Sie sind auf Seite 1von 73

A PROJECT REPORT

ON

A STUDY OF HEALTH AND SAFETY MEASURES: A


STUDY OF SELECTED EMPLOYEES IN INNOVATIVE
CUISINE PRIVATE LIMITED.

Submitted by
MR. IRSHADHUSEN INAYATHUSEN SHEKH
ROLL NO: 45

in Partial Fulfillment for the Award of the Degree of

POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LABOUR PRACTICE

Faculty of Law

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda

Vadodara

21ST APRIL, 2015


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

At the outset, I would like to articulate this project as small journey which was a remarkable
learning experience for me. The successful completion of this project is only because of the
extraordinary support, guidance, counselling and motivation from my respectable staff of the
M.S. University, and my organization. This journey was also could not be completed without
support of my family and friends.

I express my deep gratitude to Mr. Gopi Valand (HR Executives), my training officer and
mentor for this project. Thorough the support provided by him, I have imparted knowledge on
the avenues which this project have opened and explored . His directions in making me think
about unique conceptual and practical aspects of Health & Safety which has lifted this project
at this stage of successful completion.

I extend my gratitude to Innovative Cuisine Private Limited and My Manager and all my
colleagues , friends for their encouragement, support, guidance and assistance for undergoing
industrial training and for preparing the project report.

CERTIFICATE OF ORIGINALITY
Date :_______________
I, Mr. Irshadhusen Inayathusen Shekh (Seat No. 45), the undersigned hereby declare that
the project report entitled, A Study of Health & Safety Measures: A study of selected
employees in Innovative Cuisine Private Limited submitted in partial fulfillment for the
award of the Post Graduate Diploma in Labour Practice for the Academic year 2014-15 for
the evaluation in lieu of the Annual Examination to be held in April/May, 2015 is my own
work and has been carried.
The work is an original one and has not being submitted earlier to this university or to any
other institution/ organization for fulfillment of the requirement of a course or for award of
any Degree/ Diploma/ Certificate. All the sources of information used in this Project Report
have been duly acknowledged in it.

(Signature of the Student)


Mr. Irshadhusen Inayathusen Shekh
Exam Seat No: 45
Post Graduate Diploma in Labour Practice
Faculty of Law,
The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda,
Vadodara.

PREFACE

Today we are at the doorstep of 21st Century, competition at the various levels is increasing
day by day. New and new developments are taking place and these days in all fields all over
India to make the life of the people more comfortable a luxurious.

Those in order to survive in market on should practical as well as theoretical knowledge


about all different fields existing market. In todays competitive world edges is more
significant than theoretical knowledge. Today practical training and knowledge also plays an
important role.

Diploma education brings its students in direct contact with the real corporate world thorough
industrial training. The Diplomas programmes provides its students with an in depth study of
various managerial activities that are performed in any organization.

DECLARATION

I hereby declare that the entire work embodied in the Project Report entitled A Study of
Health & Safety Measures at Innovative Cuisine Private Limited", has been carried out
by me , Faculty of Law, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara. The matter
presented in this report incorporates the results of independent investigations carried out by
me. To the best of my knowledge, no part of this report has been submitted for any Degree or
Diploma to The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda or any other University/Institution
in India or Abroad.

Date:21/04/2015
Place: Vadodara

Mr. SHEKH IRSHAD .I.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER

TITLE OF THE CHAPTER

NUMBER

PAGE
NUMBER

Acknowledgements
Certificate of Originality
Declaration
1

INTRODUCTION :

8 to 19

1.1 Introduction

1.2 What is Safety?

10

1.3 Types of Accidents

10

1.4 Need for Safety

11

1.5 Health & Safety at Work

12

1.6 Building an effective health & safety management system

12

1.7 Statutory provisions of safety in India

14

1.8 What is Health

16

1.9 Identifying Hazards in the workplace

17

1.10 Importance of management commitment on health & safety

17

1.11 Statutory provisions of health in India

17

1.12 Health & Safety Programme

19

COMPANY PROFILE

20 to 23

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

24 to 31

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

32 to 35

4.1 Title of the Research Study

33

4.2 Duration of the Research Study


4.3 Rationale of the Research Study
4.4 Scope & Coverage of Research Study
4.5 Objectives of Research Study
4.6 Research Design
4.7 Sources of Information
4.8 Sampling Decisions
4.9 Data Collection, Analysis & Interpretation
4.10 Significance of Research Study
4.11 Limitations of Research Study

33
33
33
33
34
34
34
35
35
35

DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATIONS

36 to 59

FINDINGS, SUGGESSTIONS AND CONLUSION

60 to 63

BIBLIOGRAPHY

64

QUESTIONNAIRE

66

CHAPTER -1
INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER-1
INTRODUCTION
1.1 INTRODUCTION :
Due to rapid industrialization, industrial workers are exposed to several types of
hazards and accidents. Every year lakhs of workers are injured due to mechanical, chemical,
electrical and radiation hazards and it leads to partial or total disablement. So in recent years,
greater attention is given to health and safety due to pressure from government, trade unions,
labour laws and awareness of employers.
The efficiency of workers depends to a great extends on the environment in which the
work. Work environment consists of all the factors, which act and react on the body and mind
of an employee. The primary aim is to create an environment, which ensures the greatest ease
of work and removes all causes of worries.
Occupational health and safety is a discipline with a broad scope involving many
specialized fields. In its broadest sense, it should aim at:
a) The promotion and maintenance of the highest degree of physical, mental and social
well-being of workers in all occupations.
b) The prevention among workers of adverse effects on health caused by their working
conditions.
c) The protection of workers in their employment from risks resulting from factors
adverse to health.
d) The placing and maintenance of workers in an occupational environment adapted to
physical and mental needs.
e) The adaptation of work to humans.
Successful occupational health and safety practice requires the collaboration and
participation of both employers and workers in health and safety programmes, and involves
the consideration of issues relating to occupational medicine, industrial hygiene, toxicology,
education, engineering safety, ergonomics, psychology, etc.

Occupational health issues

are

often

given

less

attention

than

occupational safety issues because the former are generally more difficult to confront.
However, when health is addressed, so is safety, because a healthy workplace is by definition
also a safe workplace. The converse, though, may not be true - a so-called safe workplace is
not necessarily also a healthy workplace. The important point is that issues of both health and
safety must be addressed in every workplace.
Work plays a central role in people's lives, since most workers spend at least eight
hours a day in the workplace, whether it is on a plantation, in an office, factory, etc.
Therefore, work environments should be safe and healthy. Unfortunately some employers
assume little responsibility for the protection of workers' health and safety. In fact, some
employers do not even know that they have the moral and often legal responsibility to protect
workers.
1.2 WHAT IS SAFETY ?

Safety refers to the absence of accidents. Stated differently, safely refers to the
protection of workers from the danger of accidents. Safety, in simple terms, means freedom
from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. Industrial safety or employee safety refers to the
protection of workers from the danger of industrial accidents. An accident, then is an
unplanned and uncontrolled event in which an action or reaction of an object, a substance, a
person, or a radiation results in personal injury.

