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L~Zusanli - Stomach 36 ~

" Leg Three Miles "1


ocation
below the knee, 3 cun below Dubi (st 35),
on finger breadth lateral to the anterior
crest of the tibia. Location note; Dubai (st
35) is located on the knee, in the hollow
formed when the knee is flexed,
immediately below the patella and lateral
to the patella ligament.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 1.0 to 1.5 inch
Moxa is OK
Actions
Harmonizes the stomach
Fortifies the spleen
Resolves dampness
Tonifies Qi and nourishes blood and yin
Balances 'correct' Qi
Supports Original Qi
Clears fire
Calms the spirit
Activates the channel and alleviates pain
Revives yang and restores consciousness
Indications
gastric pain, vomiting, hiccup, abdominal distention, borborygmus, diarrhea, dysentery,
constipation, mastitis, enteritis, aching of the knee joint, beriberi, edema, cough, asthma,
emaciation due to general deficiency, indigestion, apoplexy, hemiplegia, dizziness, insomnia,
mania.
Commentary:
Zusanli is considered in classical texts to be one of the 11 most vital acupuncture points, called
the 'eleven heavenly star points.' Later Taichong (Liver 3) was added and it became the 12
1

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Heavenly Star points. The others are; Lieque (Lung 7), Hegu (Large Intestine 4), Quchi (Large
Intestine 11), Neiting (Stomach 44), Tongli (Heart 5), Weizhong (Urinary Bladder 40),
Chengshan (Urinary Bladder 57), Kunlun (Urinary Bladder 60), Huantiao (Gallbladder 30), &
Yanglingquan (Gallbladder 34).
Zusanli is indicated for any disorder of the stomach, especially disorders arising out of irregular
eating or drinking. Many TCM physicians consider proper functioning of the 'middle' to be the
key to treating almost any disorder. If the body is properly nourished it can expel any invader and
repair any damage that may be done.
As Zusanli is the point of choice for tonifying the middle, it is considered by many to be the
single most important acupuncture point on the body. It is said that "all diseases can be treated"
with Zusanli.
So strong is Zusanli's tonifying effect on the body, that some texts caution its use in some cases,
in case it is the invading pathogen that is strengthened rather than the body.
Zusanli is the He-Sea point of the stomach channel. A He-Sea point, according the 5 elements
theory is where the Qi plunges deeply into the body. He-Sea points of channels are all located at
the elbows and knee joints.
Zusanli, by its ability to balance and promote 'correct' Qi, is generally considered to be a point
that has a beneficial effect on the whole body. In this it is often paired with Taiyuan (Lung 9)
which has a tonifying effect on Qi derived from air via the Lungs to promote overall wellness
and longevity. Massaging Zusanli is often an important exercise in Qi Gong and martial arts
practices.
The term Li is the rough equivalent of a Chinese mile or kilometre. The idea is that, even when
totally exhausted, needling Zusanli would allow one to walk a further three miles.
Regular application of moxa to Zusanli is considered to be a method for gaining longevity. The
saying is 'moxa Zusanli and live to be a hundred.' Regular needling or application of Moxa to
Zusanli is well known to preserve and maintain good health, especially as one advances in age.
Zusanli is the single most important point to stimulate the generation of Qi and blood in the
stomach and spleen. Post heaven or Jing Qi is derived from food (grain) and water through the
action of the stomach and spleen. Jing or nutrient Qi is important to 'top up' one's Original or
Yuan Qi, stored in the Kidney.
Zusanli is indicated for any disorder occurring along the length of the Stomach channel,
including disorders of the breast (abscess, swelling, etc.), any pain along the length of the leg,
Zusanli is much valued to treat what are known as 'the 5 taxations & 7 injuries' of classical texts.

The 5 injuries are; 1.) excessive use of the eyes which injures the blood, 2.) excessive lying down
which injures Qi, 3.) excessive sitting which injures the flesh, 4.) excessive standing which
injures the bones, 5.) excessive walking which injures the sinews.
The 7 taxations are; 1.) overeating injuring the Spleen, 2.) great anger which injures the Liver, 3.)
heavy lifting or prolonged sitting on damp ground which injures the Kidneys, 4.) pathogenic cold
which injures the Lung, 5.) worry and anxiety which injures the Heart, 6.) wind, rain, cold and
summer-heat which injures the body, & 7.) excessive fear which injures the emotions.
Finally, Zusanli, because of its ability to clear phlegm and fire, fortify the Spleen, promote
'correct' flow of Qi, and because its divergent channel connects with the Heart (which houses
one's spirit), is indicated in a number of psycho- emotional disorders involving manic behaviour,
such as mania-depression, manic singing, raving, abusive talk, anger, fright, and outrageous
laughter.

Shu Points
Shu Points are a group of points located on the back, 1.5 cun lateral to spinous processes of the
thoracic and lumbar vertebra on the Urinary Bladder channel. Shu points are where the Qi of
each of the 12 Zang Fu organs surfaces and gathers. Accordingly, each of the Shu points strongly
tonifies its corresponding organ and is indicated for a wide variety of disharmonies of that organ.
Below the Shu points are presented as a group. One additional note, the Back Shu points,
correspond to a similar group of points on the front of the body known as 'Mu' points. There is a
Front Mu point for each of the Zang Fu organs, but they occur on different channels. While they
perform similar functions, the Back Shu points are sometimes preferred in clinical practice as
they are more easily accessed, but otherwise there is little difference between the two groups of
points in terms of treating disharmonies of the Zang Fu organs. Another quality of all these
points, Mu and Shu is that they tend to become tender when there is organ disharmony so they
can be quite useful for diagnostic purposes. Finally, these points tend to be used in combinations.
For example, for conditions in the chest, Heart and Lung Shu points may be needled together,
similarly, Spleen and Stomach Shu are often needled together.
Location
note; all the shu points are located on the inner Urinary Bladder channel. The UB channel runs
down the back in two separate paths. The inner channel is located at a distance midway between
the midline of the spine, and a line drawn parallel from the innermost border of the Scapula or
1.5 cun lateral to the spine. The outer channel runs in a parallel line at a distance from the spine
level with the inner border of the Scapula or 3 cun lateral to the spine. All the Shu points are
located on the inner channel. A cun is the distance between the 2nd and 3rd knuckles, or the
distance at the widest part of the thumb.
Feishu -Lung Shu - Urinary Bladder 13 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Third Thoracic Vertebra (T3)

Jueyinshu - Pericardium Shu - Urinary Bladder 14 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of spinous
process of the Fourth Thoracic Vertebra (T4).
Xinshu - Heart Shu - Urinary Bladder 15 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Fifth Thoracic Vertebra (T5).
Geshu - Diaphragm Shu - Urinary Bladder 17 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process the Seventh Thoracic Vertebra (T7).
Ganshu - Liver Shu - Urinary bladder 18 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Ninth Thoracic Vertebra (T9).
Danshu - Gallbladder Shu - Urinary Bladder 19 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the
spinous process of the Tenth Thoracic Vertebra (T10).
Pishu - Spleen Shu - Urinary Bladder 20 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Eleventh Thoracic Vertebra (T11).
Weishu - Stomach Shu - Urinary Bladder 21 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Twelfth Thoracic Vertebra (T12).
Sanjiaoshu - Sanjiao Shu - Urinary Bladder 22 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the First Lumbar Vertebra (L1) .
Shenshu - Kidney Shu - Urinary bladder 23 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Second Lumbar Vertebra (L2).
Dachangshu - Large Intestine Shu - Urinary Bladder 25 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of
the spinous process of the Fourth Lumbar Vertebra (L4).
Xiaochangshu " Small Intestine Shu " - Urinary Bladder 27 - 1.5 cun lateral to the midline, at the
level of the First Posterior sacral Foramen.
Pangguangshu " Bladder Shu " - Urinary Bladder 28 - 1.5 cun lateral to the midline, at the level
of the Second Posterior Sacral Foramen.
Needling
Feishu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Jueyinshu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Xinshu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
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Geshu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Ganshu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Danshu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Pishu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion carries
substation risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Weishu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Sanjiaoshu - perpendicular insertion, or at a 45 degree angle toward the spine 1.0 to 1.5 inch.
Deep perpendicular insertion, especially in thin patients may injure the Kidney.
Shenshu - perpendicular insertion or at a 45 degree angle toward the spine, 1.0 to 1.5 inch. Deep
perpendicular insertion, especially in thin patients may injure the Kidney.
Dachangshu - perpendicular insertion 1.0 to 1.5 inch.
Xiaochangshu - perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch.
Pangguangshu - perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch
Moxa is OK
Actions
Each of the Shu points has a balancing effect on its respective organ and is indicated in a variety
of disorders specific to the organ.
Feishu - is the point of choice for all disorders of the Lung
Jueyinshu - is the Shu point of the Pericardium. Jueyinshu is an exception among the Shu points
in that it is named after its channel rather than the organ. This emphasizes its main action of
invigorating Qi in the channel to 'unbind the chest' in addition to its Shu function of treating a
wide variety of Heart dysfunctions, including psycho-emotional disorders.
Xinshu - is equally effective to treat all disorders of the Heart, including psycho-emotional
disorders.
Geshu - while not a Shu point of a specific Zang Fu organ, it is an 'honourary' Shu, of the
diaphragm, with the ability to treat disorders of the region between the Lungs and Stomach.
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More importantly, it is the Hui-Meeting point of Blood. Geshu is the point of choice for virtually
all blood disorders arising out of the three main categories: blood stasis, blood heat, and blood
deficiency.
Ganshu - the main function of the Liver is to 'promote the free flow of Qi' in the body. In
addition it stores blood, dominates the sinews, and opens into the eyes. Free flow of Qi is vital to
health in the body, and Ganshu is the point of choice to regulate and tonify the Liver.
Danshu - is an important point to regulate the Gallbladder Fu organ. Its main function is to clear
damp-heat. It is a preeminent point for treating Jaundice and the symptoms of Jaundice.
Pishu - strongly regulates and tonifies the functions of the Spleen.
Weishu - strongly regulates and tonifies the functions of the Stomach.
Sanjiaoshu - strongly regulates and tonifies the Sanjiao which is responsible for Qi and water
passage through the three Jiao (upper( Lung,Heart), middle (Stomach, Spleen, Liver) and lower
(Bladder, Kidney).
Shenshu - is the point of choice for regulating and strengthening the Kidneys and is indicated in
virtually all Kidney disorders.
Dachangshu - is indicated to treat a broad range of Large Intestine disorders.
Xiaochangshu - it is the function of the Small Intestine to 'separate the pure from the turbid', that
is extract vital elements from food that has rotted and ripened in the stomach and pass on the
waste to the Large Intestine for elimination, Xiaochangshu has a strong effect not only on its own
organ, but on the organs above and below it. Its main use is to promote the draining downward of
turbid waste.
Pangguangshu - strongly tonifies the Bladder. Its main use is to promote drainage from the lower
jiao.
Signs and Symptoms
* the following are the main signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction and not an exhaustive list
of every sign one may encounter in clinical practice. See TCM Diagnosis for more detailed
information.
Feishu - cough, chest pain/fullness, mania, propensity to sadness
Jeuyinshu - chest pain/oppression, cough, shortness of breath
Xinshu - heart pain, chest oppression, restlessness, psycho-emotional disorders, inappropriate
laughter

Geshu - chest oppression, epigastric


pain, pain of the whole body, bleeding,
Ganshu - pain of lateral costal region,
irritability/anger, blurred vision, neck
rigidity
Danshu - jaundice, dry throat, blurred
vision, shao yang syndrome
Pishu - abdominal pain/distention,
heaviness in the body and limbs,
lassitude, propensity to worry
Weishu - epigastric pain, vomiting,
abdominal fullness
Sanjiaoshu - borborygmus, abdominal
distention, edema, masses, urinary
problems,
Shenshu - edema, urinary/genital
problems, menstrual problems, lumbar
pain, phobias, propensity to be startled
Dachangshu - intestinal problems, abdominal pain/distention, lumbar pain,
Xiaochangshu - urinary problems, 'wasting & thirsting' (diabetes), lumbar
pain, masses
Pangguangshu - urinary problems, genital problems, diarrhea, lower back
& buttock pain.

