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A E

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COUNTRYLIVING.COM

PG. 74
AUGUST 2009

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contents
August 2009

Features
82

Greener Pastures A reformed city girl


reveals what happened when she relocated
her family from Los Angeles to a farm in
upstate New York. By Paige Smith Orloff

90

High Camp Roughing it? Not quite. These


rened takes on rugged outdoor gear chart
stylish new territory. By Jessica Dodell-Feder

96

Coming Full Circle When Jamey Berger


moved back to the Wisconsin town where
his family has lived since 1836, he and
partner Dan DiPaolo got much more than
they bargained fornamely, a whole new
way of life. By Louisa Kamps

104

Summers Sweetest Reward Celebrate


the seasons bounty of fresh corn with these
recipes for breakfast, dinner, and everything
in between. By Monica Michael Willis

110

Good Enough to Eat With an impressive


master plan, Pamela Page transformed
a rocky Connecticut lot into an abundant
organic kitchen garden. By Douglas Brenner

90
Sit (pretty) on
the dock of the
bay in vibrant
buttery chairs.

ON THE COVER A lively striped cotton


rug ($550, 6' 9'; madelineweinrib.com for
stores) gives vintage porch furniture a lift at
Paige Smith Orloffs New York farmhouse. For more, see page 82. Photograph
by Lucas Allen. Styling by Olga Naiman.

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

.5

contents

69

Creative
fun at New
Hampshires
Squam Art
Workshops

47

Diner dishes
that cost little
more than a
blue plate special

772
2
35

An Edwardian chair
gets back to nature.

Collecting
l cting
lecting

The Good Life


19

The best way to spend $5, Americas most popular silver patterns,
and a sneak peek at the set
of Meryl Streeps new movie.
Plus: Real Estate Sampler.

47

Old and Now Retro restaurant


urant
ant
ware serves up sweet nostalgiaat
seriously old-fashioned prices.

50

What Is It? What Is It Worth?


A 1950s television set, mini furniture
samples valued at $1,200, and more.

Fresh Picks
35

Beauty Pretty products that work


just as great as they look.

40

Entertaining Oregons
Willamette Valley produces
some of the nestand
most earth-friendly Pinot Gris.

42

Idea Notebook

Decorating A lively alternative


to the usual orals, lacy fern fronds
make a striking motif.

38

Out and About

57
60

66

Country Classic From its humble


beginnings, the farm table has
become a prized gathering spot.

Entertaining Arrange owers like


a pro with these 10 tricks from Manhattans FlowerSchool New York.
Budget Makeover Thanks to
smart wallet-friendly xes, an
outdated living room becomes
a cheerful oasis.

69
6

Travel These 10 crafty workshops


prove summer camps not just for kids.

72

The Joy of... Scrabble gives writer


and book critic Liesl Schillinger a
whole other reason to love words.

76

Pets Our country vet tackles overly


affectionate kitties, Lyme disease
in dogs, and the hazards of adopting
an abandoned turtle.

IN EVERY ISSUE
12 Editors Note
14 Letters
119 Cookbook Succulent ribs, a ve-

ingredient peaches-and-cream shortcake, and one readers tomato pie.

DIY Made Easy A clever way to


jazz up a lampshade, add personality to bulletin boards, and turn a
wood door into a headboard.

57

19

Costco.com
sells roses for
less than
$1 a stem!

Americanmade Blenko
glass shows its
true colors.

127 Shop Guide


142 State Pride Were
mad for Maine!

CHECK
PAGE 7OUT
4!
Enter

o win
$100,t0
00
an
yo d pay off
ur mortg
age.

119
Roasted red peppers add
smokin avor to pimento cheese.

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Sarah Gray Miller


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
EXECUTIVE EDITOR

MANAGING EDITOR

Katy McColl

STYLE & MARKET DIRECTOR

Gyna S. Soucy

2008

DESIGN DIRECTOR

Natalie Warady

Sheri Geller

EDITOR I A L
FEATURES DIRECTOR

Monica Michael Willis


SENIOR EDITOR

Mary Kate Frank


SENIOR EDITOR/FOOD

Cheryl Slocum

1988

COPY CHIEF

Susanne L. Ruppert
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR

Steven J. Baker

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Jessica Dodell-Feder

My friends really enjoyed


watching me make a fool of myself
in front of the state capitol
building on this trip to Austin.

RESEARCH EDITOR

Kelsey Savage Hays


ASSISTANT EDITOR

Jourdan Crouch

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Lauren Callon

CONTRIBUTING SENIOR EDITOR

Tamara Glenny

CONTRIBUTING ASSISTANT EDITOR/FOOD

Khalil A. Hymore

ST Y LE & M A R K ET
DEPUTY STYLE EDITOR

Frances G. Bailey

SENIOR MARKET EDITOR

Rebecca N. Thienes
MARKET EDITOR

Katie Woolsey

1990

Here, Im hamming it up
in sleepy Bethany Beach,
Delaware, my familys
favorite getaway spot for
more than 15 years.

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Charles Fernandez

This was taken after my older sister


Erin and brother, Graham, made
me ride the teacups at Disney World.
Im smiling, but I was petried!

A RT
1989

ART DIRECTOR

Mike Bain

DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST

Toshiko S. Furuta

ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR

Alyson Keeling Cameron

1993

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER

Kayo Der Sarkissian

PHOTO
PHOTO EDITOR

Barbara Ovrutsky Menke


PHOTO ASSISTANT

Marina C. Harnik

ONLINE
SENIOR EDITOR

Karen Clark Pessoni


EDITOR-AT-LARGE

My brothers Carter [center] and Lewis


[right] and I adored vacations in Lake
Walloon, Michigan. Wed stay in a big
house with 17 other family members.

Jane Dagmi

Thats me at age 3 [left] with


my sisters, Helena [center]
and Erika [right], in Phuket,
Thailandit doesnt get
better than that.

EDITOR EMERITUS

Rachel Newman

CON T R IBU T ING EDI TOR S

Teri Edwards, Helaine Fendelman, Randy Florke, Marie Proeller Hueston, Stanley Hura, Keith Keegan, Richard Kollath, Barri Leiner,
Edward McCann, Ryan McPhail, Marie Moss, Melissa Ozawa, Kevin Reiner, Jill Kirchner Simpson, Serena Thompson
NEW YORK OFFICE (212) 649-3487

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Steven B. Grune
VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLISHER
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, ADVERTISING

Eric J. Gruseke

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, MARKETING

Christine Rannazzisi Gerstein

GENERAL MANAGER

Margaret M. Healy

A DV ERTISING

1964

NEW YORK OFFICE (212) 649-3198


HOME FURNISHINGS MANAGER Nancy Greenwald
ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Mallory Clayton, Maureen MCCarthy,


Patrick McHugh, Mary Ellen Morelli,
Jennifer Ryan

2008

SALES AND MARKETING ASSISTANTS

Brenton Land, Mehdi Ziani


CHICAGO OFFICE (312) 984-5197
ACCOUNT MANAGERS Martha Gale,

Cathy Whelan
SALES ASSISTANT Shifra T. Adler
WESTERN REGIONAL DIRECTOR Michael J. Petruncola,

(310) 664-2830
Elaine Diaz

SALES ASSOCIATE

My sisters, Rosann [center] and Chris


[right], and I were thrilled to nally be in
Cherokee, North Carolinadespite
countless signs promising we were almost
there, it took over an hours drive.

Shelley S. Zalewski,
Shelley Z, LLC, (248) 756-2420

DETROIT REPRESENTATIVE

The highlight of this San


Francisco vacation? My
college buddy Kristen and
me stuffing our faces
with In-N-Out burgers.

1966

SOUTHWEST REPRESENTATIVE Leslie Wehrmann,

The Ingersoll Company, (214) 526-3800


MARKETING DIRECTOR

Jenifer Walton

1977

SALES DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Lynn Kirincich

PROMOTION ART DIRECTOR

Sarah Massimo

MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Eileen D. Leahy

GROUP PRODUCTION MANAGER

Peter A. Farrell

ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION MANAGER

Frank Linzan

ADVERTISING SERVICES COORDINATOR

Melissa Ergisi

RESEARCH MANAGER

Joann Stanga

All I wanted to do during this pit


stop in Glidden, Wisconsinon
our way to see familywas climb
trees with my brothers [clockwise
from back left], Jack, Scott,
and Lance. I was such a tomboy!

I made many friends on this


trip to Pisa, Italybut they
really loved my dad, because
he bought them countless
scoops of gelato.

VP/GROUP CONSUMER MARKETING DIRECTOR

Alec Casey
DIRECTOR DIRECT RESPONSE Christine L. Hall
DIRECT RESPONSE ADVERTISING Lisa Del Vecchio, (212) 649-2928

2008

NEW ENGLAND TRAVEL REPRESENTATIVE Eric Lange,

Lange Media Sales, (617) 542-6913


SOUTHEAST TRAVEL REPRESENTATIVES Scott Miller, Mike Miller,

Miller Communications, LLC, (770) 993-2444


MIDWEST TRAVEL REPRESENTATIVE Warden, Kelley, Allen & Opfer, (312) 575-1100
CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE Boxer Media Inc., Mark Boxer, (416) 368-6800, ext. 10

Classified, (708) 352-8306


For subscription orders
and inquiries, log on to
service.countryliving.com,
or write to Country Living,
P.O. Box 7186, Red Oak,
IA 51591-0186, or call tollfree 800-888-0128

PUBLISHED BY HE AR ST COMMUNIC ATIONS, INC .,


A Unit of the Hearst Corporation
VICE CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Frank A. Bennack, Jr.
CHAIRMAN George R. Hearst, Jr.

HE AR ST M AGA ZINES DIVISION


PRESIDENT Cathleen Black
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Michael Clinton
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT John P. Loughlin
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Ellen Levine
PUBLISHING CONSULTANTS Richard E. Deems, Gilbert C. Maurer, Mark F. Miller

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After enjoying this view


in Capri, Italy, my family
and I saw the ruins in Pompeii.
It was such a beautiful, and
educational, trip.

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editors
ors note
My wedding day
in 20 03

Call Me
Old-Fashioned
Dont let these pictures fool youin
My mother,
a 1968 bride

My late grandmother
Mary Dunn Warren
(below) registered for
Mary Warren, a atware that happened
to share her name. My
mom, Mary Warren
Miller (left), followed
suit. For me, the pattern
is not eponymous, but
its still personal.

Three
generations,
one silver
pattern
My grandmothers
engagement
photo, c. 1936

Although the Manchester


Silver Company is now
defunct, its Mary Warren
pattern is still available at
replacements.com.

I have, on occasion, been mistaken for a


thoroughly modern galthe kind who outs
convention and breaks rules. And I understand why
people reach the wrong conclusion: After all, I did get
married in a minidress. It seems rebellious, except
for the fact that my mother wore the same dress to her
rehearsal dinner. I also registered for Moms silver
pattern, passed down from her mom. Yes, the stu costs
a fortune and requires constant polishing. But this
isnt just atware to me. Every single fork, knife, and
spoon holds meaning and reminds me of who I am
and where I came from. All of which is a long way of
explaining why youll nd pricey sterling silver,
instead of sensible stainless steel, highlighted in the
Good Life on page 20. I believe that some things
shouldnt be disposable and that true value often has
little to do with money.
Of course, as the cover promises, this issue is
jam-packed with deals, too. And I plan to snap up a
bunch of themincluding Pier 1s adorable $5 cow
creamer (page 20) and a $12 organic cotton T-shirt
from Wal-Mart (page 26). Not because Im trying
to scrimp and cut back, but so I can spend more on
whats truly importantlike carrying on
an old family tradition.

Sarah Gray Miller


E D I T O R- I N - C H I E F

sarahgray@hearst.com

12 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APH BY (SILVERWARE) REPL ACEMENTS, LTD.

some ways, Im the spitting image of


my mother and grandmother.

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letters

Readers react to our June issuesharing their fondness for North Carolina
barbecue, Pawleys Island hammocks, and the great state of Oklahoma.
I had to tell you how much I enjoyed Frances
Baileys story about North Carolina barbecue
B
[[The Great American Father-Daughter PigOut, page 108]. Im a born-and-bred Carolina
O
ggirl (Go Tar Heels! Sorry, Frances), and I
llove nothing more than eastern-style barbecue.
Allyson Calderon, Economy Borough, Pennsylvania

I deliver mail in some of


the most beautiful boondocks in Arkansas. Today,
I tucked your magazine
into so many mailboxes
that I could hardly wait to
curl up with my own issue.
When I did, your Editors
Note [page 10] brought
back memories of my own
childhood vacations.
Once, I was so anxious
READER:

the shop to watch the


Hammock Man,
Marvin Grant, at work.
Of course, we brought
a hammock homeand,
yes, we prefer napping
in it to mowing the lawn!
Kathy and Scott Lobdell
Plymouth, Minnesota

to see the ponies on


Chincoteague Island,
Virginia, but my parents
insisted on touring
every historical building
in Williamsburg!
Donna Hanke
Dover, Arkansas
Shame on you for featuring an aluminum birdhouse [For the Birds,
page 42]. Metal birdhouses
literally cook baby birds
and should never be used.
Cyndy Rogers
Anchorage, Alaska
Editors response: While
steel does indeed retain
heat, aluminum dissipates
it. We double-checked
with Greg Butcher of the
Audubon Society, who
conrmed that the house
wont harm birds of anyy age.
g

Padmini Mangunta

Marvin Grant makes a


hammock by hand.

Reading about Pawleys


Island hammocks [Made
in America, page 22]
reminded me of a trip my
husband and I took to
South Carolina. We visited

HOMETOWN:

Columbia, Missouri

HER FAVORITE SUMMER ACTIVIT Y:

Anything that gets me in the water. Id go kayaking every day if I could!


HER IDEA OF THE PERFECT DAY:

Well, kayaking, of course, or biking down the Katy Trail, which runs near
my house. Then ending the day on the back porch with a friend,
watching reies and soaking in that feeling in the air around twilight.
HER FAVORITE SIMPLE PLEA SURE:

Reading a book under a tree while listening to my iPod.

14 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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WE READ EVERY SINGLE


ONE OF YOUR LETTERS
So please, keep em coming!
E-mail countryliving@hearst
.com or write to: 300 West 57th
Street, NY, NY 10019. Letters
chosen for publication may be
edited for length and clarity. All
submissions become property
of Hearst Communications, Inc.

PHOTOGR APH BY (TOP LEF T) PHILIP FRIEDMAN/STUDIO D

Th k you ffor ffeaturing


Thank
dierent states on your
back page. I was raised in
Idaho [featured in May],
and I added my hometown of Orono to your
map. I also sent the
June issue spotlighting
Oklahoma [page 154] to
family members who
live in the Sooner State.
Susan K. Van Allen
Ogden, Utah

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the good life

Your guide to the best of whats happening in the countryside this month

PHOTOGR APH BY NOTLEY HAWKINS

See You at
the State Fair
California, Iowa, Maryland, and Wyoming number among the 26
states holding their annual fairs this month. In addition to the standard rides, concerts, and midway games, these events feature
eccentric regional festivities like Wisconsins cream-puff-eating
competition and Alaskas lawn-mower races. Throw in butter sculptures, pig-breeding contests, and inventive snack foods (Twinkies
on a stick and chicken-fried bacon, anyone?), and youve got
enough quirky excitement to satisfy the whole brood. For a
nationwide directory of state fairs, visit weekendevents.com.

