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Table of Contents

Introduction ...........................................................................................................................................
I.

Catalog Information .................................................................................................................


Catalog Reference Codes ............................................................................................
Variety Reference Codes .............................................................................................
Catalog Format ............................................................................................................
Grading Standards .......................................................................................................

X
X
X
X
X

II. Roosevelt Dime and Variety Overview ....................................................................................


FDR and The Dime .....................................................................................................
Die Varieties Overview ...............................................................................................
Roosevelt Dime Die Varieties ......................................................................................
Die Stage Diagnostics ..............................................................
Full Torch (FT) vs. Full Bands (FB) Explained ......................................................

X
X
X
X
X
X

III. The Collection ..........................................................................................................................


1946 .............................................................................................................................
1947 .............................................................................................................................
1948 .............................................................................................................................
1949 .............................................................................................................................
1950 .............................................................................................................................
1951 .............................................................................................................................
1952 .............................................................................................................................
1953 .............................................................................................................................
1954 .............................................................................................................................
1955 .............................................................................................................................
1956 .............................................................................................................................
1957 .............................................................................................................................
1958 .............................................................................................................................
1959 .............................................................................................................................
1960 .............................................................................................................................
1961 .............................................................................................................................
1962 .............................................................................................................................
1963 .............................................................................................................................
1964 .............................................................................................................................

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

IV. Most Popular and Valuable Roosevelt Dime Varieties .............................................................


Notable Roosevelt Dime Variety List .................................................................

X
X

Further Suggested Reading ...................................................................................................................

Recommended Websites ......................................................................................................................

Acronyms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................................

Collection
Recommendations ................................................................................................................

1.

X
Bibliography ..........................................................................................................................................
X
Roosevelt Dime Mintages .....................................................................................................

2.

Introduction
Franklin Delano Roosevelt is one of the most renowned and influential world leaders in history. As
President, Roosevelt was a canny politician, brilliant leader, and eminent statesman.
He guided the United States through twelve years of despair, tragedy, triumph, and recovery during the
Great Depression and World War II. In doing so, he brought about a new relationship between the
federal government and the people it served.

FDR in Warm Springs, Georgia, April 1939

Roosevelt's impact as U.S. President cannot be overstated. Yet, perhaps the most dominant aspect of
FDR's later life was his physical state.
From the age of 39 in 1921, until his death at age 63, Roosevelt suffered from as polio, which had been
label as an epidemic in the United States in 1916. Although Roosevelt's general health remained
excellent in the years following his exposure to the virus, the affects of the disease caused the function
of his legs to become so weak that he could hardly use them at all. And initially he could move about
only in a wheelchair.
As a response to the polio epidemic in America, FDR founded The National Institute for Infantile
Paralysis in 1938. The foundation was an alliance between scientists and volunteers, with volunteers
raising money to support research and education efforts for polio.

3.

In the 1930s, The National Institute for Infantile Paralysis held an annual fundraising event, that
requested each child donate to the foundation one dime which had the purchasing power of about $1
today.
At the Christmas season, slotted donation booths were set up on cities streets around the country where
children would line up to drop in their dime. These lines of dime-bearing children were the inspiration
for the term March of Dimes, which was first coined in the late 1930's by vaudeville star Eddie
Cantor as a play on the contemporary newsreel series "The March of Time".
The National Institute for Infantile Paralysis officially changed its name to include March of Dimes
in 1976. However, the foundation has almost always been better known as and called the March of
Dimes.
On April 12, 1945, while serving his fourth term a U.S. President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt suffered
a stroke at his cottage in Warm Springs, Georgia. At 3:35 p.m. that day, Roosevelt died. He was 63years-old.
An editorial by The New York Times declared, Men will thank God on their knees a hundred years
from now that Franklin D. Roosevelt was in the White House.
Immediately after his death, there were calls for the replacement of the Mercury dime with one bearing
Roosevelt's image to honor the former President's work with the March of Dimes.
The job of designing this coin was assigned to the Mint Chief Engraver, John Sinnock. Several designs
were submitted to the Commission of Fine Arts for approval or comment. A few of these initial designs
are seen below; two obverse designs on the left and reverse designs on the right and center.

4.

Based on feedback from the Commission of Fine Arts, a final design was soon selected and accepted by
then Secretary of the Treasury, Fred Vinson.
The final obverse design featured Roosevelts left-facing bust with the inscriptions LIBERTY, IN GOD
WE TRUST, and the year.
The reverse displayed a torch (signifying liberty) with an olive branch on the left (signifying peace) and
an oak branch on the right (signifying strength and independence) with the inscriptions UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, and ONE DIME.

Final design for the Roosevelt dime by John Sinnock

Production of the new Roosevelt dime began without delay and the coin was introduced to the public
on January 30, 1946, which would have been Roosevelt's 64th birthday.
Despite an overwhelmingly positive reception to the new coin, some controversy over the obverse
design of the dime ensued almost immediately.
The first stemmed from a strong anti-Communist sentiment in the United States, which led to the
circulation of rumors that the JS engraved on the coin was the initials of Joseph Stalin, placed there
by a Soviet agent in the mint.
The Mint quickly issued a statement denying that the JS initials had anything to do with communism
and confirming that the initials were indeed Sinnock's.
Another controversy surrounding Sinnock's design involves his image of Roosevelt. Soon after the
coin's release, it was claimed that Sinnock borrowed his design of Roosevelt from a bas relief created
by African American sculptor Selma Burke, unveiled at the Recorder of Deeds Building in Washington,
D.C. in September 1945.

5.

Sinnock himself denied this, claiming that he simply utilized his earlier design on the Roosevelt medal,
which is seen on the following page. The Selma Burke controversy is discussed in detail

FDR medal, 1941 by John R. Sinnock for the U.S. Mint

The Roosevelt dime was originally minted with a metal composition of 90% silver and 10% copper.
And with a total weight of 2.5 grams, a single 90% silver Roosevelt dime contains approximately
0.07234 troy ounces of silver.
With the passage of the Coinage Act of 1965, the composition of the dime changed to a clad
sandwich of pure copper inner layer between two outer layers of cupronickel (75% copper, 25%
nickel) alloy, giving post-1964 Roosevelts a total composition of 91.67% copper and 8.33% nickel.
This composition was selected because it gave similar mass (now 2.268 grams instead of 2.5 grams)
and electrical properties (important in vending machines) and most importantly, because it contained
no precious metal.

6.

Catalog Reference Codes


The catalog reference codes refer to the system used in The Rose Fields
Collection to order the coins and make reference to specific dimes
in this catalog. These codes are found in this catalog's listings as
well as on the reverse label of each slab.
Catalog Reference Code Example: 46D-B
As seen in this catalog:

1946-D MS 63
ODV-002
46D-B

Composed of two parts and separated by a hyphen, the codes are very
basic:
1. Each catalog reference code begins with the last two digits of the coin's date and mintmark. In
the example above, the coin is a 1946-D.
2. Following the date and mint are sequential letters (starting with A) representing each coin in the
collection with that same date and mint. In the example above, the code refers to the second
1946-D coin in the collection.

7.

Variety Reference Codes


The variety reference codes refer to die variety listing codes as they have been noted by other authors
and organizations. Specifically, the main referencing system used to identify die varieties in The Rose
Fields Collection is organized by CONECA, the largest national numismatic error and variety
organization. (www.ConecaOnline.org).
These variety reference codes are found in this catalog's listings as
well as on the obverse label of each slab and correspond to
CONECA's Master Listing of Die Varieties, which can be found
online here: www.VarietyVista.com
Variety Reference Code Example: RPM-005
As seen in this catalog:

1948-S MS 62
S/S West RPM-005
Stage C, LDS
48-C

CONECA's variety referencing codes are also very basic; comprising two parts and separated by a
hyphen:
1. Each reference number begins with an abbreviation that describes the general type of variety.
RPM Repunched Mintmark
OMM Over-Mintmark
DDO Doubled Die Obverse
DDR Doubled Die Reverse
ODV Observe Design Variety
RDV Reverse Design Variety
MMS Mintmark Style
2. The second part of the reference code are sequential numbers (starting with 001) for each year,
mintmark, and type of variety. In the example on the previous page, DDR-012 would refer to
the 12th Doubled Die Reverse listed by CONECA for the 1946-P dime.
The variety reference codes in this catalog will also be proceeded by a very brief description of the
variety, i.e. D/D East RPM-003 or II-C+VI DDR-012.