1.3 TYPES OF ACCIDENTS :


Accidents are of different types. They may be classified as major and minor ones,
depending upon the severity of the injury. An accident which ends in a death, or which results
in a prolonged disability to the injured is a major one. A scratch or a cut which does not
seriously disable him/her is a minor accident, but an accident nevertheless. A mere incision or
a deep scratch, say, on the leg or the shoulder, may or may not immediately disable the
worker, but he or she may develop disability later. Again, a wound which may disable one
worker may not disable another who receives a similar injury.
An accident may be internal or external. If a worker falls, or an object falls on him or
her, it is possible he or she may show no external signs of injury, but he or she may have
fractured a bone or strained a muscle or nerve- which is an internal injury. A worker may be
disabled by an injury for hour, half a day, a day, a week, a month, or a few months. If he or
10

she recovers from such a disability, his or her disability is temporary. If the injury is such that
he or she will never recover fully, his or her disability is permanent.
1.4 NEED FOR SAFETY :
(1) Cost Saving :
Two types of costs are incurred by the management when an accident occurs. There
are the direct costs, in the form of compensation payable to the dependents of the victim if the
accident is fatal, and medical expenses incurred in treating the patient if the accident is
non-fatal. The management, however, is not liable to meet the direct costs if the victim is
insured under the ESI scheme. When the victim is uninsured, compensation and medical
expenses are the responsibility of the management .
More serious than the direct costs are the indirect or hidden costs which the
management cannot avoid. In fact, the indirect costs are three to four times higher than the
direct costs. Hidden costs include loss on account of down-time of operators, slowed-up
production rate of other workers, materials spoiled and labour for cleaning and damages to
equipment.
(2) Increased Productivity :
Safety plants are efficient plants. To a large extent, safety promotes productivity.
Employees in safe plants can devote more time to improving the quality and quantity of their
output and spend less time worrying about their safety and well-being.
(3) Moral :
Safety is important on human grounds too. Managers must undertake accident
prevention measures to minimise the pain and suffering the injured worker and his/her family
is often exposed to as a result of the accident. An employee is a worker in the factory and the
bread-winner for his/her family. The happiness of his/her family depends upon the health and
well-being of the worker.
(4) Legal :
There are legal reasons too for undertaking safety measures. there are laws covering
occupational health & safety, and penalties for non-compliance have become quite severe.
The responsibility extends to the safety and health of the surrounding community, too. The
supreme court held :
An enterprise which is engaged in a hazardous or inherently dangerous industry which poses
a potential threat to the health and safety of the persons working in the factory and industry
in the surrounding areas, owes an absolute and non-delegable duty to the community to
ensure that no harm results to anyone on account of the hazardous or inherently dangerous
nature. this implies unlimited liability.
11

The civil law establishes the extent of damages or compensation. In the criminal law,
sentences are prescribed under the pollution control laws. There is no legal ceiling on the
extent of liability.
1.5 HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK :
According to Cole (2002), employer has a common law duty to provide a safe place of work
for his or her employees and is liable at common law for accidents encounter by his or her
employees in the course of their employment. The duties (regarding health and safety) which
employer owes his or her employees basically include the following:

The provision of a safe place of employment.

The provision of safe means of access to work.

The provision of safe systems of working.

The provision of adequate equipment, materials and clothing to enable employees to


carry out their work safely.

The provision of competent co-workers.

A duty of care to ensure that employees are not subjected to any unreasonable risks in
the workplace.

1.6 BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE HEALTH & SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM :


The components of effective health and safety management system are briefly explained
below:
(1) Management Leadership & Organizational Commitment :
For this system to be effective, management must show leadership and commitment to the
program. To achieve this, management should put the organizations expectation around
health and safety into writing by developing a health and safety policy. Employees who forms
part of the health and safety committee, should be involved in writing the policy, and to be
signed by senior operating officer, to indicate the commitment of management.
(2) Roles & Responsibilities :
Clearly defined and well communicated health and safety roles and responsibilities for all
levels of the organizations will create an expectation of a standard level of performance and
accountability among employees, contractors, and visitors. All levels must be aware of their
individual roles and responsibilities under both state law and company standards.
(3) Management Commitment :
For a health and safety management system to be effective, management at all levels, should
demonstrate their support of the health and safety program. This may be demonstrated
12

through management, participation in health and safety leadership training meetings, facility
inspections incident investigations etc.

(4) Employee Participation :


It is important for workers to be involved in the development of the system in order to create
ownership as well as help a better fit with the culture of the organization.
(5) Hazard Identification & Assessment Process :
Employers are required to assess a work site for existing and potential hazards before work
begins. Hazard assessment data could be used to determine what workertraining needs to be
done, and to build the content of employee orientations and job training hazard assessment
data could be used as the basis for inspection checklists. In the case of incident investigation,
hazard assessment and control data can be used to help determine if a system failure was the
cause of an incident.
(6) Determine Controls :
Address identified hazards by assigning methods of control to eliminate or reduce the hazard.
The most effective controls can be determined based on legal requirements, manufacturers
specifications, company rules, industry best practices, and worker inputs.
(7) Hazard Control :
Once the hazard assessments are completed, the next step in the development of health and
safety management system is the implementation of control measures to eliminate or reduce
the risk of harm to workers. In this case, employers should take all reasonable steps to
eliminate or control identified hazards in order to make the workplace safer.
(8) Enforcement of Controls :
To enforce control methods, develop a constructive enforcement policy, and communicate the
consequences to employees and the steps that will be taken if noncompliance occurs.
(9) Emergency Response Plan :
A serious emergency (Such as explosion, fire, or flood) could seriously affect the operation of
a business and put the health, safety, and livelihood of many employees in jeopardy. The best
health and safety management system cannot protect your company from all natural or
unexpected disasters; however, having a good emergency response plan (ERP) in place can
reduce the severity and risk of loss. Knowing what to do and who to contact can save lives
and reduce costs if disaster should strike.

13

1.7 STATUTORY PROVISIONS OF SAFETY IN INDIA :


According to factories Act, 1948, the statutory provisions regarding the safety of the workers
are stated in the sections 21 to 41. They are
(1) Fencing of Machinery (Sec 21) :
In every factory, every dangerous part of any machinery, every moving part of a prime mover
and every flywheel connected to prime mover the head-race and tail-race of every water
wheel and water turbine, and every part of an electric generator, motor or rotary converter,
every part of transmission machinery, must be securely fenced by safeguards of substantial
construction.
(2) Work on or near Machinery in Motion (Sec 22) :
It is necessary to examine any part of the machinery while it is motion. The examination and
lubrication of the machinery, while in motion, should be carried out only by a
specially-trained adult worker wearing tight-fitting clothing.
(3) Employment of Young Persons on Dangerous Machines (Sec 23) :
A young person should not be allowed to work at dangerous machines unless, has been
sufficiently instructed and received sufficient training.
(4) Striking Gear and Devices for Cutting off Power (Sec 24) :
In every factory, suitable striking gear or other efficient mechanical appliance has to be
provided, maintained and used to move driving belts.
(5) Self-acting Machines (Sec 25) :
No travelling part of a self-acting machine in any factory and no material carried thereon shall
be allowed to run on its outward or inward traverse within a distance of 18 inches from any
fixed structure which is not a part of the machine, if a person is liable to pass over the space
over which it runs.
(6) Casing of New Machinery (Sec 26) :
All machinery driven by power, every set-screw, bolt or key or any revolving shaft, spindle,
wheel or pinion, spur, worm and other toothed or friction-gearing has to be properly encased
or guarded in order to prevent danger to the workmen.
(7) Prohibition of employment of Women and Children near Cotton Openers (Sec 27) :
14

Women and child workers are prohibited to be employed in any part of a factory for pressing
cotton in which a cotton opener is at work.