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 19

the good life

We surveyed six top companies to nd out which sterling


atware rates highest across the country.
QUEEN ELIZABETH I
Towle Silversmiths
For nearly two decades, this
elegant 1970 pattern has outsold
all others at the company.
AUDUBON
Tiffany & Co.
Inspired by 19th-century Japanese
bird paintings, Audubon has been
tops at Tiffany for 138 years.
FRANCIS I
Reed & Barton
U.S. presidents Wilson, Truman,
Eisenhower, and Ford all owned
Reed & Bartons most popular silver.
OLD MARYLAND ENGRAVED
Kirk Stieff
This subtle design, introduced in
1936, has occupied Stieffs
number one slot for 73 years.
ELOQUENCE
Lunt Silversmiths
Within a year of its 1953 debut,
this fruit-and-ower pattern was
leading Lunts roster.
CHANTILLY
Gorham
President George W. Bush used
this atware, created in 1895, when
he dined on Air Force One.
Reported by Jourdan Crouch

Wh

ile similar
TH E
mo
del
s cost upward
BES T WAY
of $25, this porcelain
TO SPE ND : COW
CREAMER pours

on farmhouse style
without milking you
dry. (pier1.com for stores

Three Things
We Learned
from Books
This Month
Dorothys
slippers weree
actually silver
not ruby redin
L. Frank Baumss
book The Wonder-ful Wizard of Oz.

Find out more about Baum


Baaums
most famous work in The Real
Wizard of Oz, by Rebecca
Loncraine ($28; Gotham Books).

You can make a


delectable dessert
from only two ingredients! Just combine a
14-ounce bag of sweetened
shredded
coconut and
cup of
sweetened
condensed
milk, then spread in a
9- by 13-inch glass baking
dish (coated with nonstick
cooking spray) and bake at
350F for 20 minutes.

For 99 other simple recipes,


pick up Marcela Valladolids Fresh
Mexico ($22.50; Clarkson Potter).

Jimmy Carter and


Ozzy Osbourne
have at least one thing
in common: Both
play the harmonica.

Give the
instrument a try after
reading Sam Barrys
How to Play the
Harmonica ($9.99;
Gibbs Smith).

12 Hot Songs
HOT FUN IN THE SUMMERTIME Sly & the Family Stone HOT LEGS Rod Stewart TOO HOT Kool & the Gang

20 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APHS BY (SILVER , COW) K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D; (COC ADA DESSERT) PATRICIA SC ARPIN

Americas Best-Selling
Silver Patterns

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the good life


WHY I
PALMERS
COCOA
BUTTER
One of the
best beauty
bargains around,
this multitasking
stick of drugstore
moisturizer soothes
dry cuticles, rough
elbows, chapped
lipseven sunburns
all at just $3 a pop.

1JSKQ Are in Season...


Now
What?
Fresh ideas for cooking with this late-summer fruit
______

GALE GAND, executive pastry chef of Tru in Chicago

and author of Gale Gands Brunch!


For a light summer dish, toss together 6 large plums, pitted
and quartered; 4 tablespoons brown sugar; 2 tablespoons red
1
wine; and
2 teaspoon ground cinnamon. Bake at 400F for
25 minutes, then serve with fresh ricotta.
MICHAEL CHIARELLO, host of Easy Entertaining

on the Food Network


Marinate for 15 minutes 2 cups pitted, roughly chopped plums
1
in
2 cup extra-virgin olive oil; 4 tablespoons white balsamic
vinegar; and a teaspoon each of chopped fresh tarragon, sliced
scallions (whites only), and toasted fennel seeds; plus salt and
pepper to taste. Spoon over arugula or grilled lamb chops.
REBECCA CHARLES, chef-owner of Pearl Oyster Bar
in New York City
To make a simple crisp, combine 5 cups pitted black plums, cut
3
into 1-inch cubes, with
4 cup sugar, 6 tablespoons cornstarch,
3
4 teaspoon grated lemon zest, and a grind of pepper in a
1
2-quart baking dish. In a separate bowl, mix together
2 cup
1
1
1
oats,
2 cup rmly packed brown sugar,
4 cup our,
4 teaspoon
salt, and 6 tablespoons butter. Sprinkle streusel on top of fruit
and bake at 375F until bubbling, about 50 minutes.

Jessica Dodell-Feder

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

TH E
BES T WAY
TO SPE ND

8
Tuck a pac

k of
these little

MATCHBOOK
CANDLES into

your purse, and


youll be ready
to celebrate
whenever the
mood strikes.
(Four books per
set; fredare.com)

12 Hot Songs
HOT HOT HOT Buster Poindexter and His Banshees of Blue HOT BLOODED Foreigner
eigner H
HOT
HOT IN THE CITY
CITY Billy Idol

22 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APHS BY (PLUMS) JUPITER IMAGES; (COCOA BUT TER) K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D; (MATCHBOOK) PHILIP FRIEDMAN/STUDIO D

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the good life

A Brief History of
#JCLIM(J?QQ
_______________

Pitcher,
$92; blenko
glass.com

William J. Blenko was already 67 years old, in 1921,


when he rst set up shop in Milton, West Virginia
crafting sheets of handblown glass for stained-glass
windows, including those in New York Citys famed
St. Patricks Cathedral. Though he originally called
the company Eureka Art Glass, Blenko gave it
his name in 1930. Heres what happened next:

1930

Blenko Glass begins making colorful glass tableware to offset


plummeting Depression-era stained-glass sales.

1938

h,
Five years after William J. Blenkos death,
his youngest son, William, introduces thee
companys iconic water carafe (right, $42)
2).
It remains Blenkos top seller to this day.

1950

Works by Blenkos rst design director, Winslow Anderson,


receive the Museum of Modern Arts Good Design Award.

1981

2009

Run by the fourth generation of the family, Blenko is now the


oldest remaining producer of handblown glass in America.
Reported by Kelsey Savage Hays

PEEL A TOMATO

When recipes for pasta sauces, chutneys, and homemade ketchup


call for peeled fresh tomatoes, follow these simple steps:

g. 1

g. 2

g. 3

g. 4

With a sharp paring knife, score


an X into the bottom
(not the stem end) of the tomato.

Using a long-handled slotted


spoon, place tomato in a pot of
boiling water for 20 to 30 seconds.

Transfer tomato immediately


to a bowl of ice
water for about 20 seconds.

Peel tomato with


the paring knife, starting at
the marked X.

12 Hot Songs
HOT DOG Elvis Presley LONG HOT SUMMER the Style Council WHEN YOURE HOT, YOURE HOT Jerry Reed

24 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APHS BY K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D; ILLUSTR ATION BY HARRY BATES

Blenko Glass designs the handblown vases used as centerpieces for President Ronald Reagans inaugural dinner.

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the good life


No detail proved too small for set decorator Susan Bode
Tyson, who re-created Julia Childs kitchen for a new lm.
Writer-director Nora Ephrons latest movie, Julie & Julia (opening
August 7), weaves together two memoirs: Julie Powells 2005 best seller
of the same title and Julia Childs posthumously published My Life in
France. While Meryl Streep (left) nailed Childs mannerisms, the task of
replicating her famed Massachusetts kitchen fell to set decorator Susan
Bode Tyson, who spent close to three months scouring the Web,
as well as ea markets on two continents, to nd just the right props.
1. Cabinets Childs
husband, Paul, picked
the blue-green
paint used on their
cabinets in 1961. It
took several tries
before the crew
mixed the right hue.

2. Knives Tyson
scored old carbonsteel knives and a
60s-era mixer and
juicer from decodan
.com, an online
antiques dealer
based in the Midwest.

3. Counters To
avoid slouching,
Child, who was 6'2",
had counters built
higher than average.
In the lm, Streep
stands on a platform
to appear taller.

4. Oven Tysons
team spent days
trolling craigslist.org
to unearth a c. 1960
wall oven. Shipping
it from Texas cost
more than the
stainless unit itself.

12

As if the ridicu
lously low priceand stylish
henley neckline
werent enough
this Norma ,
Kamali T-SH
is also made ofIRT
organic cotton
Meet our new .
go-to wardrobe
staple. (walmart
.com for stores)

5
4

7
6

5. Peg-Board
Tyson reproduced
Childs signature
Peg-Board, which
featured an outline of
her pots and pans so
visitors would know
where they went.

6. China Child used


her Spode Blue Willow
dishes almost every
day. A Port Jefferson,
New York, antiques
dealer located a
12-piece set from the
1950s for Tyson.

7. Centerpiece
This ceramic fruit
basket closely
matches Childs
original, which
she bought in
Moustiers when
she lived in France.

8. Dining set Tyson


got the pine table and
side chairs in Troy, New
York. The Norwegian
armchair (at the
head of the table),
proved hard to nd, so
it was built on set.

PHONE IT IN
Recycling old cell phones
is now as easy as sending
a letter. Thanks to the
nonprot Earthworks, all
you have to do is print a
prepaid postage label from
recyclemycellphone.org,
pop your unwanted gadget
in a padded envelope, and
leave it for your mail
carrier. The program also
accepts chargers and
batteries, ensuring these
often toxic items dont
end up in a landll.

12 Hot Songs
TOO DARN HOT Ella Fitzgerald HOT CHILD IN THE CITY Nick Gilder SOME LIKE IT HOT the Power Station

26 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APHS BY (MOVIE) 2009 COLUMBIA PIC TURES INDUSTRIES, INC . AND BEVERLY BLVD LLC . ALL RIGHTS RESERVED; (SHIRT) L AR A ROBBY/STUDIO D

MAKING MOVIE MAGIC

TH E
BE ST WAY
TO SP EN D

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the good life

Real Estate
Sampler
Want to hike, sh, or rock
climb in your own backyard?
These homes, which abut
protected land, oer all
the benets of large, wooded
lotsminus the upkeep.

$120,000

Bordering the Hoffman Notch Wilderness Areaa 36,000-acre forest


preserve with beautiful lakes and ski trails in Schroon Lake, New Yorkthis
three-bedroom, 765-square-foot cottage features a wood-burning stove and
a covered front porch that looks out on the Adirondack Mountains.
AGENT: DARLEEN MARCH; 518-532-7900, ADIRONDACKCOUNTRYHOMES.COM


  


  


  
      
 


       
 

      


    
 

 

  



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$79,500

$495,000

$88,000

$485,000

AGENT: JIM WETHY;


906-341-2131,
GROVERREALESTATE.COM

AGENT: DAVID DEYSHER;


603-654-8970,
HISTORICPROP.COM

AGENT: STEVE CAREY;


800-788-5515, SHELMAN
REALTY.COM

AGENT: DEBRA KROON;


559-683-3416, YOSEMITE
WESTREALESTATE.COM

From its spacious screened


porch, this fully furnished,
three-bedroom hunting
cabin offers a stunning view
of Manistique, Michigans
Manistique Lake State Forest.
The secluded 720-square-foot
property boasts new insulation,
roong, and wood sidingplus
40 lush acres planted with
cedar, pine, and apple trees.

This 224-year-old Colonial


set on eight pastoral acres in
Jaffrey, New Hampshire
nestles against 100 acres of
community-conserved elds.
In addition to four bedrooms,
the 4,084-square-foot
restored house comes with a
second-oor office, a mudroom, an inground pool, and
a detached barn and shed.

Brand-new and equipped with


a kitchen, bath, and sleeping
loft, this 320-square-foot
outdoorsmans retreat in
Eastport, Idaho, neighbors
the Kaniksu National Forest
and its 900,000 acres of trails,
waterfalls, and lakes. The
cabin also provides access to
the Moyie River, a favorite
among white-water rafters.

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Yosemite National Parkand


all the hiking, bird-watching,
and rock climbing it affords
lies just beyond the back door
of this Yosemite, California,
lodge. Built in the late 1970s
on a forested half-acre lot,
the 1,400-square-foot home
includes three bedrooms,
vaulted ceilings, and an
oversize stone replace.

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fresh picks

Brighten your living room, vanity, and more with these 25 fun findsfrom $7.50

Fond
of Fronds
A lively alternative to
the usual florals, ferns
make for a naturally
striking motif.

PHOTOGR APH BY K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D

Plaques Stumped about what


to hang on your wall? Try Twos
Companys intricate silhouettes,
painted on slabs of mango wood.
($45 each for small and $60 each for
large; 800-896-7266 for stores)

Written by Jessica Dodell-Feder

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 35

fresh picks
Framed art Introduce a bit of
Victoriana to your decor with glass
panels that feature digital prints of
Northeastern fern species. ($590
for four; botanicalstyle.com)

Ottoman This
linen-upholstered
footstool serves as
a welcome oasis for
tired soles. ($542;
crlaine.com for stores)

C L D EA

Save

10%
Pillow Peking
Handicrafts
wool-and-cotton
needlepoint
cushion sprouts
a cluster of lacy
leaves. ($64; pkhc
.com for stores)

Champagne ute Thanks


to delicate hand-painted
fronds, Roosts stemless
glasses will be the star of any
garden-party toast. ($42 for
a set of three designs; shop
rrelish.com; enter countryliving
aat checkout for discount)

Chair A lush, foliage-inspired


toile runs wild across this
otherwise traditional Edwardian maple frame from
Williams-Sonoma Home.
($995; wshome.com)

36 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APHS BY ( ART, FLUTE, CUSHION, MAGNET) K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D

Magnets Upgrade
refrigerator notes
with bits of botanical
illustrations displayed
under glass. ($26
for a set of nine;
bensgarden.com)

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fresh picks

Pretty
on the
Outside

Lets face it: We all fall for gorgeous


packaging. Luckily, these lookers
also happen to be hardworking.
Lip balm Indian
Bollywood lms
inspired this
exotic goldtrimmed tin,
which contains
a slick, berryscented gloss.
($14 for .35 oz.;
morcosmetics.com)

Eye shadow An attention-grabbing


riot of colorful blossoms conceals
three unexpectedly neutral shades in
Paul & Joes limited edition compact.
($38; beautyhabit.com)

Face wash Since the mid1800s, British apothecary


Boots has used almost the
same geranium-infused
formula and sophisticated
glass jars for its cleansernow
available Stateside at Target.
($9.99 for 5 . oz.; target.com)

Perfume
The vintage
illustration that
backs TokyoMilks simple
atomizer evokes
springmuch
like the rosewoodand-gardenia
fragrance inside.
($28 for 1 oz.;
beautyhabit.com)

Shower gel
This little, sweetly
designed tube lasts
surprisingly long,
thanks to a rich
cleanser made with
mango and avocado
butters. ($7.50 for 1.5
oz.; lollialife.com)

38 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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the most mundane


cosmetics by funneling
shampoo, conditioner,
and other liquids into
elegant, sealable glass
jars (nd a variety from
only $2.99 at container
store.com). Dainty
vintage teacups store
smaller items, such as
cotton balls and Q-tips.
Written by Jessica Dodell-Feder

PHOTOGR APH BY K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D

Make your other


products beautiful,
too Transform even

Hair powder Tiny enough


to t in a clutch, this
container of organic dry
shampoo features a handdrawn, Art Nouveaustyle
label. ($9.50 for 1 oz.;
luluorganicsnyc.com)

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fresh picks

Oregons Pinot Gris


Produced in the Willamette Valleya region known for its earth-friendly,
family-run vineyardsthese wines put a light, fruity twist on everything from
seafood to salad. And at less than $20
$2 each,, you
y can aord
to tryy a few.
f

Our
favorite!
AL
CL DE

Save

10%
CL D

EA
Save L

Eyrie Vineyards
$16.75
eyrievineyards.com

King Estate
$17
kingestate.com

Ponzi Vineyards
$17
ponziwines.com

Maysara
$16
maysara.com

Sokol Blosser
$18
sokolblosser.com

Adelsheim
$19
adelsheim.com

When this vineyard opened in


1966, owner David
Lett was the rst in
the country to cultivate Pinot vines
without herbicides
and pesticides.
Fermented in
stainless steel
tanks to enhance
the wines crispness, Eyries version cuts the richness of creamy
pasta dishes.