8.

Cross-Referencing Varieties
In addition to CONECA's listings, other variety referencing systems are referred to in this catalog,
including Fivaz-Stanton Cherrypickers' (FS), Walter Breen (Breen), Wexler/Miller (WRPM), and
Kevin Flynn (Flynn), in an effort to cross-reference varieties listed by multiple authors and
organizations.
As seen in this catalog:

1948-S MS 62
S/S West RPM-005
Stage C, LDS
48S-C

Variety Cross Reference


Flynn RPM-005

In the example above, the S/S West repunched mintmark listed by CONECA as RPM-005 is also listed
by Kevin Flynn as RPM-005 in The Authoritative Reference on Roosevelt Dimes (2001).
However, matching variety codes for the same variety is not only the case. For example, CONECA lists
one 1946-D/D North RPM as RPM-015, while John Wexler and Tom Miller list the same exact variety
as RPM# 2 in The RPM Book (1983). This can often make cross-referencing varieties difficult.
Additionally, most of the Roosevelt dime varieties were discovered before the advent of the internet,
and much of the information on them was printed in now pricey, out-of-print books. What's even more,
these now rare variety books lack many photos. So in some cases, cross-reference varieties with older
authors is an educated guess.
For all of these reason, cross-referencing can be a variety collector's most perplexing task. Many
authors and organizations today have taken the time to cross-reference their RPMs to others. And the
large majority of the cross-referenced varieties in this catalog have previously been noted by other
authors.

9.

Collecting Roosevelt Dimes


The Roosevelt dime is now the longest-running U.S. coin design with its original obverse and reverse.
The Lincoln cent obverse goes back to 1909, but the Memorial reverse dates to 1959. Introduced in
1938, the Jefferson nickel recently received a new obverse portrait and the Monticello reverse has also
been modified. The Washington quarter, too, no longer resembles the original from 1932. Other
denominations do not even come close to the dime designs longevity.
Despite a rich history, the Roosevelt dime remains among the least collect U.S. coins, due in part to
massive production figures and the lack of any especially rare dates. Nevertheless, Roosevelt dimes
offer a very interesting and affordable series that can be quite rewarding for collectors.
Roosevelt dimes can be collected and assembled using a variety of formats. Depending on the needs
and interests of the individual numismatist, collecting Roosevelt dimes can range from an easy, short
term project to a detailed, lifelong endeavor.
Without much debate, it can be safely stated that the most popular way of collecting Roosevelt dimes is
by date and mint. This type of collection will contain a coin struck at each mint for every year that the
coin was produced.
The Roosevelt dime series is also well-known for having a prolific catalog of die varieties. Varieties
among Roosevelt dimes widely range from the very common to the extremely rare and every variety
collector has at least one Roosevelt dime in their collection. Like all other collectable coins, the value
of Roosevelt dimes are mainly dictated by condition. Perhaps even more so for the Roosevelt dime
considering the series has no especially rare dates.
The value of Roosevelt dimes with good strikes and fine details have a much higher value than stated
above. In some cases, Roosevelt dimes with Full Torch (FT) or Full Bands (FB) can be over ten
times more valuable. For example, a 1956-P Roosevelt dime at MS 66 is valued at about $30. But if the
same 1956-P dime was graded MS 66 FT or MS 66 FB, its retail value would be about $350.
Below are very general current values:
Silver Roosevelt Dimes
Grades
MS 60 to MS 63 (most dates)

Approx. Value
~$3 to ~$5

MS 60 to MS 63 (lower mintage dates)

~$15

MS 64 to MS 65 (most dates)

~$15

MS 64 to MS 65 (lower mintage dates)

~$20 to ~$40

MS 66 (most dates)

~$30

MS 66 (lower mintage dates)

~$25 to ~$100

MS 67 (most dates)

~$50 to ~$150

MS 67 (lower mintage dates)

~$150 to $200

MS 68 (all)

Over $1,000

10.

Full Torch (FT) vs. Full Bands (FB) Explained


Full Torch and Full Bands are grading designations, which can be applied to business-struck
Roosevelt dimes. The designation is not used for proof coins.
In general, the attribution indicates a coin with a strong, well defined strike,
as evidenced by very well-defined vertical and horizontal lines on the torch
bands as seen in the photo on the right..
The definition of what exactly constitutes a full torch strike is actually a bit
vague. Full Torch and Full Bands are actually the official grading
designations of the two primary third-party coin grading companies, NGC
and PCGS, respectively.
However, there is a slight difference between the two official definitions,
which is quite important to Roosevelt dime collectors:
NGC Full Torch FT
The designation FT for Full Torch will be applied to Roosevelt
Dimes having both upper and lower pair of horizontal bands
split as well as the vertical lines of the torch being defined.
PCGS Full Bands FB
The PCGS "Full Bands" designation for Roosevelts requires
that both the upper and lower pair of bands on the torch be
distinct and show full separation. The line dividing the bands
must be complete and unbroken.
As previously mentioned, coins with full torch strikes carry a significant
premium among Roosevelt dime collectors. However, there are many that
can be very difficult to obtain; thus the significantly higher prices.
The 1949-S is the hardest silver Roosevelt dimes to find with a full torch
strike. PCGS estimates their survival at MS 60 and above at 50,000. At MS
65 and above PCGS ballparks only 10,000 1949-S Roosevelts survive with
Full Bands.
47P-A

As the key date in the series, it may come as no big surprise that the 1949-S is the hardest silver
Roosevelt to find with a full torch strike. But surprising to new collectors, many relatively common
dates are also very difficult to find with full torch strikes. The eight hardest to find Roosevelt dates to
find with full torch strikes are as follows:

1949-P
1949-S
1955-P

1956-P
1957-P
1958-P

11.

1961-P
1963-P
1963-D

In this collection, both the FT and FB designations are used to describe the condition of the torch
lines on individual coins as they are defined by NGC and PCGS.

What is a Die Variety?


A die variety is any variation in the normal design of a coin. These variations can be caused by a
mistake/s in the creation, preparation, or maintenance of a working coin die. Die varieties are
distinguishable from mint errors, which are results of human or mechanical error during manufacturing.
The most popular coin die varieties include:

Repunched Mintmarks (RPM) Two or more images of the same mintmark, caused by errors in
the punching of the mintmark onto a working coin die (or very rarely, onto the hub)

Over-Mintmarks (OMM) Two or more images of different mintmarks, one punched on top of
the other, also caused by errors in the punching of the mintmark onto a working coin die

Doubled Die Obverses (DDO) Doubling in the design elements of a coin's obverse, created by
working dies with misaligned images from in the hubbing process

Doubled Die Reverses (DDR) Doubling in the design elements of a coin's reverse, same
causes as DDO

Obverse Design Varieties (ODV) Variations (often slight) in a coin's obverse design

Reverse Design Varieties (RDV) Variations (often slight) in a coin's reverse design

Mintmark Styles (MMS) Variations (often very slight) in a coin's mintmark

The Rose Fields Collection features examples of all of the die varieties above (sans OMM) plus a few
different examples of mint errors.

12.