(8) Hoists, Lifts, Lifting Machines (Sec 28 &29) :


Lifting machines, chains, ropes and lifting tackles must be of good mechanical construction,
sound material and adequate strength and free from defects. They are to be properly
maintained and thoroughly examined by a competent person at least once in every 6 months.
(9) Revolving Machinery (Sec 30) :
The maximum safe working peripheral speed of every grindstone or abrasive wheel shall be
permanently affixed. Safe working peripheral speed of every revolving vessel, cage, basket,
flywheel, pulley or disc has also to be ensured.
(10) Pressure Plant (Sec 31) :
In any factory operation is carried on at a pressure above the atmospheric pressure, effective
arrangements shall be taken to ensure that the safe working pressure is not exceeded.
(11) Floors, Stairs and Means of Access (Sec 32) :
In every factory all floors, steps, stairs, passages and gangways shall be of sound construction
and properly kept and maintained.
(12) Pits, Sumps, Openings in Floors (Sec 33) :
Every fixed vessel, sump, tank, pit or opening in the ground or in a floor, which may be a
source of danger shall be either securely covered or securely fenced.
(13) Excessive Weights (Sec 34):
No person is to be employed in any factory to lift, carry or move any load so heavy as is likely
to cause him injury.
(14) Protection of Eyes (Sec 35):
The state government may require the provision of effective screens or suitable goggles if the
risk of injury to the eyes is caused from particles or fragments thrown off in the
manufacturing process or from exposure to excessive light.
(15) Precautions against Dangerous Fumes (Sec 36):

15

In any factory, no person shall be allowed to enter any chamber, tank, vat, pipe, flue or other
confined space in which dangerous fumes are likely to be present to an extent involving risks
to persons.
(16) Explosive or Inflammable Dust, Gas (Sec 37) :
All practicable measures have to be taken to prevent explosion by, effective enclosure of
plant and machinery, removal or prevention of the accumulation of dust, gas etc and
exclusion or effective enclosure of all possible sources of ignition.
(17) Precaution in case of Fire (Sec 38) :
Every factory has to be provided with adequate means of escape in case of fire. Effective and
clearly audible means of giving warning in the case of fire have to be provided. A free
passage-way giving access to each means of escape in case of fire has to be maintained.
(18) Power to require Specifications of Defective Parts or Tests of Stability (Sec 39):
The factory inspector to serve on the manager of a factory to furnish specifications of
defective parts or he may order the manager to carry out tests as he may specify and to inform
him of the results.
(19) Safety of Buildings & Machinery (Sec 40) :
Every factory should adopt the measures to ensure the safety of the buildings and machinery.
The factory must employ the required safety officers according to the number of workers
working in the factory.
(20) Power to Make Rules (Sec 41) :
The state government has the power to make rules to supplement the provisions relating to
safety contained in the Act.
1.8 WHAT IS HEALTH :
Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the
absence of diseases. Its a positive and dynamic concept which means something more than
the absence of illness.
(1) Physical Health :
The health of employees results in reduced productivity, high unsafe acts, and increased
absenteeism. A healthy worker, on the other hand, produces results opposite to these. In other
words, healthy employees are more productive, more safe conscious, and are more regular to
work. The worker who is healthy is always cheerful, confident looking and is an invaluable
asset to the organization.
(2) Mental Health :
16

In recent years, mental health of employees, particularly that of executives, has engaged the
attention of employers. Three reasons may be given for this development. First, mental
breakdowns are common in modern days because of pressures and tensions. Second, mental
disturbances of various types result in reduced productivity and lower profits for the
organization. Third, mental illness takes its toll through alcoholism, high employee turnover,
and poor human relationships. A mental health service is generally rendered in the following
ways :

(i) Psychiatric counselling.


(ii) Co-operation and consultation with outside psychiatrists and specialists.
(iii) Education of company personnel in the manner and the importance of mental health.
(iv) Development & maintenance of an effective human relations programme.
1.9 IDENTIFYING HAZARDS IN THE WORKPLACE :
Some occupational diseases have been recognized for many years, and affect workers in
different ways depending on the nature of the hazard, the route of exposure, the dose, etc.
Some well-known occupational diseases include :
a) Asbestosis (caused by asbestos, which is common in insulation, automobile brake
linings, etc.)
b) Silicosis (caused by silica, which is common in mining, sandblasting, etc.)
c) Lead poisoning (caused by lead, which is common in battery plants, paint factories,
etc.)
d) Noise-induced hearing loss (caused by noise, which is common in many workplaces,
including airports, and workplaces where noisy machines, such as presses or drills,
etc.)
1.10 IMPORTANCE OF MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT ON HEALTH & SAFETY :
In order to develop a successful health and safety programme, it is essential
that there be strong management commitment and strong worker participation in the effort to
create and maintain a safe and healthy workplace. An effective management addresses all
work-related hazards, not only those covered by government standards.
All levels of management must make health and safety a priority. They must
communicate this by going out into the worksite to talk with workers about their concerns and
to observe work procedures and equipment. In each workplace, the lines of responsibility
17

from top to bottom need to be clear, and workers should know who is responsible for
different health and safety issues.
1.11 STATUTORY PROVISIONS OF HEALTH IN INDIA :
According to factories Act, 1948, the statutory provisions regarding the health of the workers
are stated in the sections 11 to 20. They are

(1) Cleanliness (Sec 11) :


Every factory shall be kept clean by daily sweeping or washing the floors and workrooms and
by using disinfectants where every necessary. Walls, doors and windows shall be repainted or
varnished at least once in every 5 years.
(2) Disposal of Wastes and Effluents (Sec 12) :
The waste materials produced from the manufacturing process must be effectively disposed of
wastes.
(3) Ventilation and Temperature (Sec 13) :
There must be provision for adequate ventilation for the circulation of fresh air. The
temperature must be kept at a comfortable level. Hot parts of machines must be separated and
insulated. The State Government may make rules for the keeping of thermometers in
specified places and the adoption of methods which will keep the temperature low.
(4) Removal of Dust and Fumes (Sec 14) :
If the manufacturing process used gives off injurious or offensive dust and steps must be
taken so that they are not inhaled or accumulated. The exhaust fumes of internal combustion
engines must be conducted outside the factory.
(5) Artificial Humidification (Sec 15) :
The water used for this purpose must be pure. The State Government can frame rules
regarding the process of humidification etc. The water used for humidification shall be taken
from a public supply or other source of drinking water and must be effectively purified before
use.
(6) Overcrowding (Sec 16) :
There must be no overcrowding in a factory. In factories existing before the commencement
of the Act there must be at least 9.9 cubic meters of space per worker. For factories built

18

afterwards, there must be at least 4.2 cubic meters of space. The chief inspector of factories
can also prescribe the maximum number of workers who can work in each work room.
(7) Lighting (Sec 17) :
Factories must be well lighted. Effective measures must be adopted to prevent glare or
formation of shadows which might cause eye strain.
(8) Drinking water (Sec 18) :
Arrangements must be made to provide a sufficient supply of wholesome drinking water. All
supply points of such water must be marked drinking water.

No such points shall be within 20 ft. (or 7.5 meters) of any latrine, washing place etc.
Factories employing more than 250 workers must cool the water during the hot weather.
(9) Toilet Facilities (Sec 19) :
Every factory must provide sufficient number of latrines and urinals. There must be separate
provisions for male and female workers.
Latrines and urinals must be kept in a clean and sanitary condition. In factories employing
more than 250 workers, they shall be of prescribed sanitary types.
(10) Spittoons (Sec 20) :
A sufficient number of spittoons must be provided at convenient places, in a clean and
hygienic condition. The State Government may take rules regarding their number, location
and maintenance.
1.12 HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMME :
Effective workplace health and safety programmes can help to save the lives of workers by
reducing hazards and their consequences. Health and safety programmes also have positive
effects on both worker morale and productivity, which are important benefits. At the same
time, effective programmes can save employers a great deal of money. For all of the reasons
given below, it is crucial that employers, workers and unions are committed to health and
safety.
a)

Workplace hazards are controlled - at the source whenever possible.

b)

Records of any exposure are maintained for many years.

c)
Both workers and employers are informed about health and safety risks in the
workplace.

19

d)
There is an active and effective health and safety committee that includes both
workers and management.
e)

Worker health and safety efforts are ongoing.

