SEEPIRB
Compartments: Center
Type: ERUX-2B
Endurance: 100 hours
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: ---
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Center
Type:
Colors: Red/Green
Endurance: 25 sec
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: ---
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 68 hrs (Fwd)/ 71 hrs (Aft)


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 350 (Fwd)/198 (Aft)
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 42 (Fwd)/38 (Aft)
bottles/candles referred in liters:

II-2-ESP-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: UNOR6NM/SMA/DUCALIX SMA Center/Center/Center
Gases: CO2 / O2 / H2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Manual DRAGER
Gases: O2 CO2 CO H2 Cl Measure tubes
Endurance: ---
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Fwd: 52 fixed air intakes / center: 19 Air proceeding from HP air
/ Aft: 52 system.

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1510 Tons
Overall Length (m): 67,750 mts
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5,40 mts
Beam (m): 6,8 mts
Max Casing Height (m): 1,4 mts
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft:

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 140 mts
Max Load (T) : 31,4 tons
Fin Capability
Length (m):
Width (m):
Height above Casing (m): 4,96 mts
Location from Fwd Perpendicular
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T) :
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T) :

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular --- ---
(m):

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft

II-2-ESP-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Size of Eye (mm): --- ---

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): --- ---

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1
Number of Bullrings:

II-2-ESP-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

SWEDEN

II-2-SWE-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-SWE-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Gotland Class

II-2-SWE-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-SWE-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Gotland
Number of Compartments: 2
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: 0,9 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 10*160 lit / 25 MPa
connection to Rescue / Escape 1*200, 1*160 / 25 MPa (HIS)
compartment(s): 7*270 lit/25 MPa (emergency)
Single Escape trunk: Yes
Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): No
Escape Suites: Yes 35 x SEIE MK 10 S-2
Maximum number of crew: 35
Number of Rescue Seats 1
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes (max depth 300 m) Only with Swedish PODs
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: No
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Inner hatch elliptical. 450*350 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization No
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Forward Compartment
Type: ALLIED SIGNAL ELAC, UT 2000
Frequency Transmitting: 3-60 KHz Transmitting
Automatic Emergency Mode: Yes Auto emergency mode 8087,5
Hz
Power: 1 W
Automatic emergency mode:
3 x SOS
5 seconds locating sound
3 x SOS
10 seconds pause (reception)

II-2-SWE-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Emergency UWT
Compartments: Passage/Escape tower compartment
Type: SLINGSBY ENGINEERING, A
046
Frequency Transmitting: 10, 27, 37,5, 43 and 45 KHz
Max 100W (10 KHz)
Automatic Emergency Mode: Yes
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Forward
Remotely operated: No Manual or automatic if
compartment is flooded
Frequency: 9,25 and 37 KHz
Type: Amlab, UB-pinger U2
Endurance: > 10 days
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 500 m
Frequency: 243 MHz (UHF), 121,5 kHz (VHF)
Endurance: > 10 days
Indicator light: Yes White, 30 Fl/min automatic.
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: N/A
SEEPIRB
Compartments: Passage/Escape compartment
Type: Ultra Electronics T-1639 / SRT
Endurance: Approximately 24 hours
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: N/A
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Forward/ Aft
Type: VLJ 71/K (White for exercise)
VLJ 72/K (White for emergency)
RLJ 73/K (Red)
RLJ 74/K (Red)
Colors: Red/ White
Endurance: 240 s
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Fwd and Aft
Mini POD Capable: No

II-2-SWE-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 168 h A full crew in FWD/ AFT


hours, per compartment, based on the compartment
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 Classified information.
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 None LOX from AIP system used
bottles/candles referred in liters:

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: The central atmosphere monitoring
system console (DRAGER,
Polytron-Regard) is located in the
aft compartment and is connected to
samplings stations throughout the
ship.
Gases: CO2, O2, H2, and OV
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: DRÄGER type 21/31
Gases: Measure tubes for:
CO2, CO, O2, HCN, NO2 and CL2
Endurance: Dräger tubes: N/A
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Fwd compartment 1x270 liters (25
MPa)
Aft compartment 1x160 liters (25
MPa)

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1490
Overall Length (m): 60
Max surfaced Drafts (m): Pending on weight
Beam (m): 6,1
Max Casing Height (m): 6
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft:

II-2-SWE-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 60 GTD: 55 m
Max Load (T): 426 kN
Fin Capability
Length (m): 9
Width (m): 2,4
Height above Casing (m): 4,8
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 14,5
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 5,5 (to first bollard) 43
(m):
Number of Bollards: 1 triple, 1 double (in CL) 1 triple, 1 double (in CL)
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 250 250
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability 220 kN per pair 220 kN per pair
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 220 kN per pair 220 kN per pair

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 130*92 mm 130*92 mm
Location: 3 m from FWD Perp 48.5 m from FWD Perp
Max Loading (T): - -

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): Ø=16 mm N/A
Length of Cable (m): 170 m
Max Loading (T): 146 kN

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: - 1
Number of Bullrings: 1 1

II-2-SWE-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Södermanland Class

II-2-SWE-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-SWE-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA
DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Södermanland
Number of Compartments: 2
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: 0,9 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 6*267 lit / 25 MPa (ordinary)
connection to Rescue / Escape 7*267 lit / 25 MPa (emergency)
compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: Yes
Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): No
Escape Suites: Yes 35 x SEIE MK 10 S-2
Maximum number of crew: 30
Number of Rescue Seats 1
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes Only with Swe PODs.
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Upper hatch: 740 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391): Lower hatch: 490mm x 350 mm
(oval)
Legth (clear): 1000 mm

Ventilation / Depressurization No
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Forward Compartment
Type: AMITY-Asdic 185
Frequency Transmitting: 8.0875 KHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Passage/Escape tower compartment
Type: SLINGSBY ENGINEERING, A
046
Frequency Transmitting: 10, 27, 37,5, 43 and 45 KHz
Max 100W (10 KHz)
Automatic Emergency Mode: No