Die State Diagnostics


The physical principle that governs our ability to strike coins is simply displacement. Energy is
converted into pressure and heat during the striking process which displaces a coin blank's metal into
the recessed cavities of the working coin die.
This pressure and heat, however, also causes a working coin die to become worn and damaged during
its life in the coining press. This gradual process of damage to a working coin die is called die
deterioration.
Die deterioration may result in die cracks, chips, scratches or stress marks left on minted coins. These
imperfections become more prominent over the lifespan of the working die and the gradual process of
deterioration can be observed on coins.
This progression of die deterioration is often examined to determine a coin's die state. A new and
fairly new die will produce coins that usually have sharp devices and legends. The fields of the coin are
usually very smooth and there are very few signs of deterioration; including cracks, chips, scratches, or
stress marks. Coins struck with new and fairly new working dies fall under the Early Die State (EDS)
category.
Coins struck with dies near the middle of their working lifespan, called Middle Die State (MDS) will
show more signs of deterioration, and coins struck with dies near the end of their lifespan, called Late
Die State (LDS) exhibit even more cracks, chips, scratches, stress marks, etc.
To make things a bit confusing, it's possible for a coin to be struck with an obverse die in its EDS and
with a reverse die in its MDS, or any other combination. When this occurs, attributers will often
designated a die state between the three main EDS, MDS, and LDS states. For example, the coin just
mentioned would be considered Early Middle Die State (EMDS). The die state designations and their
acronyms currently used are below:
Die State
Very Early Die State
Early Die State
Early Middle Die State
Middle Die State
Late Middle Die State
Late Die State
Very Late Die State

Acronym
VEDS
EDS
EMDS
MDS
LMDS
LDS
VLDS

Collectors use die states to help distinguish between coin varieties as well as to help cross-reference
with other authors and organizations. One very common die crack to find on Roosevelt dimes is seen
on the reverse from the bottom of the torch through the I or M of DIME and to the rim. The 1951-P
(51P-B) in this collection is a good example.

13.

Silver Roosevelt Dimes (1946 1964)


1946
1946-P
1946-D
1946-S

255,250,000
61,043,500
27,900,000

The Roosevelt dime was released for circulation on January 30, 1946. Its creation was a rush job to
honor former President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had passed away in office just nine months earlier.
Nevertheless, the U.S. Mint managed to produce over 344 million Roosevelt dimes during the initial
production year, including over 255 million at the Philadelphia Mint alone the fifth highest mintage
among the silver Roosevelt series.
Many uncirculated rolls of 1946-dated Roosevelt dimes were saved by collectors due to the novelty of
the initial production year. Thus, high-grade specimens of 1946-dated Roosevelt dimes are not difficult
to locate.
Due to the time restrictions, however, mistakes were very common in the die-making process. And
because so many Roosevelt dimes were minted during its first year of production, there are a very large
number of die varieties to be found on 1946-dated dimes.
RPM's and doubled die varieties are so numerous on 1946-dated Roosevelt dimes that completing a set
of every variety would take decades to assemble. CONECA has over 150 variety listings for the 1946-P
date alone.
Notable among these are two Obverse Design Varieties (ODV), currently designated by CONECA as
ODV-001 and ODV-002. These varieties have also been recognized by Walter Breen in his Complete
Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins (listed as Breen-3692 through -3695 and Breen-3699 3670)
and Kevin Flynn in The Authoritative Reference on Roosevelt Dimes. Both authors call these varieties
Type 1 (ODV-001) and Type II (ODV-002).
Both Obverse Design Varieties can be found on 1946 Roosevelt dimes across all three mints. It has
been noted by Breen and others that the hub that produced working dies with ODV-001 was used in the
beginning of the 1946 production run, while ODV-002 was created later in the year.
The differences between the two Obverse Design Varieties is slight and not really noticeable without a
loupe. The most prominent differences between ODV-001 and ODV-002 is can be seen in two places
on the obverse:

the distance between the Y of LIBERTY and the forelock of Roosevelt's hair, and
the prominence of the JS initials.

Below is a brief description of these differences and photos can be seen on the following page.

14.

ODV-001
The Y of LIBERTY is farther from the forelock of Roosevelt's hair and the JS initials are smaller,
weaker, misshapen, and sometimes indistinct.
ODV-002
The Y of LIBERTY is closer to the forelock of Roosevelt's hair and the JS initials are larger, stronger,
and more distinct.
ODV-001

ODV-002

When looking at the difference in the distance between the Y of LIBERTY and Roosevelt's hair, also
noticed the shape of the forelock. The forelock of Roosevelt's hair in ODV-001 is more blunt while the
forelock of ODV-002 is a slightly higher in relief and is a bit pointer and more defined.
Furthermore, notice the shape of the J in the JS initials. The top of the J on dimes with ODV-001 is
slightly curved in, while the J on ODV-002 seems to stand-up straighter. The J on ODV-001 is shaped
more like a greater-than sign (>) while the J in ODV-002 is more accurate to the letter's correct
formation.

ODV-001

ODV-002

Other less distinct differences between the two 1946 ODVs include a rounder nose and a more fleshier
appearance on Roosevelt's face on ODV-002.

15.

In the Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins, Breen calls the ODV-001 variety on the
1946-D and 1946-S Roosevelt dimes presently vary scarce. Kevin Flynn echos this in his
Authoritative Reference on Roosevelt Dimes saying that The Type 1 [ODV-001] is much rarer,
especially coins from the Denver and San Francisco Mints.
However, from my personal experience, I find that ODV-001 is actually quite easy to find on all mints
of the 1946 Roosevelt dime. And to conflict with Breen and Flynn directly, I've actually found that
ODV-002 on the 1946-S dime is the hardest of the 1946 Roosevelt ODVs to come by.
Some have also suggested that there may also be a third ODV, with the forelock found on ODV-001
and initials found on ODV-002. However, it is my belief that dimes with a third suspected ODV are
actually just ODV-001 with very good obverse strikes. A good example of this can be found in this
collection, and is mentioned later in the catalog.

1946-P MS 63 FT
ODV-002
II-C+VI DDR-012
Stage B, MDS

Variety Cross Reference


None Known

46P-C

As previously mentioned, there are a large number of known doubled dies and repunched mintmarks
found on 1946-dated Roosevelt dimes. It may have been the intentional rush for production of the
Roosevelt dime, or perhaps that mint employees were still celebrating the end of WWII. However, for
whatever reason 1946 is the dream year for a Roosevelt dime variety collector. This dime represents
one of three 1946-dated doubled dies currently in The Rose Fields Collection.
A bright white dime with a few marks on the obverse, but a good example of a doubled die reverse for
the 1946-P date. With class II & VI doubling, this DDR has light spread and extra thickness on all rim
lettering, dots, and UNUM. Stage B, MDS is marked on this dime by ODV-002 and a long die gouge
on the rim southeast of the E of DIME, seen in the photo below.

46P-C

16.

There are two other popular double dies found on the 1946-P that collectors should be on the lookout
for; DDO-008 (FS-104) and DDR-007 (FS-802). Both of these varieties are valued over $300 in grades
higher than MS 65.

1946-D AU 55
ODV-001
D/D North RPM-015
Stage C, LDS

Variety Cross Reference


Fivaz-Stanton Cherrypickers' FS-502
Wexler/Miller RPM# 2

46D-C

Although this dime is slightly circulated, it is a mostly white coin with a well-known RPM listed by
CONECA as RPM-015. This D/D North is also listed in the Cherrypickers' Guide under FS-502 and by
John Wexler and Tom Miller in The RPM Book.

46D-C

The Cherrypickers' Guide currently prices this variety in the AU grades at about $15 and estimates
there are only 3 or 4 are known. However, CONECA's Master Listing of Die Varieties lists an
examined population of 15, which is their most examined RPM for the 1946-D date.
This RPM has only been confirmed in Stage C, LDS by CONECA. They currently list a total of 33
RPMs for the 1946-D date.