CHAPTER- 2
COMPANY
PROFILE
20

CHAPTER 2
COMPANY PROFILE
ICPL was set up in 2010 as a joint venture of Deep Foods Inc. USA and Deep Kiran
Foods Pvt. Ltd-Ahmadabad, India, to manufacture Frozen Fruits & vegetable , Ready to eat &
Ready to Cook Items. One of the top ten Frozen food suppliers in the world, The company
designs, manufactures and supplies Frozen Food, products and services to the world's so
many countries like New Zealand, USA, Australia.
Innovative came in to existence in the year 2010 under the leadership of Mr. Dipak
Rasiklal Dalal. He specialized in the manufacturing frozen fruits & Vegetable. Innovative is
sister concern company of Deep Kiran Foods (Ahemdabad).
The companies to grow at a very fast speed due to the hard work, dedication and
quality consciousness of Mr. Dipak Rasiklal Dalal. His efforts were fully rewarded when
these companies were selected as major ancillary units of Deep Foods Inc. USA.
Innovative Cuisine Private Limited currently have 5 Active Directors / Partners:
Nehul Dinesh chandra Mehta, Arvind Nanubhai Amin, Archit Arvind Amin, Deepak Arvind
Amin, Dipak Rasiklal Dalal, and there are no other Active Directors / Partners in the
company except these 5 officials.
The combination of these two well-known groups has resulted in the establishment of
a vibrant company, which has had a successful track record of sustained growth over the last
Five years. ICPL is one of India's first rank companies for exporting frozen vegetable with
five manufacturing companies and a turnover of Rs 63 Cr. Incorporating the strengths of
21

Deep food Inc and the Deep Kiran Foods Ind., ICPL has emerged as one of the foremost
leaders in the Frozen Food industry today. ICPL reaches out to all segments of the Food
industry such as Frozen Vegetable, Frozen Ready to Eat, Frozen ready to Cook, Farshan, and
Pickles & Chatni. With the Food industry in the world currently undergoing phenomenal
changes, ICPL with its excellent facilities, is fully equipped to meet the challenges of
tomorrow.

PRODUCTS
ICPL manufactures the most comprehensive range of Quick frozen vegetables and ready to
eat Items in the country. A range which continues to set standards in the industry. The
products are designed to meet the demands of Customers both in India and worldwide. ICPL
has ensured that each of its products is manufactured to meet global standards.
LIST OF PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED :
Indian Market

US Market

SNAKE GAURD

PATRA

GREEN CHANA

SAMOSA POTETO

GUVAR

SAMOSA DAL

TUVAR

SAMOSA MIX VEG.

SWEET CORN

TUVER
SURTI PAPDI LILVA
SURTI PAPDI
RATALU
JINGER
KHAMAN
PARATHA
IDLI SHAMBHAR
DRUMSTICK
SUGARCANE JUICE
MENGO PULP
GREEN MENGO
RED GUVAVA
CAPCICUM

22

SNAKE GUARD
ARVI
SURAN
TINDORA
KARELA
CARROT
GREEN PEAS
CHIKOO
PALSA PULP

CLIENTS
CUSTOMER

COUNTRY

DEEP KIRAN FOODS

INDIA

DEEP FOODS NJ

USA

DEEP FOODS AS

AUSTRALIA

DEEP FOODS CN

CANADA

DEEP FOODS SF

SAN FRANCISCO

DEEP FOODS NZ

NEW ZEALEND

DIVISIONS
ICPL has grown hand in hand with the automobile industry in the country. The
company's policies have recognized the need to respond effectively to changing customer
needs, helping to propel it to a position of leadership. The company has raised its standards
on quality, productivity, reliability and flexibility by channeling its interests.
At present, there are five divisions:
1. Frozen Vegetable (ICPL-FV)
2. Frozen Fruit

(ICPL-FF)

3. Ready to Eat

(ICPL-RE)

4. Ready to Cook

(ICPL-RC)

5. Chatni-Pickles

(ICPL-CP)

23

CHAPTER -3
REVIEW OF
LITERATURE

24

CHAPTER -3
REVIEW OF LITERATURE
1) Johannson B; Rask K; Stenberg M (2010), this study was to carry out a broad survey
and analysis of relevant research articles about piece rate wages and their effects on health
and safety. A total of 75 research articles were examined extensively and 31 of these were
found relevant and had sufficient quality to serve the purpose of this study. The findings
of these relevant articles are summarized and analyzed in the survey. More recent research
shows a clear interest for health, musculoskeletal injuries, physical workload, pains and
occupational injuries. The fact that 27 of the 31 studied articles found negative effects of
piece rates on different aspects of health and safety does not prove causality, but together
they give very strong support that in most situations piece rates have negative effects on
health and safety.
2) Tompa, Emile PhD; Dolinschi, Roman MA; de Oliveira (2009), we reviewed the
occupational health and safety intervention literature to synthesize evidence on financial
merits of such interventions. A literature search included journal databases, existing
systematic reviews, and studies identified by content experts. We found strong evidence
that ergonomic and other musculoskeletal injury prevention intervention in manufacturing
and warehousing are worth undertaking in terms of their financial merits. The economic
evaluation of interventions in this literature warrants further expansion. The review also
provided insights into how the methodological quality of economic evaluations in this
literature could be improved.
3) Conor CO Reynolds; M Anne Harris; Peter A Cripton; Meghan Winters (2009),
Bicycling has the potential to improve fitness. Understanding ways of making bicycling
safer is important to improving population health. We reviewed studies of the impact of
transportation infrastructure on bicyclist safety. To assess safety, studies examining the
following outcomes were included: injuries; injury severity; and crashes. Results to date
suggest that sidewalks and multi-use trails pose the highest risk, major roads are more
hazardous than minor roads, and the presence of bicycle facilities (e.g. on-road bike
routes, on-road marked bike lanes, and off-road bike paths) was associated with the

25

lowest risk. Street lighting, paved surfaces, and low-angled grades are additional factors
that appear to improve cyclist safety.
4) Lucia Artazcoz; Imma Cortes; Vincenta Escriba-aguir; Lorena Cascant (2009), the
objectives of this study was to identify family and job characteristics associated with long
work hours. The sample was composed of all salaried workers aged 1664 years (3950
men and 3153 women) interviewed in the 2006 Catalonian Health Survey. Factors
associated with long working hours differed by gender. In men, working 5160 h a week
was consistently associated with poor mental health status, self-reported hypertension, job
dissatisfaction, smoking, shortage of sleep. Among women it was only related to smoking
and to shortage of sleep. The association of overtime with different health indicators
among men and women could be explained by their role as the family breadwinner.
5) Dee W. Edington; Alyssa B. Schultz (2008), The aim was to present the literature which
provides evidence of the association between health risks and the workplace economic
measures of time away from work, reduced productivity at work, health care costs and
pharmaceutical costs. A search of PubMed was conducted and high quality studies were
selected and combined with studies known to the authors. A strong body of evidence
exists which shows that health risks of workers are associated with health care costs and
pharmaceutical costs. A growing body of literature also confirms that health risks are
associated with the productivity measures. The paper shows that measures of success will
continue to be important as the field of worksite health management moves forward.
6) David E. Cantor (2008), The purpose of this paper was to review the literature and call
for additional research into the human, operational, and regulatory issues that contribute
to workplace safety in the supply chain. This paper identifies several potential research
opportunities that can increase awareness of the importance of improving a firm's
workplace safety practices. This paper identifies 108 articles which informs, how the
logistics and transportation safety has evolved. The paper identifies 14 future research
opportunities within the workplace safety in the supply chain, that have been identified
can have a positive effect on practitioners confronted with safety issues.

26

7) Lucia Artazcoz; Imma Cortes; Vincenta Escriba-aguir; Lorena Cascant (2007), To


provide a framework for epidemiological research on work and health that combines
classic occupational epidemiology and the consideration of work in a structural
perspective focused on gender inequalities in health. Gaps and limitations in classic
occupational epidemiology, when considered from a gender perspective, are described.
Classic occupational epidemiology has paid less attention to womens problems than
mens. Research into work related gender inequalities in health has rarely considered
either social class or the impact of family demands on mens health. The analysis of work
and health from a gender perspective should take into account the complex interactions
between gender, family roles, employment status and social class.
8) Shouji Nagashima; Yasushi Suwazono; Yasushi Okubo; Mirei Uetani (2007), The
aim was to clarify the influence of working hours on both mental and physical symptoms
of fatigue and use the data obtained to determine permissible working hours. The survey
of day-shift male workers, using the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and Cumulative
Fatigue Symptoms Index (CFSI). A total of 715 workers participated. In the group
working 260279 h/month, the odds ratios for SDS and irritability and chronic
tiredness of the CFSI were increased. In the group working 280 h/month, the odds ratios
on CFSI for general fatigue, physical disorders, anxiety and chronic tiredness were
likewise increased. The research clarified that working hours should be <260 h/month in
order to minimize fatigue symptoms in male day workers.