II-2-SWE-11 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Forward
Remotely operated: No Automatic Emergency Mode
Frequency: 9,25 and 37 KHz
Type: Amlab, UB-pinger U2
Endurance: > 10 days
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 350 m
Frequency: 243 MHz (UHF), 121,5 MHz (VHF)
Endurance: > 10 days
Indicator light: Yes White, 30 Fl/min
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: 406 MHz
Compartment: Passage/Escape Tower
Compartment
Endurance: Approximately 24 hours
SEEPIRB
Compartments: Passage/Escape compartment
Type: Ultra Electronics T-1639 / SRT
Endurance: Approximately 24 hours
Personal Locator Beacon
N/A
Compartments:
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Forward/ Aft
Type: VLJ 71/K (White for exercise)
VLJ 72/K (White for emergency)
RLJ 73/K (Red)
RLJ 74/K (Red)
Colors: Red/ White
Endurance: 240 s
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Fwd and Aft
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 168 A full crew in FWD/AFT


hours, per compartment, based on the compartment
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:

II-2-SWE-12 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Number of National Units CO2 Classified information
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 2.6 lit * 62 units (FWD Normaly GOX from AIP
bottles/candles referred in liters: compartment) system used

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: The central atmosphere monitoring
system console (DRAGER,
Polytron-Regard) is located in the
aft compartment and is connected to
samplings stations throughout the
ship.
Gases: CO2, O2, H2, and OV
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: DRÄGER type 21/31

Gases: Measure tubes for:


CO2, CO, O2, HCN, NO2 and CL2

Endurance: Dräger tubes: N/A


Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Fwd Compartment 1x267 liters (25
MPa)
Aft Compartment 1x267 liters (25
MPa)

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1412
Overall Length (m): 60
Max surfaced Drafts (m):
Beam (m): 6.1
Max Casing Height (m): 6
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft:

Rip Out Tow Yes/No


Length of Wire (m): 60
Max Load (T): 426 Kn
Fin Capability
Length (m): 9
Width (m): 2.3
Height above Casing (m): 5,0
II-2-SWE-13 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 14
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 8 to first bollard 46 (aft bollard)
(m):
Number of Bollards: 1 double 1 double
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 250 250
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T):

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 130*92 mm 130*92 mm
Location: 3.5 m from FWD Perp 48 m from FWD Perp
Max Loading (T):

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): Ø = 16 mm
Length of Cable (m): 170
Max Loading (T): 146 KN

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1
Number of Bullrings:

II-2-SWE-14 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II
\

CHAPTER 1

THE NETHERLANDS

II-2-NLD-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-NLD-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

II-2-NLD-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-NLD-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Walrus Class Only for WLR , BVS.
Number of Compartments: 3
Volume Rescue Compartment: Fwd 200 m3, Aft 435 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles inside 12 x 885 ltr, 275 bar Bottles outside pressure hull
rescue compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: SET forward , DET aft
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): No
Escape Suites: 75 aft, 75 forward,
BFA SPES Mk3nl
Maximum number of crew: 62
Number of Rescue Seats 1
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes NAVSEA
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes, 400mtr
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 680 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization No
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes Connection in Fin

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Control room
Type: UT 2000
Frequency Transmitting: USB 1-57Kc, LSB 4060 Kc
adjustable on 50 hz by PLL 8,0875
Kc
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Forward and aft escape comparment
Type: Marconi seapiper
Frequency Transmitting: 8 and 40 Kc
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Aft escape compartment

II-2-NLD-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Remotely operated: Yes
Frequency: 10 and 35 Kc 3,5 Kc
Type: Elac SBE 2 -53 Elac SBE 2-52
Endurance: 370 hours 360 hours
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 600mtr
Frequency: 8364Kc, 243 and 406 Mhz
Endurance: 3 days
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: No
Compartment: No
Endurance: No
SEEPIRB
Compartments: No
Type: No
Endurance: No
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: 2 in fwd, 2 in aft compartment
Frequency: 121,5, 243,0 and 406,025
Type: MR 509
Endurance: > 24 hours
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fwd and aft escape compartment
Type: Nr 21 / 4 inch NSN 1370-17-054-0001
Colors: Red, green, yellow, white, white
with messenger and green dye
Endurance: Minimal 6 minutes
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Escape compartment forward and aft
Mini POD Capable: Yes

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 7 days


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 800 cannisters of sodalime
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 76 candles CAN 33 48 in fwd escape compartment
bottles/candles referred in liters: 28 in aft escape compartment
II-2-NLD-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: CAMS 1
Gases: CO, CO2, O2,H2,R12,R22
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Analox Drager tubes
Gases: O2 , CO2 CO, CO2, O2,HCN,NO2 Cl2
Endurance: 7 days
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 2 x 575 ltr, 275 bar Bottles in casing

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 2400
Overall Length (m): 68
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 7.2
Beam (m): 6.8
Max Casing Height (m): 3.5
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 8.6

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 19.07
Max Load (T): 100Kn
Fin Capability
Length (m): 12
Width (m): 4
Height above Casing (m): 6.6
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 15
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load None
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load None
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 6 and 12 29 and 42
(m):
Number of Bollards: 4 4
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 120 120
(mm):

II-2-NLD-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Max Longitudinal Load Capability 40 Kn 40 Kn


(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 40 Kn 40 Kn

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 70 None
Location: bow None
Max Loading (T): 126Kn None

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): Chain
Length of Cable (m): 175 mtr
Max Loading (T): 126Kn

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1
Number of Bullrings: 1 1

II-2-NLD-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

II-2-NLD-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-NLD-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Walrus Class Only for DLF , ZLW.
Number of Compartments: 3
Volume Rescue Compartment: Fwd 200 m3, Aft 435 m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles inside 12 x 885 ltr, 275 bar Bottles outside pressure hull
rescue compartment(s):
Single Escape trunk: SET forward , DET aft
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): No
Escape Suites: 75 aft, 75 forward,
BFA SPES Mk3nl
Maximum number of crew: 62
Number of Rescue Seats 1
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes NAVSEA
SRC capable: No Under construction
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes, 400mtr
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks 680 mm
(Transferred from STANAG 1391):
Ventilation / Depressurization No Under construction
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing No
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: Yes Connection in Fin