1946-S
The 1946-S Roosevelt dime deserves a bit of special attention. In addition to the numerous RPMs
DDOs, and DDRs that are found on the date, there are also 3 known Mintmark Styles (MMS) for the
1946-S Roosevelt dime. They are:

MMS-004 (Trumpet-Tail Mintmark)

MMS-006 (Ball-Serif Mintmark)

MMS-007 (Sans-Serif Mintmark)

Extremely Rare, Not in Collection

The two common mintmark styles are the trumpet-tail and ball-serif. There trumpet-tailed style has
the tail of the S flared like the bell shaped end of a trumpet. The ball-serif style (also called knob-tailed
17.

style) mintmark has the tail of the S ending in an oval knob. These two mintmarks styles are seen
below.

Trumpet-Tail

Ball-Serif

According to Walter Breen, both of the trumpet-tail and ball-serif varieties were used on the Roosevelt
dime in unison through 1954. However, more recent research done by Bill Fivaz on San Francisco
mintmarks suggests that the ball-serif style was used in 1946 and 1947 and then discontinued.
Observations from this writer seem to back this assertion as examples of ball-serif mintmarks on coins
from 1948 to 1955 appear to be nonexistent.
Bill Fivaz has also reported that a third style of mintmark that was used 1946-S Roosevelt dimes,
known as the sans-serif. This mintmark variety is listed in the Cherrypickers' Guide as FS-504.
However, it is extremely rare. There are less than five known examples of 1946-S Roosevelts with the
sans-serif mintmark. Even a circulated example could fetch thousands of dollars at market. So
unfortunately, it is not included in this collection. However, the sans-serif mintmark style was also used
on the 1947-S Roosevelt, and there is an example of this in the collection.
Walter Breen does not mention the sans-serif mintmark on 1946-S Roosevelts in the Complete
Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins, but he does note the MMS for 1947-S dimes (Breen-3704).
He says that the sans-serif mintmark was possibly intended for coins made for foreign governments.
It should also be noted that the combination of the knob-tail mintmark and ODV-002 are unknown to
exist. The Rose Fields Collection includes all known ODV and MMS combinations for the 1946-S
Roosevelt, with the exception of sans-serif mintmark.
1946-S

MMS

Catalog Reference Code

ODV-001

MMS-004

46S-A

ODV-001

MMS-006

46S-B

ODV-001

MMS-007

(not known to exist)

ODV-002

MMS-004

46S-E

ODV-002

MMS-006

(not known to exist)

ODV-002

MMS-007

(extremely rare)

18.

1946-S AU 55
ODV-001
MMS-004
S/S East RPM-003
II-C DDO-010
Stage B, MDS
46S-C

Variety Cross Reference


Wexler/Miller RPM# 3
Flynn RPM-001 and DDO-001

Although this dime slightly circulated, it is bright white with good luster and near full torch lines. It
exhibits ODV-001 and MMS-004 and is a double variety with an S/S East RPM-003 and II-C DDO010 at Stage B MDS. Stage B is markered by a very light die scratch from mintmark to the I of
PLURIBUS.

46S-C

This RPM and DDO match is one of the more well-known and available varieties on the 1946-S
Roosevelt dime. I am surprised that it is not listed in the Cherrypickers' Guide, although it has been
listed by others including Wexler/Miller and Kevin Flynn.

1946-S MS 63 FT
ODV-001
MMS-004
II-C+V-CW DDR-019
Stage B, MDS

Variety Cross Reference


None Known

46S-D

A really nice bright white dime with good luster and a great strike on both sides with full torch line
details. This dime exhibits ODV-001 and is a good example of what I believe some have confused for a
third ODV.
The distance between the Y of LIBERTY and the forelock of Roosevelt's hair is clearly that indicative
of ODV-001. However, this dime has a nice and clear set of JS initials, like those found on ODV-002.
But a very close look at this dime shows the more curved, greater-than sign (>) J found on ODV-001.
See the following page for an image of the initials on this dime.
19.

46S-D

With trumpet-tail mintmark style this Roosevelt has II-C+V-CW DDR-019 with light spread on
AMERICA, UNUM, ONE DIME, and the right stem. Stage B MDS is markered by strong die
scratches on Roosevelt's nose.

46S-D

On a scale of rarity, this DDR would fall someone right near the middle; relative to other double dies
found on the 1946-S Roosevelt dime.

1947
1947-P
1947-D
1947-S

121,520,000
46,835,000
34,840,000

After the initial production rush, the Roosevelt dime's obverse features would remain stable through the
successive years until 1957. And on average, 1947 dimes are better struck than the previous year.
For the 1947 Roosevelt dimes, some have suggested that there is some minor variation in the JS
initials, similar to the initial variations on the 1946 ODVs. However, again, I believe that these
variations can be explained by strike qualities.
The 1947-S Roosevelt dime should be noted as having two of the most desirable varieties among the
silver Roosevelt dime series. These are two S/D Over-Mintmarks (OMM). They are listed by many
variety authors including:
20.

CONECA

OMM-001
OMM-002

Fivaz-Stanton
Cherrypickers'

FS-501
FS-502

Walter Breen

Breen-3705

Kevin Flynn

OMM-001
OMM-002

Wexler/Miller

RPM# 1

In the Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins, Walter Breen mentions that this variety was
first discovered by Lewis Lawton before 1963 and publicized by Hugh Campbell in Coin World in the
October 23, 1983 issue.
Although this variety is currently referred to as an Over-Mintmark, it was initially believed to be an S
over horizontal S and is listed as such in John Wexler's and Tom Miller's The RPM Book as RPM# 1.
Whether it is actually a S/D OMM, an S/S RPM, or the result of a die chip is still subject to
controversy. Nevertheless, these varieties are very popular among variety collectors, both valued over
$500 in grades higher than MS 65. Unfortunately, however, this collection does not include either
variety.
The Rose Fields Collection currently contains five 1947-dated dimes, including two with full torch
strikes and two varieties.

1947-D MS 62
MMS-004
D/D North RPM-005
Stage D, VLDS

Variety Cross Reference


None Known

47D-B

A mostly white coin with a weaker strike around the rim on both sides, this dime exhibits a D/D North
RPM at Stage D, VLDS listed by CONECA as RPM-005.

47D-B

21.

This is one of five 1947-D RPMs listed by CONECA. It is one of the more common RPMs for the
1947-D date, however none of them are very easy to come by.

1947-S MS 62
MMS-007 (Sans Serif
Mintmark)

Variety Cross Reference


Breen-3704

47S-B

As previously mentioned, the sans-serif mintmark is extremely rare on 1946-S dated Roosevelts.
However, also as already mentioned, it can sometimes be found on 1947-S dated dimes as seen in this
example. Walter Breen lists the mintmark variety as Breen-3704.

Sans-Serif on a 1947-S 47S-B


This mintmark variety is not very well-known and is very rarely identified. There could be hundreds to
thousands of surviving examples. Considering this, it is very difficult to put a value on this variety. But
it is quite interesting.

1948
1948-P
1948-D
1948-S

74,950,000
52,841,000
35,520,000

Production of the Roosevelt dime fell at the Philadelphia Mint in 1948 from the previous years, but
increased a bit at the Denver and San Francisco Mints. Due to high production numbers, mint state
examples of 1948-dated Roosevelt dimes are not difficult to locate, but nicely struck gem condition
coins take a bit more searching.
One small thing to note on the 1948 Roosevelt dimes is the date. The lower loop of the 8 nearly rides
up on the rim on the east side. All 1948-dated Roosevelt dime exhibit this and it seems to be a minor
general design flaw. The date should have perhaps been moved slightly to the west or made a bit
smaller.
The years of hundreds of different varieties found on the Roosevelt dime come to an end with the 1948
production. There are several RPMs, OMMs, and double dies found on the 1948- and later-dated
dimes, but nothing like the quantity of varieties found on 1946-dated Roosevelt dimes.

22.