9) L Ala-Mursula; J Vahtera; A Kouvonen; A Vaananen; A Linna (2006), The


associations of working hours (paid, domestic, commuting, and total) with sickness,
absence, and to examine whether these associations vary according to the level of
employee control over daily working hours. The study among 25,703 full-time public
sector workers in 10 towns in Finland. Long domestic and total working hours were
associated with higher rates of medically certified sickness absences among both genders.
Low control over daily working hours predicted medically certified sickness absences for
both the women and men. In combinations, high control over working hours reduced the

27

adverse associations of long domestic and total working hours with medically certified
absences. Employee control over daily working hours may protect health and help
workers successfully combine a full-time job with the demands of domestic work.
10) A Baker; K Heiler; S A Ferguson (2002), The occupational health and safety
implications associated with compressed and extended work periods have not been fully
explored in the mining sector. Absenteeism and incident frequency rate data were
collected over a 33 month period that covered three different roster schedules. The only
significant change in absenteeism rates was an increase in the maintenance sector in the
third data collection period. The current study did not find significant negative effects of a
12-hour pattern, when compared to an 8-hour system. However, when unregulated and
excessive overtime was introduced as part of the 12-hour/5-day roster, absenteeism rates
were increased in the maintenance sector.
11) N Nakanishia; H Yoshidaa; K Naganoa; H Kawashimob; K Nakamurac (2001), to
evaluate the association of long working hours with the risk of hyper-tension. The work
site is in Osaka, Japan. 941 hypertension free Japanese male white collar workers aged
3554 years were prospectively examined by serial annual health examinations. 424 men
developed hypertension above the borderline level. After controlling for potential
predictors of hypertension, the relative risk for hypertension above the borderline level,
compared with those who worked < 8.0 hours per day was 0.48, for those who worked
10.010.9 hours per day was 0.63. These results indicate that long working hours are
negatively associated with the risk for hypertension in Japanese male white collar
workers.
12) N. Haworth; C. Tingvall & N. Kowadlo (2000), In response to an increasing awareness
of the role of work-related driving in crashes and the related costs, many private and
government organisations have developed programs to improve fleet safety. The purpose
of this project is to investigate the potential to introduce road safety based initiatives in
the corporate environment. From the review, that the fleet safety initiatives which have
potential to be effective are, Selecting safer vehicles, Some particular driver training and
education programs, Incentives, Company safety programs. It is assumed that the degree
28

of influence is likely to decrease as the type of vehicle moves from the fleet towards the
private end of the continuum.
13) Graves carol gevecker; Matanoski genevieve m; Tardiff robert g (2000), Carbonless
copy paper (CCP), introduced in 1954. Its safety to workers who handle large amounts of
CCP has been addressed in numerous studies and reports. This review encompasses the
world's literature on CCP and provides a weight-of-evidence analysis of the safety of CCP
to workers in the United States. Since 1987, has produced neither primary skin irritation
nor skin sensitization under normal conditions of manufacture and use. Finally, very few
published complaints have come from the manufacturing sector where the closest and
most voluminous contact occurs. Based on the weight of the evidence, NIOSH is
anticipated to conclude that CCP is not a hazard to workers and has only a small
possibility of producing mild and transient skin irritation.
14) Karen J.M. Niven (2000), A literature review was described which aimed to evaluate
economic evaluations of health and safety interventions in healthcare. Problems were
identified with valuing benefits in health and safety because they frequently take many
years to emerge and are difficult to measure. Understanding of economic techniques
within the health and safety professions was limited, resulting in wide-ranging
assumptions being made as to the positive economic impact of health and safety
interventions. Healthcare managers, health economists, and health and safety
professionals have not traditionally worked together and have inherent misunderstandings
of each other roles. The review concludes that the aim of future research should be to
assist the National Health Service (NHS) to make valid decisions about health and safety
investment and risk control methods.
15) A Spurgeon; J M Harrington; C L Cooper (1997), The European Community
Directive on Working Time, which should have been implemented in member states of
the European Community by November 1996. This paper reviews the current evidence
relating to the potential effects on health and performance of extensions to the normal
working day. Research to date has been restricted to a limited range of health
outcomes--namely, mental health and cardiovascular disorders. Other potential effects
29

which are normally associated with stress--for example, gastrointestinal disorders,


musculoskeletal disorders, and problems associated with depression of the immune
system, have received little attention. It is concluded that there is currently sufficient
evidence to raise concerns about the risks to health and safety of long working hours.
16) Simon Chapple and Tracy Mears (1996), Most OECD countries rely on a mixture of
market forces, tort liability, compulsory insurance and government regulation to deal with
workplace safety and health issues. There are also other non-efficiency reasons for
government involvement in workplace safety and health. However, while markets may
not be efficient, government intervention can fail to make any improvement and/or not
satisfy cost-benefit criteria. While the empirical evidence is not clear cut, the balance of
the evidence suggests that wages may include some consideration for health and safety
risks. Evidence also suggests that workers compensation systems increase the frequency
and duration of claims for non-fatal injuries, but may decrease the number of fatal
injuries.
17) Peter Hasle and Hans Jorgen Limborg (1995), The scientific literature regarding
preventive occupational Health and Safety Activities in Small Enterprises has been
reviewed in order to identify effective preventive approaches and to develop a future
research strategy. There is a lack of evaluation of intervention studies, both in terms of
effect and practical applicability. However, there is sufficiently strong evidence to
conclude that workers of small enterprises are subject to higher risks than the larger ones,
and that small enterprises have difficulties in controlling risk. The most effective
preventive approaches seem to be simple and low cost solutions, disseminated through
personal contact. It is important to develop future intervention research strategies, which
study the complete intervention system of the small enterprises.
18) International Council on Nanotechnology, Rice University, The report, "Current
Knowledge and Practices regarding Environmental Health and Safety in the
Nanotechnology Workplace", offers a review and analysis of existing efforts to develop
"best practices." This report finds that efforts to catalogue workplace practices have not
systematically documented current environment, health and safety practices in a variety of

30

workplace settings and geographies. Moreover, it finds that some existing documents are
not publicly available.
19) Maynard, Andrew D, Article from newsletter by Andrew Maynard summarizing the
current level of development and government investment in nanotechnology research and
development, how nanotechnology presents a potential challenge to conventional
approaches to understanding health hazards in the workplace, and how the United States
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health is working to address current and
potential adverse health impacts in the workplace from nanotechnology.
20) Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment, and Health, This article seeks to
address a number of important questions concerning the potential health and workplace
safety risks raised by the manufacturing, handling, and distributing of engineered neno
particles. The article addresses the following questions; (1) the hazards classification of
engineered neno particles, (2) exposure metrics, (3) the actual exposures workers may
have to different engineered neno particles in the workplace, (4) the limits of engineering
controls and personal protective equipment in protecting workers in regard to engineered
neno particles, (5) the kind of surveillance programs that should be put in place to protect
workers, (6) whether exposure registers should be established, and (7) if engineered neno
particles should be treated as new substances and evaluated for safety and hazards.

31

32

CHAPTER-4
RESEARCH
METHODOLOGY

CHAPTER-4
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
4.1 TITLE OF THE RESEARCH STUDY :
A Study of Health and Safety Measures : A study of Selected employees in Innovative
Cuisine Private Limited.
4.2 DURATION OF THE RESEARCH STUDY :
This study was carried out for duration of 2 month.
4.3 RATIONALE OF THE RESEARCH STUDY :

33

When it comes to performance, employees performance is one the main in organisational


success. Therefore, it is an need of the hour where organizational has to make very
specific efforts for Health & Safety Measures to improving employees performance to
optimally utilize knowledge and skills of their employees. The proposed research study
also would report on employees feedback as well as expectations & experiences with
regard to Health & Safety. It also list out suggestions for an overall improvement in
Health & Safety. The research study would make an attempt to find the impact of Health
& Safety on effective employees performance.