At 1,033 acres,
King Estate is
Oregons largest
contiguous
organic vineyard.
Our size gives
us access to some
of the best grapes
in the region,
explains winemaker Jeff
Kandarian, whos
partial to the
Pinot Griss citrusy taste. (Enter
countryl at checkout for discount)

With some of the


oldest vines in the
region, Ponzi produces an earthy,
complex Pinot
Gris. The winery
also boasts certication by LIVE
(Low Input
Viticulture and
Enology)an
agricultural conservation program that requires
its members to
limit their use of
water, chemicals,
and pesticides.

This biodynamic
vineyard, known
for its slightly
smoky Pinot Gris,
operates under
the strictest ecoguidelines: In
addition to using
only organic
grapes, Maysara
has set aside
more than a third
of its 532 acres as
wildlife habitat,
says owner
Moe Momtazi.

Although this
organic operation
has produced
Pinot Gris for only
11 of its 38 years, it
ranks as one of the
vineyards best
sellers. Because
the wine boasts a
dry nish, its a
great alternative
to Chardonnay,
promises vintner
Alison Sokol
Blosser. (Enter
country at checkout for discount)

This energyefficient, LIVEcertied winery


produces a crisp
white that tastes
faintly of pears,
peaches, and
apples. Our winemaking focuses
on freshness and
intense fruit
avors, says coowner David
Adelsheim, who
likes to serve
Pinot Gris with
not only shellsh
but Thai food.

40 . COUNTRYLIVI NG.C OM . August 2009


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Written by Jessica Dodell-Feder

PHOTOGR APHS BY L AR A ROBBY/STUDIO D

20%

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fresh picks

The Farm Table

The original Harvest tables,

From its humble


beginnings as a
work surface, this
rustic icon has
become a prized
gathering spot
in todays kitchens
and dining rooms.

common features of 19th-century cellars,


were typically used for sorting produce.
Built by farmers for their own homesfrom
inexpensive, readily available wood
these pieces are now valued for their sturdy
construction and aged patina. This
painted pine-and-poplar model from
the early 1800s, for example, recently
fetched $1,692 at Garths Americana
Auction in Delaware, Ohio.
A

Understated Solid breadboard


ends make for neat detailing
on this otherwise simple silhouette crafted from teak.
($799; crateandbarrel.com)

Geometric A sawbuck
base pays homage
to Pennsylvania Dutch
craftsmanshipand
gives this pine model
architectural edge.
($1,399; ethanallen.com)

Recycled Boards made


from reclaimed oak
whiskey barrels top this
rough-and-tumble
trestle table. ($2,795;
sundancecatalog.com)

The steal This glossy


option delivers a clean,
contemporary look
and saves space with a
leaf that slides under
when not in use.
($279; ikea.com for stores)

Zinc-topped Thick turned


legs, a silvery metal
surface, and a dovetailed
side drawer add charm
to this ash workhorse.
($1,199; potterybarn.com)

42 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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Written by Jessica Dodell-Feder

PHOTOGR APH (ORIGINAL) COURTESY OF GARTHS AUCTIONEERS & APPR AISERS; GARTHS.COM

Rugged Modeled after


a North Carolina antiquesstore nd, this heavy oak
version features unexpected
angled corners. ($939;
broyhillfurniture.com for stores)

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collecting

Vintage finds, what theyre worthand tiny furniture valued at $1,200!

Blue Plate
Specials
Retro restaurant ware serves
up sweet nostalgia at seriously
old-fashioned prices.

PHOTOGR APH BY K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D

In the mid-20th
century, companies as
diverse as Ford (mug,
above right), Maxwell
House (mugs, right),
and the Helmsley
Hotel (platter, left)
commissioned
custom dinnerware.

Written by Melinda Page

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 47

collecting

Railroad Collectors covet anything


to do with trains. The Harvey chain,
with its famous waitress logo, operated
eateries at stations throughout the
Southwest. Worth: $250

48

Western Many restaurants opted


for stock patternslike this rodeo
imageinstead of paying for a logo.
Cowboy themes remain so popular
that the lack of a topmark doesnt
affect value. Worth: $45

Airbrushed This glazing technique


took off in the 40s, but typically one hue
was used, and only on the rim. Tepcos
60s-era Confucius dinnerware features
a rare allover design in three colors,
plus a topmark. Worth: $150

Airline Syracuse made this in-ight

Hotel The instantly recognizable


and pleasantly kitschy Holiday Inn logo
raises the price of this 1960s Jackson
$35$45
China piece. Worth: $35
$45

Designer Restaurant ware by


renowned designers like Russel Wright,
who created this pattern for Sterling
China, fetch moreeven without a
topmark. Worth: $60$75

Diner While dishes from a well-known

service plate for American Airlines in


1946, when air travel still held the promise
of glamour. Worth: $100$150

spot such as Howard Johnsons might


cost $50, those from more anonymous
haunts, like this 50s California drive-in,
go for less. Worth: $30

Dishes shown are from the personal collections of Barbara J. Conroy, author of
Restaurant China, and Julie Gaines, co-owner of New York Citys Fishs Eddy.

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PHOTOGR APHS BY (HOTEL,


(HOTEL DESIGNER) K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D;
D (OTHERS) AYA BR ACKET T

During the diners heyday


from the 1940s through thee
60sa restaurants plates didnt hold
just the daily special; they often served
d
as the eaterys calling card. From
mom-and-pop joints to hotel chains,
they all put their names on their
dishes, says Jackie Tromble of the
Restaurant Ware Collectors Network
(restaurantwarecollectors.com). And
most of those dishes were made by
the same 20 companies, including, to
o
name a few, Syracuse, Tepco, and
Jackson. Though few industrial china
manufacturers still exist, their
ultradurable wares remain sought
afterespecially if they bear a
restaurants logo, called a topmark.
The real value, says Tromble, is
in the logos emotional resonance:
People want to buy pieces from
places theyve visited or heard about.
The most desirable items? Those
created for trains, ships, and airlines
during travels golden age. Also
prized: mementos from icons like
Horn & Hardart automats or New
York Citys Plaza Hotel. But while an
extremely rare railroad cup and
saucer might go for $1,200, most
restaurant ware tops out around $50,
and you can score nds in junk shops
for a buck or two. Take a look at some
of the most collectible categories:

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collecting

What Is It?
What
Is
It
Worth?
Our antiques specialist,

HELAINE FENDELMAN,

evaluates your nds and collectibles.

Only six
inches
high!

B.E., New York City

What it is: MINIATURE FURNITURE


Good eye! Although your wire garden chair, Windsor chair, and bamboo armoire
are toysthe chairs made for dollhouses, the wardrobe to hold a dolls outtsyour
other treasures exhibit the larger scale and ner craftsmanship typical of salesmens
samples. From the mid-1700s to the late 1800s, these pieces functioned as advertisements for a cabinetmakers skill, so theyre as well made as full-size versionsand
worth almost as much. According to Ann Meehan, a Pennsylvania-based dealer
specializing in miniature furniture, your bureau, Napoleon IIIstyle upholstered chair,
and urn-back chair are from England or America and likely date to the 19th century.
With its gured-mahogany veneer and dovetail-jointed drawers, the bureaus value
lies between $350 and $400; the chairs, $200 to $300 apiece. Add in the toys (at $150
for the armoire, $25 each for the chairs), and your collection could fetch up to $1,200.

What its worth: $1,200

50 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APH BY PHILIP FRIEDMAN/STUDIO D

Ive collected
tiny chairs, chests,
and other
pieces over the past
20 years. Some
of them seem too
ne for mere
dollhouse decor.
Did they serve
another purpose?

When my aunt died,


she left me this
print, marked Drawn
from nature by John J.
Audubon and Published
by the American Print
Craft Guild, Bronxville,
New York. What
is its value?
W.C., Brownsboro,
Alabama

What it is:

REPRODUCTION AUDUBON PRINT

Artist and naturalist John James Audubons greatest


work, Birds of Americaa collection of 435 prints made
from his original drawingswas rst released in Britain
between 1827 and 1838. Those early prints can command
thousands of dollars apiece, but many subsequent
editions have also been produced. Your Snowy Heron
is of more recent vintage, says Audubon specialist
Leslie Kostrich. Part of an edition of 1,000 dating from
the 1930s, its a well-made image in a nice frame and
might bring $200 to $250.

What its worth: $200


We bought this
cool old TV online
about ve years
ago for $400. It
works greatin
black-and-white,
of course. Can you
tell us if we invested
our money wisely?
W.G., Somers,
New York

What it is:

PREDICTA TELEVISION SET


Manufactured by Philcoa pioneering,
though now defunct, radio and TV maker
founded in 1906the Predicta television
debuted in 1958, when futuristic, space-age
design was all the rage. Sadly, only the
styling proved truly cutting-edge: The sound
was tinny and the tubes often burned
out, so the line was dropped in 1960.
Today, though, these icons of early
electronics are popular with collectors.
Your particular Predicta, the more
affordable Princess tabletop model,
originally retailed for $280.Since it still
works, it could now earn at least $600 at auction.

What its worth: $600


What it is: STEUBEN BOWL

I received thi
this
vintage
g bowl,
marked Steuben
Steuben,, as a
wedding
ddi present
17 years ago. How
old is it?

Steuben Glass was founded in 1903 in Corning, New


York, and bought by Corning Glassworks 15 years later.
In 1932, Corning chemists developed an optic lead
glass of intense clarity and brilliance, known as 10M,
which was used for all subsequent Steuben wares.
Your bowlmodel 7806, created by staff designer
Walter Heintzedates to 1938 and bridges the
transition from classic Art Deco style to softer,
biomorphic shapes. Only 200 were made, in two
sizes. Yours, the larger 12-inch bowl, sold for $15.
Now, in good condition, its worth 20 times that.

J.M., West Hartford,


Connecticut

What its worth: $300


51

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collecting
My purse,
e,
made by Whiting
iting
& Davis, was
a Christmass gift
g
from my mother
other
in the 1960s.
0s.
Is it worth much?
M.P., Sarasota,
asota,
Floridaa

What it is: SILVER MESH EVENING CLUTCH

Founded in 1876 as a jeweler, Whiting & Davis began producing purses in 1892. After
1909, with the invention of the mesh-fabric machine, the Plainville, Massachusetts,
company became Americas leading manufacturer of metal mesh bags. Couture
collectors seek out the elaborately patterned precious-metal examples W&D sold
in the early years of the 20th century. Without a sterling silver hallmark, however, your
clutch is almost certainly silvered nickel, though it may be older than you think:
The clasp has an Art Deco look, and the scrolled frame is typical of the rms style in the
1930s and 40s. At the moment, these purses dont command high prices, but the
winds of fashion change all the time, so your chic little bag may bring a tidy sum one day.

What its
its worth:
wo
$50
I bou
bought this 1930s
refrigerator for $65,
refri
complete with its
co
me
metal ice trays and
gla
glass bottles. Even
tthough its not
working, Id like to
wo
re
restore and use it.
S
Should I bother?
P.W., Atlanta

What it is: VINTAGE FRIGID


FRIGIDAIRE

You have a 1933 Frigidairewhich originally sold for $96with a body in great
condition. Considering that John JJowers of Antiqu
AntiqueAppliances.com, who restores
old refrigerators, says he pays around $600 for similar defunct pieces, you got a deal.
Thats the good news. The bad news: Jowers sells the refurbished appliances for as
much as $6,000in other words, he explains, the cost of replacing insulation,
reconditioning the condenser, and substituting modern coolant for Freon can run up to
$2,000. Your refrigerator remains a bargain nonetheless.

What its worth: $500


52

VISIT COUNTRYLIVING.COM/WHATISIT for information

on how to submit your nds for appraisal.

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www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

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idea notebook

PHOTOGR APHS BY VIC TOR SCHR AGER; ST YLING BY FELIPE SA STRE

Clever flower techniques, a new use for an old door, and one thrifty living room redo

Arrange
Flowers
Like
a
Pro
The oral designers at Manhattans

FlowerSchool NewYork reveal


their top 10 tricks.(You wont believe
what they do with tulips!)

Written by Sally Koslow

1. Branch out. Why bother with


oral foam or marbles when the best
arranging tool is right in your backyard?
You can use tree branches to form a
backbone that will support more delicate
stems, says orist Felipe Sastre. Here,
Sastre crisscrossed six pear boughs (inset)
and weaved in hydrangea and lisianthus,
as well as ladys mantle. If your branches
are alive and leafy like these, scrape the
bottoms, then split them up the center a
couple of inches to aid water absorption.

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 57

idea notebook
says George. The band will be totally
invisible. (Goody Ouchless clear,
latex elastics, $3.89 for a package of
52; goody.com for stores)

7. Stay away from scissors.


For a clean cut, its best to snip stems
with garden clippers or a sharp knife.
When you use scissors to trim
owersespecially those with tubular
stems, like Gerbera daisiesthe
stems crack, says Sastre. The blooms
cant get water and will die soon after.

8. Hydrate hydrangeas.

Rare tropicals?
Nah, its just a
bunch of ordinary tulips (inset)
with their petals
ipped open.

2. Transform tulips. To make


these common bulbs more exotic,
just put your thumb under each petal
and fold it back with your forenger.
Afterward, they almost resemble
camellias, says Sastre.

3. Consider every angle. Its


so much easier to arrange a bouquet
on a lazy Susan, says orist Meredith
Perez, because you can turn the vase
and see your display from all sides.
4. Shock roses into
drinking up. Heres how orist
Michael George gets roses to absorb
more water and live longer: Wrap the
owers in brown packaging paper to
protect them, then snip a quarter inch
off the stems and place them in one
inch of boiling water. The shock of it
forces the air out, says George. You
can actually see bubbles coming from

the ends. Leave roses in place until


the water turns tepid, give the stems a
fresh cut, then transfer to cool water.

5. Pass the PAM. Who knew?


Good old cooking spray helps
tropicalssuch as bird-of-paradise,
ginger, and heliconialast. The
spray basically seals the pores of the
ower and prevents it from drying
out, says orist Remco van Vliet.
Lightly spritz each bloom once, from
about 12 inches away. Itll make
em shine, too!

9. Just add bleach. No ower


food? No problem. You can put a
few drops of Clorox in the water as an
alternative, says Sastre. The bleach
prevents bacteriaone of the main
purposes of other additives.

10. Pay less than a buck a


bloom at Costco. If you dont
have access to a wholesale ower
market, dont worry. You can still buy
quality buds in bulk at costco.com,
says George, and theyre a downright
steal! (Only $99.99 for 100 roses,
including shipping and handling)

6. Bring a centerpiece
together with a ponytail
holder. Yep, the same elastic that
secures your hair will also keep owers
in place. Put the band around the
stems, about four inches below the
top of the blossoms. Choose clear
elastic and position it at the waterline,

58 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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100 roses
for less than
$100!