Hui Meeting Points


Hui Meeting Points are specific points where the Qi of each of the 8 main
processes of the body gathers. These points are important both from a
diagnostic and a treatment point of view. If a point is tender upon
palpation, then disharmony is indicated. Needling, or massaging these
points will have a beneficial effect.
Zang Organs - Zhangmen (liv 13)
Fu Orgnas - Zhongwon (Ren 12)
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Qi - Shanzhong (Ren 17)


Blood - Geshu (UB 17)
Sinews - Yanglingquan (GB 34)
Vessels - Taiyuan (LU 9)
Bone - Dazhu (UB 11)
Marrow - Xuanzhong (GB 39)

Diagnosis
Diagnosis is of crucial importance in any medical or healing system that works on the body.
Metaphysical healing systems tend to pay far less attention to the body assuming that removing
emotional and mental causes will automatically remove the physical symptom. While this is a
legitimate approach, in the meantime, the body still needs to be looked after. The following is a
brief overview of the diagnostic approach of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
The point of diagnosing is to
design a treatment. An improper
diagnosis will lead to an
improper treatment and as often
as not a worsening of the
conditions.
Even though the approach of
TCM seems fairly
straightforward, the fact is that
most often one encounters
numerous and often
contradictory symptoms in the
same patient.
There is a lot more to diagnosing
then, than simple observation of
symptoms. One must take
account of the relative strengths of symptoms, whether they are getting stronger or weaker in
relation to other symptoms, the relative strength of the patient, and other such intangibles.
Intuition is as important a diagnostic tool as knowledge and experience.
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The most common method of diagnosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine is the so-called 8
Principals. Diagnosing a disharmony consists of asking whether the condition is
Internal or External,
Hot or Cold,
a Deficiency or an Excess,
whether it has a Yin character or a Yang character.
Causes of Disease According to Traditional Chinese Medicine.
There are many factors that can cause disease. In Chinese medicine in fact illness is
characterized as a 'syndrome.' That is a collection of symptoms that together make up a pattern of
disharmony in the body. Nor are these symptoms restricted to the body. Along with physical
symptoms, emotional and even mental states are considered in the diagnosing of a syndrome.
Causes of disease generally speaking fall into a number of general categories.
There are;
a) 6 Exogenous Factors,
b) 7 Endogenous (emotional) factors,
c) conditions arising from improper diet,
d) too much activity (hyperactivity),
e) too little activity stagnation,
f) traumatic injury,
g) insect, animal or reptile bite.
Within each category there are a number of differentiating categories to look at. For example the
6 Exogenous factors are;
1.Wind,
2. Cold,
3. Heat,
4. Fire,
5. Dampness,
6. Dryness.
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These will quickly be recognized as conditions that exist in nature. Under ordinary circumstances
these are not pathological to the human body, but become so when conditions are extreme,
sudden or the body's resistance is low.
Exogenous factors are seen as those that enter the body from the exterior and are closely related
to seasonal changes.
For example what we call Colds and Flu, seen most often in the fall when seasons are changing,
are characterized in TCM as invasions of Wind, invasions of Wind/Cold, or invasions of
Wind/Heat, depending on the severity of symptoms and depth of penetration into the body.
Heat and Fire Syndromes are seen
most often in the summer. Dampness
syndromes are seen most often in later
summer. Dryness is seen most often in
Autumn. Cold Syndromes are seen
most often in the Winter.
Ambient pain in the muscles and joints
called by various names in Western
medicine is characterized in Chinese
Medicine as 'Bi Syndrome' caused by
invasion of Wind/Cold/Dampness.

There are several different kinds of


'Bi Syndrome.'
Ancient physicians, of course had little
notion of invading microscopic
organisms like bacteria or viruses and
while treatment options do include
'expulsion of pathogenic factors' it is not enough to simply expel the particular factor. Proper
treatment most often includes tonifying specific organs or the body as a whole both to help with
expelling the invading pathogen and to speed recovery.

Signs and Symptoms of;


External cause - characterized by sudden onset affecting the exterior of the body, sensitivity

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to Cold or Wind, slight fever, thin coating on the tongue and a superficial pulse.
Internal cause - characterized by longer term onset as the pathogen works its way into the
interior of the body. In most cases the internal organs are affected and signs and symptoms of
channel and organ disharmony are seen. See below for symptoms of each organ system
disharmony.
Cold - characterized by aversion to Cold, pale tongue, preference for hot drinks, pale face,
thin pulse.
Heat - characterized by aversion to heat, red tongue, preference for cold drinks, flushed face,
full pulse.
Deficiency - deficiency refers to not enough Qi to ward off pathogenic factors. Deficiency
manifests in the body in different ways including deficiency of Qi, deficiency of Blood,
Deficiency of Yin or Yang.
Symptoms are varied but include; emaciation, listlessness, feeble breathing, loss of strength,
shortness of breath, spontaneous sweating, night sweats, incontinence, and pain that is
alleviated by pressure.
Excess - refers to hyperactivity of Qi in the body. Excess manifests in the body in different
ways including excess Qi, excess Blood, Excess Yin or Yang.
Again symptoms are varied but include; agitation, loud voice, heavy breathing, fullness
and/or bloating in the chest and/or abdomen, pain aggravated by pressure, constipation,
irritability, thick tongue coating and full pulse.
Yin & Yang are a pair of principals used to generalize categories of syndromes. Once we
have looked at all the symptoms presented we can say whether a condition is mostly Yin or
mostly Yang. *see Yin/Yang Theory page.
For example Cold syndromes are Yin in character. Heat syndromes are Yang in character.
Deficiency syndromes are Yin in character. Excess syndromes are Yang in character. External
syndromes are Yang in character. Internal syndromes are Yin in character.
It is rare of course that one finds a condition that is purely Yin or purely Yang, but from a
diagnostic perspective one may be able to gauge the relative strength and direction of
movement in the body. This is important information for designing treatments. For Yang
syndromes we need to reduce. For Yin syndromes we need to tonify.

Improper Diet
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Key to Chinese thinking is balance and harmony. Everything must be balanced with everything
else in order to achieve harmony. In the area of diet, the Chinese have separated all foods into 5
different categories according to taste. Each of these categories has a specific effect on the body
and why Chinese cooking makes every effort to balance all five tastes. This is known as 5
Elements theory.
The five tastes are;
1. Sweet
2. Sour,
3. Bitter,
4. Salty,
5. Pungent,
For more information see *5 Elements Theory page
In theory, then one can eat pretty much what one wants as long it is balanced. By this though, I
am not necessarily referring to the over processed sugar based packaged snacks so popular in the
West these days. The food one eats must have at least some nutritive value.
So it is not so much that specific diets are bad for you, it is the overindulgence of specific kinds
of diets that lead to illness. For example, overindulgence in a hot spicy diet will lead to
symptoms of Heat or Fire and excess in the body. A strictly vegetarian diet of raw vegetables will
lead to symptoms of Cold and Deficiency. A diet with too much Dairy in it will lead to symptoms
of Cold and Phlegm.
For optimum health, though, certain diets are recommended.
As well as the kinds of foods that are consumed attention must also be paid to how food is
prepared and how it is consumed. In Taoist philosophy there is a lot more to food than just eating
it.
Each of the tastes characterized above, according to the 5 Elements theory is linked to a major
organ system.
1. Sweet taste is linked to the Spleen/Stomach organ system.
2. Sour taste is linked to the Liver organ system,
3. Bitter taste is linked to Heart organ system,
4. Salty taste is linked to the Kidney organ system,
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5. Pungent taste is linked to the Lung organ system.


It is often the case in Chinese medicine that appropriate treatment for an illness is a change in
diet. The line between what is food and what is medicine is quite blurred, and many items that
are considered food or spice in the west are consumed for their medicinal properties in the East.
Among these, onions, garlic, pumpkin seeds, scallions, ginger, leeks, rhubarb, watermelon,
mustard seeds, cinnamon, chives, and cloves.
Hyperactivity, Stagnation, Traumatic Injury, Insect, Animal or Reptile Bite,
These are all variations on a similar theme. Physical activity, beyond one's limit leads to injuries
to muscles and tendons. These can be relatively minor or quite serious. Relatively minor injuries
not treated and persistently aggravated can lead to serious injury over time.
Not enough physical activity leads to atrophy of muscles and tendons.
The treatment is either to slow down or speed up. In other words figure out what the appropriate
amount of physical exercise is for you and do that.
We in North America tend to think being bitten by insects, animals or reptiles as little more than
an annoyance. Certainly here in Southern Ontario where I am, there's nothing too dangerous.
Still there are many parts of the world where this sort of thing is a serious concern and an
important cause of illness that TCM concerns itself with.
Endogenous Causes
Endogenous causes of illness are characterized in Chinese medicine as the 7 Emotions. They
are;
1. Anger - associated with the Liver system
2. Joy - associated with the Heart system
3. Worry/ Overthinking - associated with the Spleen/Stomach system
4. Grief - associated with the Lung system
5. Sorrow - (chronic grief) associated with the Lung system
6. Fear - chronic condition (phobias) associated with the Kidney system
7. Fright - acute condition - associated with the Kidney system.
Emotional responses have an effect on the body. This is nothing new. When we are fearful or
severely angry, the stomach tightens, we sweat, the heart pumps faster and stronger, we breathe
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faster, adrenaline and other chemicals are released into the blood to stimulate some organ
systems and shut others down. When we are in grief or in joy we dont feel much like eating,
sleeping is difficult, we may have heart palpitations, or we may feel disoriented.
While modern medicine continues to scratch its head and wonders if emotional responses can
actually have any lasting effect on the physical body, ancient Chinese physicians had a useful
working model of just how emotions and the body are intricately linked and affect each other.
Using this system we are able to diagnose internal disharmonies according to external symptoms
observed. The following are some of the major symptoms that one may observe, the organ
system to which they apply and the emotion that is suggested by the symptom.
This exercise is intended to help you begin to understand what it is your body is telling you about
your emotional state. As well it is to help you understand how your emotional state affects the
body. The links between the body and the emotions are intimate and interactive. Physical
symptoms indicate emotional disharmony and emotional expression indicates physical
disharmonies. Strange as it may seem, I believe that most of us are not nearly as familiar with
our emotions as we might think.
For example; Grief is housed in the Lungs. Grief would then be seen as an important aspect of
Asthma. Any treatment of Asthma, to be effective from an Wholistic perspective would have to
include reduction or release of Grief. In Acupuncture, the same point that is chosen to tonify the
Lungs also helps to release Grief.
The following then is a list of symptoms, which are, in Chinese medicine indicators of
disharmony in the five main organ systems, which according to the 5 elements theory suggests
also an underlying emotional component.

Spleen/Worry.
The Spleens main function is to Transform water, food and air into Qi and Transport that Qi
throughout the body.
Needless to say, this is an important function. If the body is properly nourished, the Spleen can
do its job and good health is the result.
If the Spleen does not receive the proper raw materials it has to work that much harder to extract
the Qi and transport it. As this function is critical to the organism as a whole, the key to any
treatment for any kind of illness is to feed the body well. In severe illness this may involve
herbal or pharmaceutical medication.
The emotion of the Spleen is Worry or Overthinking. The balance of Yin and Yang is always the
goal.
It is recommended that one eat in peaceful surroundings without distractions. Some recommend
that one not even talk to others while eating and certainly watching TV, reading, doing
homework, or catching a bite on the run are not healthy things to do.