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Control room
Type: UT 2000
Frequency Transmitting: USB 1-57Kc, LSB 4060 Kc
adjustable on 50 hz by PLL 8,0875
Kc
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Forward and aft escape comparment
Type: Marconi seapiper
Frequency Transmitting: 8 and 40 Kc
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Aft escape compartment
Remotely operated: Yes
II-2-NLD-11 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Frequency: 10 and 35 Kc 3,5 Kc
Type: Elac SBE 2 -53 Elac SBE 2-52
Endurance: 370 hours 360 hourd
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 700mtr
Frequency: 121,5, 243 and 406 Mhz
Endurance: 10 days
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy Yes
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: No
Compartment: No
Endurance: No
SEEPIRB
Compartments: No
Type: No
Endurance: No
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: 2 in fwd, 2 in aft compartment
Frequency: 121,5, 243,0 and 406,025
Type: MR 509
Endurance: > 24 hours
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fwd and aft escape compartment
Type: Nr 21 / 4 inch NSN 1370-17-054-0001
Colors: Red, green, yellow, white, white
with messenger and green dye
Endurance: Minimal 6 minutes
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Escape compartment forward and aft
Mini POD Capable: Yes

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 7 days


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2 800 cannisters of sodalime
scrubbing material referred in kg:
Number of National Units O2 76 candles CAN 33 48 in fwd escape compartment
bottles/candles referred in liters: 28 in aft escape compartment

II-2-NLD-12 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: CAMS 1
Gases: CO, CO2, O2,H2,R12,R22
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Analox Drager tubes
Gases: O2 , CO2 CO, CO2, O2,HCN,NO2 Cl2
Endurance: 7 days
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 2 x 575 ltr, 275 bar Bottles in casing

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 2400
Overall Length (m): 68
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 7.2
Beam (m): 6.8
Max Casing Height (m): 3.5
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 8.6

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 19.07
Max Load (T): 100Kn
Fin Capability
Length (m): 12
Width (m): 4
Height above Casing (m): 6.6
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 15
(m):
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load None
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load None
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 6 and 12 29 and 42
(m):
Number of Bollards: 4 4
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 120 120
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability 40 Kn 40 Kn
(T):

II-2-NLD-13 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Max Transverse Load Capability (T): 40 Kn 40 Kn

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): 70 None
Location: bow None
Max Loading (T): 126Kn None

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): Chain
Length of Cable (m): 175 mtr
Max Loading (T): 126Kn

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1
Number of Bullrings: 1 1

II-2-NLD-14 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
PART II

CHAPTER 2

TURKEY

II-2-TUR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-TUR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

AY CLASS (T 1200) SUBMARINES


TURKEY

II-2-TUR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-TUR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: AY Class Type 209 (T 1200)
Number of Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Volume Rescue / Escape Compartment: 700 m³ Single Compartment.
No watertight Bulkhead
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 4 x 340Lt. x 250 Kg/cm² Single Compartment.
connection to Rescue / Escape No watertight Bulkhead
compartment:
Two Man Escape Trunk: Yes
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suites: MK-10 Beaufort / 45
Maximum number of crew: 39
Number of Rescue Seats No
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: No
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes
POD bags & ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks: UH: 650 mm
LH: 650 mm
Length: 2045mm
Ventilation / Depressurisation Yes
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: UT-12
Frequency Transmitting: 8.0-11.5 kHz. (Voice)
8.8 kHz. (Keyed CW)
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: CSU 3-22 (UWT Mod) Only on boats TCG Yildiray,
TCG Batiray, TCG Doganay,
TCG Dolunay
Frequency Transmitting: 8.6-11.5 kHz.
Automatic Emergency Mode: No

II-2-TUR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
No
Pinger

Indicator buoy tethered


No Life Raft acts as indicator
within length of cable.
Length of cable: 184 m
Frequency:
Endurance:
Indicator light: No
Combined life raft/indicator buoy Yes
Expendable Communication Buoy
No

SEEPIRB
No

Personal Locator Beacon


No

Endurance:
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: MKE
Colors: 3 Red, 10 Green, 10 White
Submarine Signal Ejector
Yes
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal ~ 200 Hours
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2
scrubbing material referred in kg: 5000 Kg (Potassium Chlorate)
Number of National Units O2
bottles/candles referred in liters: 20 x 50 Lt x 200 Kg/cm²

II-2-TUR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Beckman 715
Ducalix B6-33 (H2)
Gases: CO2, O2, H2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Dräger XM 7000
Gases: CO2, O2, H2, Cl2, H2S, CO
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 4 x 340 Lt x 250 Kg/cm²

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1180 T
Overall Length (m): 55,87 m
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5,6 m
Beam (m): 6,2 m Aft Hydroplanes - 7,60 m
Max Casing Height (m): 7,1 m (For boats TCG Atilay & TCG Fin - 11.8 m
Saldiray)
7,7 m (For boats TCG Yildiray, TCG
Batiray, TCG Doganay,
TCG Dolunay)
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 0 Trim

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 30 m Polyamide Rope
Max Load (T): 30 T
Fin Capability No

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 2,2 m (Center of pair) 29.8 m (Center of 2 pairs)
(m):
Number of Bollards: 2 (For boats TCG Atilay &
TCG Saldiray)
4 (For boats TCG Yildiray, 4
TCG Batiray, TCG Doganay,
TCG Dolunay)
Height of raised Bollard above
Casing (mm): 235 mm 235 mm
Max Longitudinal Load Capability 24 T 24 T
(T):

II-2-TUR-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Max Transverse Load Capability 24 T 24 T
(T):

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) No No

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 19 mm
Length of Cable (m): 200 m
Max Loading (T): 9,2 T

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 -

II-2-TUR-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PREVEZE CLASS (T 1400) SUBMARINES