1948-S MS 62
S/S West RPM-003
Stage C, LDS
48S-B

Variety Cross Reference


Wexler/Miller RPM# 3
Flynn RPM-003

A nice white dime with a good strike and nice torch lines, this dime has a S/S West RPM, listed by
CONECA as RPM-003. This is a well-known RPM for the date, also listed by Wexler/Miller in The
RPM Book as well as by Kevin Flynn in The Authoritative Reference on Roosevelt Dimes.

48S-B

1948-S MS 62
S/S West RPM-005
Stage C, LDS

Variety Cross Reference


Flynn RPM-005

48S-C

Another nice white coin with a good strike and near full torch lines, this 1948-S has another RPM; this
time a S/S West listed by CONECA as RPM-005. Kevin Flynn also listed this variety in The
Authoritative Reference on Roosevelt Dimes as RPM-005.

48S-C

In total, CONECA currently lists eight RPMs and one double die obverse for the 1948-S Roosevelt
dimes. Both of the 1948 S/S RPMs currently in The Rose Fields Collection are valuable at about $10
each.

23.

1949
1949-P
1949-D
1949-S

30,940,000
26,034,000
13,510,000

For Roosevelt dime collectors, 1949 is considered a key year in the series. Lower mintage figures
support higher prices for dimes produced at all mints; but in particular the 1949-P and 1949-S.
Roosevelts dated 1949-D are a bit harder to find in high grades than most other dates, but gem
examples of 1949 Philadelphia and San Francisco minted dimes can be quite pricey relative to other
dates in the series.

1949-S

1949-S MS 62
49S-A

1949-S MS 61 FT
49S-B

Of particular interest to any Roosevelt dime collector is the 1949-S. The 1949-S Roosevelt is widely
regarded as the key date in the 1946-1964 series, even though it only has the second lowest mintage
in the series, and prices for BU coins are among the highest in the silver series.
There are two 1949-S Roosevelt dimes in this collection. Both lack considerable eye-appeal, however
coin 49S-B may have full torch lines. This is quite notable because the 1949-S is the one of most
difficult silver Roosevelt dime to find with a full torch strike.

49S-B

The two main professional coin grading services, NGC and PCGS, have only certified about a hundred
1949-S Roosevelt dimes combined with Full Torch or Full Bands.

24.

1950
1950-P
1950-D
1950-S

50,130,114
46,803,000
20,440,000

Roosevelt collectors often consider 1950 to be a semi-key year for the series, again due to lower
production numbers; primarily the 1950-S. In this collection is a nice white 1950-S as well as a very
nice 1950-P with full torch lines.
Of particular note, there are a few highly sought after varieties found on the 1950-dated Roosevelts. On
the 1950-D, DDR-001 (FS-801) is one of the major doubled die errors found in the Roosevelt series
and is highly valued by variety specialists.
Other quite popular varieties found among the date are two Over-Mintmarks; a 1950-D D over S (FS501) and a 1950-S S over D RPM-005 (FS-501). Both of these OMMs are also highly valued by variety
collectors.
The Rose Fields Collection does not contain any of these, but there is a nice 1950-D Southwest D/D
RPM.

1950-D MS 62 FT
Southwest D/D RPM-001
Stage B, MDS

Variety Cross Reference


Wexler/Miller WRPM# 1
Flynn RPM-001

50D-B

A nice white dime with great luster and a strong Southwest D/D RPM, listed by CONECA as RPM-001
as well as by Wexler/Miller and Kevin Flynn. Stage B MDS is markered by a weak vertical bar on the
secondary mintmark and numerous east-west die scratches on the reverse.

50D-B

In total, CONECA lists three RPMs for the 1950-D Roosevelt. This RPM is valued at about $10 in
grades MS 60 to MS 63.

25.

1951
1951-P
1951-D
1951-S

103,880,102
56,529,000
31,630,000

The year 1951 would bring annual production of the Roosevelt dime back over 100 million at the
Philadelphia mint for the first time in three years. Uncirculated and high grade specimens of the 1951-P
Roosevelt are fairly common and available.
There are two 1951-P dimes in this collection. The second dime (51P-B) has strong examples of two
common die cracks found on the reverse of the Roosevelt dime.
The upper crack runs from one of the flame tip, through the seconds S of STATES, and to the rim. This
crack will generally starts at one of the flame tips, runs anywhere between the second T of STATES to
the F of OF, and to the rim.
The lower crack on this dime runs from the bottom of the torch, through the D of DIME and to the rim.
This is an even more common die crack to find on the Roosevelt dime. This crack generally runs from
the bottom of the torch through the D, I, or M of DIME, and to the rim.
Both of these die cracks are commonly found through all dates and mints of the Roosevelt dime.
However, it is not so common to find both cracks on the same coin. When both of these cracks are
present, I like to recognize them as having a Lightening Strike reverse, because of their combined
resemblance to a bolt of lightening, although they are technically two separate cracks.

51P-B

These die cracks add no value to Roosevelt dimes. In fact, if anything, they should devalue the coin in
my opinion. However, these die cracks, and others found on the Roosevelt dime, typically do not
significantly affect the value in either way. The biggest value of die cracks for collectors are their use as
as markers for varieties and in die state diagnostics.

26.

The 1951-D Roosevelt, despite having a much lower mintage, is an easier date to find uncirculated and
in high grades. It's not even uncommon to find 1951-D dimes with full torch strikes. The 1951-S, on
the other hand, is sometimes considered to be semi-key to the series, due to lower relative
production.
The 1951 San Francisco-minted dimes have been noted to have weaker strikes. However, the strike of
the 1951-S in this collection is pretty good on both sides, although several die scratches and chips
suggest a later die state. Overall, the 1951-S dime in this collection is a nice-looking coin to the naked
eye, but a look through a loop shows many scratches and die imperfections.
Varieties on the 1951-dated Roosevelts are relatively few and far between. There are no known double
dies on any 1951 business-struck Roosevelts from any of the three mints. As far as RPMs, CONECA
only lists three for 1951-D and five for 1951-S.

1951-D MS 61
D/D North RPM-001
Stage C LDS
51D-B

Variety Cross Reference


Fivaz-Stanton Cherrypickers' FS-501
Wexler/Miller WRPM# 1
Flynn RPM-001

A decent looking coin that's lost a bit of luster, this D/D North RPM is list by CONECA as RPM-001 as
well as in The Cherrypickers' Guide as FS-501 and by Wexler/Miller as RPM# 1 and Kevin Flynn as
RPM-001.

51D-B

This is the most common RPM for the 1951 date, but a nice long-known RPM for the series.

1952 through 1954


1952-P
1952-D
1952-S
1953-P
1953-D
1953-S
1954-P

99,040,093
122,100,000
44,419,500
53,490,120
136,433,000
39,180,000
114,010,203

27.

The 1952 date begin a run of seemingly lackluster years of production for the Rooosevelt dime. With
much higher production from all three mints, well-struck specimens in high-grades from these years are
readily available, for the most part. There are only a handful of very interesting dates and varieties
through 1954. But nothing compared to previous dates.
The 1953-P Roosevelt is a bit of interest to collectors. Even with a mintage of over 50 million, a nice
looking 1953-P Roosevelt can be tricky to find in high grades. The 1953-P in this collection is a really
nice bright white dime with great original luster. The surfaces are free of and major detracting contact
marks, however there are many die scratches in the fields on both sides. Most of the torch lines on the
reverse are complete, however the lower band line is all but nonexistent. The 1953-P date is one of the
harder dates to find with full torch lines on Roosevelt dimes.
1954-S
S/S/S Northwest, South RPM-001
Stage E, VLDS
54S-B

Variety Cross Reference


Fivaz-Stanton Cherrypickers' FS-501
Wexler/Miller WRPM# 1
Flynn RPM-005

In the Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins, Walter Breen notes a variety of 1954-S that is missing
the JS initial. This variety probably resulted from over polishing of the working die in the initial and is
not the result of any design change. Nevertheless, it is very sought after by collectors. Yet it is also very
rare. PCGS has only certified ten 1954-S with missing JS initials.
The 1954-S variety represented in this collection is still a very nice triple struck RPM. Listed by
CONECA as RPM-001, this variety's secondary and tertiary strike are located to the Northwest and
South.