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Of course, this becomes a vicious cycle. The more we worry, the more deficient the Spleen
becomes which in turn causes us to worry still more.
Nourishing the body is absolutely primary in the recovery from any illness.
If the Spleen system is nourished properly, the better it can nourish all the other systems and their
related emotions.
In the West, perhaps it is a stretch to grasp that simple changes to ones diet can have far reaching
emotional and physical consequences, but in the East it is a fundamental principal. You may take
note of the fact that people who mainly 'think' for a living often have stomach problems.
The following physical symptoms suggest a Spleen dysfunction of some kind. Emotionally, they
suggest Worry/Overthinking.
Fatigue/tiredness/listlessness;
Puffy eyelids and puffiness under the eyes
Bleeding gums
Craving for sweets
Drooling/excess saliva/saliva leaking
Anything to do with the mouth or lips
Prolapse of any vessel including uterus,scrotum,intestine,anus
Easy bruising or bleeding
Rashes of any kind
A thick or swollen tongue with teeth marks on the side.
Belching/hiccups
Borborygmus or stomach/intestinal gurgling.
Painful, numb or tingling extremities, especially the feet.
Ulcers/hyperacidity/chronic heartburn/indigestion.
Stomach aches
It is often the case that these symptoms come and go related directly to our diet and our
propensity for worry. Often we dont pay much attention until something becomes chronic and
starts to affect our lives. If a symptom is not too much of an inconvenience we either ignore it or
cover it up and go on with what we were doing.
Since Fatigue is a major symptom of Spleen dysfunction, if you have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
it might be a good idea to look at your propensity to worry or over-think things, as well as your
diet, not only what you eat but how you eat.
The Lungs.
Disharmony in the Lungs takes 2 forms; a) acute such as the response to sudden loss of a
family member, and b) chronic - characterized as 'sorrow' which may be held in the body for
months or years.
The Lungs are associated with the emotion of Grief. Symptoms indicating a Lung system
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disharmony and by association Grief as an underlying component include;


Breathlessness
Asthma/any kind of breathing problem
Any kind of nasal problem (as the nose is associated with the Lungs)
Phlegm in the lungs or sinuses
Susceptibility to colds, flu, or other ambient infections
Lungs govern the skin so any kind of skin problem may indicate Grief as an underlying
component.
Inability to urinate fully
Fatigue/listlessness
Foggy mind
Sneezing (an explosive clearing of pathogenic factors)
Sweating, especially spontaneous sweating in the absence of a cold or flu, indicates a Lung
deficiency, or perhaps a clearing of grief along with other pathogenic factors. Spontaneous
sweating is a common symptom of cleansing.
The Liver/Anger
The Liver is responsible for the free flow of Qi in the body. It stores blood and is responsible for
maintaining blood levels and efficiency. The emotion attached to the Liver is Anger.
Since the Livers responsibility is to move Qi in the body, a Liver disharmony will have an effect
on all the other organ systems
and their related emotions.
While the basis for the 5
Elements theory is precisely that
all organ systems, their
functions, and related emotions
is in fact, that they are
interconnected and affect each
other, The Liver's effect is
particularly pronounced.
This is consistent with the
observation that Anger is a
particularly strong, even primal
emotion. Anger is often seen in
combination with other
emotions. We often get ourselves
out of fear, grief, or worry,
simply by getting angry, at
ourselves or at another.
From a TCM perspective, this is
very much, the body doing what it needs to do to promote Qi flow and return to wellness. While
we tend to take a dim view of someone expressing Anger, in some situations, it is in fact the
16

healthy thing to do. The expression of Anger, at least temporarily has the effect of promoting Qi
flow and clearing stagnant blockages in the body. Suppressing Anger causes Qi to stagnate in the
Liver and therefore affects Qi flow in the body as a whole.
Of course, we must emphasize that the expression of Anger in particular situations is only a
temporary measure. It is what the Body does when all other measures fail.
Symptoms of Liver dysfunction include;
Pain or distention in the hypochondriac region, at the sides of the body around the diaphragm is a
common sign of Liver disharmony.
Acute, stabbing pains anywhere in the body
Pain or distention in the eyes
Headaches at the sides of the head including Migraine headaches
Frequent and/or heavy sighing.
In Chinese Medicine, any kind of pain is considered to be Stagnation of Qi and or Blood. This
means that the treatment principal for any kind pain is usually move Qi & Blood. From a TCM
perspective then, if you have Fibromyalgia or some other such condition characterized by
'mystery' pain, it would be a good idea to look at your Anger.

The Heart/Joy
The heart houses the Mind in Chinese Medicine. The brain is considered an extraordinary Fu
organ, that is an empty sac, which is a characteristic of Fu organs. The Brain is seen as a
place to store and process raw data.
It is in the Heart that a persons essence and personality is kept.
This is why, in Chinese Medicine, many mental problems are seen as disharmonies of the
Heart.
From a TCM perspective, then, there is a medical basis for the observation that lack of Joy or
Love in a persons life ultimately makes them crazy.
When you speak from the Heart, you speak from Joy and the world is truly a brighter place.
Physical Symptoms of a Heart disharmony include;
Shortness of breath
Sweating (in the absence of disease)
Pallor or pale complexion
Tiredness/listlessness
Stuffiness in the chest
Palpitations or irregular heart beat
Dizziness
Restlessness/agitation
Anxiety/confusion
17

Dream disturbed sleep


Insomnia
Poor memory
Propensity to be startled
Feelings of uneasiness
Muttering to ones self
Mania

The Kidneys/Fear
The Kidney system is often seen in combination with dysfunctions of other organ systems. In
TCM the Kidneys have the unique function of housing ones corporeal essence or life force. One
is born with YUAN QI, also called Primary Qi or Congenital Qi. According to the theory one is
born with only so much Yuan Qi, which can never be added to, but which can be topped up by
Jing or Nutrient Qi from the Spleen.
Yuan Qi, may also be seen as the motive force of the Corporeal Soul which animates the body.
When ones Yuan Qi is all gone the body dies and the Corporeal soul dies with it releasing the
Ethereal Soul.
Physical manifestations of weak Yuan Qi are birth defects, problems with birth, weak
constitution, and susceptibility to childhood illness.
Strong healthy babies are said to have strong Yuan Qi.
Whether one has strong or weak Yuan Qi will affect one throughout life. Weak Yuan Qi, or
essence, may lead to complications or illness later in life, premature aging, or death at a
relatively young age.
A mans essence is manifest in his semen. The sexual organs are seen as part of the Kidney organ
system. Overindulgence in sex or masturbatory ejaculation are a couple of ways that Kidney
essence may be depleted.
A womans essence is manifest in her menstrual blood and giving birth. Excessive menstrual
flow, difficult pregnancies, and too many pregnancies will deplete a womans essence.
Excessive fear over a period of time will also deplete Kidney essence.
A severe fright or a particularly intense ejaculatory orgasm in a man, will deplete the Kidneys
essence almost instantaneously.
Physical symptoms of Kidney Disharmony include;

18

Weak or sore lower back.


Weak or sore knees.
Urinary dysfunction.
Darkness under the eyes.
Irregular or problematic menstrual
flow.
Weak ejaculation.
Seminal emission.

Accupuncture
1.There are altogether, in the classic
texts, 12 main channels and 8
extraordinary channels, 2 of which
have points of their own, (the Ren
and the Du), in the human body
containing 365 mapped Acupoints.
Additionally, there some 70 Extra
Points not associated with any
channel. It is well beyond the scope
of this site to provide detailed
information about all these points.
However, there are several well used
and important points of interest to
the Acupuncture student.
The channels & points of interest
illustrated on this model are;
The Ren
Extra.
Channel

The Lung
Channel

The Spleen
Channel

The Du
Extra.
Channel

The Liver
Channel

Front Mu
Points

Qihai
(RN 6)

Zhongfu
(LU 1)

Taibai
(SP 3)

Renzhong
(DU 26)

Taichong
(LR 3)

Zhongfu
(LU1)

Zhongwan
(RN 12)

Chize
(LU5)

Gongshun (SP
4)

Zhangmen
(Liv 13)

Tianshu
(ST 25)

Juque
(RN 14)

Lieque
(LU 7)

Daheng
(SP 15)

Qimen
(Liv 14)

Zhongwan
(RN 12)

19

Shanzhong
(RN 17)

Taiyuan
(LU 9)

Sanyinjiao (SP
6)

Zhangmen
(Liv 13)

Shimen
(RN5)

Juque
(RN 14)

Guanyuan
(RN4)
Zhongji
(RN3)

Yinlingquan
(SP 9)

Tiantu
(RN 22)

Xuehai
(SP 10)

Locate the point on the model and click on the specified dot.

2.There are altogether, in the classic texts, 12 main channels and 2 extraordinary channels in the
human body containing 365 mapped Acupoints. Additionally, there some 70 Extra Points not
associated with any channel. It is well beyond the scope of this site to provide detailed
information about all these points. However, there are several well used and important points of
interest.
The Channels and points of interest on this model are;
The Du Extraordinary
Channel

The Urinary
Bladder Channel

The Small
Intestine Channel

Mingmen (DU 4)

Dazhu (BL 11)

Houxi (SI 3)

Dazhui (DU 14)

Fengmen (BL12)
Back Shu Points
(BL 13, BL 14, BL
15,
BL 18, BL 19, BL 20,

Baihui (DU 20)


BL 21, BL 22, BL 23,
BL 25, BL 27, BL
28)
Geshu (BL 17)
Weizhong (BL 40)

20

The San Jiao


Channel
Weiguan (SJ 5)

Chengshan (BL 57)


Kunlun (BL 60)
Zhiyin (BL 67)

Locate the point on the model and click on the specified dot.

3.There are altogether, in the classic texts, 12 main channels and 8 extraordinary channels 2 of
which(the Ren and the Du) have points of their own, in the human body containing 365 mapped
Acupoints. Additionally, there some 70 Extra Points not associated with any channel. It is well
beyond the scope of this site to provide detailed information about all these points. However,
there are several well used and important points of interest to the Acupuncture student.
The Channels and Points of interest illustrated on this model are;
Large
Intestine

Stomach

Pericardiu

21

Heart

Kidney

Gallbladder

Channel

Channel

m Channel

Channel Channel

Hegu
(LI4)

Rugen
(ST 18)

Tianchi
(P1)

Tongli
(HT 5)

Yongquan
(KI 1)

Quchi
(LI 11)

Liangmen
(ST 21)

Neiguan
(P6)

Shenmen

Taixi
(KI 3)

Jianjing
(GB 21)
Riyue
(GB 24)

(HT 7)
Jianyu
(LI 15)

Channel

Tianshu
(ST 25)

Daling
(P7)

Zhaohai
(KI 6)

Jingmen
(GB 25)

Zusanli
(ST 36)

Laogong
(P8)

Fuliu
(KI 7)

Huantiao
(GB 30)

Fenglong
(St 40)

Zhongchon
g
(P9)

Neiting
(St 44)

Yanglingquan
(GB 34)

Xuanzhong
(GB 39)

Locate the point on the


model and click on the
specified dot.

22

4. There are altogether, in the classic texts, 12 main channels and 8 extraordinary channels, 2 of
which have points of their own, (the Ren and the Du), in the human body containing 365 mapped
Acupoints. Additionally, there some 70 Extra Points not associated with any channel. It is well
beyond the scope of this site to provide detailed information about all these points. However,
there are several well used and important points of interest to the Acupuncture student.

23

The Channels and points of interest illustrated on this model are;

Mu
points
Mu points are similar to Shu points of the back, in that they are points where the Qi of specific
organs gathers and collects on the front of the body. There are 12 Mu points located on the front
of the body, one for each of the Zang Fu organs. The front of the body is considered the Yin
aspect (soft and vulnerable) , whilst Shu points are located on the back or Yang aspect (hard and
protective). It could generally be stated then, that all organ difficulties could be treated by
24

choosing either a Mu point or a Shu point (or a combination of the two). Very often in fact,
treatment protocols alternate front and back points.
Interestingly, while Shu points are all located on the same channel, the Urinary Bladder Channel,
Mu points are located on different channels, only three of which are the corresponding channel to
the organ.
Mu points, like Shu points have the action of balancing the function of its related organ. This
means they are indicated, generally speaking, for all disharmonies whether acute or chronic,
excess or deficiency.
The 12 Mu points are;
Lung - Zhongfu (Lung 1) - indicated for all disharmonies of the Lung.
Large Intestine - Tianshu (Stomach 25) - indicated for all disharmonies of the Large Intestine and
point of choice for Diarrhea.
Stomach - Zhongwan (Ren 12) - indicated for all disharmonies of the stomach and one of the
main points to treat collape of Yang (loss of consciousness). As the Hui-meeting point of the Fu
organs has a strong effect on harmonizing all these organs.
Spleen - Zhangmen (Liver 13) - indicated for all disharmonies of the Spleen and especially
useful for harmonizing the Spleen and Liver. A the Hui-Meeting point of the Zang organs, has a
pronounced effect on harmonizing all these organs.
Heart - Juque (Ren 14) - Indicated for disharmonies of the Heart organ.
Small Intestine - Guanyuan (Ren 4) - indicated for disharmonies of the Small Intestine and
especially useful for fortifying the Kidneys and strengthening Yuan Qi.
Urinary Bladder - Zhongji - (Ren 3) - indicated for all disharmonies of the Urinary Bladder.
Kidney - Jingmen (Gallbladder 25) - indicated specifically for harmonizing Qi in the body,
specifically, Yuan or original Qi housed in the kidneys, and Jing or nutrient Qi produced in the
Spleen.
Pericardium - Shanzhong (Ren 17) - indicated for disharmonies of the Pericardium, unbinds the
chest, and as the Hui-Meeting Point of Qi, indicated for pain and discomfort due to stagnation of
Qi in the whole body.
Sanjiao - Shimen (Ren 5) - indicated for all disharmonies of water passage in the body.
Gallbladder - Riyue (Gallbladder 24) - indicated for disharmonies of the Gallbladder.
Liver - Qimen (Liver 14) - indicated for disharmonies of the Liver.
25

~Zhongfu - Lung 1~
"Middle Palace "
Location
Lateral and slightly superior to the Sternum at the lateral side of the first intercostal space, 6 cun
lateral to the Ren Meridian.
Needling
obliquely 0.5 - 0.8 inches towards the lateral (outside) of the chest.
Note; never needle deeply inwards as there is a possibility of puncturing the Lung.
Moxa is OK
Actions
Loosens and descends Lung Qi., clears heat, transforms phlegm, Regulates water passages
Indications
cough, Asthma, pain in the chest, shoulder, upper back, fullness of chest
Commentary:
Zhongfu is the Front Mu point of the Lung. A Front Mu point is where the Qi of a particular
organ gathers and concentrates. Activating a Mu point will have a direct affect on the Organ
itself. While the Lung channel runs from this location to the end of the thumb, it actually has its
genisis in the Middle Jiao (Stomach area) and runs down into the Large Intestine, (Lower Jiao),
before proceeding up to its first point and on down the arm. This is why points on the Lung
channel can be used to treat some Stomach problems. As well, the main function of the three
Jiaos (upper, middle and lower) is to regulate water passage in the body, you will find some
points indicated for regulating water passage.