TURKEY

II-2-TUR-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-TUR-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Preveze Class Type 209 (T 1400)
Number of Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Volume Rescue / Escape Compartment: 712 m³ Single Compartment.
No watertight Bulkhead
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 4 x 340Lt. x 250 Kg/cm² Single Compartment.
connection to Rescue / Escape No watertight Bulkhead
compartment:
Two Man Escape Trunk: Yes
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suites: MK-10 Beaufort / 50
Maximum number of crew: 44
Number of Rescue Seats 1 - Forward Escape Trunk Hatch
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes
POD bags & ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks: UH: 650 mm
LH: 650 mm
Length: 2350 mm
Ventilation / Depressurisation Yes
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: TBSH-04
Frequency Transmitting: 8.088 kHz. (Voice)
712 Hz. (CW)
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: ISUS 83-26 (UT)
Frequency Transmitting: 8.3875-11.3875 kHz.
Automatic Emergency Mode: No

II-2-TUR-11 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise


Pinger
Compartment: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: LF 5 kHz.
HF 35 kHz.
Type: Honeywell ELAC SBE 1
Endurance: ~ 400 Hours
Indicator buoy tethered
No Life Raft acts as indicator
within length of cable.
Length of cable: 650 m
Frequency:
Endurance:
Indicator light: No
Combined life raft/indicator buoy Yes
Expendable Communication Buoy
No
Frequency:
Compartment:
Endurance:
EPIRB is located in life raft and
SEEPIRB
Yes must be activated manually.
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: TRON 40S
Endurance: -
Personal Locator Beacon
No

Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: MKE
Colors: 3 Red, 10 Green, 10 White
Submarine Signal Ejector
Yes
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal ~ 220 Hours
capabilities and emergency food/water:

II-2-TUR-12 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Number of National Units CO2
scrubbing material referred in kg: 5500 Kg
Number of National Units O2
bottles/candles referred in liters: 21 x 50 Lt x 200 Kg/cm²

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: CO2 Dräger Polytron (Infrared)
O2 Dräger Polytron(Partial Pressure)
H2 Rosemount
Gases: CO2, O2, H2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Dräger XM 7000
Gases: CO2, O2, H2, Cl2, H2S, CO
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 4 x 340 Lt x 250 Kg/cm²

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1454 T
Overall Length (m): 62 m
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5,8 m
Beam (m): 6,2 m Aft Hydroplanes - 7,60 m
Max Casing Height (m): 7,7 m Fin - 12.5 m
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 0 Trim

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 30 m Polyamide Rope
Max Load (T): 30 T
Fin Capability No

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 3,43 m (Center of 2 pairs) 35.8 m (Center of 2 pairs)
(m): 17,2 m (Center of 2 pairs) Middle
Number of Bollards: 4 (+ 4 Middle ) 4

Height of raised Bollard above


Casing (mm): 240 mm 240 mm
Max Longitudinal Load Capability 46 T 46 T
(T):

II-2-TUR-13 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Max Transverse Load Capability 46 T 46 T


(T):

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Yes Yes


Size of Eye (mm): Inner Radius 96 mm Inner Radius 96 mm
Location FP: 2,61 m 40 m
Max Loading (T): 58,6 T Horizontal Plane 58,6 T Horizontal Plane
30 T Vertical Plane 30 T Vertical Plane

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 20,5 mm
Length of Cable (m): 200 m
Max Loading (T): 10 T

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1

II-2-TUR-14 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

GUR CLASS (T 1400) SUBMARINES


TURKEY

II-2-TUR-15 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-TUR-16 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Gur Class Type 209 (T 1400)
Number of Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Volume Rescue / Escape Compartment: 720 m³ Single Compartment.
No watertight Bulkhead
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with 4 x 340Lt. x 250 Kg/cm² Single Compartment.
connection to Rescue / Escape No watertight Bulkhead
compartment:
Two Man Escape Trunk: Yes
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suites: MK-10 Beaufort / 50
Maximum number of crew: 45
Number of Rescue Seats 1 - Forward Escape Trunk Hatch
(STANAG 1297):
Seat Certification: Yes
SRC capable: Yes
POD Capable / possible limitations: Yes
POD bags & ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks: UH: 650 mm
LH: 650 mm
Length: 2350 mm
Ventilation / Depressurisation Yes
capabilities (STANAG 1450)
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: No

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: TUBITAK TBSH-04
Frequency Transmitting: 8.088 kHz. (Voice)
712 Hz. (CW)
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: ISUS 90-33 (UT)
Frequency Transmitting: 8.0875 kHz.
Automatic Emergency Mode: No

II-2-TUR-17 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: LF 5 kHz.
HF 35 kHz.
Type: Honeywell ELAC SBE 1-10
Endurance: ~ 400 Hours
Indicator buoy tethered
No Life Raft acts as indicator
within length of cable.
Length of cable: 650 m
Frequency:
Endurance:
Indicator light: No
Combined life raft/indicator buoy Yes
Expendable Communication Buoy
No

EPIRB is located in life raft.


SEEPIRB
Yes
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: TRON 40S
Endurance: -
Personal Locator Beacon
No

Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Type: MKE
Colors: 3 Red, 10 Green, 10 White
Submarine Signal Ejector
Yes
Compartments: Single Compartment No Watertight Bulkheads
Mini POD Capable: No

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in


hours, per compartment, based on the
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal ~ 240 Hours
capabilities and emergency food/water:
Number of National Units CO2
scrubbing material referred in kg: 6600 Kg

II-2-TUR-18 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Number of National Units O2 21 x 50 Lt x 200 Kg/cm² Additional 1 bottle 1 x 340 Lt x


bottles/candles referred in liters: 200 Kg/cm² (outside the
pressure hull).