4.4 SCOPE & COVERAGE OF RESEARCH STUDY :

This study was given an overview of the health and safety measures existing at Innovative
Cuisine Pvt. Ltd. Since health and safety are two important elements essential for
improving the productivity of an organization, a study on the existing health and safety
measures would help the organization to perform better. This study was highlight on the
perception of the workers regarding health and safety. Innovative Cuisine Pvt. Ltd. can
identify the areas where it can be improved, so as to improve the performance of the
workers. This study would also help to analyze the satisfaction level of the workers
towards health and safety measures and suggest provisions to improve health and safety.

4.5 OBJECTIVES OF THE RESEARCH STUDY:


Basic Objectives :

To ascertain the health and safety measures adopted in Innovative Cuisine Private
Limited.

Other Objectives :

To study the awareness of the workers about health and safety in the work place.

To find the occurrence of accidents happened at work place.

To identify the role of management in implementing health & safety.

To find out satisfaction level of the respondents towards health & safety measure.

To give suggestions to improve the health & safety in the organization.

34

4.6 RESEARCH DESIGN :

The research design of this study considering its objectives, scope & coverage was
exploratory as well as descriptive in nature.

4.7 SOURCES OF INFORMATION :

4.7.1 PRIMARY DATA :


The primary data has been obtained from the selected employees & senior executive
of Innovative Cuisine Private Limited through circulation of the structured
non-disguised questionnaire.

4.7.2 SECONDARY DATA :


The secondary data has been obtained from published as well as unpublished
literature on the topic and from Books, Journals, News Papers, Research Articles,
Thesis, Websites, Magazines etc.

4.8 SAMPLING DECISIONS:

4.8.1 SAMPLE SIZE:


Appropriate number of sample size (i.e. 60) was put to used for the purpose of
collecting primary data from the selected employees of the Innovative Cuisine
Private Limited.

4.8.2 SAMPLING METHOD:


Non-probability sampling design based on convenient sampling method has been
used for this research study.

4.8.3 SAMPLING FRAME :

35

The representative sampling units in appropriate & justified size has been
conveniently drawn from amongst different employees across various heterogeneous
socio- economic age groups, occupations, gender who have availed health & safety
measures as offered the Innovative Cuisine Private Limited.

4.8.4 RESEARCH INSTRUMENT :


A structured non-disguised questionnaire has been prepared to get the relevant
information from the respondents. The questionnaire consists of variety of questions
presented to the respondents for their responses. The researcher has been used
questionnaire with the support & cooperation of the selected respondents of various
departments at managerial and non-managerial level of Innovative Cuisine Private
Limited.

4.8.5 SAMPLING MEDIA :


Sampling media has been in the form of Filling up of questionnaire.

4.9 DATA COLLECTION, ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION :

The collected information and primary data has been subjected to data analysis and
interpretation. The collected primary data has been pre-coded considering the designing
of the structured non-disguised questionnaire. The primary data has been scrutinized,
edited and validated and thereafter it has been presented in the forms of tables, charts,
graphs and diagrams as the case may be.

4.10 SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROPOSED RESEARCH STUDY:

36

Health and Safety measures are inevitable to any organization where workers are
involved. Its an organizations responsibility to provide to its workers beyond the
payment of wages for their services. The workers health and safety on and off the job
within the organization is a vital concern of the employer. The working environment in a
factory adversely affects the workers health and safety because of the excessive heat or
cold, noise, odors, fumes, dust and lack of sanitation and pure air etc., which leads
to
accident or injury or disablement or loss of life to the workers. Providing a health and
safer environment is a pre-requisite for any productive effort. These must
be held in
check by providing regular health check-up, protective devices and compensatory
benefits to the workers. This research deals with the study on the health and safety
measures provided to the workers at Innovative Cuisine Private Limited.

4.11 LIMITATION OF THE PROPOSED RESEARCH STUDY:

The sample size selected by the researcher is limited.

The study is applicable only to Wheels India ltd, Padi, chennai. Therefore the
results cannot be generalized for the whole industry.

The time factor in collecting the responses as in conducting the research study
would be limiting factor.

The respondents were unable or unwilling to give response.

CHAPTER5
37

DATA ANALYSIS &


INTERPRETATIONS

CHAPTER 5
DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETAION
TABLE 1 : Table showing age of respondents
Sr.
No.
A
B
C
D
E

Range
Below 25

No. of
Respondents
10

17

26 - 30
31 35
36 40
Above 40

18
22
4
6

30
36
7
10

60

100

Total

38

Interpretation : The chart depicts that :


17% respondents tend to age below 25,
30% respondents tend to age between 26-30,
36% respondents tend to age between 31-35,
07% respondents tend to age between 36-40 and;
10% respondents tend to age above 40.
Majority of the respondents tend to age between 31-35.

TABLE 2 : Table showing the Experience (in years) of the respondents


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Below 5

05

08

6 - 10

12

20

11 15

22

37

39

16 20

18

30

Above 20

03

05

60

100

Total

Interpretation : From the above table, 8% of the respondents have work experience of
below 5 years, 20% of the respondents have work experience of 6-10 years, and 37% of the
respondents have work experience of 11-15 years,30% respondents have work experience of
16-20 years, and 5% respondents have work experience of above 20 years .
Majority of the employees in the organization have a work experience of 11-15 years.

TABLE 3 : Table showing the awareness of health and safety


40

Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

YES

48

80

NO

12

20

60

100

Total

Interpretation: In the survey,80% of the respondents are aware of the health and safety
measures but 20% of the respondents respond that they are not aware of the health and safety
measures adopted in the company.

TABLE 4 : Table showing the effective arrangements for communicating Health and
Safety matters
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

YES

24

40

NO

36

60

41

Total

60

100

Interpretation : In the survey, only 40% of the respondents say that they have effective
arrangements for communicating health and safety matters but nearly 60% of the respondents
says that they have no effective arrangements for communicating health and safety matters in
the company.
TABLE 5 : Table showing the medical facility
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

YES

48

80

NO

12

20

60

100

Total

42

Interpretation : In the survey, 80% of the respondents say that the company is providing
medical facilities to the workers but 20% of the respondents respond the company is not
providing any medical facilities to the workers.
TABLE 6 : Table showing the Health and Safety Training
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

YES

42

70

NO

18

30

60

100

Total

43

Interpretation: In the survey, 70% of the respondents respond that they attended the health
and safety training programme conducted in the company but 30% of the respondents says
that they are not attended any health and safety training programme conducted in the
company.

TABLE 7 : Table showing the frequency of Training Offered


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Once in 5 year

14

23

Once in 3 year

36

60

Yearly once

10

17

Monthly

00

Rarely

00

60

100

Total

44

Interpretation : In the survey, 23% of the respondents say that the training is offered once in
5 years and 60% of the respondents respond that the training is offered once in 3 years and
the remaining 17% of the respondents says that the training is offered yearly once. No
respondents say that the training is offered monthly or rarely.

TABLE 8 : Table showing the Drinking Water Facility


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Always

10

17

Sometimes

32

53

Often

12

20

Rarely

06

10

Not at all

00

60

100

Total

45

Interpretation: In the survey, 17% of the respondents say that always they have proper
drinking water and 53% of the respondents respond that sometimes they have proper drinking
water and 20% respondents says often they have proper drinking water and 10% of the
respondents says rarely they have proper drinking water facility inside the work place.

TABLE 9: Table showing the Stress towards Work


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Always

08

13

Sometimes

16

27

Often

32

53

Rarely

04

07

Not at all

00

46

Total

60

100

Interpretation : In the survey, 13% of the respondents say that always they have stress and
27% of the respondents respond that sometimes they have stress and 53% of the respondents
says often they have stress and only 7% respondents says rarely they have stress towards
work.