PHOTOGR APH BY (BOT TOM RIGHT) K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D

BEFOR

Hydrangeas drink better from their


big ower heads than from those
skinny little stems, says Perez. She
suggests putting each blossom facedown in room-temperature water and
letting it soak that way for 20 minutes.
Then shake the oret out and remove
any foliage; otherwise, the leaves
will hog all the vase water.

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idea notebook
B E FOR E

A Dramatic
Living Room
Redoon
the Cheap!
How wallet-friendly
xes transformed
an outdated space

JOURDAN CROUCH

Window The bigger the window,


the betterexcept when the design
is dated, says Ross of this ones
pointed peak (inset). So he squared
it off with Sheetrock inside; outside,
new cedar planks cover the work.
Total cost: $175. (Linen curtains, from
$49 each; westelm.com)

Open the page! Lift this ap


for a play-by-play account
of how Eddie Ross made over
the entire room. I found
amazing steals! he says.

60 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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PHOTOGR APHS BY BJRN WALL ANDER

The place was stuck in a


seventies time warp, says
designer Eddie Ross of this Long
Island, New York, living room. And
while homeowners Chris and Jackie
Keber didnt exactly adore their
Brady Bunch set, the couple had no
intention of spending a fortune. So
Ross focused on simple upgrades,
rejuvenating the 350-square-foot
room with minimal outlay. He
painted the jarring marigold walls a
fresh white and removed the drab
carpet, revealing hardwood oors.
For furniture, the designer shopped
inexpensive retailers like Target
and Ikeaand even hit a thrift shop,
where he found the sofa at right.
The Kebers reaction? What was
once an eyesore, says Chris, is now
our favorite room in the house.

Paint What a difference!


Covering the overpowering
yellow hue with crisp white
created a serene backdrop,
plus the illusion of more space.
(Decorators White, from
$15.99 per quart; benjamin
moore.com for stores)
Bookshelves Provide visual
interest by arranging some
books horizontally, says Eddie
Ross. You can also place accessories atop the stacks. Coating
the built-in units interior with a
pale blue added depth. (Skylark
Song, from $15.99 per quart;
benjaminmoore.com for stores)
Chair Washable cotton slipcovers, like the one on this Ikea
Ektorp armchair, make
cleanup a breeze. (Slipcovered
chair, $249; ikea.com)
Planter White paint
freshened up a plain terracotta pot. (12-inch pot,
$8.97; lowes.com)
Chaise Ross scored this
astonishingly affordable,
utterly stylish ikat seat at
Target. (Santa Fe chaise in
blue, $489.99; target.com)

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B E FOR E

Bookshelves arent
just for books. Use them
to display your favorite
things, and leave
open spaces to make it
all feel airy.
Eddie Ross
Lamp Grosgrain ribbon trim,
attached with a glue gun, gives
an off-the-rack shade a custom
look. (Lamp with shade, $49.99;
homegoods.com for stores)
Sofa The price for this chic
toile couch, including its
matching armchair and ottoman? An unbelievable $225
at a thrift store.
Pillows The little details that
nish a room often wind up
blowing the budget, but Ross
shopped smartand saved
big. (On sofa: Pink, $12.99;
pier1.com for stores. White,
$12.99; homegoods.com
for stores. On white chair:
Striped, $16.99; homegoods
.com for stores. Crab, $45;
artandartifact.com. On chaise:
Blue patterned, $16.99; home
goods.com for stores)
Carpet Neutral sea grass
supplies texture, while color
and pattern come from a
small area rug that can be
changed out seasonally.
(Sea-grass rug, $549; home
decorators.com. Similar striped
rug, $59; qvc.com)

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idea notebook
B E FOR E

Bed and Board


Transform an old door into a (nearly) new headboard.

A queen-size bed frame can easily set you back


$2,000. A salvaged door? This one cost about
$25. Of course, turning it into a headboard did require
some work: sawing the door down to size, adding chair-rail
molding to the top, brushing on a few coats of paint. (See
page 127 for step-by-step instructions.) But you could pay

66 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August

a pro to do the heavy lifting and still come out aheadat


which point, you get to lie back and count up your good
deeds: Youve recycled an architectural castoff that didnt
deserve to be trashed, saved loads of cash, and created
one truly unique piece of furniture. All facts that should
help you sleep easier. LAURA FENTON

2009

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Period Pinups

PHOTOGR APHS BY (CLOCK WISE FROM TOP LEF T) AMBER S. CL ARK; K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D (2); (OPPOSITE) SIMON BEVAN

Give utilitarian bulletin boards personality by disguising


them as artful silhouettes. STEP 1 Download and print our
prole templates from countryliving.com/template, then use
a photocopier to enlarge them by 130 percent. STEP 2 Center
each enlarged prole on an 11- by 17-inch corkboard ($4.99 per
board; craftsetc.com), and trace around it with a pen. STEP 3
Working on a protected surface, such as a chopping block or
self-healing mat, slowly score the pen lines with an X-Acto
knife. Because of the corks thickness, youll need to go over
each cut several times before slicing all the way through.
STEP 4 Spray the silhouettes with two coats of at black paint,
let dry overnight, and hang with adhesive mounting strips
($2.49 for nine; officedepot.com). Very Pride & Prejudice. L.F.

MADE IN THE SHADE


To see old-fashioned doilies in a brand-new light, grab a pack
of paper ones ($6.99 for 100 eight-inch-round doilies; ssww.com)
and give a plain drum lampshade a lift. Start by arranging the
doilies on the shade in a pattern you nd pleasing, then affix withh
double-sided tape. If the doilies extend beyond the shades top
or bottom, fold them over the edges and tape to the inside. Sprayy
paint the shade in your color of choice (one light coat will do),
being careful to avoid the interior. Let dry overnight, peel off the
doilies, and bask in the glow of your bright idea. KELLY WILKINSONN

IF YOU HAVE MONEY

BDDWs take
on Jacques
Adnets looking
glass ($1,700;
212-625-1230)

French furniture designer


Jacques Adnet created
his midcentury captains
mirror using Herms
leather belts. At a recent
Rago Arts auction in
New Jersey, an original
Adnet sold for $2,520.
Even homages, like
BDDWs handmade
version, will cost you.

IF YOU HAVE TIME


Transform a $30 Ikea
mirror with three leather
belts. Buckle two together
so they t around the
mirrors frame and
superglue in place. Attach
the third belt to the top
with Dritzs heavy-duty
snap kit ($5.59; createfor
less.com), following
package directions.*

*Mount your Ikea mirror using the hardware on its back; the belt strap is just for show.

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Buckle upand
turn Ikeas Grundtal
mirror into a
designer tribute
($29.99; ikea.com
for stores).

67

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out and about

Arts-and-crafts getaways, the lure of Scrabble, and pet advice from our country vet

Who Says
Summer
Camp Is Just
for K ds?
Want to design jewelry or take
up quilting? These workshops
make it fun to acquire new
skillsno bunk beds required.
John C.Campbell
Folk School
PHOTOGR APH BY KEATHER WEIDEMAN

Brasstown, North Carolina


This 300-acre camp in the foothills of
the Smoky Mountains offers a year-round
roster of 860 two-, ve-, and six-day sessions
in traditional skills such as basketry, calligraphy, and
batik dyeing (pictured). Lodging options range from
rustic dorm rooms that sleep six to plush doubles with
private baths. All the family-style meals feature
organic produce grown on-site. (Starting at $444 for a
two-day class, food and room included; folkschool.org)

Written by Michelle Hainer

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 69

out and about

Chickens, goats, and geese roam


the lower level of this Iowa barn,
home to Country Threads quilt
camps. Though you dont need to
be a superior stitcher to attend,
basic sewing knowledge helps.

Squam Art Workshops


Holderness, New Hampshire
At this three-day sleepaway camp, you
can stay in private lakeside cabins (On
Golden Pond was lmed nearby) and
choose from a variety of classes devoted
to knitting, jewelry-making, songwriting,
and more. Our programs give women
an excuse to hang out with people who
enjoy the same things they do, says
owner Elizabeth MacCrellish. ($890,
lodging and meals included; squamart
workshops.com)

Santa Fe Photographic
Workshops
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Housed in an active monastery with
views of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains,
these workshops last from three days
to a week and specialize in such
subjects as Adobe Photoshop, digital
photography, and black-and-white
developing, among others. While the
school provides towels and linens, the
private on-site housing is bare-bones:
no air-conditioning, TVs, or phones.
(Starting at $295, room and board extra;
santafeworkshops.com)
f
p
)

Country Threads
Quilt Camp
Held at least three times a year in the
hayloft of a 19th-century barn, these
four-day quilting classes are taught by
master patternmakers Connie Tesene
and Mary Etherington. Theres no
lodging, but nearby Clear Lake offers
affordable options. ($175 for the
September 811 class, includes patterns
and two lunches; countrythreads.com)

The Steel Yard


Above: Create stamped
metal charms at one of
the Steel Yards jewelrymaking classes. Right:
eldwork at the Santa Fe
Photographic Workshops

Providence, Rhode Island


Learn the basics of ceramics, stone
setting, or blacksmithing in just one
weekend at the Steel Yard, the former site
of Providence Steel & Iron. End your days
with dinner at one of the many family-run
Italian restaurants on Federal Hill, then

70
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PHOTOGR APHS BY (BOT TOM RIGHT) TRICIA CRONIN;


(OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM LEF T) THEA COUGHLIN; PAUL C ALHOUN

Garner, Iowa

bunk at the nearby Christopher Dodge


House. ($115 includes materials and tools,
but no meals or accommodations;
thesteelyard.org; providence-hotel.com)

Alabama Chanin
Weekend Workshops
Florence, Alabama
At these small gatherings held in
designer Natalie Chanins Alabama
studio, students choose from 45 fabrics
and 200-plus patterns and stencils,
then re-create a favorite piece from
Chanins high-end clothing line.
Accommodations arent provided,
so book a room at the Coldwater Inn
in nearby Tuscumbia. (Beginners
welcome;$1,125 includes materials
and two meals; alabamachanin.com;
coldwater-inn.com)

Sonoma County
Grape Camp
Sonoma, California
Whistle-toting counselors are on hand
to keep would-be vintners on schedule
as they pick, sort, and crush grapes
at this three-day camp for oenophiles.
When guests leave, says director Larry
Levine, they have a real appreciation of
what it takes to produce ne wine. That,
and a hand-blended bottle of vino to
carry home. ($1,900 for classes, luxury
lodging, and all meals, including dinners

hosted in the vineyards by well-known


vintners; sonomagrapecamp.com)

Atlanta Printmakers
Studio
Atlanta, Georgia
This nonprot studio, founded in
2005, hosts weekend workshops in
bookbinding, lithography, etching,
letterpress, and ne-art printmaking.
Out-of-towners can reserve a room
at the Georgian Terrace Hotel, an
Atlanta landmark whose rooftop pool
offers 360-degree views of the city.
(Open year-round; $85 to $200,
depending on class; atlantaprintmakers
studio.com; thegeorgianterrace.com)

Penland School
of Crafts
Penland, North Carolina
Try your luck at two-week sessions in
wood carving, glassblowing, or chair
upholstering at this year-round craft
school in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Students stay in single or shared dorm


rooms, enjoy meals made from scratch,
and have access to the workshop
facilities 24 hours a day. What you can
learn here in a week will astonish you,
says communications manager Robin
Dreyer. ($445 to $640 per week,
depending on classes, room and meals
extra; penland.org)

Taos School of
Metalsmithing and
Lapidary Design
Taos, New Mexico
Design a silver ring, learn how to solder
metals, or practice cutting gemstones
at these ve-day workshops, during
which participants make a one-of-a-kind
jewelry creation. Held downtown in a
historic adobe house, classes include
just four students per session to ensure
ample individual instruction. Nearby
inns offer attendees discounted stays.
($700, all materials included; taos
jewelryschool.com)

F
From
far left: Guests come
ffrom as far away as Switzerland and New Zealand to
la
attend Squam Art Workat
shops. At Atlanta Printmaksh
ers Studio, students hand-set
er
type
ty
y on a Vandercook press.
Budding
B
u
fashionistas cut patterns, sew, and apply stencil
te
designs to clothing at
de
Natalie Chanins classes.
N
Na

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out and about

frofro. That is a word that describes the


motion of a uy dogs tail wagging. Or so my
father insisted many summers ago, during a heated
family game of Scrabble on our screened porch in
Indiana, as we drank my mothers homemade lemonade
and laughed above the roar of neighbors lawn mowers.
My dad was angling for 36 points on a triple-word
score, and though we loved him, there were standards to
uphold. According to the dictionary, frofro was not a
word! We stood our ground. In the end, I think he won
the game anyway. (At 4, 7, and 10, we kids werent
daunting rivals.) But he did put a bit of a dent in the
father-knows-best myth that day.
I cant remember a time when I didnt love playing
Scrabble. Is there a more perfect game? It has an orderly
multicolored board that resembles a crossword grid, 100
smooth and touchable wooden tiles, and 61 magical
squaresthe triple-word, triple-letter, double-word, and
double-letter spacesthat oer the thrilling chance of
multiplying your score if you land on them. Unlike other
games that also require thinking, such as chess, Scrabble
involves a certain degree of luck, so if you lose, you dont
feel completely stupid. And winning never requires
betraying your fellow players. (Yeah, Im talking about
you, greedy capitalist Monopoly and ruthless Risk.)
Scrabbles as social as bridge, but works with players of
varying skill levels, even kids with limited vocabularies.
And its dierent from most other word gamesincluding Boggle, with that ever-present egg timerin that its
highly interactive and proceeds as slowly or as quickly as
players choose. Theres no personal best
with Scrabbleits a group

eort, a group joy, and a group gamble. One word feeds


another, and even the most skilled players cant help
pouting when they get a tray that contains the vowels I, I, I,
I, O, O, and A, or exulting when an opponent lays down a
clever, long, or funny word.
One afternoon last winter, my boyfriend, Sven, and
I were playing Scrabble when I managed to spell
oxidizing using all seven letters on my tray, and creating
several linked words where my letters intersected with
previous plays. The word earned 212 points. Sven
high-ved me in delight, and called his family...who
thought we were insane. We crack out the Scrabble
board whenever we cansometimes for hours on rainy
daysand we have a portable version we take to cafs,
parks, beaches, and on airplanes. We worry it looks a
little codgerish, but we have too good a time to care.
When pieces go astray, we sort the tiles, identify the
missing, and craft paper substitutes. Our standard game
lacks the M, V, O, and I. Our travel version lacks a Y. You
might say, Get a new board! But theres something sad
about a sterile, unmarred set. Each Scrabble game
develops its own personality, holding memories of the
words played, the places the board was laid, and the runic
tallies of friends scores. The set my family used when I
was a child belonged to my parents when they were
courting. They had gratied a heart with BH + JS
inside it on one edge of the game board, like lovers who
carve their initials in a tree. Sven and I havent defaced
our boards, but last Valentines Day I did get him
Scrabble-tile cu links with his initials. If our game loses
an S, well know where to go for a replacement.
Its always a good time to play Scrabble, if you ask me.
But the current economic climate seems especially
well-suited to the game. Scrabble was invented during
the Great Depression by an unemployed architect named
Alfred Mosher Butts, though
g it didnt receive its

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PHOTOGR APHS BY K ARL JUENGEL /STUDIO D

Even though she spends her days wrestling with language as a writer and book critic,
LIESL SCHILLINGER still cant get enough of this wordy board game.