26

~ Tianshu - Stomach 25 ~
" Heaven's Pivot "
Location
on the abdomen 2 cun lateral to the umbilicus. A cun is the distance between the 2nd & 3rd
knuckles, or the distance at the widest part of the thumb.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 1.0 to 1.5 inch. Also oblique insertion toward the Uterus for problems in
the Uterus.
Moxa is OK
Actions
Regulates the intestines
Regulates the stomach/spleen
Resolves dampness and damp/heat
27

Regulates Qi and blood


Eliminates stagnation
Indications
abdominal pain/distension, borborygmus, pain around the umbilicus, constipation, diarrhea,
irregular menstruation, edema.
Commentary:
Tianshu is the Front Mu point of the Large Intestines. A Mu point is where the Qi of a particular
organ gathers and collects. That the Stomach and Intestines have a particularly close relationship
is indicated by the fact the Front Mu point of the Large Intestines is located on the Stomach
channel.
Its name 'Heaven's Pivot' reflects the idea that the area above is ruled by Heavenly or Celestial
Qi, the area below is ruled by Earthly Qi, and where these two intersect is the origin of Human
Qi: namely the Umbilicus. See Shenque.
The Taoist idea is that a human is the bridge between Heaven and Earth, and the centre of a
human is 'the source of 10,000 things.'
Because of its central position, its effect extends upward to the Stomach/Spleen and downward to
the Lower Abdomen, especially in conditions arising from Dampness.
This is the point of choice for the widest spectrum of intestinal disorders. Most specifically it is
indicated for the treatment of diarrhea. While Tianshu is also indicated for constipation, its
companion point Daheng (Spleen 15) located 2 cun more laterally, is considered more effective.
As well, because of its damp clearing effect, Tianshu is indicated for edema, swelling of the face,
and painful urination.

28

~ Zhongji - Ren 3 ~
" Middle Pole "
Location
on the midline of the lower abdomen, 4 cun below the umbilicus and 1 cun above the pubic
symphesis. The distance between the umbilicus and the pubic symphesis is 5 cun. Divide the
distance into 5 equal parts and count upwards or downwards.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch

29

caution; deep insertion may penetrate a full bladder. One should always empty the bladder before
treatment.
moxa is OK
Actions
Benefits the bladder
Regulates Qi transformation and drains damp-heat
Drains dampness
Treats leucorrhoea
Benefits the uterus and regulates menstruation
Dispels stagnation and benefits the lower jiao
Fortifies the kidneys
Signs and Symptoms
enuresis, nocturnal emission, impotence, hernia, uterine bleeding, irregular menstruation,
dysmenorrhea, morbid leucorrhoea, frequency of urination, retention of urine, pain in the lower
abdomen, uterine prolapse, vaginitis,
Commentary
In its capacity as the front Mu point of the Bladder, Zhongji is the point of choice for virtually
any urinary disorder.
Its action extends to the lower abdomen as a whole and may be used for most kinds of excess
conditions, not only in the bladder but also the Uterus, and genitals, especially those involving
dampness like itching, swelling, leucorrhoea, and seminal emission.
As Zhongji is a meeting point of the Ren, Spleen, Liver and Kidney channels it has an important
application in regulating the uterus and menstruation. Its primary use is to treat irregular or
absent menstruation, infertility, and to help expel the placenta after childbirth.
Finally, Zhongji is useful in the treatment of panic attacks known as Running Piglet Qi in TCM.
This is a condition in which chaotic Qi arises in the abdomen and rushes to the throat with such
ferocity as to cause breathlessness and a feeling one is about to die.

30

~ Guanyuan - Ren 4 ~
" Gate of Origin "
Location
on the midline of the lower abdomen, 3 cun below the umbilicus, and 2 cun above the pubic
symphesis. The distance between the umbilicus and the pubic symphesis is 5 cun. To find this
point divide the distance into 5 equal parts and count upwards or downwards.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Deep insertion may puncture a full bladder. Empty
bladder before treatment.
31

moxa is OK
Actions
Fortifies original (Yuan) Qi and benefits essence
Tonifies the Kidneys
Warms and fortifies the Spleen
Benefits the uterus
Regulates the lower jiao
Benefits the bladder
Regulates small intestine Qi
Restores collapse
Signs and Symptoms
enuresis, nocturnal emission, frequency of urination, retention of urine, hernia, irregular
menstruation, morbid leucorrhoea , dysmenorrhea, uterine bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage,
lower abdominal pain, indigestion, diarrhea, rectum prolapse,
Commentary
Guanyuan is the front Mu point of the Small Intestine. A Mu point is where the Qi of a particular
organ gathers and collects. The action of a Mu point is specific to the organ rather than the
channel.
Guanyuan is also a meeting point on the Ren channel with the Spleen, Liver and Kidney
channels.
According to the classics, the area below the navel is referred to as the Lower Dantian. This is an
area that runs from Guanyuan (ren4) to Qihai (ren6).
The Lower Dantian is where the energies of the body run the deepest and is the source of Yuan
or original Qi. The lower Dantian connects one with the earth and the deepest Yin energies. In Qi
Gong practice it is necessary to master the Lower Dantian (usually taking 20 - 40 years), before
moving on to higher levels.
Guanyuan, then is a most powerful point for fortifying original or Yuan Qi, strengthening mainly
the Yin, but also the Yang of the Kidneys (where original Qi is stored), and for strengthening the
Qi of the whole body.
Guanyuan is indicated for virtually all Kidney disorders.
According to TCM diagnosis, long-standing emotional disharmony is a primary cause of disease
in the body. The emotion of the Kidneys is fear (chronic)/fright (acute). Thus Guanyuan is
strongly indicated for phobias and panic attacks which are seen to be signs of weakened Kidneys.

32

Because of its strong action of tonifying the Kidneys and promoting original Qi, Guanyuan is a
point of choice for treating infertility in both men and women.
Finally, in Qi Gong practice, it is actually Qihai (ren6) that is usually seen as the precise location
of the Lower Dantian. While both Qihai (ren6) and Guanyuan strengthen both Yin and Yang,
Qihai's emphasis is on the Yang, while Guanyuan's emphasis is on the Yin. Classically, Qi Gong
practitioners were men so Qihai (ren6) seems like the logical place to locate the Dantian. Female
practitioners, though may wish to consider Guanyuan (ren4) as a reasonable alternative to work
on. In any case, as mentioned Qi Gong practice requires mastery of the whole area.

~ Shimen - Ren 5 ~
" Stone Gate "
Location
33

on the midline of the lower abdomen, 2 cun below the umbilicus and 3 cun above the pubic
symphesis. The distance between the umbilicus and the pubic symphesis is 5 cun. Divide the
distance into 5 equal parts and count up or down.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.8 to 1.0 inch.
caution; deep needling may puncture the peritoneum.
needling is contraindicated during pregnancy.
moxa is OK. Moxa is contraindicated during pregnancy.
Actions
Moves and benefits water passages
Regulates Qi and alleviates pain
Regulates the uterus
Signs and Symptoms
abdominal pain, diarrhea, edema, hernia, anuria, enuresis, amenorrhea, morbid leucorrhoea,
uterine bleeding, post partum hemorrhage
Commentary
Shimen is the Front Mu point of the San Jiao. A Mu point is where the Qi of a particular organ
gathers and collects. The San Jiao is unique in that it is not actually an organ, but refers to the
function of being responsible for water passage through the body. The Upper Jiao refers to the
upper part of the body (Heart & Lungs), the Middle Jiao refers to the upper abdomen (Stomach,
Liver, Spleen), and the Lower Jiao refers to the lower abdomen below the umbilicus (Kidney and
Bladder).
Shimen is indicated for all disorders of the Lower abdomen and extremities, involving water,
including difficult urination, painful urination, edema, diarrhea, dysentery.
Shimen is also effective at treating twisting pain in the lower abdomen, hernia, and swelling/pain
in the genitals, uterine bleeding, abdominal masses and leucorrhoea.
While modern texts make no mention, ancient texts cautioned that needling this point could
induce infertility.

34

~ Qihai Ren 6 ~
" Sea of Qi "
Location
on the midline of the lower abdomen, 1.5 cun below the umbilicus, and 3.5 cun above the pubic
symphesis (pubic bone). (A cun is the distance between the 2nd and 3rd knuckles or the distance
at the widest part of the thumb).
Needling
perpendicular insertion aprox 1.0 inch. Use caution when needling extremely thin patients.
Moxa is OK
35

Actions
Tonifies Qi
Promotes Yuan or Original Qi
Tonifies the Kidneys
Fortifies Yang
Regulates Qi and harmonizes the blood
Indications
abdominal pain, bed wetting, nocturnal emissions, impotence, hernia, edema, diarrhea, dysentery,
uterine bleeding, irregular menstruation, painful menstruation, morbid leucorrhoea, post partem
hemorrhage, constipation, asthma.
Commentary:
The main action of Qihai is to strongly fortify Yuan or Original Qi, which is stored in the
Kidneys. In TCM theory, the Kidneys are considered to be the origin of all the Qi in the body and
sometimes called the 'Mother of all the organs.'
Because of its action of strongly fortifying Qi, Qihai is recommended for all disharmonies
involving Qi deficiency no matter where they occur in the body.
In fact, so strong is its effect, that sudden collapse into unconsciousness can be treated effectively
by strongly stimulating this point either by needling or with Moxa when extreme cold is
involved.
It has a particular effect on disorders of the lower intestinal tract including gynecological
disorders, impotence, urinary disorders and sexual disorders.
Qihai is known as the Lower Dantian in Qi Gong and martial arts practices. The vital energies of
the body are generated and stored here. Qi Gong literally means 'Qi practice' and mastery of this
point on the small heavenly circle is a necessary pre-requisite to continuing one's journey.
One of the principal practices is learning how to 'breath' through this point.
Qihai connects one with earthly energies which serve to anchor the student to the earth, so that
one can begin the journey to Heaven without fear of floating away. At the same time one is
connected with the world of Spirit as well as one's ancestors, as Yuan Qi is also called preheavenly Qi; that is the Qi that is brought through with us into this world. Each of us has a set
amount of Yuan Qi, the result of the contributions of Mother and Father, which cannot be added
to, but which depletes over one's life. When Yuan Qi is all used up, death of the body occurs.
This is why Kidney disharmonies are always a deficiency and never an excess.

36

Interestingly, there are some Qi Gong practices that apparently can add to one's store of Yuan Qi
thus extending one's life.