TABLE 10: Table showing the awareness about first aid activities and contents of the
first aid kit
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Strongly agree

46

77

Agree

14

23

Neutral

Disagree

47

Strongly disagree

Total

60

100

Interpretation : In the survey,77% of the respondents strongly agrees


about the first aid activities and contents of the first aid kit but 23%
agrees that they are aware about the first aid activities and contents of
respondents say that they are not aware about the first aid activities and
aid kit.

that they are aware


respondents simply
the first aid kit. No
contents of the first

TABLE 11: Table showing the effective disciplinary procedures implementation


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Strongly agree

36

60

Agree

24

40

Neutral

Disagree

48

Strongly disagree

Total

60

100

Interpretation : In the survey, 60% of the respondents strongly agrees that the company
implements effective disciplinary procedures but 40% respondents simply agrees that the
company implements effective disciplinary procedures to maintain health and safety in the
organization. No respondents say that the company is not implementing effective disciplinary
procedures.

TABLE 12 : Table showing the working temperature is reasonable to work


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Strongly agree

17

28

Agree

43

72

Neutral

00

49

Disagree

00

Strongly disagree

00

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 28% of the respondents strongly agree that the working
temperature is reasonable to work but 72% respondents simply agree that the working
temperature is reasonable to work. No respondents say that the working temperature is not
reasonable to work.

TABLE 13 : Table showing the enough space to work


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Strongly agree

13

22

Agree

28

46

50

Neutral

19

32

Disagree

Strongly disagree

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 22% of the respondents strongly agree that they have enough
space to work but 46% respondents simply agree that they have enough space to work and
32% of the respondents say that they have no idea about the overcrowding. No respondents
say that they are not having enough space to work.

TABLE 14 : Table showing the latrines and urinals are cleaned and maintained
properly
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Strongly agree

14

23

51

Agree

36

60

Neutral

10

17

Disagree

Strongly disagree

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 23% of the respondents strongly agree that the latrines and
urinals are cleaned and maintained properly but 60% respondents simply agree that the
latrines and urinals are cleaned and maintained properly and 17% of the respondents say that
they have no idea about the maintenance of latrines and urinals. No respondents say that the
latrines and urinals are not cleaned and maintained properly.

TABLE 15 : Table showing the environment is safe to work


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

52

Strongly agree

33

55

Agree

14

23

Neutral

13

22

Disagree

Strongly disagree

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 55% of the respondents strongly agree that their environment
is safe to work but 23% respondents simply agree that their environment is safe to work and
22% of the respondents say that they have no idea about their environment is safe to work. No
respondents say that their environment is not safe to work.

53

TABLE 16 : Table showing the enough Training given to workers before handling the
Machines
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Strongly agree

42

70

Agree

12

20

Neutral

06

10

Disagree

Strongly disagree

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 70% of the respondents strongly agree that enough training is
given to the workers but 20% respondents simply agree that enough training is given to the
workers and 10% of the respondents say that they have no idea about enough the training
given to the workers. No respondents say that enough training is not given to the workers
before handling machines.

54

TABLE 17 : Table showing the health checkup for workers


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Yearly

Half yearly

11

18

Quarterly

45

75

Monthly

04

Rarely

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 18% of the respondents say that the company provides health
check-up half yearly and 75% of the respondents respond that the company provides health
check-up quarterly and 7% respondents says that the company provides health check-up
monthly. No respondents say that the health check-up was provided yearly or rarely.

55

TABLE 18: Table showing the machines maintained properly


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Always

Sometimes

21

35

Often

28

46

Rarely

07

12

Not at all

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 7% respondents say that always they are maintaining the
machines properly and 35% of the respondents respond that sometimes they are maintaining
the machines properly and 46% respondents says often they are maintaining the machines
properly and 12% of the respondents says rarely they are maintaining the machines properly.

56

TABLE 19 : Table showing the Accidents Happened


S

RANGE

NO. OF RESPONDENTS

PERCENTAGE %

Always

04

Sometimes

17

28

Often

29

48

Rarely

10

17

Not at all

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 7% respondents say that always the accidents are happened
and 28% of the respondents respond that sometimes the accidents are happened and 48%
respondents says often the accidents are happened and 17% of the respondents says rarely the
accidents are happened.

57

TABLE 20 : Table showing the ranking Accidents by their Occurrence


Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Fallen from height

02

Finger injuries

22

37

Electric shocks

32

53

Fire accidents

04

60

100

Total

Interpretation : In the survey, 3% of the respondents ranked fallen from height are occurred
and 37% of the respondents ranked finger injuries are occurred but 53% of the respondents
ranked electric shocks are happened and 7% of the respondents ranked fire accidents are
happened.
TABLE 21 : Table showing the company providing safety requirements
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

YES

52

87

NO

08

13

58

Total

60

100

Interpretation : In the survey, 87% of the respondents say that the company is providing
safety requirements for work and 13% of the respondents only respond that the company is
not providing any safety requirements for work.
TABLE 22: Table showing the safety committee formed
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

YES

17

28

NO

43

72

60

100

Total

59

Interpretation : In the survey, 28% of the respondents respond that the safety committee is
formed in the company but 72% of the respondents say that the safety committee is not
formed in the company.
TABLE 23 : Table showing the safety inspections held in the company
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Yearly

03

05

Monthly

48

80

Weekly

09

15

Daily

Rarely

60

100

Total

60

Interpretation : In the survey, 5% of the respondents say that the safety inspections are held
yearly once and 80% of the respondents respond that the safety inspections are held monthly
once and 15% respondents says that the safety inspections are held weekly once. No
respondents say that the safety inspections are held daily or rarely in the company.

TABLE 24 : Table showing the satisfactory level of workers towards health and safety
measures
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Very much satisfied

Satisfied

52

87

Neutral

08

13

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

60

100

Total

61

Interpretation : In the survey, 87% of the respondents say that they are simply satisfied with
the health and safety measures adopted in the company and 13% of the respondents say that
they have no idea about the satisfaction level from health and safety measures. No
respondents are very much satisfied and dissatisfied with the health and safety measures
adopted in the company.

TABLE 25 : Table showing the role of management in implementing health and safety
Sr. No.

Range

No. of Respondents

Excellent

Best

11

18

Better

33

55

Good

16

27

Poor

60

100

Total

62

Interpretation : In the survey, 18% of the respondents say that the role of management in
implementing health and safety is best and 55% of the respondents say that the role of
management is better and 27% of the respondents respond that the role of management in
implementing health and safety is good. No respondents say that the role of management in
implementing health and safety is excellent or poor.

63

CHAPTER-6
FINDINGS,
SUGGESTIONS &
CONCLUSIONS

CHAPTER-6
FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS & CONCLUSIONS
FINDINGS:

Only 20% of the respondents respond that they are not aware of the health and safety
measures and 80% of the respondents are aware of the health and safety measures.

64

60% of the respondents say that they have no effective arrangements for
communicating health and safety matters; only 40% agrees that they have effective
arrangements for communicating health and safety matters.

Majority of the respondents are told that company is providing medical facility to the
workers.

70% of the respondents respond that they attended the health and safety training
programme but 30% of the respondents says that they are not attended any health and
safety training programme conducted in the company.

Most of the respondents respond that sometimes they have proper drinking water and
some of the respondents says often they have proper drinking water and very few of
the respondents say that always they have proper drinking water.

77% of the respondents strongly agree that they are aware about the first aid activities
and contents of the first aid kit and 23% of the respondents simply agree that they are
aware about the first aid activities and contents of the first aid kit.

Majority of the respondents strongly agree that the company implements effective
disciplinary procedures and few of the respondents simply agree that the company
implements effective disciplinary procedures.

55% of the respondents strongly agree that their environment is safe to work and
23%% of the respondents simply agree that their environment is safe to work and 22%
of the respondents say that they have no idea about the safe working environment.

Majority of the respondents says often they are maintaining the machines properly and
some of the respondents respond that sometimes they are maintaining the machines
properly and only very few of the respondents says rarely they are maintaining the
machines properly.

48% of the respondents say often the accidents are happened and 17% of the
respondents say rarely the accidents are happened and 28% of the respondents respond
that sometimes the accidents are happened and only 7% of the respondents say that
always the accidents are happened.