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: CO2 Dräger Polytron(Infrared)
O2 Dräger Polytron(Partial Pressure)
H2 Fischer Rosemount
Gases: CO2, O2, H2
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Dräger XM 7000
Gases: CO2, O2, H2, Cl2, H2S, CO
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: 4 x 340 Lt x 250 Kg/cm²

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 1454 T
Overall Length (m): 62 m
Max surfaced Drafts (m): 5,8 m
Beam (m): 6,2 m Aft Hydroplanes - 7,60 m
Max Casing Height (m): 7,7 m Fin - 12.5 m
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 0 Trim

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 30 m Polyamide Rope
Max Load (T): 30 T
Fin Capability No

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 3,43 m (Center of 2 pairs) 35.8 m (Center of 2 pairs)
(m): 17,2 m (Center of 2 pairs) Middle
Number of Bollards: 4 (+ 4 Middle ) 4

Height of raised Bollard above


Casing (mm): 240 mm 240 mm
Max Longitudinal Load Capability 46 T 46 T
(T):

II-2-TUR-19 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Max Transverse Load Capability 46 T 46 T


(T):

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Yes Yes


Size of Eye (mm): Inner Radius 96 mm Inner Radius 96 mm
Location FP: 2,61 m 40 m
Max Loading (T): 58,6 T Horizontal Plane 58,6 T Horizontal Plane
30 T Vertical Plane 30 T Vertical Plane

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 20,5 mm
Length of Cable (m): 200 m
Max Loading (T): 10 T

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 1

II-2-TUR-20 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

PART II

CHAPTER 2

UNITED KINGDOM

II-2-GBR-1 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-GBR-2 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Vanguard Class
More detailed information will be provided by the UK Rescue coordination centre as required

II-2-GBR-3 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-GBR-4 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Vanguard
Number of Compartments: Two
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: Fwd Compartment:
Volume = 3032m3
Aft Compartment:
Volume = 1667m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with Fwd Compartment:
connection to Rescue / Escape Volume: 2.322m3 9 off 0.258m3 Cylinders
compartment(s): Pressure: 276 Bar
Aft Compartment:
Volume: 2.322m3 9 off 0.258m3 Cylinders
Pressure: 276 Bar
Single Escape trunk: No
Two man escape trunk: Fwd Compartment: LET (Logistics & Embarkation
LET Trunk)
Aft Compartment:
LET
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suits: Fwd Compartment: SEIE Mk10
168 in number (Plus additional suits for sea
Aft Compartment: riders as required)
168 in number 2008-2010 to be replaced by
BFA SPES
Maximum number of crew: 162 in number
Number of Rescue Seats 3 in number one at fwd LET, one at
(STANAG 1297): amidships LET and one at aft LET
Seat Certification:
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: POD Posting Capable
Depth Limit 426m using
ROV/ADS/Divers/LR5/RV
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Hatch Dimensions:
(Transferred from STANAG 1391): Fwd LET Upper – 762mm Diameter
Fwd LET Lower – 762mm Diameter
Aft LET Upper – 762mm Diameter
Aft LET Lower – 762mm Diameter

UK ELSS POD Dimensions:


Overall Length – 1260mm
Outside Diameter – 360mm
Ventilation / Depressurization Ventilation: No
capabilities (STANAG 1450) Depressurisation: No

II-2-GBR-5 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes Utilising salvage techniques


capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: BIBS: No Re-supply of BIBS bottles from
HP Air: No HP air system only possible
with base support

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Control Room
Type: Sonar 2008
Frequency Transmitting: 8.08 kHz Carrier frequency
Transmit/Receive 10kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number
Mid LET:
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Type: Sonar 2073
Frequency Transmitting: Voice Comms – 10/27/43 kHz Continuous Endurance:
12hrs Transmitting (10kHz)
32hrs Receiving (10kHz)

Acoustic Beacon – 10/37.5kHz Submarine Locator Acoustic


Homing Beacon – 10/37.5kHz Beacon (SLAB)
168hrs Low Freq pinging
5hrs High Freq pinging
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: Fwd Compartment:
Channel 44
Aft Compartment:
Channel 33
Type: Model 409 SSE Launched
Transponder

II-2-GBR-6 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Endurance: Inactive >45days


1Hz interrogation >24hrs
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 1000 Metres Type 639 – 2 in number one
forward and one aft
Frequency: GMDSS 243 and 406.0 MHz (Alert and Locate)
Endurance: 72 Hours
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: GMDSS 406.0 MHz Type 680
Compartment: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Endurance: 8 Hours
SEPIRBS being introduced
SEEPIRB
across the Flotilla 2009. Check
with SUBOPAUTH for
individual unit fit.
Compartments:
Type:
Endurance:
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: Fwd Compartment: Generally deployed first, middle
3 in number and second to last escapee
Aft Compartment
3 in number
Frequency: GMDSS 121.5/243/406.0 MHz
Type: PLB(S) SARBE 10
Endurance: 24 Hours
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fwd Aft
Type: Grenade and Grenade and
Smoke Candles Smoke Candles
Colors: Red Grenade Red Grenade
White Smoke White Smoke
Endurance: 4 in number Red 4 in number Red
Grenades and 6 Grenades and 6
in number White in number White
Smoke Smoke

II-2-GBR-7 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Submarine Signal Ejector


Compartments: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number SSE Mk10
Aft Compartment:
2 in number SSE Mk10 (Port and Stbd)

Mini POD Capable: Not proven Takes a 4inch diameter store or


with a sleeve will take a 3inch
diameter store with a maximum
length of 40.4inches

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS
Survivability of a standard crew, in 168 Hours (7 Days)
hours, per compartment, based on the 1Litre water pmpd
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal 100g boiled sweets pmpd
capabilities and emergency food/water: 210g ration bar pmpd
1151kCal pmpd
Number of National Units CO2 Fwd Compartment: 4 in number Carbon Dioxide
scrubbing material referred in kg: 271 in number Absorption Unit, 2 in number
Information is provided per platform Aft Compartment: fwd compartment and 2 in
272 in number number aft compartment
(Cannisters)
From late 2007 the CO2
canisters designated for
Submarine escape and rescue
will be replaced with Lithium
Hydroxide Curtains
Number of National Units CO2 Forward Compartment: 1 box contains 1 x 50ft curtain
Lithium Hydroxide Curtains 255 Boxes
Information is provided per platform Aft Compartment: To be introduced late 2007
255 Boxes onwards
Number of National Units O2 Fwd Compartment: 4 in number Self Contained
bottles/candles referred in liters: 144 in number Oxygen Generator (SCOG)
Information is provided per platform Aft Compartment: Holders, 3 fwd and 2 aft. Each
172 in number SCOG Holder can hold 2
SCOGs