1955
1955-P
1955-D
1955-S

12,450,181
13,959,000
18,510,000

The Treasury Department thought that it would be more cost effective to stop minting business-struck
coinage at San Francisco Mint and turn the facility into an assay office. Circulation coinage would be
minted at the Philadelphia and Denver Mints and simply shipped West to supply the market.
In those days, the U.S. Government's fiscal year ran from July 1 st to June 30th. So the closing of the San
Francisco mint means coins could only be produced during the first half of the calender year. The
closing of the San Francisco mint and relatively low mintage was recognized by collectors at the time
and the 1955-S Roosevelt was considered a significant date for the series. This lead to a high volume of
hoarding the 1955-S date. In fact, original bank rolls of 1955-S Roosevelts are still readily available.
It wasn't until a few years later that the 1955 Philadelphia- and Denver-minted Roosevelts were
recognized as scarcer dates. The 1955-P Roosevelt dime actually has the lowest mintage figure among
the 1946 to 1964 series. However, as with the case of the 1955-S, the low mintage of the 1955-P was
recognized and many coins were hoarded. Thus all 1955-dated Roosevelts are readily available in the
MS grades and do not command very high prices.
28.

It should be noted, however, that 1955-P and 1955-S Roosevelt dimes with full torch strikes can be
very difficult to find.
The 1955-P (55P-A) in The Rose Fields Collection has a bright blue toning on both sides with hints of
oranges and reds. There are a few small dings on Roosevelt's ear and scratches across the torch lines.
However, this dime has a very good strike for the date and it's high eye-appeal should be credited in
grading.

1955-P MS 64 (55P-A)

This collection includes two 1955-D Roosevelt dimes. The first (55D-A) is a bright white coin with
great luster and nice near full torch strike. However, a look through a high-power loupe shows a tiny
interruption in the lower band line. Nevertheless, this dime has a nice strike.
The second 1955-D (not coded) is another bright white coin
also with a pretty good strike. However, the main reason
that this dime is in the collection is simply because it's in
that awesome vintage cardboard flip.
I am unsure of when this dime was put in this cardboard
flip, but my guess is sometime in the 1980s based on the
yellowing of the cardboard.
The 1955-S (55S-A) in this collection was once in an old
PCGS rattler holder graded MS 65. However, I removed
this coin from is PCGS slab because the holder was quite
damaged.
You'll notice that my grade of MS 62 is significantly lower
than PCGS assessment. I deducted quite a few points for
lack of eye-appeal and luster. This is a coin that I believe
was grossly overgraded.

29.

1955-D MS 62

1956
1956-P
1956-D

108,640,000
108,015,100

1956 begins a series of successive years with slight obverse variations that runs to the end of the 1964
silver series. However, only two dates have variations within the mintage year; 1958 and 1964. The
obverse design varieties of the other dates will carry no premium and are really only a footnote.
Before discussing these varieties, it's important to note that CONECA's research on the Obverse Design
Varieties is incomplete. Dr. James Wiles, the primary die variety attributer for CONECA, tells me that
he will get eventually get to it. So some the CONECA reference codes could be chaged or added to in
the future. Nevertheless, all of the current CONECA-listed ODVs are represented and noted in this
collection.
The 1956 Obverse Design Variety change can be noted by a more prominent beak and upper serif on
the G of GOD, currently listed by CONECA as ODV-003. The 1956-P is one of the harder dimes to
find with a full torch strike. Between NGC and PCGS, less than 250 Roosevelts with this date have
been certified Full Torch or Full Bands.
The 1956-P dime in this collection does not have the greatest eye-appeal. However it well-struck
resulting in a very near full torch strike. Nearly all of vertical and horizontal band lines are present,
although the lines are not very clear in many places, particularly on the lower band line. This dime
would probably not get a FT or FB designation from NGC or PCGS. Nevertheless it is a good example
of a 1956-P with a good torch strike.
A 1956-P Roosevelt at graded at MS 66 NGC or PCGS without full torch is valued at about $20. With
FT or FB, the value goes to $150.

1957
1957-P
1957-D

160,160,000
113,354,330

The 1957 Obverse Design Variety removes the beak and upper serif on the G of GOD, but adds a
pronounced horizonal arm on the G of GOD that resembles a very large serif. This design variety is
listed as ODV-004 by CONECA.

30.

The 1957 Roosevelt is another date that known for heavy colored toning. The first 1957-P (57P-A, seen
above) in this collection is brushed with a light orange/champagne glow on the obverse with a backside
covered in a wild electric blue when caught in the right light.
The 1957-P should also be noted as one of the hardest Roosevelt dimes to find with a full torch strike.
NGC and PCGS have certified less than 200 1957-P Roosevelts with FT or FB.
The second 1957-P in this collection is a bright white coin with great luster and strike. All torch lines
are nearly full and complete.
A 1956-P Roosevelt at graded at MS 66 NGC or PCGS without full torch is valued at about $20. With
FT or FB, the value goes to about $125.

1958
1958-P
1958-D

31,910,000
136,564,600

In 1958, two slightly different obverse working dies were used to produce Roosevelt dimes. One, listed
by CONECA as ODV-005, is noted for the prominent spur on the G of GOD. The other, ODV-006, has
very nearly no protruding spur on the G of GOD, appearing almost straight ar the bottom of the letter.

1958-P
ODV-005
58P-A

1958-D
ODV-005
58D-A

1958-P
ODV-006
58P-B

1958-D
ODV-006
58D-B

The 1958-P should also be noted as one of the hardest Roosevelt dimes to find with a full torch strike.
A 1956-P Roosevelt at graded at MS 66 NGC or PCGS without full torch is valued at about $20. With
FT or FB, the value goes to about $275.

1959
1959-P
1959-D

85,780,000
164,919,790

In 1959 the obverse design of the Roosevelt dime was consistent for the year. This design, listed by
CONECA as ODV-007, is characterized by a smaller spur on the bottom of the G of GOD.
Some specimens from the 1959 year show evidence of die deterioration of the JS initials. They are
often indistinct and the S may appear to be little more than a blob or in later die states, most of the
bottom of the S may even be missing.
This collection includes two 1959-P (59P-A & 59P-B) and two 1959-D (59D-A & 59D-B) Roosevelt
dimes. The first 1959-P (59P-A) in this collection exhibits very similar toning to the 1957-P (57P-A)
31.

with red, orange, and blue coloring on the front with an electric blue on the reverse.
The second 1959-P (59P-B), as well as the second 1959-D (59D-B), in this collection were cut from a
mint set but still sealed in their original mint cellophane. Of particular note, the 1959-D (59D-B) has a
very good torch strike with near full line detail.

1960
1960-P
1960-D

70,390,000
200,160,400

In 1960, the mint again added a pronounced horizontal arm to the G of GOD as it was on the 1957dated Roosevelts. However, this ODV exhibits a small nick at 4 o'clock on the O of GOD. This design
is currently known as ODV-008 in CONECA's master listings.

1960-D Unc. Details (Cleaned)


ODV-008
D/D East RPM-003
Stage C, LDS
60D-B

Variety Cross Reference


Fivaz-Stanton Cherrypickers' FS-501

Although this dime shows evidence of cleaning, it is a good example of a well-known D/D East RPM,
listed by CONECA as RPM-003 and in The Cherrypickers' Guide under FS-501. This coin is also good
to have in a collection to have as example of a clearly cleaned coin. There is clear surface damage on
both sides from what we can only assume was some chemical.