~Juque - Ren 14 ~
" Great Gateway "

Location
on the midline of the abdomen 6 cun above the umbilicus and 2 cun below the sternocostal angle.
(a cun is the distance between the 2nd and third knuckles or the lateral distance of the widest part
of the thumb).
37

Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch or obliquely downward 1.0 to 1.5 inch.
Caution: deep insertion in thin patients may the Liver of Heart if either is enlarged.
oblique insertion upward is contraindicated in all cases.
Moxa is OK
Actions
Regulates the heart and alleviates pain
Descends Lung Qi and unbinds the chest
Transforms phlegm and calms the spirit
Harmonizes the stomach and descends rebellious Qi
Indications
pain in the chest esp. the cardiac region, nausea, acid regurgitation, difficulty in swallowing,
vomiting, mental disorders, epilepsy, palpitations.
Commentary:
Juque is the Front Mu point of the Heart. A Mu point is where the Qi of a particular organ gathers
and collects and provides a direct line to the particular organ.
According the TCM theory, the Heart is the residence of the Spirit so this point is indicated for
most mental disorders. Physical disorders are usually treated via the Pericardium channel, but if
there are attendant emotional or mental symptoms then the Heart Channel should also be
accessed.
There are a number of aetiologies that can affect the Heart, Juque is the point of choice in most
cases. Poor memory, disorientation, loss of consciousness or epilepsy with vomiting foam, arises
out of phlegm along 'misting the heart.' When phlegm combines with heat, mania disorders such
as ranting & raving, anger & fury, cursing and scolding may arise. Deficient Heart blood or
stagnant heart blood may give rise to agitation of the spirit, anxiety, nervousness, palpitations,
and agitation in the pit of the stomach.
The Ren Channel (also called the Conception Vessel) has a strong downward pull on Qi. Since
Juque is located midway between the Lungs and Stomach it has a strong action on both of
descending Qi.

38

~ Tiantu - Ren 22 ~
" Heavenly Prominence "

Location
on the midline, in the centre of the suprasternal fossa, 0.5 cun above the suprasternal notch. A
cun is the distance between the 2nd and 3rd knuckle, or the distance at the widest part of the
thumb.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.3 inch or along the inside border of the manubrium of the sternum, 0.5
to 1.0 inch.

39

note; for the second method, puncture perpendicularly 0.3 inch, then bend the needle so that it is
pointed straight downward along the inside border of the manubrium and continue insertion.
moxa is OK
Actions
Descends rebellious Qi and calms cough and wheezing
Benefits the throat and voice
Signs and Symptoms
asthma, cough, sore throat, dry throat, hiccup, sudden hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, goitre.
Commentary
Tiantu has a strong action descending Qi, and is therefore indicated for disorders of the throat
and Lungs where Qi is rebelling upwards. It is mainly used in conditions of excess manifesting
in cough, asthma, inability to breathe, and Lung abscess with bloody pus. It is specifically
indicated for obstruction of Qi where there is Heart pain.
Tiantu may be used with virtually any throat disorder.
The most common application of Tiantu is to treat wheezing and asthma.

~Chize - Lung 5~
"Cubit Marsh "
40

Location
On the Cubital Crease (elbow), on the radial (outside) side of the tendon of muscle biceps
bracchi. Locate this point with the elbow slightly flexed.
Needling
perpendicular, 0.5 - 1.0 inch
Moxa is not recommended since this point's main action is to clear heat.
Actions
Clears heat from the Lungs
Descends rebellious Qi
Regulates water passages
Activate the channel
Relaxes muscles and alleviates pain in the local area
Indications
cough, coughing phlegm, asthma, wheezing, shortness of breath, fullness of the chest, problems
with tongue and throat due to heat, spirring blood, coughing blood, sneezing, vomiting,
nosebleed,
Commentary:
The main function of Chize is to clear heat, whether excess or deficiency from the Lungs, and to
descend rebellious Qi. Lung Qi has a natural tendency to descend into the body. When Qi goes
counter to its natural tendency (ie cough) this is called 'Rebellious Qi.'
Chize is He-Sea point of the Lung Channel.

41

~ Lieque - Lung 7 ~
" Broken Sequence "

Location
on the radial aspect of the forearm (inner surface), aprox. 1 1/2 " proximal to the styloid process
of the radius, in the cleft between the tendons of brachiorradialis and abductor pollicis longus.
Needling
with one hand pinch the skin up and needle with the other needle under the skin in either
direction.
moxa is OK

42

Actions
Releases the exterior
Expels wind
Promotes proper function of the Lung
Pacifies internal wind
Dispels phlegm
Benefits the Head and Neck
Regulates the Ren Channel
Regulates water passage
Alleviates pain along the channel
Signs and Symptoms
headache, migraine, neck rigidity, cough, asthma, sore throat, facial paralysis, toothache, pain
and weakness of the wrist.
Commentary
Lieque is the Luo Connecting point of the Lung Channel. A Luo Connecting point is a secondary
channel that connects each organ with its opposite counterpart. For example Lieque connects the
Lungs (a Zang/Yin organ) with the Large Intestine (a Fu/Yang) organ. These connections are
very important in the understanding of the flow of Qi in the body.
The Lung is paired with the Large Intestines.
The Pericardium is paired with the San Jiao
The Heart is paired with the Small Intestine
The Spleen is paired with the Stomach
The Liver is paired with the Gallbladder
The Kidneys are paired with the Urinary Bladder.
It is this connection that allows Lieque to be a point of choice for one-sided headache even
though the Lung channel ascends no higher than the throat. The Large Intestine channel, which
does, is well known for its strong effect on the face and head.
Lieque is included in the grouping of Acupuncture points known as the 12 Heavenly Star Points.
These are a grouping of points presented by physician Ma Dan-Yang as the most important
points of all.

43

Lieque may well be the most frequently used point on the Lung channel. With its connections to
both the Large Intestine and Ren Channels it is indicated for conditions not only on its own
channel but along these two channels as well.
Specifically, Lieque is recommended for one-sided headache and pain in the nape of the neck, as
well as phlegm in the upper body, lockjaw and numbness of the whole body.
Lieque has a strong effect fortifying the exterior and is an important point for fending off
invasion of Wind (colds, flu and other such ambient infections), as well as for treating the early
symptoms. It is especially useful for clearing phlegm from the Lungs in the early stages.
Lieque is the Confluent Point of the Ren Extraordinary Channel. A Confluent Point is a point on
one of the 12 regular channels that opens one of the extraordinary channels. In this case it is the
Ren Channel. Lieque opens and regulates the flow of Qi within the Ren channel. This association
with the Ren Channel means that Lieque is able to treat problems of the genitals including
retention of the foetus and genital pain as well as various urinary difficulties.
Lieque is also indicated for a number of psycho-emotional disorders and is specifically indicated
for poor memory.
Finally, Lieque is frequently used for local pain of the thumb and forefinger.

44

~ Taiyuan - Lung 9 ~
" Supreme Abyss "
Location
at the wrist joint, in the depression between the radial artery and the tendon of abductor pollicis
longus, level with Shenmen (H7).
Needling
45

perpendicular insertion 0.3 - 0.5 inch


moxa is OK
Actions
Tonifies the Lungs
Transforms phlegm
Promotes the descending function of the Lungs
Harmonizes the vessels
Activates the channel and alleviates pain
Signs and Symptoms
cough, asthma, sore throat, palpitations, pain in the chest, pain in the wrist and/or arm.
Commentary
Taiyuan is the Yuan Source point of the Lung Channel. A Yuan Source point is where Yuan or
Source Qi gathers and collects. Yuan Qi, is the basic amount of Qi we are born with and depletes
over the course of a life. It is also known as pre-heavenly Qi.
Since Taiyuan accesses Source Qi, it is the most effective point on the channel for tonifying the
Lungs. It is recommended then, for deficiency conditions characterized by chronic weak cough
or wheezing, shortness of breath, much yawning, heat in the palms of the hands spitting blood
and the presence of phlegm and pain or discomfort in the chest.
According to ancient texts, Qi is the commander of Blood. Since the lungs are the primary organ
for gathering Qi through breath and descending it into the body, the relative health of the Lungs
will have an impact on the rest of the body through its function of energizing the blood with the
Qi of breath.
Taiyuan is the Hui-Meeting Point of the vessels (arteries, veins, capilleries etc.). A Hui-Meeting
Point is where the Qi of specific body structures gathers and collects. In this case, the vessels.
The vessels are the blood's pathways to carry Qi throughout the body. Taiyuan is recommended
for poor circulation and any disorder of the blood vessels including vomiting blood or coughing
blood.
Taiyuan then is a primary point to promote proper circulation of blood in the body, both as the
promoter of Qi (both Original Qi and Nutrient Qi from breath) and as the Hui-Meeting point of
the Blood vessels.

46

~Taibai - Spleen 3 ~
" Supreme White "

Location

47

proximal and inferior to the head of the first metatarsal bone, at the junction of the red and white
skin.
note; in the depression located by sliding the fingertip over the side of the ball of the foot
towards the heel.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch
Moxa is OK
Actions
Tonifies the Spleen and resolves dampness and damp-heat
Harmonizes the Spleen and Stomach
Regulates Qi
Indications
gastric pain, abdominal distention, constipation, dysentery, vomiting, diarrhea, borborygmus,
sluggishness.
Commentary:
Taibai is the Yuan Source point of the Spleen channel. Each channel has a Yuan Source point. A
Yuan Source point is said to be the point on a channel where Yuan (or Source) Qi comes to the
surface. Yuan Qi or Source Qi, is also called Pre-Heavenly Qi, as it is the Qi we are born with
and is said to reside in the Kidneys.
Yuan Source points generally are considered to have a strong effect on the particular organ.
Taibai is no exception. It is recommended for deficiency of both the Stomach and the Spleen.
Since the Spleen is the organ mainly responsible for transforming water and food into Qi and
transporting this Qi to the rest of the body, Spleen deficiency will have an effect on all the organs
and the body as a whole, most often manifesting as fatigue or sluggishness.
Deficiency in the Spleen often leads to dampness or damp-heat so it is also good for these
conditions. Dampness arising out of Spleen deficiency may manifest as diarrhea, borborygmus,
undigested food in the stool, heaviness of the body, sluggishness of the four limbs.
Taibai is also good for conditions along the channel, including abdominal distention, pain in the
abdomen, epigastrium, and even into the costal and cardiac regions.

48

Taibai is also indicated for disorders along the length of the leg right down to the big toe,
especially when dampness and/or Spleen deficiency is involved. When dampness is involved it is
manifested as insensitivity and flesh atrophy.

~ Gongshun - Spleen 4 ~
" Grandfather Grandson "

Location
on the medial side of the foot, in the depression distal and inferior to the base of the 1st
metatarsal bone.
note; first locate Taibai (Sp3), then slide the finger proximally along the shaft of the 1st
metatarsal until it reaches the depression at the base of the bone.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch
Moxa is OK
Actions
Fortifies the spleen and harmonizes the middle jiao
Regulates Qi and resolves dampness
49

Calms the spirit


Benefits the heart and chest
Regulates the chong channel (also called the penetrating vessel)
Indications
gastric pain, vomiting, abdominal pain, abdominal distention, diarrhea, borborygmus, blood in
the stool, mania-depression, manic raving, insomnia, restlessness, much sighing, irregular
menstruation, gynecological disorders, placenta retention, swelling of the head and face, edema,
foot pain, heat in the soles of the feet.
Commentary:
Gongshun is the Luo-Connecting point of the Spleen channel, connecting the Spleen with its
related organ the Stomach. Together the Spleen and Stomach comprise the middle jiao and
together provide nourishment for the whole body; the Stomach in its function of 'rotting and
ripening' food and drink, and the Spleen in its function of transforming food and drink into Qi
and transporting Qi to the rest of the body.
The principal action of Gongshun is, not surprisingly, then, the harmonizing of the middle jiao.
As well, it is used to fortify the spleen, regulate Qi in the channel, and transform dampness.

~ Daheng - Spleen 15 ~
" Great Horizontal "
50

Location
on the abdomen, in a depression, 4 cun lateral to the umbilicus. a cun is the distance between the
2nd and 3rd knuckles or the distance at the widest part of the thumb
note; at 4 cun is the lateral border of the rectus abdominus muscle.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch.
note; avoid insertion into the muscle.
caution; in very thin patients deep needling may penetrate the peritoneal cavity or an enlarge
liver or spleen
Moxa is OK
Actions
Moves Qi and regulates the intestines.
Signs and Symptoms
abdominal pain and distention, diarrhea, constipation. sadness, sighing, weeping, weakness of
the four limbs.
Commentary:
Daheng has a strong effect on the Large Intestine and has much in common in this respect with
its companion point Tianshu (Stomach 25) While it is indicated for both diarrhea and
constipation, in clinical practice it is more favoured as point of choice for constipation, while
Tianshu is favoured for diarrhea.
As well, Daheng is indicated for sadness, weeping and sighing. While there is no theoretical
basis why this point should have this action, it does.