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Central Atmosphere Monitoring
System
Gases: Oxygen
Carbon Dioxide
Carbon Monoxide
II-2-GBR-8 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Hydrogen
R114, R12
Halon 1301 / Freon 13B1
Benzene
Aliphatic Organics
Aromatic Organics
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Fwd Compartment:
2 x Draeger Gas Detector Kits
2 x Analox Multi Gas and Pressure
monitors
1 x Absolute Pressure Gauge
Aft Compartment:
2 x Draeger Gas Detector Kits
2 x Analox Multi Gas and Pressure
monitors
1 x Absolute Pressure Gauge
Gases: Oxygen
Carbon Dioxide
Chlorine
Endurance: Oxygen: 38packs (380tubes) 0.5 hourly – 7.9days
Carbon Dioxide: 30packs (300tubes) 0.5 hourly – 6.25days
Chlorine: 2packs (20 tubes) 6 hourly, 2 hourly – 5days,
1.6days
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Fwd Compartment:
Volume – 2.322m3 9 off 0.258m3 Cylinders
Pressure – 276Bar
Aft Compartment:
Volume – 2.322m3 9 off 0.258m3 Cylinders
Pressure – 276Bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 13996tonnes Deep surface condition
Overall Length (m): 149.3metres
Max surfaced Drafts (m): Fwd Marks: 10.1metres Deep surface condition
Aft Marks: 11.0metres
Beam (m): 19.3metres Extreme to outside of
stabilisers
Max Casing Height (m): 4.0metres Waterline to top of casing
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: 0.9metres by the stern Deep surface condition
Yes
Rip Out Tow
Length of Wire (m): 100metres High Modulus Polyethylene
Rope
II-2-GBR-9 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Max Load (T):
Fin Capability
Length (m):

Width (m):
Height above Casing (m): 6.9metres
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 25.9metres Fin Fairing/casing intersection
(m): 28.0metres Fin leading edge intersection
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T):
Fwd Aft
Bollards (if fitted)
Location from Fwd Perpendicular Fwd: 15.4metres Fwd: 89.6metres
(m): Centre: 25.6metres Centre: 101.2metres
Aft: 46.1metres Aft: 118.6metres
Number of Bollards: Fwd: 3 in number Fwd: 2 in number
Centre: 1 in number Centre: 1 in number
Aft: 2 in number Aft: 3 in number
Height of raised Bollard above Casing 225mm 225mm
(mm):
Max Longitudinal Load Capability
(T):
Max Transverse Load Capability (T):
Fwd Aft
Special Towing Eyes (if fitted)
Size of Eye (mm): n/a n/a
Location: n/a n/a
Max Loading (T): n/a n/a
Anchor Facility and location
Size of cable (mm): 35mm
Length of Cable (m): 247.0metres
Max Loading (T): Anchor Windlass Brake = 21tonnes
Anchor Chain =
Fwd Aft
Other Information
Number of Capstans: 1 in number 1 in number
Number of Bullrings: 1 in number 2 in number

II-2-GBR-10 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Trafalgar Class
More detailed information will be provided by the UK Rescue coordination centre as required

II-2-GBR-11 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-GBR-12 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA

DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Trafalgar
Number of Compartments: Two
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: Fwd Compartment:
Volume = 220m3
Aft Compartment:
Volume = 789m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with Fwd Compartment:
connection to Rescue / Escape Volume – 1.29m3 5 in number 0.258m3 Cylinders
compartment(s): Pressure – 295bar
Aft Compartment:
Volume – 1.29m3 5 in number 0.258m3 Cylinders
Pressure – 295bar
Single Escape trunk: Fwd Compartment:
Yes, SET
Aft Compartment:
Yes, SET
Two man escape trunk: No
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suits: Fwd Compartment: SEIE Mk10
115 in number (plus additional suits for sea
Aft Compartment: riders as required)
115 in number 2008-2010 to be replaced by
BFA SPES
Maximum number of crew: 124 in number
Number of Rescue Seats 2 in number one at Fwd SET and
(STANAG 1297): one at Aft SET
Seat Certification:
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: POD Posting Capable Introduction of higher depth
Depth Limit 180metres rated lower lid will allow POD
posting to maximum rescue
depth
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Hatch Dimensions:
(Transferred from STANAG 1391): FET – Upper Hatch – 0.610m clear
opening
AET – Upper Hatch – 0.610m clear
opening

UK ELSS POD Dimensions:


Overall Length – 1260mm
Outside Diameter – 360mm
Ventilation / Depressurization Ventilation: No
capabilities (STANAG 1450) Depressurisation: No

II-2-GBR-13 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes Utilising salvage techniques


capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: BIBS: No Re-supply of BIBS bottles from
HP Air: No HP air system only possible
with base support

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Control Room
Type: Sonar 2008
Frequency Transmitting: 8.08kHz Carrier frequency
Transmit/Receive 10kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Type: Sonar 2073
Frequency Transmitting: Voice Comms – 10/27/43kHz Continuous Endurance:
12hrs Transmitting (10kHz)
32hrs Receiving (10kHz)

Acoustic Beacon – 10/37.5kHz Submarine Locator Acoustic


Homing Beacon – 10/37.5kHz Beacon (SLAB)
168hrs Low Freq pinging
5hrs High Freq pinging
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: Fwd Compartment:
Channel 44
Aft Compartment:
Channel 33
Type: Model 409 SSE Launched
Transponder
Endurance: Inactive >45days
1Hz interrogation >24hrs