87% of the respondents say that they are simply satisfied with the health and safety
measures and 13% of the respondents say that they have no idea about the satisfaction
level from health and safety measures.
55% of the respondents say that the role of management is better and 18% of the
respondents say that the role of management is best and 27% of the respondents
respond that the role of management in implementing health and safety is good.

RECOMMENDATIONS/ SUGGESTIONS :

The company has to create the awareness for the workers regarding health and safety.
65

They have to provide effective arrangements to the workers for communicating their
health and safety matters.

It is better to provide frequent health and safety training, at least once in a year.

The company has to provide enough drinking water facility available at all the time.

The management has to take necessary steps to reduce the stress level of the workers.

Orientation programmes can be conducted to make the workers to feel that their work
environment is safe to work.

The maintenance department has to maintain the machines properly to reduce


lead-time.

Proper training has to be given to the workers to avoid frequent accidents.

Meditation practices can be given to avoid electric shocks, finger injuries etc. due to
lack of concentration.

Safety committee has to be formed to monitor the health and safety issues.

The company has to conduct the regular inspections to ensure higher level of safety in
the workplace.

Cordial relationship has to be maintained between the management and the workers to
implement the health and safety policies and measures in a smooth manner.

CONCLUSION :
It is revealed from the study that, the health and safety measures adopted in
Innovative Cuisine Pvt. Ltd. are provided to the workers according to the provisions of the
factories Act. It reveals that the awareness of the workers about health and safety in the
workplace is inadequate. Also repeated accidents like electric shocks, finger injuries are
66

occurred in the workplace. Suitable ideas were suggested to avoid those accidents and to
improve the health and safety measures. The role of management in implementing health and
safety in the organization is very effective. Most of the workers were satisfied with the health
and safety measures adopted in the company. If the company implements effective
disciplinary procedures; it will help the company to go with their policies and also to maintain
health and safety in the organization.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Arun Monappa (1994); Industrial Relation (8th Edition)


67

K Aswathappa (2014); Human Resource Management (7th Edition); Mc Graw


Hill Education.

Armstrong, M. (2004); Handbook of Human Resources Management Practice


(9th Edition) London: Kogan Page.

P. Subba Rao (2008); Essentials of Human Resource Management and


Industrial Relations (3rd Edition); Himalaya Publishing House.

Emmanuel I. Akpan (2011); Effective Safety & Health Management Policy for
Improved Performance of Organization in Africa: International Journal of
Business & Management, Volume 6, No. 3, pp. 159-165.

D.M. Yakubu & I. M. Bakri (2013); Evaluation of Safety & Health


Performance on construction sites : Journal of Management & Sustainability,
Volume 3, No. 2, pp. 100-109.

Noor Aina Amrirah, Wan Izatul Asma, Shaladdin Muda & Aziz Amiri (2013);
Operationalisation of Safety culture to foster safety & health in the Malaysian
Manufacturing Industries: Asian Social Science, Volume 9, No. 7, pp. 283-289.

Collins Badu Agyemang, Joseph Gerald Nyanyofio & Gerald Dapaah Gyamfi
(2014) ; Job Stress, sector of work & shift work pattern as correlates of worker
health & safety : A study of Manufacturing company in Ghana : International
Journal of Business & Management, Volume 9, No. 7, pp. 59-69.

Fariba Kiani (2014); Preventing injuries in workers : the role of management


practices in decreasing injuries reporting : International Journal of Health
policy & Management, pp. 171-177.
68

Joseph M Putti (1980); The management of securing and maintaining the


workforce, S Chand & Co Ltd. Ram Nagar, New Delhi.

WEBLIOGRAPHY:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20106469
http://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/2009/09000/A_Systematic_Review_of_Occupation
al_Health_and.6.aspx
http://www.ehjournal.net/content/8/1/47
http://jech.bmj.com/content/63/7/521.abstract
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do;jsessionid=9F2CDBC6B5111
CA6756D2D26B9121610?contentType=Article&contentId=1718276
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&conten
tId=1728145
http://jech.bmj.com/content/61/Suppl_2/ii39.abstract
http://occmed.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/57/6/449
http://oem.bmj.com/content/63/9/608.abstract
http://oem.bmj.com/content/60/1/43.abstract
http://jech.bmj.com/content/55/5/316.abstract
http://www.monash.edu.au/muarc/reports/muarc166.html
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=1519328
http://ethics.iit.edu/NanoEthicsBank/popular_search.php?cmd=search&words=workplace+
safety&mode=normal
http://oem.bmj.com/content/54/6/367.abstract
http://www.dol.govt.nz/publication-view.asp?ID=53
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2007-123/pdfs/2007-123.pdf

69

http://cohesion.rice.edu/CentersAndInst/ICON/emplibrary/Phase%20I%20Report_UCSBI
CON%20Final.pdf
http://www.icohweb.org/newsletter/icoh_newsletter_2004_04.pdf
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pu bmed/19030766?dopt=Abstract

QUESTIONNAIRE
QUESTIONNAIRE ON A STUDY OF HEALTH AND SAFETY
MEASURES : A STUDY OF SELECTED EMPLOYEES IN
INNOVATIVE CUISINE PRIVATE LIMITED

Respected Sir/ Madam,


I am Irshad Shaikh student of Post Graduate Diploma in Labour Practice,
Faculty of Law, M.S. University of Baroda, pursuing a research project on A
Study of Health & Safety measures in Innovative Cuisine Private Limited.
I will grateful to you if you spare your valuable time & efforts with your
valuable views on the subject of the research study.

1) Name (Optional) :
2) Age :
70

(a) Below 25 (b) 26-30 (c) 31-35 (d) 36-40 (e) Above 40
3) Experience (in years):
(a) Below 5 (b) 6-10 (c) 11-15 (d) 16-20 (e) Above 20
4) Are you aware of the health and safety measures adopted in the company?
(a) Yes (b) No
5) Do you have effective arrangements for communicating health and safety matters?
(a) Yes (b) No
6) Does the company provide medical facility to the workers?
(a) Yes (b) No
7) Have you attended any health and safety training in your company?
(a) Yes (b) No
8) How frequent training is offered in the company?
(a) Once in 5 year (b) once in 3 year (c) yearly once (d) Monthly (e) Rarely
9) Do you have proper drinking water facility inside your work place?
(a) Always (b) Sometimes (c) Often (d) Rarely (e) Not at all
10) Do you have any stress towards work?
(a) Always (b) Sometimes (c) Often (d) Rarely (e) Not at all
Q.NO

11)

12)

13)

PARAMETERS

STRONGLY
AGREE

AGREE

NEUTRAL

DISAGREE

STRONGLY
DISAGREE

Do you know the first aid


activities and contents of the
first aid kit?
The company implements
effective
disciplinary
procedure to maintain health
and safety?
The working temperature is
reasonable to work?

71

14)

15)

16)

17)

Do you have enough space to


work?
The latrines and urinals are
cleaned
and
maintained
properly?
Do you think that your
environment is safe to work?
Is enough training given to the
workers before handling the
machines?

18) How often the company provide health checkup for workers?
(a) Yearly (b) Half yearly (c) Quarterly (d) Monthly (e) Rarely
19) Are the machines maintained properly?
(a) Always (b) Sometimes (c) Often (d) Rarely (e) Not at all
20) How often the accidents happen?
(a) Always (b) Sometimes (c) Often (d) Rarely (e) Not at all
21) Rank the accidents by their occurrence?
ACCIDENTS

RANKING

Fallen from height


Finger injuries
Electric shocks
Fire accidents

22) Are they providing the safety requirements for work?


(a) Yes (b) No
23) Whether safety committee formed in the company?
(a) Yes (b) No
24) How often the safety inspections are held in your company?
72

(a) Yearly (b) Monthly (c) Weekly (d) Daily (e) Rarely
25) Satisfactory level of the health and safety measures taken in the company?
(a) Very much satisfied (b) Satisfied (c) Neutral (d) Dissatisfied (e) Highly
dissatisfied
26) The role of management in implementing health and safety?
(a) Excellent (b) Best (c) Better (d) Good (e) poor

Thank you for your Time & Experience

73