51

~ Renzhong - Du 26 ~
" Man's Middle "

Location
on the philtrum (the groove on the midline between upper border of the upper lip and the lower
border of the nose), two thirds the way above the upper lip.
Needling
upward insertion .3 to .5 inches.
*note. this point is often pressed upon with force with thumb or forefinger to restore
consciousness.

52

moxa is forbidden
Actions
Restores consciousness
Calms the spirit
Benefits face and nose
Benefits spine and lumbar
Signs and Symptoms
sudden loss of consciousness, fainting, mental disorders, epilepsy, hysteria, coma, deviation of
mouth and eyes, puffiness of the face, pain and stiffness in lower back.
Commentary
Renzhong, also known as Shuigou, is the main meeting point of the Du Extraordinary Channel
which governs all the Yang channels in the body and the Ren Extraordinary Channel which
governs all the Yin channels in the body. Renzhong is the classic meeting point of Heaven and
Earth. As its name implies, Renzhong is 'man in the middle', reflecting the ancient idea that man
is the bridge between Heaven and Earth.
In meditation, placing one's tongue on the roof of the mouth, closes the connection between the
Du and Ren Channels and by implication, between Heaven and Earth.
Loss of consciousness results from the separation of Yin and Yang in the body. Renzhong is the
single most important point for restoring consciousness. It may be needled vigorously, or more
commonly, one presses forcefully with thumb or forefinger.
Renzhong has an equally strong effect 'calming the mind', and is effective at treating a variety of
psycho-emotional disorders, including mania, mad laughing, and epilepsy.
As well it is indicated for various disorders of the nose and face.
As it is close to the very end of the Du Channel, following the principal of choosing points at one
end of a channel to treat disorders at the other end, Renzhong is strongly indicated for Lumbar
sprain, especially when the pain is acute and located on the spine. The point is needled while the
patient stands and rotates back and forth from the waist.

53

~ Taichong - Liver 3 ~
" Great Rushing "
Location
on the dorsum of the foot, in the hollow at the junction of the first and second metatarsal bones.
note; this point is easily located by running the finger along the space between the big toe and
second toe until it falls into the depression at the junction of the bases of the first and second
metatarsals.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch
moxa is OK
Actions
Spreads liver Qi
Subdues liver yang and extinguishes wind
54

Nourishes liver blood and liver yin


Clears the head and eyes
Regulates menstruation
Regulates the lower jiao
Signs and Symptoms
headace, dizziness, vertigo, insomnia, congestion, swelling/pain of the eye, depression, infantile
convulsion, deviation of the mouth, pain in the hypochrondiac region, uterine bleeding, hernia,
eneurisis, retention of urine, epilepsy, local foot pain.
Commentary
Taichong is arguably one of the most important Acupuncture points on the body, if not on the
Liver channel because of its ability to treat any kind pain in any location.
Taichong is the 12th Heavenly Star point, being added to Ma Dan-Yang's original 11, during the
Ming dynasty.
Taichong's main action is to promote the free and easy flow of Qi in the body, which is the
function of the Liver itself. When Qi is flowing easily, like a mountain stream, disharmony does
not arise and there is no illness.
Taichong is indicated in all cases of stagnant Qi. Qi stagnation arises in 3 ways;
i) suppression of all emotions, but especially anger
ii) if the Liver itself is not nourished
iii) the presence of a pathogen obstructing the Liver's function.
Given the Liver's function, disharmony here has consequences in every other organ and
throughout the body. Qi can stagnate anywhere and prolonged Qi stagnation leads to Blood
stagnation. In both cases, pain is the symptom. Qi stagnation is indicated by relatively mild, pain
that tends to move around. Blood stagnation is indicated by fixed, stabbing, and severe pain. As
Qi is the engine that moves blood in all cases of pain, mild or severe, Taichong is indicated.
The Liver opens into the eyes so Taichong is indicated for any eye disorder including blurry
vision, spots, redness, swelling, drooping eyelids, any kind of pain in the eyes, and any kind of
unusual movement of the eyelids.
The Liver channel connects with the Du extraordinary channel at Baihui (Du 20), the topmost
point on the body and in this manner Taichong is indicated for headache, especially at the vertex
and dizziness.
Another function of the Liver is to store blood, acting as a reservoir to maintain proper levels of
blood in the vessels. In this way, the Liver is closely related to the menstrual cycle. As well, the
Liver channel connects with the Ren channel at three points on the lower abdomen which

55

reinforces this connection to the menstrual cycle. Any disharmony in the Liver, then, will give
rise to menstrual disorders and pain.
Failure of Qi to flow freely may cause constipation, difficult defecation, or alternating diarrhea
and constipation. Taichong is specifically indicated for this latter condition.
Finally, Taichong is paired with Hegu (Li4) in a combination known classically as 'The Four
Gates'. The Four Gates are indicated for any painful obstruction anywhere in the body and
especially useful for such modern conditions as Fibromyalgia.

~ Zhangmen - Liver 13 ~
" Completion Gate "
Location
directly behind and below the free end of the eleventh rib
Needling
56

sideways insetion along the line of the rib, either way, .5 to 1.0 inch.
*Caution; deep insertion may penetrate an enlarged Liver or Spleen.
moxa is OK
Actions
Harmonizes Liver and Spleen
Regulates Middle and LowerJiao
Fortifies the Spleen
Promotes the free flow of Liver Qi.
Signs and Symptoms
abdominal distention, borborygmus, pain in the hypochondriac region, vomiting, diarrhea,
indigestion,
Commentary
Zhangmen is an important harmonizing point, both to harmonize the Liver and Spleen, and to
harmonize the middle and lower Jiao (stomach and intestines respectively). While located on the
Liver channel it is also the front Mu point of the Spleen. A front Mu point is where the Qi of a
particular organ gathers and collects.
Zhangmen is also the Hui Meeting point of the Zang organs. In TCM there are Yin organs - the
Zang - Heart, Liver, Kidneys, Spleen and Lungs, and there are Yang organs - the Fu - Small
Intestine, Gallbladder, Urinary Bladder, Stomach and Large Intestines. Together the whole
system is known as the Zangfu.
* See also, Zhongwan (ren12), which is the Hui-Meeting point of the Fu organs.
A Hui-Meeting Point is where the Qi of particular structures gathers and collects, similar to Mu
points. In its capacity as both the Front Mu of the Spleen, and the Hui-Meeting point of all the
Zang organs Zhangmen's harmonizing influence is particularly strong.
The Spleen is responsible not only for the transformation of food and water into Qi, but also for
transporting it throughout the whole body. The Liver is responsible for the free flow of Qi in the
body, so there is a very close and intimate relationship between these two organs in this regard.
Many consider a healthy Spleen to be the key to treating all disharmony in the body. Virtually
any disease or condition may be treated by tonifying and strengthening the Spleen which in turn
nourishes the body sufficiently to fight off any kind of pathogen or repair any damaged organ or
tissue.

57

Zhangmen's main action is to harmonize Liver and Spleen. Disharmony is characterized by such
symptoms as propensity to anger, abdominal distention and pain that is relieved by passing a
stool, borborygmus (stomach gurgling), diarrhea, loss of appetite, alternating diarrhea and
constipation.
Zhangmen is also able to fortify the Spleen directly. Signs of Spleen deficiency are weariness of
the limbs, fatigue, emaciation, and undigested food in the stool.
As well, Zhangmen is indicated for Liver deficiency without Spleen involvement, characterized
by such signs as constriction of the esophagus, chest fullness, and pain in the lateral costal
region.
The Liver channel is coupled with the Gallbladder channel which controls the sides of the body,
important in turning and bending. Zhangmen is a meeting point of these two channels and is
indicated for rigidity of the spine, lumbar pain, and difficulty turning and bending.
Finally, Zhangmen is indicated for certain kinds of Panic attacks, known in TCM as 'Running
Piglet Qi.' Running Piglet Qi is a disorder in which the Qi arises in the lower abdomen and
rushes up to the throat with such ferocity that one feels close to death. It attacks then remits.

~ Qimen - Liver 14 ~
" Cycle Gate "
Location
on the mamillary line, in the 6th intercostal space, 4 cun lateral to the midline. A cun is the
distance between the 2nd and 3rd knuckle, or the distance at the widest part of the thumb.
Needling
angular insertion (45 degrees) either towards the midline or away from the midline.
deep perpendicular insertion can puncture the lung (pneumothorax).
moxa is OK
Actions
Disperses and regulates liver Qi
Invigorates the blood and disperses masses
Harmonizes the liver and stomach
58

Signs and Symptoms


hypochondriac pain, abdominal distention, hiccup, acid regurgitation, mastitis, depression,
febrile diseases, manic raving, alternating chills and fever, uterine bleeding, post partum
disorders, malaria, gallstones, diabetes, running piglet qi,
Commentary
Qimen is the last point on the Liver channel, and is indeed the last point on the great cycle that
begins with Zhongfu (lu1), and passes through every point on every channel in the body.
Qimen is the Front Mu point of the Liver, one of only 4 Mu and Shu points that is located on its
own channel. A Mu point is where the Qi of a specific organ gathers and collects. Mu points are
indicated specifically for organ disharmony, rather than channel disharmonies.
The Liver's main responsibility is to promote the free flow of Qi in the body. By far the most
common Liver disharmony is Qi stagnation. If Liver Qi stagnates then Qi will tend to stagnate in
the other organs. Interestingly, retained anger is a prime cause of Liver Qi stagnation. Irritability,
propensity to anger, and frequent or heavy sighing are sure signs Liver Qi is stagnant.
Between them, Qimen (liv14) and Zhangmen (liv13), cover the 3 Jiao. The San Jiao refers to the
action of water passage through the body, rather than to any specific organ. The upper Jiao refers
to Heart/Lungs. The middle Jiao refers to Stomach/Spleen. The lower Jiao refers to the Kidneys,
Intestines, Bladder etc..
Qimen, then, acts mainly on the middle and upper Jiao indicated for such symptoms as pain,
fullness or distention of the lateral costal region (under the rib cage), cough, and sighing.
Qimen is especially recommended for breast pain or tenderness accompanying the menstrual
cycle.
In TCM it is said that Qi moves blood. When Qi moves, blood moves. Prolonged Qi stagnation
will lead to blood stagnation and the development of masses or hardness and stabbing pain in the
chest, abdomen, and elsewhere. Qimen is able to move both Qi and blood and is indicated in any
condition characterized by stabbing muscular pain such as Fibromyalgia, and especially stabbing
pain in the region of the Heart.
According to the classics if one eats while angry the Stomach and Spleen will be injured. This
supports the modern idea that you 'are what you eat.' It was well known to the ancients that
emotional turmoil at meal times wreaked havoc on the digestive system, and hence the whole
body. Qimen is able to harmonize Stomach and Liver and is indicated for gas, distention, acid
reflux, vomiting, hiccup - all signs of Stomach disturbance due to Qi stagnation.
Finally, Qimen is an important point in the treatment of certain kinds of panic attacks, known to
TCM as 'Running Piglet Qi.' In this condition, chaotic Qi arises in the abdomen and rushes to the
throat with such ferocity that one loses one's breath and feels close to death.
59

~ Sanyinjiao - Spleen 6 ~
" Three Yin Intersection "

Location
on the medial lower leg, 3 cun above the prominence of the medial malleolus (ankle bone), in a
depression close to the medial crest of the tibia. A cun is the distance between the 2nd and 3rd
60

knuckles, or the distance at the widest part of the thumb.