II-2-GBR-14 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 1000 metres Type 639 – 2 in number one
forward and one aft
Frequency: GMDSS 243 and 406.0MHz (Alert and Locate)
Endurance: 72 Hours
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: GMDSS 406.0MHz Type 680
Compartment: Fwd Compartment:
2 in number
Aft Compartment:
2 in number
Endurance: 8 Hours
SEPIRBS being introduced
SEEPIRB
across the Flotilla 2009. Check
with SUBOPAUTH for
individual unit fit.
Compartments:
Type:
Endurance:
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: Fwd Compartment: Generally deployed first, middle
3 in number and second last escapee
Aft Compartment:
3 in number
Frequency: GMDSS 121.5/243/406.0MHz
Type: PLB(S) SARBE 10
Endurance: 24 Hours
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fwd Aft
Type: Grenade and Grenade and
Smoke Candles Smoke Candles
Colors: Red Grenade Red Grenade
White Smoke White Smoke
Endurance: 4 in number Red 4 in number Red
Grenades and 6 Grenades and 6
in number White in number White
Smoke Smoke
Submarine Signal Ejector
Compartments: Fwd Compartment: Type Mk8
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number

II-2-GBR-15 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Mini POD Capable: Not proven Takes a 4inch diameter store or


with a sleeve will take a 3inch
diameter store with a maximum
length of 40.4inches

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 168Hours (7 Days)


hours, per compartment, based on the 1Litre water pmpd
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal 100g boiled sweets pmpd
capabilities and emergency food/water: 210g ration bar pmpd
1151kCal pmpd
Number of National Units CO2 Forward Compartment: 4 in number Carbon Dioxide
scrubbing material referred in kg: 148 in number Absorption Units, 2 forward
Information is provided per platform Aft Compartment: and 2 aft.
168 in number
(Canisters) From late 2007 the CO2
canisters designated for
Submarine escape and rescue
will be replaced with Lithium
Hydroxide Curtains
Number of National Units CO2 Forward Compartment: 1 box contains 1 x 50ft curtain
Lithium Hydroxide Curtains 184 Boxes
Information is provided per platform Aft Compartment: To be introduced late 2007
184 Boxes onwards
Number of National Units O2 Forward Compartment: 4 in number Self Contained
bottles/candles referred in liters: 111 in number Oxygen Generator (SCOG)
Information is provided per platform Aft Compartment: Holders, 2 fwd and 2 aft. Each
111 in number SCOG Holder can hold 2
SCOGs

ATMOSPHERE / ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Fixed Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Central Atmosphere Monitoring
System
Gases: Oxygen
Carbon Dioxide
Carbon Monoxide
Hydrogen
R114, R12
Halon 1301 / Freon 13B1
Benzene
Aliphatic Organics
Aromatic Organics

II-2-GBR-16 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Emergency Atmospheric Monitoring
Type: Fwd Compartment:
2 x Draeger Gas Detector Kits
2 x Analox Multi Gas and Pressure
monitors
1 x Absolute Pressure Gauge
Aft Compartment:
2 x Draeger Gas Detector Kits
2 x Analox Multi Gas and Pressure
monitors
1 x Absolute Pressure Gauge
Gases: Oxygen
Carbon Dioxide
Chlorine
Endurance: Oxygen: 38packs (380tubes) 0.5 hourly – 7.9days
Carbon Dioxide: 30packs (300tubes) 0.5 hourly – 6.25days
Chlorine: 2packs (20 tubes) 6 hourly, 2 hourly – 5days,
1.6days
Fixed Emergency Breathing System
Compartment, Volume and Pressure: Fwd Compartment:
Volume 1.29m3 5 x 0.258m3 Cylinders
Pressure – 295Bar
Aft Compartment:
Volume 1.29m3 5 x 0.258m3 Cylinders
Pressure – 295Bar

SUBMARINE TOWING DATA


EQUIPMENT REMARKS

Submarine Particulars
Surfaced Displacement (T): 4740 tonnes Deep Surfaced
Overall Length (m): HMS Trafalgar 85.4metres
HMS Turbulent onwards 86.0metres
Max surfaced Drafts (m): Forward Marks 8.1metres Deep surface condition
Aft Marks 8.8metres
Beam (m): HMS Trafalgar 13.9metres Extreme to Outside of
HMS Turbulent onwards 14.2metres stabilizers
Max Casing Height (m): 10.7metres USK to top of superstructure
casing
Trim Fwd or Trim Aft: Trim Aft 0.8metres Deep surface condition

Rip Out Tow Yes


Length of Wire (m): 100metres High Modulus Polyethylene
Rope

Max Load (T): 114tonnes


Fin Capability
Length (m): 9.0metres
II-2-GBR-17 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
Width (m): 2.0metres
Height above Casing (m): 5.5metres Top of superstructure to top
of Bridge Fin
Location from Fwd Perpendicular 27.4metres FP coincident with the
(m): extreme forward end of the
ship
Max Permissible Longitudinal Load 4.5tonnes 4.7tonnes at towing vessel
(T):
Max Permissible Transverse Load
(T):

Bollards (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Location from Fwd Perpendicular 3 in number (12.8metres) 1 in number (50.4metres)
(m): 1 in number (25.3metres) 3 in number (63.1metres)
Number of Bollards: 4 in number 4 in number
Height of raised Bollard above Old Cleat = Old Cleat =
Casing (mm): Modified Cleat = Modified Cleat =
New Cleat = 199mm New Cleat = 199 mm
Max Longitudinal Load Capability Old Cleat = 4tonnes Old Cleat = 4tonnes
(T): Modified Cleat = 7.5tonnes Modified Cleat = 7.5tonnes
New Cleat = 12tonnes New Cleat = 12tonnes
Max Transverse Load Capability
(T):

Special Towing Eyes (if fitted) Fwd Aft


Size of Eye (mm): n/a n/a
Location: n/a n/a
Max Loading (T): n/a n/a

Anchor Facility and location


Size of cable (mm): 25mm
Length of Cable (m): 192.0metres 8 x 15fathoms
Max Loading (T): Anchor Windlass Brake = 13.2tonnes (based on maximum stalled
Anchor Chain = 39.7tonnes load)