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out and about


Theres no personal best with Scrabbleits a group eort,
a group
, and a group gamble.
trademark until 1948. According to company lore, the
game took o in the 1950s, after Macys discovered it and
launched a Scrabble blitz. Soon after, passion for the
game spread across the world. My father is a retired
Russian professor, and my parents long ago acquired a
Russian setSkrebl. Looking at the Cyrillic characters on
the familiar tiles lled me with awe for my parents exotic
interests. There is one letter in Skrebl, , which in English
would be spelled SHCH. Imagine the possibilities!
Although I confess a weakness for the uted trays and
clattering tiles of the original Scrabbleas well as a
preference for face-to-face interactionthese days, you
can even play Scrabble online with a stranger. Theres
also a tournament circuit, where players memorize all
the dictionary-sanctioned two-letter words to hike their
scoressuch as xu, qi, and zaas if words were math
formulas. But that bloodless approach distresses me.
The point of Scrabble, surely, is the amateur, leisurely
matching of wits, and the delectable serendipity of the

golden wordeven if that word hasnt been given a green


ag from lexicographers. I dont believe the dictionary
should be the nal authority. Since I can order a pakora
in an Indian restaurant, I will ght ercely to get 12
points for spelling it. Sven insists that quone, a joke
word that aired in a Scrabble-themed episode of Seinfeld,
should count. Thus far, I havent given in, but Im
wavering. quone hasnt made it into Merriam-Websters, but
it has entered the online Urban Dictionary, which grants
it a shade more legitimacy than, say, frofro. Who am I to
be less exible than the English language? Scrabble,
according to Websters, means to grope about clumsily or
frantically. What could be more in the spirit of the game
than scrabbling for new words?
A book critic for The New York Times, Liesl Schillinger
acquired her love of language in a boisterous polyglot household in
the Midwest. Shes also the founder of wordbirds.tumblr.com, a
blog of newly minted 21st-century coinages.

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Enter to Win
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enter now
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out and about

Ask
a
Country
Vet
Why is my cat always licking me? Should I let the kids keep

If I just stay here,


maybe the ticks
wont nd me.

down with the disease, he may limp, lose


his appetite, and run a fever, but these
signs often last only a few days, returning
later. Left untreated, Lyme can be
seriousdamaging joints permanently,
for instancethough its rarely fatal.
In the Northeast, northern Midwest, and
Pacic Coastthe areas where almost all
Lyme cases occurthe best prevention is to
vaccinate your dog against the disease and
use a tick-control treatment. The vaccine,
given in two shots, costs around $100, plus
an annual booster that runs about $50.
With tick-control products, always talk to
your vet about the best option for your pet
and your family. Most collars, sprays, and
spot-ons contain some kind of pesticidethe
point is, after all, to get rid of pests. Though
relatively safe when properly administered,
these treatments can be harmful if used
incorrectlyespecially on very young, old,
or sick dogs. Which is exactly why I
recommend conferring with your vet rst.
The prevention isnt a guarantee, but if
your Weimaraner contracts Lyme, dont
worrycaught early, the disease should
respond to antibiotics in a week. Some
dogs may require a longer course of
medication to get rid of the disease fully, so
contact your vet if your pups limp returns.

I worry that my Weimaraners


might get Lyme disease, but
Ive heard that the preventive
Q
treatments can be harmful. What
do you recommend? M.B.,Madison,Connecticut

Lyme disease, one of the most


common tick-borne illnesses, is
a recurrent bacterial arthritis that can
aect horses, cats, dogs, and humans.
Deer, though a host for Lyme ticks, do
not get infected. When a dog comes

Why does
my kitty
try to lick me all
the time? Ive
heard its a sign
of affection, but
its starting to
gross me out.

K.M., Provo, Utah

Ive always
thought of a
dog as an open

76 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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Its the look of


love. Or not.

PHOTOGR APHS BY GET T Y IMAGES

the turtle they found? How do I deal with a dogs cracked


paws? DR. ROB SHARP of Hillsboro, Ohio, has answers.

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out and about


book, trying his best to please
and possessing an unmistakable
happiness ag attached to his
south end. But the path to feline
understanding is a twisted one.
Cats are harder to read than dogs,
and their actions can be partially
explained at best. We do know,
however, that cats clean themselves
by licking and that they only groom
friends and family. So you could
consider yourself honored. Of
course, your kitty may also like the
avor of your new hand cream, the
saltiness of your sweat, or the taste
of supper on your skin. Youll never
know for sure. If youd rather not
be licked, the best response is to tell
your friendly visitor to stop while
gently pushing her o you. Shell
get the message eventually and
wont take oense. She may not
even noticeshes a cat.

My children found an
abandoned baby turtle
in our yard and are begging
to keep it. Should I let them?

J.H., Virginia Beach

Im never in favor of keeping


wild animals as pets. Your
turtle wasnt abandoned; it
was captured by another species (that
would be you) with no expertise in
providing the food, shelter, or social
environment necessary for its best
care. Im not alone in this opinion
the Humane Society of the United
States and most veterinarians agree
with me. You should return the
turtle to where it was found and
release it as soon as possible.
Another problem associated with
turtles is that they carry salmonella
bacteria, and can infect people who
touch them and dont wash their

hands afterward. In the 1970s, the


FDA banned the sale of baby turtles
because a quarter of a million
children developed salmonellosis
the same food poisoning you might
get from undercooked chicken
directly attributable to contact with
turtles. In fact, the Centers for
Disease Control recommends that

Before bringing a turtle into the family,


youd better do your homework.

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PHOTOGR APHS BY GET T Y IMAGES; (OPPOSITE PAGE) VEER

reptiles and amphibians not


be kept in homes with children
under 5 years old.
Of course, an injured animal
presents a dierent situation, one
that might require a brief stint in
captivity. Had the turtle in your yard
been hurt, I would advise you to
take it to a vet who could evaluate the
problem, monitor it for a day or two,
then release it back into the wild.
If youor your kidsare determined to own a turtle, buy one thats
been born and raised in captivity.
(Eastern box and three-toed box
turtles both do well as pets.) Itll be
used to eating turtle food and
living in connement, and wont be
as easily stressed as a wild-caught
critter. Dont forget, these animals
can live 25 to 30 years, so its a
long-term commitment. And always
scrub up after handling a turtle.

My dogs paws
crack in the
summer. Is it because
she walks on hot
pavement a lot? Can
I prevent it?

cracked paws after a day


spent on hot asphalt.
Moisturizing your
puppys pads can help. I
would apply petroleum
jelly daily until the
R.T., Portville, New York
dryness improves. If
shes reluctant to stand
Pads tell a story
or move, you may want
about where dogs
to consider antibiotics
live and their tness
or antibacterial creams,
for a given activity. Pups
which a vet can prewho get little outdoor Oh, my aching feet.
scribe.
But as long as you
exercise have soft feet;
dont
give
your
dog
more exercise on
those who hang out on hot, dry
sidewalks than she can handle, and
ground, such as arid desert soil
are careful about checking her pads
or pavement, have hard, dry pads.
daily, she shouldnt end up with
Fitness matters because dogs feet,
such severe problems.
like peoples, can suer if subjected
to an activity theyre unprepared for.
Coon dogs that hunt all night on the
Veterinarian Rob Sharp, author of
rst day of coon season come in with
No Dogs in Heaven? (Running Press),
shredded pads. Similarly, a house
would love to answer your pet questions. Drop
him a line at countryliving@hearst.com.
dog unused to long walks will have

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simple country pleasures

PHOTOGR APH BY AIME HERRING

August 2009

Only two things that


money cant buy,
Thats true love and
homegrown tomatoes.
Guy Clark

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In the Orloffs living room, an


oversize mirror creates the illusion
of an entrance to another room.
Mauve velvet updates an Empire
sofa, found at a local antiques
shop. The large secretary (at
right) belonged to Paige Orloffs
mother, and the wallpaper is by
Cole & Son. Opposite: Paige and
her childrenJordan, 8, and
Petra, 4welcome a new addition
to their farm: ex-racehorse Dacos.

82
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(SFFOFS1BTUVSFT

A reformed city girl reveals what happened when she


decided, on a lark, to relocate her family from
urban Los Angeles to a rural farmhousewith horses
and chickens!in New Yorks Hudson Valley.
Written by Paige Smith Orloff

Photographs by Lucas A llen

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Styling by Olga Naiman

At breakfast one morning, our son looked up from his bagel


and asked, So when are we moving to Runaround
Farm? Unbeknownst to us, our new house had a name.

hree years ago, if you had told me Id celebrate


a friends birthday by getting together to toss
hay bales, Id have laughed in your face. Back
then, I saw myself as a committed city girl. I
liked nature ne, as long as it stayed outside where
I could keep an eye on it. That was before my husband,
John, and I decided to move 2,856 miles from Los
Angeles to a 15-acre farm in New Yorks Hudson Valley.
Our move came out of a growing desire to shake up
our lives, to have an adventure. Some might call this a
midlife crisis, and they might be right. We were tired of
L.A.s frenetic pace and wanted our kids to experience
an environment in which elds and woods outnumbered freeways and parking lots. As writers, John and
I are able to do most of our work wherever we have a
computer, a phone, and space to think, though none of
these, it turns out, should be taken for granted.
We found the house on a lark, during a fall trip to visit
friends who spend weekends in the hamlet we now call
home. By December, we were ready to sell our L.A.

place. At breakfast one morning, our son, Jordan, then


5, looked up from his bagel and asked, So when are we
moving to Runaround Farm? Unbeknownst to us,
our new house had a name.
In March, John and I threw ourselves a birthday and
bon voyage party. (The invitations said, Were turning
41. Weve bought the farm.) Bemused friends muttered
about our madness. It happened so fast, there was little
room for doubt. But my husband did exact one promise.

In all the homes we had shared,


Id suered from massive indecision. Rooms remained
unpainted; the overall design scheme was high hodgepodge. This time, John said, he wanted to live in a house
that made sense and felt nished. I knew the only way
hed get his wish was if I got some professional help.
I found interior designer Victoria Klein, who took to
heart my half-baked ideas about connecting our home to
its seasonal vistas and turning the nondescript contemporary farmhouse into something (continued on pg.88)

84 . COUNTRYLIVING.C OM . August 2009


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The horse portrait on the dining room


sideboard depicts Grey Lady, a mare
that belonged to Paige Orloffs
grandmother. Opposite, from left:
Four antique herbiers (framed pressed
plants) hang above a 1940s reproduction French-style desk and Frank
Gehrys Superlight aluminum chair.
The OrloffsPetra, Paige, Jordan, and
Johnpose by the barn. Paige
repainted the kitchen three times
before landing on the perfect shade of
green, Benjamin Moores Chameleon.

Steal
this idea!

It may look like


wallpaper, but
Orloffs dining room
reveals an easier
route: These oral
ourishes are paper
cutouts pasted
directly onto the
painted walls.

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Steal
this idea!

For hooks with


rustic appeal, use a
handsaw to slice
branches down one
sideso theyll lie
atthen nail them
right onto the wall.

A few months in, I announced that Id


ordered chickens. Not for dinner. The kids and I
picked up our new pets at the feedstore in town.

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Steal
this idea!

A truly inventive
way to display an old
quilt: Reupholster
a worn chair with it.

Farrow & Balls Off-Black paint


brings a sense of mystery to simple
bookshelvesand serves as the
perfect foil for a painting by Johns
father. Opposite: The mudrooms
brick-red paint, Zoffanys Moulin
Rouge, shows off the clean curves of
a bench found at an antiques mall in
Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

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87

The house isnt perfect: The Internet goes down when the
wind blows hard; our phones work in only two rooms. But we
live in a place that astonishes us with its loveliness every day.

(continued from pg. 84) unique. Our new place had to make
room for family heirlooms. It had to be fun, it had to be
kid-friendly, and it had to be a place wed love to live in,
even in the bleak, bleached beauty of winter.

Victoria leapt at the challenge,


fearlessly mixing old and new: My mothers faded
armchairs burst into life with fresh fabric, and the giant
secretary wed always seen as a white elephant suddenly
anchored an airy living room, balanced by a big mirror
that made the space feel larger. Victoria took a tattered
quilt I got on eBay and used it to upholster a thrift-shop
chair. She turned the dining room into a work of art,
adorned with dcoupaged owers instead of wallpaper.
Outside, an iron daybed, found locally, got gorgeous
with cushions; now its our favorite napping/working spot.
Victorias greatest contribution, though, may have been the
confidence she gave us to make our own choices: buying
that daybed and mirror, for example, or arranging coat
hooks made from branches on the mudroom wall.
But our changes havent all been about aesthetics. A

88

few months in, I announced that Id ordered chickens.


Not for dinner. The kids and I picked up our new pets at
the feedstore in town. What do you know about raising
chickens? asked the resident skeptic. But now we have
15 hens who give us eggs daily. We adopted Dacos, an
ex-racehorse, and spend mornings mucking out stalls
and, yes, hauling hay for him and his companion, Dalia.
We miss friends and family in L.A.; we miss favorite
museums and restaurants and Chinese home delivery.
Our house isnt perfect: The Internet goes down when
the wind blows hard; the power fails, sometimes for
days; and our cell phones work in only two rooms. Its
not done, either. We still have a bathroom to renovate
and details to add. But we live in a place that astonishes
us with its loveliness every day, and where we can take
time to appreciate it. It seems that in this nearly nished
house, we may have nally found our real home.
Former TV and lm producer Paige Smith Orlo writes about
food and design. Shes now tending her rst vegetable garden. As
God is my witness, Ill never buy $8 arugula again, Orlo says.

SEE SHOP GUIDE, page 127, for Paige Orloffs favorite sourcesplus, how to re-create her living room on a budget.

www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

For the master bedroom walls, Paige


opted for Benjamin Moores Vibrant
Blush: We have winter ve months a
yearand I wanted to feel cozy. Made
from reclaimed r, the Gustavian-style
bed came from VivaTerra. Were still
trying to gure out what to hang
above it, she says. Opposite, from left:
The iron daybed on the front porch
has become the family hangout.
Jordan and Petra read a story in the
attic. Maintaining their 15 acres is a
constant challenge, Paige admits. I
keep threatening to get sheep so we
wont have to mow so much.

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Sleep among the trees, then


wake to owers with
Cath Kidstons whimsical tent,
$192; cathkidston.com.
Sleeping bags*, $49 each;
llbean.com. Leaf-print
pillow, $32; potterybarn.com.
White shams, $58 each;
utilitycanvas.com. On table:
GSI Outdoors percolator,
$24.95, and cup, $3.95;
peak62.com. Lantern, $39;
potterybarnkids.com.

Were giving away 10 of


L.L. Beans sleeping bags! Enter
to win at countryliving.com/
sweeps. For details, see page 130.

HIGH CAMP
Roughing it? Not quite. These rened takes
on rugged outdoor gear bring old-school tents, blankets,
and more into stylish new territory.

W R I T T E N BY J E S S I C A D O D E L L- F E D E R P H OTO G R A P H S BY M A R C U S N I L S S O N

90
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Rustic, hand-lettered signs deliver


a low-key dose of lake-shack
chic. LAKE plaque, $44, and BAIT AND
TACKLE sign, $150; lavilleframes
.com. Yellow cotton shirt by American
Eagle Outtters, $34.50; ae.com.
Black Rhino leather quiver, $19.50, and
arrows, $19.95 for six; bows.net.
Steel cooler, $149.99; coleman.com.
Boat cushion, $37; seasons
ofcannonfalls.com for stores.

www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

Earthenware bowls
provide the perfect home for
nature-inspired accessories.
Cul de Sac Design dishes, $70
for large and $30 for
small; velocityartanddesign
.com. Jewelry (from top):
vermeil necklace, $175; jessica
hicks.com. Gold-dipped
earrings, $174, and necklace,
$98; dogeared.com.