note; this point is located 1 handbreadth above the prominence of the medial malleolus.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 1.0 to 1.5 inch.
Caution; contraindicated in pregnancy
Moxa is OK
Actions
Tonifies the spleen and stomach
Resolves dampness
Harmonizes the liver and tonifies the kidneys
Regulates menstruation
Induces labour
Harmonizes the lower jiao (intestines)
Regulates urination
Benefits the genitals
Calms the spirit
Invigorates the blood
Activates the channel and alleviates pain
Signs and Symptoms
abdominal pain, borborygmus, abdominal distention, diarrhea, painful menstruation, irregular
menstruation, uterine bleeding, morbid leucorrhoea, uterine prolapse, sterility, delayed labour,
nocturnal emission, impotence, enuresis (bed wetting), edema, hernia, pain in external genitalia,
muscular atrophy, motor impairment, paralysis of lower extremities, headache, dizziness, vertigo,
insomnia.
Commentary:
Sanyinjiao is one of the pre-eminent acupuncture points. As its name states it is the meeting point
of the three Yin channels of the leg... the Spleen, the Liver and the Kidney channels.
Sanyinjiao is especially useful as a 'balancing' point. That is whatever the disharmony, the action
of Sanyinjiao is to bring things back into balance regardless whether the disharmony is an excess
or a deficiency. This quality, along with its strong effect on all three Yin organs of the leg gives it
an extraordinarily broad range of actions.
While its main action is on the Spleen, it also has a strong effect on both the Liver and the
Kidneys

61

Its main function is to harmonize the Spleen in all its functions. Not only is the Spleen
responsible for the transformation and transportation of Qi in the body, it is also responsible for
'keeping things in their place'... referring to organs in their proper place, blood within arteries and
veins, etc.
Sanyinjiao then is indicated for undigested food in the stool, diarrhea, abdominal distention and
fullness, borborygmus and other such digestive disharmonies.
It is indicated for blood deficiency arising out of Spleen inability to provide adequate Qi to the
body, manifesting as palpitations, blurred vision, painful menstruation, and postpartum dizziness,
It is indicated for conditions arising out of the Spleen's failure to 'hold things in their place', such
as uterine bleeding, hernia, uterine prolapse etc.,
A deficient Spleen makes the body susceptible to dampness, whether accompanied by heat or
cold, manifesting as heaviness of the body, heaviness of the limbs, and especially in the lower
jiao manifesting as diarrhea, leucorrhoea.
The three yin channels of the leg all pass through and the genital area. Sanyinjiao is the distal
point of choice for virtually any disharmony involving any gynecological disorder, menstruation,
conception, leucorrhoea, and the external genitals.
However, because if its ability to induce labour, and expel a dead foetus it is generally
contraindicated during an otherwise healthy pregnancy.
Sanyinjiao is an important point in the treatment of any sexual disorder in both women and men
including pain and contraction, seminal emission, impotence, and excessive sexual drive.
Most urinary disorders including difficult urination, retention of urine, enuresis (bed wetting), &
cloudy urine, can all be treated with Sanyinjiao.
Sanyinjiao's effectiveness is not restricted to the Lower Jiao. It is often indicated for treatment of
insomnia. The Spleen's involvement is explained by the fact that the Spleen is responsible for the
Transformation and Transportation of Qi. Disharmonies arising out of Qi deficiency, or Qi and
Blood deficiency, in other parts of the body can be traced back to the Spleen. An essential part of
the treatment for any disharmony diagnosed as a deficiency of Qi or Qi and Blood, would
include fortifying the Spleen.
Finally, it is an essential assumption of TCM diagnosis that everything is connected to everything
else in the body. At the centre of everything is the Spleen. It is the organ responsible for
producing the 'motive force' of the body, Qi. Sanyinjiao is the single most important point for
balancing the Spleen, not only regarding its ability to do its job, but in its relationships with other
organs.

62

~ Yinlingquan - Spleen 9 ~
" Yin Mound Spring "

Location
on the medial side of the lower leg, in a depression, in the angle formed by the medial condyle of
the tibia, and the posterior border of the tibia.
63

note run the finger in the groove posterior to the medial border of the tibia until it falls in the
depression below the tibial condyle; this point lies at about the same latitude as Yanglingquan
(Gallbladder 34)
Needling
perpendicular insertion 1.0 to 1.5 inch
Moxa is OK
Actions
Regulates the spleen and resolves dampness
Opens and moves the water passages
Benefits the lower jiao
Signs and Symptoms
abdominal pain and distention, diarrhea, dysentery, edema, jaundice, dysuria, enuresis,
incontinence, pain in external genitalia, painful menstruation, pain in the knee
Commentary:
Yinlingquan is the He-Sea point of the Spleen Channel. A He-Sea point, according to 5 Elements
theory is where the Qi plunges deeply into the body. As well, Yinlingquan is the Water point of
the Spleen channel, again according to 5 Elements theory.
Yinlingquan is the point of choice for all conditions, especially in the Lower Jiao involving
dampness. When the Spleen is deficient or diseased, dampness is generated and it is in the Lower
Jiao that it is most likely to occur first.
According to TCM theory the three Jiao (upper, middle, and lower) are primarily responsible for
water passage in the body, and in particular the Lower Jiao as it is here that water leaves thus
ensuring free flow of water. If the organs of the Lower Jiao (Kidney and Urinary Bladder) are
deficient then the water accumulates manifesting as edema,abdominal pain and distention,
seminal emission, genital pain, painful urination etc..
Yinlingquan then, is the point of choice for 'opening the water passages and moving water in the
body.'
The Spleen's main function is transform water (and food) into Qi and transport the Qi to the rest
of the body. If the Spleen fails to do this, then water accumulates, as mentioned, first in the
Lower Jiao.

64

If the condition is not alleviated then water can back up through the jiao obstructing the free flow
of Qi and bile giving rise to Jaundice, fullness below the heart (epigastrium), poor appetite, and
abdominal distention.
Although less important, Yinlingquan can also treat pain and fullness in the chest area if it is due
to dampness.
So potent is the effect of Yinlingquan in treating dampness, that it is used by many practitioners
to treat it, wherever it occurs in the body.
Finally, Yinlingquan is an important local point for pain and swelling of the knee area.

65

~ Xuehai - Spleen 10 ~
" Sea of Blood "

Location
2 cun proximal to the upper border of the patella, in a tender depression on the bulge of the
vastus medialis muscle.
note; this point is located at 2 cun (the height of the patella is 2 cun and can be used as a guide),
at a 45 degree angle from the inside upper corner of the patella.
this point is located 2 cun above the upper border of the patella, directly above Yinlingquan
(Spleen 9).
a cun is the distance between the 2nd and 3rd knuckles, or the distance at the widest part of the
thumb.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 1.0 to 1.5 cun.
Moxa is OK
Actions
Invigorates the blood
Dispels stagnation
Cools the blood
Harmonizes menstruation
Benefits the skin
Signs and Symptoms
irregular menstruation, painful menstruation, uterine bleeding, urticaria, eczema, heat rash,
erysipelas, pain in the inner thigh.
Commentary:
Xuehai, as its name implies is a primary point of choice for many blood disorders. In fact some
authorities recommend it for all disorders of the blood. Just as it is necessary for Qi to circulate
freely in the body, blood must also circulate freely. Diagnostically, Qi is the energetic level.
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When there is disharmony at the Qi level, there are signs and symptoms, but little actual physical
involvement. The blood level is where the disharmony has taken root and descended into the
physical level. There are actual physical manifestations such as skin eruptions. This is the basic
difference between the Qi level of diagnosis and the Blood level of diagnosis. Signs and
symptoms manifest at the Qi level will become more serious. For example, pain at the Qi level
will be relatively mild and tend to move around, while the same pain at the Blood level will
become fixed and stabbing and more difficult to treat.
Xuehai is noted for its dual action, of not only 'moving the blood', which makes it appropriate for
menstrual disorders, but it also 'cools' blood, which makes it appropriate for many skin
conditions diagnosed as 'heat in the blood.' Heat is manifest as various types of skin eruptions,
with lesions that are either red indicating heat alone, or purple indicating stagnation.
Finally, while Xuehai is mainly used to treat gynaecological and dermatological disorders, there
are only a couple of points that treat the blood directly. Xuehai, therefore can be used to move or
cool blood anywhere it occurs in the body. In modern clinical practice, Xuehai would be
indicated for such modern conditions as Fibromyalgia, and Lupus.

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~ Shanzhong - Ren 17 ~
" Chest Centre "
Location:
on the midline of the sternum, in a depression level with the fourth inter costal space.
* note; this point can be located midway between the nipples on the midline in men.
Needling
insert subcutaneously upwards or downwards along the channel. Insertion may be towards either
breast for breast disorders.
Moxa is OK
Actions
Regulates Qi and unbinds the chest
descends rebellious Qi of the Lung and Stomach
benefits gathering Qi
benefits the breasts
Indications
Asthma, pain in the chest, fullness of the chest, palpitation, insufficient lactation, hiccup,
difficulty swallowing, pain in the body
Commentary:
Shanzhong is both the Front Mu point of the Pericardium and the
Hui-Meeting point of Qi of the entire body. The term 'Mu' means to collect or gather. The front
Mu points are where the Qi of the various organs gathers and collects. A Mu point then, would
have direct effect on the particular organ. In this case, since the Pericardium is the muscle that
protects the heart. This is the point of choice to treat physical problems with the Heart.
As well, as the gathering point of Qi in the body, it is well used in conjunction with other points
to 'move Qi' to treat stagnation of Qi (pain) in any part of the body.
As a local point, located directly in the centre of the chest, it also has a strong effect on the lungs
and the chest as a whole.
Since the effect of needling Shanzhong is to strongly move Qi downwards it also has an effect on
rebellious Qi of the Stomach (vomiting, regurgitation, etc.).
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Located midway between the breasts it is also an important point for treating any kind of breast
disorder and in particular insufficient lactation.
Finally, one interesting side-effect of needling this point is that some people seem to become
more sociable.

II)
~ Mingmen - Du 4 ~
" Gate of Life "
Location
on the midline of the lower back, in the depression below the spinous process of the second
lumbar vertbra.
Needling
perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch
moxa is OK . Moxa is contraindicated in some texts to those under 20 years old.
Actions

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Clears heat
Regulates the Du channel
Tonifies the kidneys
Benefits the lumbar spine
Signs and Symptoms
stiffness of the back, lumbago, impotence, nocturnal emission, irregular menstruation, diarrhea,
indigestion, leukorrhea.
Commentary
Mingmen's main action is to regulate heat in the body both interiorly and exteriorly. If heat is
excessive, it is drained. If the body is cold it is warmed.
Because of its ability to strongly, drain heat, Mingmen is classically indicated for the treatment of
heat in the body 'like fire.'
Because of its ability to strongly warm the body, Mingmen is classcially indicated for treatment
of deficiency in the body due to cold, very common among men of advancing age.
The Du Channel (also called the Governing Vessel), is also known as the 'Sea of Yang'. This is
because it is located on the midline of the back or the Yang side of the body. As well, all the Yang
Channels of the body criss cross and meet with the Du channel at various points. As well, the Du
channel runs through the vertex of the head, the topmost or most Yang point on the body.
Mingmen, then is seen as a point that can strongly fortify Yang.
Mingmen is located directly betwen the Kidney Shu points and these three points are often
needled or Moxa'd together, especially in cases of lumbar pain or discomfort due to Kidney
deficiency.
Mingmen is closely associated with 'Ministerial Fire' which is the Qi that warms one's essence.
One's essence is seen as the energetic basis for life and hence the name 'Gate of Life.'
Mingmen is indicated for such symptoms of Kidney deficiency as shaking of the head, tinnitus
and dizziness. Mingmen is not only able to stimulate the Kidneys but is also able to open the
channel to assist the ascent of Kidney Qi up the spine and into the brain. The Du channel goes
directly into the brain.
Mingmen's strongest action, though is on the lumbar region, where it is located and is a point of
choice for all lumbar pain, discomfort or stiffness.
As well, Mingmen is indicated for all kinds of sexual and urinary difficulties arising from Kidney
deficiency.

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Finally, in Qi Gong practice, Mingmen is a primary Gate in the Small Heavenly Circle, a Qi
strengthening mediation/exercise that follows the path taken by the Ren and Du channels. It is
said, this is one of the gates presenting major difficulties to most practitioners.