1961
1961-P
1961-D

93,730,000
209,146,550

In 1961, the mint strengthened the spine of the G of GOD, but the small nick at 4 o'clock on the O of
GOD is still evident. Many will also have a noticeable mark between the left and center peaks of the W
of WE. This mark is likely the result of an imperfect master die. CONECA listed this design variety as
ODV-009.
The 1961-D dime should also be of particular note for Roosevelt collectors. Despite over 200 million
being produced, it seems currently a bit difficult to obtain high-grade 1961-D Roosevelt dimes with
good eye-appeal. Uncirculated coins are still available in mint sets, but most are discolored or lost their
luster.

1962
1962-P
1962-D

72,450,000
334,948,380

For the 1962 Roosevelt the mint fixed nick on the right side of the O of GOD to strengthen the letter.
CONECA calls this obverse design ODV-010.
32.

The three 1962 dimes in this collection are all very nice bright white coins with great strikes and luster.
The 1962-D (62D-A) in particular has a very nice example of a complete bottom torch band line. There
appears to be some scuffs on the upper band, but there is no interruption of the line.

1962-D MS 62 FT
ODV-010
D/D North RPM-001
Stage B, MDS
62D-B

Variety Cross Reference


Flynn RPM-002

There are no known doubled dies for the the 1962-D but CONECA has six RPMs listed for the date.
This D/D North is the first repunched mintmark listed by CONECA as RPM-001. The bowl of the
secondary D can be seen protruding from the Northeast of the primary mintmark. This RPM is also
noted in Kevin Flynn's Authoritative Reference on Roosevelt Dimes as RPM-002. Stage B is marked
by North-South die scratches on the reverse.

1963
1963-P
1963-D

123,650,000
421,476,530

The Philadelphia Mint produced over 123 million Roosevelt dimes dated 1963. And several hundreds
of thousands survive in mint condition. But dimes with full torch strikes are much less common.
In total, NGC and PCGS have less than 200 Philadelphia-minted Roosevelts certified FT or FB, putting
the date among the top ten least silver Roosevelt dimes to receive the designation. Grades above MS 67
are also uncommon. NGC and PCGS have less then 25 certified 1963-P Roosevelts graded higher than
MS 67 in their registries combined.
The 1963-D Roosevelt is very common among the series. The Denver Mint produced over 420 million
dimes dated 1963, and mint state specimens survive in the millions. Roosevelts certified MS 65 have
book values of only $5 to $10.
However, coins with full torch strikes are much less common. In total, NGC and PCGS have less than
250 Denver-minted Roosevelts certified FT or FB, putting the date among the top ten least silver
Roosevelt dimes to receive the designation. Grades above MS 67 are also quite uncommon. NGC and
PCGS have less then 50 certified 1963-D Roosevelts graded higher than MS 67 in their registries
combined.
In 1963 the spur on the G of GOD is more pronounced than the previous year for what CONECA labels
ODV-011. The 1963-P should also be noted as one of the hardest Roosevelt dimes to find with a full
torch strike.

33.

1964
1964-P
1964-D

929,360,000
1,357,517,180

Although most collectors believe that 1964 was the last year that silver dimes would intentionally be
coined for general circulation, this is not the case. According to Domestic and Foreign Coins
Manufactured by Mints of the United States 1793-1980, issued by the Department of the Treasurys
Bureau of the Mint, 1964 dated dimes were struck from January 1964 through April of 1966.
During this time, the Treasury Department produced over 2 billion Roosevelt dimes dated 1964. With
so many coins produced, mint state examples survive in the millions. However, only a few very highgrade examples have been certified by NGC and PCGS. Of both mints, there are only two 1964-D
Roosevelt dimes that have been graded MS 68 by PCGS, and none by NGC.
New obverse hubs were introduced during 1964 mintage resulting in working dies with two new and
distinct variations. These variations are not found on the G of GOD, but in the 9 of the 1964 date.
These variations are more commonly known and the Pointed 9 and Blunt 9 varieties.

1964-P
ODV-012.1 (self-assigned code)
Pointed 9
64P-A

1964-D
ODV-012.1 (self-assigned code)
Pointed 9
64D-A

1964-P
ODV-012
Blunt 9
64P-B

1964-D
ODV-012
Blunt 9
64D-B

ODV-012.1 (self-assigned code) Pointed 9 As previously mentioned, CONECA's research on the


ODV of Roosevelt dimes is incomplete and the organization does not currently have an assigned ODV
number for the Pointed 9 variety. So for the purposes of identification, I will use ODV-012.1 in this
catalog (as well as on the slab label) to identify the Pointed 9 variety. Roosevelt dimes produced during
the early part of the 1964 run have a pointed tail on the 9 and a plain upper serif on the 1 in the date.
ODV-012 Blunt 9 The result of the new obverse hub ,Roosevelt dimes produced during the
remainder of the year exhibit a rectangular or blunt tail to the 9 and no serif on the 1 in the date.
This collection includes both ODV-012.1 and ODV-012 examples from the 1964-P and -D mintage.

1964-D MS 62
ODV-12 (Blunt 9)
Minor Clipped Planchet @ 2:00

A mostly white coin which has lost a bit of shine; but a good example of a legitimate clipped planchet
mint error with the Blakesley Effect, which is characterized by rim weakness directly opposite the
missing portion of a clipped planchet error coin.. A minor ~3% clip is seen at 2:00 with very clear
weakness on and around the rim at 8:00.
34.

Clad Roosevelt Dimes (1965 Present)


Due to rising silver prices, the U.S. mint ceased production of the business-struck silver Roosevelt
dime in 1964. The new substitute would be a sandwich metal composed of cupro-nickel outer layers
bonded to a copper core.
It is interesting to note that some silver planchets inadvertently found their way into the new coppernickel stock and were actually struck with 1965, 1966, and even 1967 dates. These coins are referred to
as Transitional Errors and are very rare. One 1965 silver Roosevelt dime graded AU-55 by PCGS
sold in 2010 at auction for over $5,000. (see The rim trick section in this catalog on how to spot
silver dimes)

35.

Acronyms and Abbreviations


AG = About Good
AG = Silver (Chemical Symbol)
ANA = American Numismatic Association
ANACS = American Numismatic Association Certification Service (Grading Service)
AT = Artificial Toning or Artificially Toned
AU = Almost Uncirculated
BU = Brilliant Uncirculated
BV = Bullion Value
CAC = Certified Acceptance Corporation
CCW = Counter Clockwise
CH = Choice
CONECA = Combined Organization of Numismatic Error Collectors of America
CW = Clockwise
CWR = Customer Wrapped Roll
D = Denver Mintmark
D/D = D over D RPM
D/D/D = D over D over D RPM
DDD = Die Deterioration Doubling
DDO = Doubled Die Obverse
DDR = Doubled Die Reverse
D/S = D over S OMM
EDS = Early Die State
EF = Extremely Fine
EMDS = Early Mid Die State
F = Fine
FB = Full Bands (PCGS Designation)
FS = Fivaz-Stanton (Reference Number Prefix in the Cherrypickers Guide)
FSB = Full Split Bands (ANACS Designation)
FT = Full Torch (NGC Designation)
G = Good
LDS = Late Die State
LMDS = Late Mid Die State
MAD = Misaligned Die
MDD = Machine Damage Doubling
MDO = Master Die Doubling
MDR = Master Die Doubling
36.