Gleaming gold jewelry,


light as a feather, makes for
some very happy campers.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

Custom seat coverscrafted from weather-resistant


materialscan withstand more than a few splashes.
DelGreco Textiles outdoor ower-printed fabric from
Patio Culture, $158 per yard; 310-314-9700.
Sunbrella striped fabric, $30.99 per yard; calicocorners
.com. Water-repellent burgundy pillow, $25;
potterybarn.com. DelGreco Textiles outdoor blue oral
fabric from Patio Culture (on pillow), $158 per
yard; 310-314-9700. Lantern, $12; gracioushome.com.
Bucket, $35; themacbethcollection.com. Boat cushion
(in canoe), $37; seasonsofcannonfalls.com for stores.

www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

93

Bold retro prints transform workaday


dishcloths into works of art. Moda Home
bait-and-tackle towel set, $23.99 for four;
homealamode.com. Leanne Graeff canoe
towel, $14; papernstitch.com.

Strung from a clothesline, graphic


cotton tea towels do double duty as
an impromptu summertime banner.

94
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A pile of eecy blankets


invites snuggling under the
stars. Northwest Traders
handwoven throws, $175 each;
nwtrader.com.

www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

Steal
this idea!

Why bother perfecting


a complicated mixed
border when a bunch of
black-eyed Susans
look so bold?

Jamey Berger and Dan DiPaolos 1883 house


displays unusually rened masonry for a
Wisconsin farm, with large, elegant cornerstones. Berger and DiPaolo painted the trim
on the windows in two soft shades of green:
Prentis Store and George Davenport House,
both from Pratt & Lamberts Williamsburg
Palette. The barn at right houses the couples
farm store, where they sell produce and eggs.

96
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Coming Full Circle


Jamey Berger nally found his way back to the quiet Wisconsin town
where his family has lived since 1836. But when he and partner
Dan DiPaolo bought a house there, they got much more than they
bargained fornamely, a whole new life in which work, play,
and a sense of community merge joyously together.
Written by Louisa Kamps | Photographs by Aime Herring
August
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DiPaolo began collecting


wire whisks after a friend
gave him one 15 years ago.
Below: Red Wing bowls
an obsession of Bergers
since he inherited his rst
from his grandmother
sit atop a cupboard, with
original paint, acquired
at a local antiques show.

Everyone

in Jamey Bergers family


knows the story, passed down through the generations, of
how Bergers great-great-great-grandfather Herman
Loomis settled in Burlington, Wisconsin, in 1836, and
raised the rst two children ever born there. One of them
was Charlotte Loomis, Bergers great-great-grandmother.
Berger himself grew up in Burlington, but left, as grown
children will dorst for college in Ohio in 2001, then
ve years ago, in search of a design career in Milwaukee.
There Berger met Dan DiPaolo, now his partner.
DiPaolo, executive creative director of a calendar company, hired Berger as a sta artist, and the two moved into
a ranch house in the suburbs. But barely a year passed
before both admitted they longed for a home with some
landand some history. The couple began searching for
a place, any place that had character and was within commuting distance of work. After theyd shaken their heads
at a slew of hopelessly far-gone ruins scattered across
southern Wisconsin, their real estate agent nally e-mailed
a photo of a charming 1883 stone house on 40 acres
situatedyou guessed itonly a few miles outside Bergers
hometown of Burlington.
We came around that bend, says DiPaolo, pointing
to the road that leads up to their gorgeous oak- and pinedotted front lawn, and it looked just like a postcard. The
house still had its original warbled-glass windowsinnitely pleasing to Berger, who studied historic preservation
in college. And no one had tampered with the Victorian
wooden front porchthe clincher for DiPaolo, who spent
many happy boyhood days at his grandmothers country
home in upstate New York. Im always trying to re-create
my grandmas house, he admits.
f course, instant gratication was denitely not
part of the houses package. Much of what the
couple found, inside and out, didnt resemble any
kind of postcard (decades of bad trends, sighs
DiPaolo). Working nights over three hard months, the pair
scraped layers of carpet and linoleum o original hardwood
floors; undid so-called improvements, such as sixties
knotty-pine cabinets in the kitchen; and painted the walls
soothing tones of mustard, taupe, and brown. Surprisingly, the muted shades seem to lure even more sunshine
in. We love those in-between colors that morph with the
light of day, DiPaolo explains.
The two artists ability to see the beauty in everyday
objects is apparent in each room. Theyve collected
Early American and turn-of-the-century furniture and
pottery for years, along with a hodgepodge of folk art
created by friends. Now brought together in the farmhouse, the simple, strong-lined piecesfrom sturdy
18th-century cabinets to bentwood (continued on pg. 103)

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In the kitchen, a frieze


of folk-art tin crows
watches over a fruit sign
found in southern
Indiana and an unabashedly modern Kenmore
Elite stove (DiPaolo
loves its double oven).

99
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The original carriage house now


makes a high-class home for
chickens. Above: Berger (left) and
DiPaolo in one of their elds.
Left: Most of DiPaolos ironstone
is in the Wheat pattern.

100
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DiPaolos hand-broom
collection. Bottom: Sweet
Pea the kitty relaxes
on a ea-market daybed
dressed up with linens
from Vagabond Vintage.
Left: Modern game
hen Iggy recovers from
a foot injury in
splendid isolation.

In ways that the two never expected,


the farm has changed them more
than theyve changed it.

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We love those in-between colors


that morph with the light of day,
DiPaolo explains.

A photo of DiPaolos
grandfather and greatuncle as boys hangs
above a reproduction
armchair in the master
bedroom. The swing
clock on the mantel is
a copy of a popular
1940s style.
SEE SHOP GUIDE, page 129, for DiPaolo and Bergers sources, as well as ideas for replicating their farmhouse kitchen.

www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

The bedrooms gentle wall color


(Ralph Laurens Khaki) and subtly
patterned linens, from Family
Heirloom Weavers in Pennsylvania,
suit the houses subdued palette.
Below: A tiny spare bedroom
serves as a dressing room.

(continued from pg. 98) storage rkins stacked sculpturally


in odd corners (early Tupperware, jokes DiPaolo)
blend together seamlessly.
In ways that the two never expected, though, the farm
has changed them more than theyve changed it. During
the spring of 2006, their rst in the house, Berger and
DiPaolo planted some heirloom squash seeds on a bit of the
property, curious to see what shapes might sprout out of
the ground. But the packet yielded such a bumper crop
We ate so much squash that year! recalls Bergerthat, on
a lark, they decided to bring their bounty to the Thursday
farmers market in downtown Burlington. It wasnt long
before the newcomers were a regular xture.
he marketand even, in a way, the couples presence there (their stand is named Fried Green
Tomatoes)has helped revitalize Burlington and
gives people a reason to go downtown again, to
be there and connect, Berger notes with homegrown pride.
And as he and DiPaolo became part of the community, they
found themselves wanting to spend more and more time at
the house. Finally, two years ago, they cut the cord and quit
their day jobs to work at the farm full-time. With help from
Berger, DiPaolo runs his freelance design businesscreating kitchenware and calendars for merchants such as Kohls
and Bed Bath & Beyondfrom a sunny studio in the living
room; they take turns selling produce and eggs in the store
they operate out of their barn. Berger, who used to wonder,
during their commute, why he wasnt born in the 1800s,
relishes the centeredness he feels on the farm, where the
couples crops now occupy ve of their 40 acres: When
Im planting tomatoes, Im in the momentIm thinking
about planting tomatoes.
So far, they havent hired anyone to help with the crops,
and the design business still pays the bulk of the bills (while
also keeping them busy during Wisconsin winters), but
DiPaolo jokes that Berger has gotten so into farming the
old-fashioned way that soon hell probably get a horse and
plow. To which Berger shrugs, as if to say, Well, whats so
crazy about that? Putting in hard agricultural labor and
eating their vegetablesincluding the pickles they tint a
vibrant green in honor of DiPaolos grandmother, who
made them that way because she was color-blind, he
explainsthe two have each lost about 30 pounds. What
theyve gained, though, cant be measured on a scale. The
couple marvel daily at the magic theyve cooked up on the
farm. Thinking of those rst squash seeds, DiPaolo says,
I love the times where you do this one simple thing, and
it takes on a life of its own.

Steal
this idea!

The no-carpentry
closet (a curtainedoff wall) takes on
quiet glamour when
gussied up with a
matching valance.

Louisa Kamps, an avid collector of rustic pottery, lives with her husband and
son in Madison, Wisconsin. Armed with tips from Berger and DiPaolo on ea
markets around the state, shes ready for more jug and bowl hunting this summer.

103
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summers
sweetest
reward

After much anticipation,

fresh-picked eld corn


sweeps into farm stands this month and steals the late-summer show. Crisp,
sweet, and delicious, this humble vegetable manages to capture the essence of the
season in a single, satisfying bite. Beneath its glossy green husk lie the makings
of a feast, whether a simple meal for one or a backyard barbecue for 50. Although
newly harvested ears require little adornment to shinesave for a pat of butter
and sprinkle of saltversatility remains the crops strong suit. Use corn in salads,
baked goods, and savory casseroles, and trust it to complement nearly any food
youd prepare on a grill. So go ahead, get cooking. Corn season wont last forever.

104
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written by
MONIC A M ICHAE L
W I LL IS

photographs by
C ON POU LOS

Made with everyday


pantry staples and
kernels cut straight
from the cob, these
airy fritters will get
eaten up as fast as you
can fry them (see
recipe, page 107).

recipes by
C H ERYL SLOCU M

prop styling by
H EAT H ER C HONTOS

food styling by
HEI DI JOH ANNSE N

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A simple CORN RELISH


spiked with lime,
jalapeos, and red onion
adds CITRUSY HEAT
to tender slices of
marinated FLANK
STEAK , one of the most
avorfuland
ECONOMICAL cuts
of beef.
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Just-picked corn,
plump blueberries,
and a dusting of raw
sugar kick this basic
corn muffin up a
notch (see recipe,
page 108).

corn fritters with


yogurt dip
CORN FRITTERS
Makes 12 fritters. Working time 25 min.
Total time 30 min.
1
1
1 12
1
2
1
8
1
2
3
2
1

(48-ounce) bottle canola oil


cup our
teaspoons baking powder
teaspoon sea salt
teaspoon cayenne pepper
large egg
cup milk
tablespoons unsalted butter,
melted
cup fresh corn kernels
(about 2 ears)

Preheat oven to 200F. Heat oil to


375F in a medium pot tted with
deep-fry thermometer. Sift our,
baking powder, salt, and cayenne
together in a medium bowl. In a
separate bowl, whisk egg, milk, and
butter together and stir into dry
ingredients. Fold in corn and let
batter sit for 5 minutes. Drop heaping tablespoonfuls of batter into
heated oil and fry until golden, about
3 minutes (work in batches of 4 or 5).
Drain on a baking pan lined with
paper towels. Transfer to a second
baking pan and keep warm in oven.
Serve with yogurt dip (recipe follows).
NUTRITION PER FRITTER protein: 2 g; fat:
7.4 g; carbohydrate: 8.6 g; ber: 3 g; sodium:
160 mg; cholesterol: 24 mg; calories: 109.

3
2
2
1
2

2
1
2

FLANK STEAK
Makes 4 servings. Working time 20 min.
Total time 2 hr.
1
2
1
4
2
1

pound ank steak


cup olive oil
cup Worcestershire sauce
garlic cloves, crushed

2
2
3
4
3
1

Salt and freshly ground pepper

YOGURT DIP
Makes 1 cup. Working time 5 min.
Total time 5 min.
2

CORN RELISH
Makes 2 cups. Working time 20 min.
Total time 20 min.

grilled ank steak


with corn relish

cup yogurt
tablespoons dill
tablespoons olive oil
teaspoon sea salt

Mix all ingredients together. Chill


and serve with corn fritters.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein:
0.9 g; fat: 5.5 g; carbohydrate: 1.3 g;
ber: 0 g; sodium: 209 mg; cholesterol:
4 mg; calories: 57.

Marinate ank steak in olive oil,


Worcestershire sauce, and garlic for
1 hours. Remove from marinade
and season with salt and pepper.
Grill until medium-rare, about 7
minutes per side. Let steak rest for 15
minutes before thinly slicing. Serve
hot or at room temperature, topped
with corn relish (recipe follows).
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein:
24 g; fat: 18.6 g; carbohydrate: 1 g;
ber: 0.1 g; sodium: 398 mg; cholesterol:
40 mg; calories: 269.

tablespoons olive oil


cup chopped red onion
medium seeded jalapeos,
nely chopped
cups fresh corn kernels
(about 4 ears)
teaspoon sea salt
teaspoon crushed red pepper
tablespoons fresh lime juice
tablespoon honey

Heat oil in medium skillet over


medium heat. Add onion and
jalapeos and cook for 1 minute.
Add corn and continue to cook until
vegetables are slightly soft, about
5 minutes. Remove from heat and
toss with remaining ingredients.
Cool and serve at room temperature
over grilled ank steak.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein: 1.5 g;
fat: 4 g; carbohydrate: 12.3 g; ber: 1.5 g;
sodium: 154 mg; cholesterol: 0 mg; calories: 83.

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 107

Smoked Gouda,
heavy cream, and
eggs give this
silky corn custard its
satisfyingly rich
taste and texture.

1
2

teaspoon sea salt


teaspoon freshly ground
pepper

Preheat oven to 300F. Butter a


10- by 7-inch baking dish; set aside.
Heat cream and milk over medium
heat until simmering. Reduce heat to
low and stir in 1 cups cheese until
melted. Add bread crumbs. Remove
from heat and cool for 10 minutes.
Whisk in egg yolks, cup corn, salt,
and pepper. Pour custard into prepared dish and top with remaining
cup corn and cup cheese. Place
dish in a large roasting pan, pour
1 inch hot water into pan, and bake
until custard sets, about 1 hours.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein: 14.2 g;
fat: 31 g; carbohydrate: 21.8 g; ber: 1.4 g;
sodium: 808 mg; cholesterol: 207 mg;
calories: 419.

corn-stued tomatoes
blueberrycorn muns
Makes 12 muns. Working time 20 min.
Total time 45 min.
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
6
1

1
1
1

cup stone-ground yellow


cornmeal
cup our
cup granulated sugar
teaspoons baking powder
teaspoon sea salt
large egg
cup buttermilk
tablespoons unsalted butter,
melted and cooled
cup blueberries
cup fresh corn kernels
(about 2 ears)
tablespoon turbinado sugar

Preheat oven to 400F. Place baking


liners in a 12-cup mun pan and
set aside. Combine cornmeal, our,
granulated sugar, baking powder,
and salt in a large bowl and set aside.

In a separate bowl, whisk egg, buttermilk, and butter together and stir into
dry ingredients until just combined.
Gently fold in blueberries and corn.
Divide batter among mun cups and
sprinkle with turbinado sugar. Bake
until a skewer inserted into center of
muns comes out clean, about 25
minutes. Cool on a wire rack.
NUTRITION PER MUFFIN protein: 3.5
g; fat: 6.9 g; carbohydrate: 29.9 g; ber:
2.6 g; sodium: 331 mg; cholesterol: 33 mg;
calories: 192.

corn-and-cheese
custard
Makes 6 servings. Working time 30 min.
Total time 1 hr. 45 min.
1 14
1
1 34
1
3
1

cups heavy cream


cup milk
cups grated smoked Gouda
cup fresh bread crumbs
egg yolks
cup fresh corn kernels
(about 2 ears)

Makes 6 servings. Working time 25 min.