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~ Shu Points of the Back~


Shu Points are a group of points located on the back, 1.5 cun lateral to spinous processes of the
thoracic and lumbar vertebra on the Urinary Bladder channel. Shu points are where the Qi of
each of the 12 Zang Fu organs surfaces and gathers. Accordingly, each of the Shu points strongly
tonifies its corresponding organ and is indicated for a wide variety of disharmonies of that organ.
Below the Shu points are presented as a group. One additional note, the Back Shu points,
correspond to a similar group of points on the front of the body known as 'Mu' points. There is a
Front Mu point for each of the Zang Fu organs, but they occur on different channels. While they
perform similar functions, the Back Shu points are sometimes preferred in clinical practice as
they are more easily accessed, but otherwise there is little difference between the two groups of
points in terms of treating disharmonies of the Zang Fu organs. Another quality of all these
points, Mu and Shu is that they tend to become tender when there is organ disharmony so they
can be quite useful for diagnostic purposes. Finally, these points tend to be used in combinations.
For example, for conditions in the chest, Heart and Lung Shu points may be needled together,
similarly, Spleen and Stomach Shu are often needled together.
Location
note; all the shu points are located on the inner Urinary Bladder channel. The UB channel runs
down the back in two separate paths. The inner channel is located at a distance midway between
the midline of the spine, and a line drawn parallel from the innermost border of the Scapula or
1.5 cun lateral to the spine. The outer channel runs in a parallel line at a distance from the spine
level with the inner border of the Scapula or 3 cun lateral to the spine. All the Shu points are
located on the inner channel. A cun is the distance between the 2nd and 3rd knuckles, or the
distance at the widest part of the thumb.
Feishu -Lung Shu - Urinary Bladder 13 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Third Thoracic Vertebra (T3)
Jueyinshu - Pericardium Shu - Urinary Bladder 14 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of spinous
process of the Fourth Thoracic Vertebra (T4).
Xinshu - Heart Shu - Urinary Bladder 15 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Fifth Thoracic Vertebra (T5).
Geshu - Diaphragm Shu - Urinary Bladder 17 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process the Seventh Thoracic Vertebra (T7).
Ganshu - Liver Shu - Urinary bladder 18 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Ninth Thoracic Vertebra (T9).
Danshu - Gallbladder Shu - Urinary Bladder 19 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the
spinous process of the Tenth Thoracic Vertebra (T10).

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Pishu - Spleen Shu - Urinary Bladder 20 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Eleventh Thoracic Vertebra (T11).
Weishu - Stomach Shu - Urinary Bladder 21 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Twelfth Thoracic Vertebra (T12).
Sanjiaoshu - Sanjiao Shu - Urinary Bladder 22 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the First Lumbar Vertebra (L1) .
Shenshu - Kidney Shu - Urinary bladder 23 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous
process of the Second Lumbar Vertebra (L2).
Dachangshu - Large Intestine Shu - Urinary Bladder 25 - 1.5 cun lateral to the lower border of
the spinous process of the Fourth Lumbar Vertebra (L4).
Xiaochangshu " Small Intestine Shu " - Urinary Bladder 27 - 1.5 cun lateral to the midline, at the
level of the First Posterior sacral Foramen.
Pangguangshu " Bladder Shu " - Urinary Bladder 28 - 1.5 cun lateral to the midline, at the level
of the Second Posterior Sacral Foramen.
Needling
Feishu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Jueyinshu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Xinshu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Geshu - insert at 45 degree angle towards the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Ganshu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Danshu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Pishu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion carries
substation risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
Weishu - insert at 45 degree angle toward the spine, 0.5 to 1.0 inch. Perpendicular insertion
carries substantial risk of puncturing the Lung (Pneumothorax).
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Sanjiaoshu - perpendicular insertion, or at a 45 degree angle toward the spine 1.0 to 1.5 inch.
Deep perpendicular insertion, especially in thin patients may injure the Kidney.
Shenshu - perpendicular insertion or at a 45 degree angle toward the spine, 1.0 to 1.5 inch. Deep
perpendicular insertion, especially in thin patients may injure the Kidney.
Dachangshu - perpendicular insertion 1.0 to 1.5 inch.
Xiaochangshu - perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch.
Pangguangshu - perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch
Moxa is OK
Actions
Each of the Shu points has a balancing effect on its respective organ and is indicated in a variety
of disorders specific to the organ.
Feishu - is the point of choice for all disorders of the Lung
Jueyinshu - is the Shu point of the Pericardium. Jueyinshu is an exception among the Shu points
in that it is named after its channel rather than the organ. This emphasizes its main action of
invigorating Qi in the channel to 'unbind the chest' in addition to its Shu function of treating a
wide variety of Heart dysfunctions, including psycho-emotional disorders.
Xinshu - is equally effective to treat all disorders of the Heart, including psycho-emotional
disorders.
Geshu - while not a Shu point of a specific Zang Fu organ, it is an 'honourary' Shu, of the
diaphragm, with the ability to treat disorders of the region between the Lungs and Stomach.
More importantly, it is the Hui-Meeting point of Blood. Geshu is the point of choice for virtually
all blood disorders arising out of the three main categories: blood stasis, blood heat, and blood
deficiency.
Ganshu - the main function of the Liver is to 'promote the free flow of Qi' in the body. In
addition it stores blood, dominates the sinews, and opens into the eyes. Free flow of Qi is vital to
health in the body, and Ganshu is the point of choice to regulate and tonify the Liver.
Danshu - is an important point to regulate the Gallbladder Fu organ. Its main function is to clear
damp-heat. It is a preeminent point for treating Jaundice and the symptoms of Jaundice.
Pishu - strongly regulates and tonifies the functions of the Spleen.
Weishu - strongly regulates and tonifies the functions of the Stomach.

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Sanjiaoshu - strongly regulates and tonifies the Sanjiao which is responsible for Qi and water
passage through the three Jiao (upper( Lung,Heart), middle (Stomach, Spleen, Liver) and lower
(Bladder, Kidney).
Shenshu - is the point of choice for regulating and strengthening the Kidneys and is indicated in
virtually all Kidney disorders.
Dachangshu - is indicated to treat a broad range of Large Intestine disorders.
Xiaochangshu - it is the function of the Small Intestine to 'separate the pure from the turbid', that
is extract vital elements from food that has rotted and ripened in the stomach and pass on the
waste to the Large Intestine for elimination, Xiaochangshu has a strong effect not only on its own
organ, but on the organs above and below it. Its main use is to promote the draining downward of
turbid waste.
Pangguangshu - strongly tonifies the Bladder. Its main use is to promote drainage from the lower
jiao.
Signs and Symptoms
* the following are the main signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction and not an exhaustive list
of every sign one may encounter in clinical practice. See TCM Diagnosis for more detailed
information.
Feishu - cough, chest pain/fullness, mania, propensity to sadness
Jeuyinshu - chest pain/oppression, cough, shortness of breath
Xinshu - heart pain, chest oppression, restlessness, psycho-emotional disorders, inappropriate
laughter
Geshu - chest oppression, epigastric pain, pain of the whole body, bleeding,
Ganshu - pain of lateral costal region, irritability/anger, blurred vision, neck rigidity
Danshu - jaundice, dry throat, blurred vision, shao yang syndrome
Pishu - abdominal pain/distention, heaviness in the body and limbs, lassitude, propensity to
worry
Weishu - epigastric pain, vomiting, abdominal fullness
Sanjiaoshu - borborygmus, abdominal distention, edema, masses, urinary problems,
Shenshu - edema, urinary/genital problems, menstrual problems, lumbar pain, phobias,
propensity to be startled
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Dachangshu - intestinal problems, abdominal pain/distention, lumbar pain,


Xiaochangshu - urinary problems, 'wasting & thirsting' (diabetes), lumbar pain, masses
Pangguangshu - urinary problems, genital problems, diarrhea, lower back & buttock pain

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~ Dazhui - Du 14 ~
" Great Vertebra "

Location
on the midline at the base of the neck, in the depression below the spinous process of the seventh
cervical vertebra
Needling
perpendicular/ upwards insertion 0.5 to 1.0 inch
moxa is OK
Actions
Expels wind and supports the exterior
Clears heat
Signs and Symptoms
neck pain/rigidity, malaria, febrile diseases, epilepsy, cough, asthma, common cold, back
stiffness.
Commentary
According to generally accepted TCM theory a pathogenic factor will only attack a body that is
already weak, or Yang deficient. Dazhui has not only the capability of expelling invading
pathogenic factors but of also fortifying the Yang of the body in so doing.
When a body is invaded by a pathogenic factor, this is called 'invasion of Wind in TCM. Wind
can also carry with it Cold, Heat, & Dampness into the body. In modern terms this is colds, flu
and other such ambient infections.
Dazhui is the meeting point of the Du channel, which is Yang in nature, with all six of the other
Yang channels. the Du channel, otherwise known as the Governing Vessel, is known as the 'sea
of Yang' channels.
In this sense, then, it is extremely powerful in fortifying the Yang of the body as well as fending
off ambient infections.

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Dazhui is a point of choice to treat any kind of invasion of pathogenic factors (colds, flus,etc.), as
well as any condition that includes sweating among its symptoms, whether from excess or
deficiency.
As well, Dazhui is ideally suited to treat exhaustion and lack of strength in the whole body due to
any deficiency condition, again because of its ability to fortify Yang.
Due to its ability to restrain Wind, Dazhui is suited to treat Epilepsy and Acute Childhood Fright
and other manifestations of internal Wind.
Dazhui is useful in the treatment of 'painful obstruction syndrome' anywhere in the body, but
specifically in the neck area and when pain radiates to the shoulder.
Finally, Dazhui is indicated for the treatment of nosebleed that will not stop. The Du Channel,
runs over the head, continuing down through the midline of the nose to end inside the upper lip.

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~ Baihui - Du 20 ~
"Hundred Meetings "

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Location
at the vertex of the head, on the midline, in the depression, 5 cun behind the hairline at the front,
and 7 cun ahead of the hairline at the back.
Note; in balding men, measure from where the hairline would be if there were hair. Alternatively
one can measure 8 cun back from Yintang (the glabella or the point on the midline directly
between the ends of the eyebrows), and 6 cun forward from the external occipitual protuberance,
(the little bump on the midline at the base of the skull).
Needling
along the channel, under the skin 0.5 to 1.0 inch
moxa is OK
Actions
Pacifies wind and subdues yang
Raises Yang and treats prolapse
Bnefits the head and sense organs
Nourishes the Sea of Marrow (brain)
Benefits the brain and calms the spirit.
Signs and Symptoms
headache, vertigo, tinnitus, nasal obstruction, aphasia, coma, mental disorders, prolapse of the
rectum or uterus.
Commentary
Baihui is the uppermost Accupuncture point on the body. Its name, 'Hundred Meetings', refers to
the idea that it is not only the meeting point of all the Yang channels of the upper body (plus the
Liver channel), but that it is indicated in a 'hundred diseases.'
Baihui's main action is to regulate Yang, both to strongly draw Yang to the head to treat such
conditions of deficiency as, whirling sensation, tinnitus, dizziness, vision impairment and desire
to sleep, and to treat such excess conditions as headache, windstroke, and pain at the vertex.
As well, Bahui is able to raise sinking Qi at the other end of the channel and is indicated for
prolapse of the rectum, uterus and vagina.
Baihui is an important point in Qi Gong practice. According to some it is an alternative to
Yintang as the location of the Upper Dantian because of its obvious proximity to Heaven. In any
case, it is an important gate in the 'Small Heavenly Circle,' the quintiessential Qi Gong Qi
building meditation/exercise that follows the Ren and Du channels.
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As Baihui is at the apex of the circle it is seen as a direct connection to Heaven. In the Chinese
view of the world, a Human is seen as the bridge between Heaven and Earth. One connects to
Heaven through Baihui and with the Earth through Yongquan (K1), on the sole of the foot and so
doing seeks to master the Lower Dantian (located just below the navel), and the Upper Dantian
previously mentioned.
Since the tendency of Yang is always to strongly rise, Qi Gong students are required to master
the Lower Dantian (located below the navel) and thus the connection to the Earth in order to be
securely anchored before focusing on the upper Dantian and accessing Heaven.
There has been a long-standing controversy over the role of the brain. Most consider the Heart to
be the actual residence of the Mind (Spirit) while the Brain is seen as a place of data storage, or
at best 'intelligence.' The Brain is considered an 'Extraordinary Fu organ - literally an 'empty sac'.
Even so, some do speculate that since the Brain connects directly to Heaven, it is the residence of
spirit.
Interestingly, Baihui, while a point on the Du channel and connecting directly to the brain, also
connects directly to the Heart through a divergent channel. In other words the 2 contradictory
theories seem to be resolved at Baihui. This is reflected in the fact that Baihai is strongly
indicated for a variety of psycho-emotional disorders, usually the preserve of points on the
Pericardium and Heart channels. Agitation and oppression, fright, palpitations, poor memory,
lack of mental vigour, disorientation, much crying, profound sadness, a desire to die, and mania,
are all treated with Baihui.

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