Other Information Fwd Aft


Number of Capstans: 1 in number 1 in number
Number of Bullrings: 1 in number 1 in number

II-2-GBR-18 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Swiftsure Class
More detailed information will be provided by the UK Rescue coordination centre as required

II-2-GBR-19 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

II-2-GBR-20 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

SUBMARINE SPECIFIC DATA


DATA REMARKS
Submarine Class: Swiftsure
Number of Compartments: Two
Volume Rescue / Escape compartment: Fwd Compartment:
Volume = 213m3
Aft Compartment:
Volume = 744m3
Volume / Pressure HP Air bottles with Fwd Compartment:
connection to Rescue / Escape Volume – 1.29m3 5 in number 0.258 m3 Cylinders
compartment(s): Pressure – 295Bar
Aft Compartment:
Volume – 1.29m3 5 in number 0.258 m3 Cylinders
Pressure – 295Bar
Single Escape trunk: Fwd Compartment:
SET
Aft Compartment:
SET
Two man escape trunk: n/a
Compartment Escape (Rush escape): Yes
Escape Suits: Fwd Compartment: SEIE Mk10
115 in number (plus additional suits for sea
Aft Compartment: riders as required)
115 in number 2008-2010 to be replaced by
BFA SPES
Maximum number of crew: 124 in number
Number of Rescue Seats 2 in number one at Fwd SET and
(STANAG 1297): One at Aft SET
Seat Certification:
SRC capable: No
POD Capable / possible limitations: POD Posting Capable Introduction of higher depth
Depth limit 180metres rated lower lid will allow POD
posting to maximum rescue
depth.
POD bags w/ropes pre-stored on board: Yes
Dimensions Hatches and POD Trunks Hatch Dimensions: Superb Only (similar except):
(Transferred from STANAG 1391): FET – Lower – Oval major axis AET – Lower – Oval major axis
18in (0.457m) minor axis 16.5in 18in (0.457m) minor axis 16.5in
(0.419m) (0.419m)
FET – Upper – 24in (0.610m)
diameter
AET – Lower – Oval major axis
19.5in (0.495m) minor axis 18in
(0.457m)
AET – Upper – 24in (0.610m)
diameter

II-2-GBR-21 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)
UK ELSS POD Dimensions:
Overall Length = 1260mm
Outside Diameter = 360mm
Ventilation / Depressurization Ventilation: No
capabilities (STANAG 1450) Depressurisation: No
Surface assisted emergency blowing Yes Utilising salvage techniques
capabilities:
Re-supply of BIBS/HP air capability: BIBS: No Re-supply of BIBS bottles from
HP Air: No Submarine HP air system only
possible with base support

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATON AND ALERTING CAPABILITIES


EQUIPMENT REMARKS
Main UWT
Compartments: Control Room
Type: Sonar 2008
Frequency Transmitting: 8.08 kHz Carrier frequency
Transmit/Receive 10kHz
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency UWT
Compartments: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Type: Sonar 2073
Frequency Transmitting: Voice Comms – 10/27/43kHz Continuous Endurance:
12hrs Transmitting (10kHz)
32hrs Receiving (10kHz)

Acoustic Beacon – 10/37.5kHz Submarine Locator Acoustic


Homing Beacon – 10/37.5kHz Beacon (SLAB)
168hrs Low Freq pinging
5hrs High Freq pinging
Automatic Emergency Mode: No
Emergency Sonar Beacon/Noise
Pinger
Compartment: Fwd Compartment:
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Remotely operated: No
Frequency: Fwd Compartment:
Channel 44
Aft Compartment:
Channel 33

II-2-GBR-22 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Type: Model 409 SSE Launched


Transponder
Endurance: Inactive >45days
1Hz interrogation >24hrs
Indicator buoy tethered
Length of cable: 1000meters Type 639 – 2 in number one
forward and one aft
Frequency: GMDSS 243 and 406.0MHz (Alert and Locate)
Endurance: 72 Hours
Indicator light: Yes
Combined life raft/indicator buoy No
Expendable Communication Buoy
Frequency: GMDSS 406.0MHz Type 680
Compartment: Fwd Compartment:
2 in number
Aft Compartment:
2 in number
Endurance: 8 Hours
SEPIRBS being introduced
SEEPIRB
across the Flotilla 2009. Check
with SUBOPAUTH for
individual unit fit.
Compartments:
Type:
Endurance:
Personal Locator Beacon
Compartments: Fwd Compartment: Generally deployed first, middle
3 in number and second last escapee
Aft Compartment:
3 in number
Frequency: GMDSS 121.5/243/406.0MHz
Type: PLB(S) SARBE 10
Endurance: 24 Hours
Pyrotechnics (Flares)
Compartment: Fwd Aft
Type: Grenade and Grenade and
Smoke Candle Smoke Candle
Colors: Red Grenade Red Grenade
White Smoke White Smoke
Endurance: 4 in number Red 4 in number Red
Grenades and 6 Grenades and 6
in number White in number White
Smoke Smoke

II-2-GBR-23 ORIGINAL
ATP 57(B)

Submarine Signal Ejector


Compartments: Fwd Compartment: Type Mk 6
1 in number
Aft Compartment:
1 in number
Mini POD Capable: Not proven Takes a 4inch diameter store or
with a sleeve will take a 3inch
diameter store with a maximum
length of 40.4inches

SURVIVABILITY / Emergency Life Support Stores (ELSS)


REMARKS

Survivability of a standard crew, in 168Hours (7Days)


hours, per compartment, based on the 1Litre water pmpd
aboard availability of O2, CO2 removal 100g boiled sweets pmpd
capabilities and emergency food/water: 210g ration bar pmpd
1151kCal pmpd
Number of National Units CO2 Forward Compartment: 4 in number Carbon Dioxide
scrubbing material referred in kg: 148 in number Absorption Units, 2 forward
Information is provided per platform Aft Compartment: and 2 aft.
168 in number
(Canisters) From late 2007 the CO2
canisters designated for
Submarine escape and rescue
will be replaced with Lithium
Hydroxide Curtains