Total time 25 min.
1 34
1
2
1
4
1
4
1
4
4
3

2 12
1
4
1
4
4
6

cups fresh corn kernels


(about 2 12 ears)
cup cooked jasmine rice,
cooled to room temperature
avocado, chopped
cup chopped yellow pepper
cup chopped green pepper
cup chopped red onion
tablespoons olive oil
tablespoons chopped
fresh cilantro
tablespoons lemon juice
teaspoon sea salt
teaspoon freshly ground
pepper
teaspoon ground cumin
medium vine tomatoes

In a large bowl, toss all ingredients


togetherexcept tomatoesand set
aside. Slice tops o tomatoes and
remove insides. Fill each tomato with
cup corn-rice mixture and serve.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein: 3.9 g;
fat: 12.7 g; carbohydrate: 24 g; ber: 4.7 g;
sodium: 115 mg; cholesterol: 0 mg; calories: 209.

108 . COUNTRYLIV I NG.C OM . August 2009


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When SUMMER PRODUCE reaches its


PEAK, why cook more than you
have to? This NO-FUSS side dish MAKES
THE MOST of local corn, tomatoes,
and bell peppers.

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Pamela Pages expansive,


90- by 55-foot fenced-in plot
initially overwhelmed her. But
its amazing how fast I lled in
every square inch of dirt, she
says. Within two years, I was
already dreaming of what I could
grow if only I had more space.

110
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GOOD ENOUGH
to EAT
With patience, hard workand an impressive
master planPamela Page transformed
a rocky lot in Bethel, Connecticut, into a gorgeously
abundant organic kitchen garden.

W R I T T E N BY D OUG L A S B R E N N E R t P HOTO G R A P H S BY L I S A H U B B A R D
S T Y L I N G B Y M E L I S S A O Z AWA

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Theres no need to buy


expensive trellises, says
Page, who dreamed up
this DIY version, made
from rot-resistant cedar,
for her tomatoes. Right,
from top: Nasturtiums
tangle with owering
kale. Page stakes deeppink Emory Paul dahlias.

I V I NG F ROM H A N D
to mouthliterally, that isand
savoring every moment of it has
been Pamela Pages style since she
was a little girl growing up in
New Orleans. Back then, she
picked kumquats in her grandmothers yard, foraged in
blackberry brambles, and sneaked a watermelon seed
into a ower bed beside her parents suburban front
walka secret that sprouted and crept until her nongardener father tripped over a runaway vine. Get that
thing out of here! he barked. This is not Green Acres.
Unfazed, the pint-size farmer clung to two ideas:
Someday she would have a patch where she chose what
to sow herselfand she planned to reap surprises.
Today, decades later, the fruits of those resolutions
ll the 4,950-square-foot organic kitchen garden that
Page tends on land she and her husband, architect Igor
Jozsa, bought in Connecticut 24 years ago. The couple,
who co-own an architectural rm, call their eight and a
half acres Ho Hum Hollow, but thumb-twiddling isnt
on the agenda. Besides building a new house, Page and

Jozsa hacked through poison ivy, pried up basketballsize stones from the earth, and hauled manure to
bring back the land. Theyve also brought delicious
memories back to life.
As an undergraduate, Page spent several semesters in
France; she fell in love with the luscious produce that
Provenal villagers raised in tidy potagers and the wild
greens they gathered in meadows. Jozsa, an inventive
cook, learned to revere seasonal ingredients during his
boyhood in Italy. In their early years together, the couple
scoured Manhattan specialty shops for vegetables and
fruits to serve at dinner parties, yet even the fanciest
groceries underwhelmed their nostalgic palates. Short
of moving back to Europe permanently, Page asked,
how could we get just-picked Tuscan kale or an exquisite
Charentais melon? The answer: Grow their own.
Coddling taste buds and planning orderly crop
rotations, however, werent Pages only reasons for nally
mapping out her neat grid of garden paths and beds
seven years ago. No fan of gyms, she valued the wholesome exercise involved in digging, weeding, and wheelbarrow pushing. And she envisioned a place where

112 . COUNTRYLIVI NG.C OM . August 2009


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The head gardener for King William III of England insisted


that a sallet contain no fewer than 35
ingredients, says Page. So far, I only have 27!

1
3
2

11

7
8

10

13

16

15
14

12

20

17

21

18

19

25
23
22

24

27

26

Inspired by her research into 17th-century kitchen gardens, Page decided to grow the xings for her own Baroque salad:
1 Crispino iceberg lettuce 2 mizuna 3 oak-leaf lettuce 4 RedRiding Hood lettuce 5 baby romaine lettuce 6 fennel fronds
7 calendula owers 8 basil 9 Creamsicle nasturtium owers 10 spearmint 11 Creamsicle nasturtium leaves 12 Spitre nasturtium leaves
13 baby Red Express cabbage 14 salad burnet 15 romaine lettuce 16 at-leaf parsley 17 Black-Seeded Simpson lettuce
18 wild arugula 19 Miniature White cucumbers 20 True Lemon cucumber 21 fennel owers 22 purslane 23 Spitre nasturtium owers
24 komatsuna 25 Mascara lettuce 26 purple mizuna 27 Red Rapids lettuce.

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Clockwise from top left:


To deter pesky groundhogs and rabbits, Page fortied the perimeter of her
post-and-rail fence by digging a trench and installing chicken wire about three
feet below the surface along
the edge. A Ruskin Gypsy
dahlia. Bartlett pears
ripe for the picking. Edible
owers, like nasturtiums
and calendula, are really
easy to grow, says Page.

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Im learning, playing, having the time of my life.


Gardening is one-third science,
one-third art, one-third Peace Corps.

Page and her husband, Igor


Jozsa (above center), frequently entertain under their
grape arbor, which they situated just outside the kitchen
door. With so many fresh
crops, we rarely make elaborate concoctions, says Page.
We eat a lot of our vegetables
raw, straight from the garden.

symmetry would calm the soul, along the lines of the


geometric plots she had admired abroad and read about
in histories of horticulture from ancient Egypt on. I
knew I was plagiarizing, she confesses, so I felt I should
dress up my Old World design in New World clothesa
split-rail fence with rabbit wire to keep out all-American
groundhogs. Raised beds and trellises that Igor and I
would build with cedar from our woods.
When her husband rst saw the fence, which Page had
installed while Jozsa was away, he gasped at her grandiose
scheme. Sure enough, it took all summer just to clear the
ground and amend the soilfor plants that, by then, Page
couldnt hope to grow from seed until the next year. She
still orders seeds in winter and starts them indoors in
February, because its the only way to cultivate rare or
heirloom varieties that local places dont stock. If you buy
run-of-the-mill transplants, youre limited, and the point
of this garden is that its limitless. Ive grown three-dozen
dierent tomatoes, a dozen pepper varieties, a half-dozen
types of cucumber, okra, and beansin a single season.
Not to mention edible owers (and inedible iris, peonies,
and dahlias that tempt the eye); just-for-fun oddities, like
African jelly melons; and companion plants that do more

than repel pests or attract benecial insects. On a sultry


August day, Page says, a combination of scarlet and orange
marigolds and tomatoes looks so vibrant that shes happy
to drag hoses and shovel compost.
X U B E R A N T H O S T S, Page and
Jozsa entertain every weekend. When visitors
bemoan the toil a kitchen garden must
demand, Page nods silently. Its a charade,
she admits: I try to look very tired and dont
let on that when I garden, Im hardly working. I listen to
bees, sni the mock oranges, stretch, and look. Im
learning, playing, having the time of my life. Gardening
is one-third science, one-third art, one-third Peace
Corps. At dusk, while Jozsa is prepping dinner, Page
invites guests to harvest greens for a salad or raspberries
for dessert. It makes everything worthwhile to see the
excitement on visitors faces when they come back with
full baskets. Theyre like kids.
Douglas Brenners A Rose by Any Name (Algonquin),
written with Stephen Scanniello, was published this year. He grows
raspberries and asparagus in his garden on the Jersey Shore.
August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 115

How to plan a kitchen garden (big or small)


WHILE IT MAY be too late to plant a potager this summer,
its never too early to get a jump start on next years
vegetable patch. For Pamela Page, the secret to maintaining
her 4,950-square-foot plot is advance planningreviewing
this seasons results and getting organized for the future.
Following, her gardening tips as well as a planting key:

Take stock Survey your garden as it looks now. Snap photographs of everything, including overall views and close-ups
of individual beds and groupings. Where are the gaps and
mistakes? Do you wish you had more of one thing, less of
another? Not as many elements? Visually, fewer varieties in
one place creates a bigger impact. Half the beds in my garden

21
23
17

29

38

43

43

30

22
20

31

24

39

32

46
23

46
45

44

19
47

40

33
39

34

48
25
19

49
26

46

35
41

46

50

51

18

53

17

36

27

42

52

37

28
16

52

53
14

12

15

13

Planting key
Garden perimeter
1 Mock oranges
Virginial
2 Red currants
Red Lake
3 Daylilies
Apricot Sparkles
Winsome Lady
Kwan Yin

Hyperion
Mauna Loa
4 Raspberries
Heritage
5 Pole beans
Bobis Nero
Cosse Violette
Neckargold
Dolico un Metro

Taiwan Black
6 Blackberries
Thornfree 2G
Sherman
7 Climbing roses
Martine Guillet
8 Kiwi vines
(Actinidia kolomikta)

9 Monkshood
(Aconitum napellus)
10 Echinacea
Robert Bloom
11 Dahlias
Ginger Snap
12 Hydrangeas
Blue Wave

13 Highbush
blueberries
Bluegold
14 Dahlias
Clydes Choice
Emory Paul
Spartacus
Bodacious
Thomas Edison

116
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Prince Noir
Jersey Beauty
Pennsford Marion
Ben Houston
Ruskin Gypsy
Sunowers
Miriam Edible
15 Honeysuckle
Graham Thomas

12

contain just a single type of vegetable or herb, says Page.


Draw a plan Sketch a basic layout of your bedswhether its
whats already in place or what you hope to achieveand
make photocopies. Use these diagrams to plan crop
rotations and plot new plant combinations. Order early Page
suggests buying seeds by January to ensure what you want

54

59
60
55

61
56

57
55

61
56

57

62
58

63

14
13

16 Spearmint
Kentucky Colonel
17 Snake gourds
Polo F1
18 Strawberries
Fraises des bois
19 Plums
Shiro
Santa Rosa

20 Bee balm
Panorama Red
Shades
21 Mint
Bowles
Interior beds
22 Marigolds
Sparkler Double

doesnt sell out: This year, I waited till April to order, and
half the tomato varieties were already gone. Surprise yourself
Always plant at least one or two new things, recommends
Page. Do what you can Dont give up because your space
or timeis limited. Start small, says Page. Lay out just one
six-foot square, or grow a few vegetables and herbs in pots.

26 Cucumbers
Diva
True Lemon
2
Telegraph Improved
Miniature White
27 Okra
10
1
Fife Creek Cowhorn
Hill Country Red
28 Daylilies
Catherine Woodbury
29 Fennel
64
Rubrum
30 Daylilies
11
Mauna Loa
59
31 Chili peppers
Thai yellow
Habaero
Jalapeo
32 Beets
Detroit Dark Red
65
33 Radishes
12
Chinese Red Meat
66
34 Broccoli
Natalino Romanesco
35 Broccoli rabe
Spring Raab
36 Meadow rue
12
Lavender Mist
67
37 Cabbages
Red Acre
66
Red Express
38 Sweet peppers
Sweet Cal Wonder
39 Siberian irises
Caesars Brother
11
40 Zinnias
Benarys Giant Lime
68
41 Calendula
Triangle Flashback
Indian Prince
42 Sweet peppers
Sweet Chocolate
Lilac
Purple Beauty
1
43 Sedum
Autumn Joy
44 Pears
Red Bartlett
45 Cherries
Montmorency
23 Tomatoes
Opalka
46 Sage
Red Pear
Striped Stuffer
White Sage
Yellow Pear
Dr. Wyches
47 Nasturtiums
Chocolate Cherry
Yellow Tomatillo
Spitre
Green Zebra
24 Basil
48 Passionowers
Big Rainbow
Profumo di Genova (Passiora incarnata)
Orange Oxheart
25 Melons
49 Peonies
Tondino
Savor Charentais
Kelways Glorious
Principe Borghese
Pink Formal

Torch Song
50 Pears
Bosc
51 Cherries
Bing
52 English lavender
Buena Vista
53 Sea holly
Amethyst
54 Sweet peppers
Quadrato dAsti
Rosso
King of the North
55 Flowering kale
Purple Pigeon F1
56 Rhubarb
Victoria
57 Nasturtiums
Creamsicle
58 Sweet peppers
Quadrato dAsti
Giallo
59 Asparagus
Jersey Knight
Larac Hybrid
60 Onions
Red Burgermeister
61 Beets
Detroit Dark Red
Golden
62 Escarole
Natacha
63 Eggplant
Pingtung
64 Onions
Copra
65 Lettuces &
greens
Wild arugula
Salad burnet
Mizuna
Oak-leaf
Romaine
Komatsuna
66 Chives
Nira
67 Lettuces &
greens
Black-Seeded
Simpson
Purple Mizuna
Red Rapids
Purslane
Crispino
Mascara
Red-Riding Hood
68 Sweet potatoes
Beauregard
Violetta

117

Illustration by Michael A. Hill

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cookbook

Fast rst courses, a nger-licking rib dinner, and a savory summer pie
BISCUIT MIX

+ SUGAR + VANILLA BEAN + HEAVY CREAM + PEACHES =

Shortcake
with Peaches
and Cream

Makes 6 servings. Working time 25 min. Total time 45 min.

Preheat oven to 350F. Mix 2 cups biscuit mix, such as Bisquick, with
cup sugar and seeds from half of a vanilla bean in a medium bowl. Stir in
cup heavy cream and cup cold water. Transfer batter to lightly oiled
8-inch cake pan and bake until a skewer inserted in center of cake comes
out clean, about 25 minutes. Set pan on a wire rack and cool for 15
minutes. Release cake from pan and cool completely. Meanwhile, peel,
pit, and slice 4 medium peaches. Toss with 2 tablespoons sugar and seeds
from remaining half of vanilla bean in medium bowl; let sit 15 minutes,
to allow peach juices to release. For whipped cream, beat cup heavy
cream to soft peaks. Chill both peaches and cream. Cut cake into
wedges. Split each piece, spoon peaches onto bottom halves, cover with
top halves, and drizzle with juice. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein: 4.1 g; fat: 18.4 g; carbohydrate: 47 g; ber:
1.7 g; sodium: 516 mg; cholesterol: 45 mg; calories: 361.

By Cheryl Slocum
Photographs by Ellen Silverman
Prop and food styling by Paul Lowe

August 2009 .

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C OUN T RY L I V I NG .C OM

. 119

cookbook

Three Fresh Ideas for

Marinated Roasted
Red Peppers
Skip the messy steps of peeling charred skin and scraping
seeds. Get smokin avor with roasted peppers from a jar.

Pimento-Cheese Sandwiches
Makes 32 nger sandwiches. Working time 20 min. Total time 20 min.

Stir together pound sharp yellow Cheddar cheese, grated; teaspoon cayenne
pepper; 2 teaspoons horseradish; teaspoon Worcestershire sauce; teaspoon
dry mustard; and 5 tablespoons mayonnaise in a medium bowl. Blend half the
mixture in a food processor until smooth. Transfer back to bowl, add 3 tablespoons chopped marinated roasted red pepper, and stir to combine. Trim crusts
from 16 slices rm white bread. Spread pimento cheese among 8 slices. Top
with remaining bread. Cut sandwiches into quarters, slicing on the diagonal.
NUTRITION PER FINGER SANDWICH protein: 2.4 g; fat: 4.5 g; carbohydrate: 4.1 g; ber:
0.6 g; sodium: 104 mg; cholesterol: 8 mg; calories: 65.

Red-Pepper Straws
Makes 24 straws. Working time 20 min. Total time 55 min.

Preheat oven to 400F. Saut 1 nely chopped shallot and cup chopped marinated roasted red pepper in 1 tablespoon olive oil, 4 to 5 minutes. Let cool. Stir in 1
cups grated Parmigiano-Reggiano. Roll 1 sheet thawed frozen puff pastry to 1/16-inch
thickness. Trim to about a 16- by 8-inch rectangle. Spread red-pepper mixture
over dough. Roll out another sheet to same dimensions and place over rst sheet.
Press slightly to seal. Lightly brush with water and sprinkle with more grated
cheese. Cut dough into 24 eight-inch-long strips. Twist each strip and transfer to
2 parchment-lined baking pans. Chill for 20 minutes. Bake for 15 minutes.
NUTRITION PER STRAW protein: 2.2 g; fat: 2.9 g; carbohydrate: 1.8 g; ber: 0.1 g; sodium:
116 mg; cholesterol: 3 mg; calories: 42.

Red-Pepper Soup with Basil Cream


Makes 6 servings. Working time 30 min. Total time 30 min.

Saut 3 small chopped garlic cloves and 1 chopped small onion with 2 tablespoons olive oil in large pot over medium heat for 6 minutes. Add 1 (15-ounce)
can crushed tomatoes, 1 (12-ounce) jar drained and chopped marinated roasted
red peppers, and 2 cups chicken broth. Cook for 15 minutes. Add cup packed
fresh basil, 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar, and 2 teaspoons sugar and puree in a
blender or food processor. For basil cream, stir cup each sour cream and heavy
cream together with cup chopped fresh basil and teaspoon each salt and
freshly ground pepper. Serve soup with dollop of basil cream and chopped basil.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein: 2.7 g; fat: 10.9 g; carbohydrate: 12.5 g; ber: 2.1 g; sodium:
508 mg; cholesterol: 18 mg; calories: 152.

120
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cookbook

From Ribs
to Fried Rice
[ MAKE THIS TONIGHT ]

Glazed Country Ribs


Makes 6 servings. Working time 55 min.
Total time 4 hr. 25 min.
2
3
2
3
4
1
4
4
1
2
1
2
1 12
4

medium yellow onions


pounds country-style pork ribs
large garlic cloves, crushed
tablespoons canola oil
teaspoons grated fresh ginger
cup low-sodium soy sauce
teaspoons sherry vinegar
teaspoon salt
teaspoon freshly ground pepper
cups red-currant jelly
teaspoons ketchup

Preheat oven to 300F. Chop 1 onion into


1-inch pieces. Place ribs, chopped onion,
and garlic in 9- by 13-inch roasting pan
with 1 cups water. Cover tightly with foil
and place in oven. Braise until ribs are very
tender, about 3 hours. Meanwhile, for
red-currant glaze, nely chop remaining
onion. Heat canola oil in a small pot over
medium heat. Add onion and cook until
soft, about 6 minutes. Add ginger and
cook for 1 more minute. Stir in remaining
ingredients and simmer for 5 minutes.
Remove from heat, reserve 2 tablespoons
glaze for pork fried rice (recipe at right),
cup for serving alongside ribs, and
remaining glaze for brushing on ribs.
Remove ribs from pan, discard onion and
garlic, and drain braising liquid. Increase
oven to 350F. Return ribs to pan, brush
with glaze, and place on middle rack in
oven. Baste with glaze every 10 minutes for
30 minutes. Serve hot or warm alongside
cup reserved glaze.
NUTRITION PER RIB protein: 39 g; fat: 45.9 g;
carbohydrate: 28.2 g; ber: 0.3 g; sodium: 427 mg;
cholesterol: 156 mg; calories: 687.

[ ENJOY THIS TOMORROW ]

Sweet-and-Salty
Pork Fried Rice
Makes 4 servings. Working time 35
min. Total time 35 min.

Heat 1 tablespoon canola oil in a


large nonstick frying pan over
medium heat. Beat 2 eggs and
teaspoon salt together. Add to
frying pan and cook, stirring to
scramble, until set, 1 to 2 minutes.
Transfer to plate and set aside. Wipe
pan clean, return to medium heat,
and heat 2 tablespoons oil. Add cup chopped carrot and cup
chopped red pepper, and cook until slightly softened, 4 to 5 minutes. Add cup snow peas, sliced into thirds; cup green onion; 1
cup chopped leftover rib meat (about 1 rib); 3 cups cooked white rice;
2 tablespoons leftover red-currant glaze; 2 tablespoons low-sodium
soy sauce; 1 tablespoon sesame oil; and 2 tablespoons grated ginger
and cook 8 more minutes, until heated through. Stir in scrambled
eggs and cook 1 minute more. Serve hot.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein: 30.2 g; fat: 29.2; carbohydrate: 45.1 g;
ber: 1.9 g; sodium: 489 mg; cholesterol: 185 mg; calories: 573.

122 . COUNTRYLIV I NG.C OM . August 2009


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cookbook

Tandi Haas,
Atlanta

Tandis Tomato Pie


Makes 8 servings. Working time 20 min.
Total time 1 hr. 20 min.
4
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1

medium plum tomatoes


(9-inch) deep-dish pie shell, baked
cup chopped white onion
teaspoon salt
teaspoon freshly ground pepper
tablespoons chopped fresh basil
cup mayonnaise
cup grated Parmesan cheese
cup grated Cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 375F. Cut 6 tomato


slices for garnish; set aside. Halve
remaining tomatoes, remove seeds,
and cut each half into about 6 wedges.
Place half the wedges in bottom of
baked pie shell. Sprinkle with cup
onion, teaspoon each salt and

pepper, and 1 tablespoon basil. Stir


mayonnaise, Parmesan, and
Cheddar together in a small bowl,
then spread half of mixture over
onion layer. Repeat with remaining
tomatoes, cup onion, teaspoon each salt and pepper, and 1
tablespoon basil. Add remaining
mayonnaise mixture. Place reserved
tomato slices in pinwheel design in
pie center. Bake 30 to 40 minutes,
until golden brown. If piecrust starts
overbrowning, cover edges with
aluminum foil. Allow pie to cool 20
minutes before serving.
NUTRITION PER SERVING protein:
6.6 g; fat: 22.3 g; carbohydrate: 11.6 g;
ber: 0.9 g; sodium: 499 mg; cholesterol:
23 mg; calories: 273.

My Aunt Evelyn was a big-time tomato


lover and always served this dish.
She taught me the best way to slice them
with a serrated knife! Tandi Haas
VISIT COUNTRYLIVING.COM/COOKS to share your original recipes.

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shop guide

Your go-to resource for re-creating the looks featured in this issue

IDEA NOTEBOOK: DIY MADE EASY PAGE 66

Headboard
How-To
Build this bedroom showpiece in ve steps.
STEP 1 Choose a solid wood door, preferably with
a design element like paneling, thats a few inches
taller than your bed is wide. If your door is too long,
youll need to trim it down with a power saw.*
Determine where to cut by positioning the door
sideways at the head of the bed; any decorative
details should be centered.
STEP 2 Fill any holes in the door with wood putty,
then sand with medium-grade sandpaper and wipe
down with a damp cloth. Flip the door horizontally
and choose one long side to be the top of the headboard. Saw* a piece of chair-rail molding so
its the same length; attach it with wood glue. Once the glue is dry, hammer several nishing nails
across the top of the molding to secure.
STEP 3 Coat the headboard with primer; let dry, then paint with two coats of semigloss in a color
of your choice. (If your door has panels, consider painting them a complementary shade.) We
used Farrow & Balls Wimborne White and Babouche (farrow-ball.com).
STEP 4 Hang the headboard on your wall so that at least half is visible above your pillows. Treat
the door as if it were a heavy mirror: Screw two D-rings into its back, just below the molding and a
few inches in from either side. Stretch heavy-duty picture wire between the rings and twist to
secure. Hammer a picture hook that can bear up to 100 pounds into the wall and hang.
STEP 5 To further support the board, measure the distance from the oor to the bottom of
the door. Saw* three pieces of two-by-two lumber to that length (to t between the bottom
of the headboard and the oor). Screw each plank into the wall (one at each end of the board,
one in the middle) to help support the headboards weight. Sleep tight!
*Not comfortable with power tools? Most lumberyards will do the sawing for you for a couple of bucks per cut (its free if you buy lumber there).

Designer Index
Heres how to contact the interior decorators, orists,
architects, and other pros featured in this issue:
DAN DIPAOLO

Dan DiPaolo Studios


dandipaolostudios
.blogspot.com

IGOR JOZSA
PAMELA PAGE

Jozsa/Page Design Assoc.


212-539-1177

FLOWERSCHOOL
NEW YORK

VICTORIA KLEIN

owerschoolny.com

Victoria Klein Interior Design


victoriaklein.com

MICHAEL GEORGE

MEREDITH PEREZ

Michael George Hybrid


michaelgeorgeowers.com

Belle Fleur
belleeurny.com

EDDIE ROSS

Eddie Ross, Inc.


eddieross.com
FELIPE SASTRE

347-995-8935

REMCO VAN VLIET

Van Vliet & Trap Event


Design
vanvlietandtrap.com

GREENER PASTURES
PAGES 8289

Rural
Sophisticate
Track down the items Paige
Smith Orlo used to dress up
her rustic farmhouse, then
turn the page for more ideas.
Sources

PAGE 82 Cole & Son rococo damask


wallpaper in gray-taupe (available at Lee
Jofa), #72/6024CS, $240 per roll; e-mail
designpro@ddbuilding.com. On sofa:
aubergine chevron block-print pillow, $325;
madelineweinrib.com for stores. On
ottoman: platter, $35; calypso-celle.com for
stores. PAGE 85 Dcoupage on walls
hand-done by John Hastings, from $1,500;
e-mail jhh1066@gmail.com. Aero small
silver tray, $95; 212-966-1500. PAGE 86
Aero leather tote, $350; 212-966-1500.
Blue Versa carpet, 6' 9', $550; madeline
weinrib.com for stores. On bench: lattice
pillow, $38; pineconehill.com for stores.
Kiko purple towel, $35; calypso-celle.com
for stores. Just Scandinavian Rox & Fix
pillow, $188; 212-334-2556. In corner: lidded
laundry basket, $115; calypso-celle.com
for stores. PAGE 88 (Left photo) diamond
sprout rug, 6' 9', $288; dashandalbert
.com. On chair: Montauk throw, $70;
calypso-celle.com for stores. (Middle
photo) On window seat: Alberto Pinto
Satin Gary fabric, $250 per yard; e-mail
designpro@ddbuilding.com. PAGE 89
Gustavian bed, $1,995 for queen;
vivaterra.com. On bed: ruched sham,
$58; pineconehill.com for stores. Draper
stripe duvet set in ash, $253 for queen;
dwellstudio.com. Aero ribbon-pattern
cord-work pillow, $250, and merino
throw, $475; 212-966-1500.

127
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shop guide
Lamp This sleek
xture adds a contemporary note to
an otherwise delicate
decorat a no-nonsense price. ($39.99;
ikea.com for stores)

GREENER PASTURES
PAGES 8289

Luxe for Less


Echo the Orlos glam livingg room
with a few fanciful ourishes
urishes that cost
a fraction of the originals.
nals.
Table Keep reading materials
or refreshments close at hand
with this adjustable-height
iron stool. ($219; cspost.com)

Mirror Even in
a smaller size, an
ornately carved wood
mirror reects good
taste. ($799, 32 12
42 12"; wisteria.com)

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Wallpaper Blue
Mountain reinterprets a traditional
trellis pattern in washable, durable vinyl.
($44.98 per bolt;
homedepot.com)

Sofa Lazy afternoons


feel even more decadent when spent lounging on a velvet-covered
settee. ($575, 71" wide;
urbanouttters.com)

COMING FULL CIRCLE PAGES 96103

Farmhouse Fresh
Where to locate Jamey Berger and Dan
DiPaolos favorite ndsplus our picks
for replicating their look.

Dish towels Get the


homespun appeal of
Berger and DiPaolos
curtains with tickingstripe cloths. ($40 for two;
decorativethings.com)

Art Park Hill


Collections
weathered tin
produce sign
points the way to
good eats. ($54
for a set of two,
19 12" 14 12";
501-771-4090)
Coat rack A heavier version
of the couples tin folk-art nd,
these hooks support a ock of
iron crows. ($59; atwestend.com)

Sources

Salt and pepper


shakers Styled like
mugs, Fiestas handled
tableware makes seasoning simple. ($34
per set; bonton.com)

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PAGE 101 Bottom: similar


Vagabond Vintage linens and
bolster, from $19; mothology
.com. PAGE 102 Pictured
above: reproduction highback chair, from $295, and
hearth mantel, from $295;
oldepicketfence.com. Lt. Moses
Willard chandelier, $450;
800-621-8956. PAGE 103
Top right: similar cotton linens
and pillow, from $26;
familyheirloomweavers.com.

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Its Hard to Be Humble


When Youre from .?GLC

________

With 5,500 miles of gorgeous


coastline, its little wonder the
Pine Tree State goes by the
nickname vacationland.

Maines oldest
sailors beacon, the
1787 Portland Head
Light (left) inspired
Henry Wadsworth
Longfellows 1849
poem The Lighthouse (portland
headlight.com).

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grows as many
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AUGUSTA

Bangor resident Stephen


King set many of his
novelsincluding Carrie
and Dolores Claiborne
in his home state, albeit
towns.
iin ctionalize
ctionalized
ed town

BANGOR

UNION

ROCKLAND

FREEPORT

CAPE ELIZABETH

Seafood
S
f d llovers consume a whopping
10 tons of lobsters
at Rocklands annual
Lobster Festival,
held July 29 through
August 2 (maine
lobsterfestival.com).

PROUTS NECK

Nineteenth-century
American landscape
artist Winslow Homer
painted The Gulf
Stream (right) in his
Prouts Neck studio.

142 Reported by Kelsey Savage Hays

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PHOTOGR APHS BY (MOOSE) AL AMY; (KING) AMY GUIP/CORBIS OUTLINE; (LOBSTER , BERRIES, FR AME) GET T Y; (PAINTING) THE METROPOLITAN
MUSEUM OF ART, C ATHARINE LORILL ARD WOLFE COLLEC TION, WOLFE FUND, 1906 (06.1234); (LIGHTHOUSE) GET T Y; (BOOT) L.L. BEAN

Americas source
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boots (left), canvas
totes, and down
vests since 1912,
L.L. Beans agship store stays
open 24 hours a
day, 365 days a
year (llbean.com).

Maine boasts
more moose per
mile than any
other state. Just
outside Greenville (where the
animals outnumber residents
three to one) is
the best place to
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