MDS = Mid Die State


MLDS = Mid to Late Die State
MMS = Mintmark Style
MS = Mint State
NGC = Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (Grading Service)
NT = Natural Toning or Naturally Toned
OBW = Original Bank Wrapped Roll
OC = Off-center
ODV = Obverse Design Variety
OMM = Over Mintmark
P = Poor
PCGS = Professional Coin Grading Service (Grading Service)
PMD = Post Mint Damage
PQ = Premium Quality
PUP = Pick-up Point
RDV = Reverse Design Variety
RPM = Repunched Mintmark
S = San Francisco Mintmark
S/D = S over D OMM
SMS = Special Mint Set
S/S = S over S RPM
S/S/S = S over S over S RPM
TDV = Transitional Design Variety
TPG = Third Party Grading Service
UNC = Uncirculated
URS = Universal Rarity Scale
UVC = Universal Variety Code
VEDS = Very Early Die State
VG = Very Good
VF = Very Fine
VLDS = Very Late Die State
WDDO = Doubled Die Obverse listed by Wexler/Miller in The RPM Book
WDDR = Doubled Die Reverse listed by Wexler/Miller in The RPM Book
WOMM = Over Mintmark listed by Wexler/Miller in The RPM Book
WRPM = Repunched Mintmark listed by Wexler/Miller in The RPM Book
XF = Extremely Fine

37.

Bibliography
Breen, Walter. Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins. New York, NY:
Doubleday, 1988.
Flynn, Kevin. The Authoritative Reference on Roosevelt Dimes, 2001.
Fivaz, Bill and J.T. Stanton. The Cherrypickers' Guide to Rare Die Varieties, Fourth Edition, Volume II.
Atlanta, GA: Whitman Publishing, LLC, 2006.
Wexler, John. The Encyclopedia of Doubled Dies, Volume 1, 1981.
Wexler, John. The Encyclopedia of Doubled Dies, Volume 2, 1981.
Wexler, John and Tom Miller. The RPM Book, Newbury Park, CA: Devine Printing Co., 1983.
Yeoman, R.S. And Kenneth Bresset, ed. A Guide Book of United States Coins, 67th Edition, Atlanta,
GA: Whitman Publishing, LLC, 2013.

Further Suggested Reading


Errorscope CONECA's bimonthly journal mailed to members.

Recommended Websites
www.CoinGrading.com A great introduction to grading coins by Scott Travers
www.ConecaOnline.org Combined Organization of Numismatic Error Collectors of America, or
CONECA for short, is a major numismatic organization for error and variety coin collectors
www.DoublEddie.com John Wexler's website, an incredible resource for variety information
www.Money.org The official website of the American Numismatic Association, nation's largest
organization for coin and paper money collectors
www.NGCCoin.com Numismatic Guaranty Corporation's website (NGC), one of the two primary
third-party grading companies
www.RichardsRooseveltReview.net An excellent resource for coin collectors focused on silver
Roosevelt dimes, published by Grand Blanc Associates
www.PCGS.com Professional Coin Grading Service's website (PCGS), one of the two primary thirdparty grading companies
www.PCGS.com/EyeAppeal PCGS' guide to the eye-appeal of coins, a terrific guide to explaining
eye-appeal
www.PCGS.com/Photograde PCGS' photograde guide, a great way to help beginners grade coins
www.VarietyVista.com CONECA's Master Listing of Die Varieties
38.

Roosevelt Dime Mintages


1946-P
1946-D
1946-S
1947-P
1947-D
1947-S
1948-P
1948-D
1948-S
1949-P
1949-D
1949-S
1950-P
1950-D
1950-S
1951-P
1951-D
1951-S
1952-P
1952-D
1952-S
1953-P
1953-D
1953-S
1954-P
1954-D
1954-S
1955-P
1955-D
1955-S
1956-P
1956-D
1957-P
1957-D
1958-P
1958-D
1959-P
1959-D
1960-P
1960-D
1961-P
1961-D
1962-P
1962-D
1963-P
1963-D
1964-P

255,250,000
61,043,500
27,900,000
121,520,000
46,835,000
34,840,000
74,950,000
52,841,000
35,520,000
30,940,000
26,034,000
13,510,000
50,130,114
46,803,000
20,440,000
103,880,102
56,529,000
31,630,000
99,040,093
122,100,000
44,419,500
53,490,120
136,433,000
39,180,000
114,010,203
106,397,000
22,860,000
12,450,181
13,959,000
18,510,000
108,640,000
108,015,100
160,160,000
113,354,330
31,910,000
136,564,600
85,780,000
164,919,790
70,390,000
200,160,400
93,730,000
209,146,550
72,450,000
334,948,380
123,650,000
421,476,530
929,360,000

1964-D
1965-P
1966-P
1967-P
1968-P
1968-D
1969-P
1969-D
1970-P
1970-D
1971-P
1971-D
1972-P
1972-D
1973-P
1973-D
1974-P
1974-D
1975-P
1975-D
1976-P
1976-D
1977-P
1977-D
1978-P
1978-D
1979-P
1979-D
1980-P
1980-D
1981-P
1981-D
1982-P
1982-D
1983-P
1983-D
1984-P
1984-D
1985-P
1985-D
1986-P
1986-D
1987-P
1987-D
1988-P
1988-D
1989-P

39.

1,357,517,180
1,652,140,570
1,382,734,540
2,244,007,320
424,470,400
480,748,280
145,790,000
563,323,870
345,570,000
754,942,100
162,690,000
377,914,240
431,540,000
330,290,000
315,670,000
455,032,426
470,248,000
571,083,000
585,673,900
313,705,300
568,760,000
695,222,774
796,930,000
376,607,228
663,980,000
282,847,540
315,440,000
390,921,184
735,170,000
719,354,321
676,650,000
712,284,143
519,475,000
542,713,584
647,025,000
730,129,224
856,669,000
704,803,976
705,200,962
587,979,970
682,649,693
473,326,970
762,709,481
653,203,402
1,030,550,000
962,385,489
1,298,400,000

1989-D
1990-P
1990-D
1991-P
1991-D
1992-P
1992-D
1993-P
1993-D
1994-P
1994-D
1995-P
1995-D
1996-P
1996-D
1996-W
1997-P
1997-D
1998-P
1998-D
1999-P
1999-D
2000-P
2000-D
2001-P
2001-D
2002-P
2002-D
2003-P
2003-D
2004-P
2004-D
2005-P
2005-D
2006-P
2006-D
2007-P
2007-D
2008-P
2008-D
2009-P
2009-D
2010-P
2010-D
2011-P
2012-P
2012-D

Most Popular and Valuable Roosevelt Dime Varieties


The most valuable varieties found on the Roosevelt dime are not from the 1946 to 1964 silver series.
Nor are they business-struck coins. The most valuable Roosevelt dimes varieties are a series of proofstruck coins that, due to an apparent oversight, are missing their S mintmark. These proof dates include
the 1968, 1970, and 1983. Recent examples of the highest graded 1968 No S Roosevelt proofs have
sold for $30,000 to $35,000. But the granddaddy of them all is the 1975 No S Roosevelt proof.
Only two examples of the 1975 No S Roosevelt proof are known to exist. It is the second rarest U.S.
coin to be struck, which David Hall founder and CEO of PCGS a legendary rarity. And only one has
ever been brought to public auction.
In 2011, Stack's Bowers Galleries brought a 1975 No S Roosevelt dime graded PF-68 by PCGS to the
market. The final selling price was just under an incredible $350,000!
This was no doubt the highest price ever paid for a Roosevelt dime. But extreme prices come with
extreme rarity. The rarity of finding one of these No S proofs is comparable to winning the lottery.
However, when collecting silver Roosevelt dimes there are a few very popular and valuable variety to
be on the lookout for.
1946-P
DDO-008 (FS-104) and DDR-007 (FS-802) Popular doubled die varieties among collectors,
both valued over $350 in grades higher than MS 65.
1947-S
S/D OMM-001 (FS-501) and S/D OMM-002 (FS-502) Very popular OMMs among variety
collectors, both valued over $500 in grades higher than MS 65.
1950-D
DDR-001 (FS-801) One of the major doubled die errors found in the Roosevelt series, highly
valued by variety specialists. And valued at $500 in grades higher than MS 65.
D/S OMM (FS-501) A highly sought after OMM among variety collectors, valued at $850 in
grades higher than MS 65.
1950-S
S/Inverted S (RPM-005) or S/S/D (FS-501) There is some debate over whether this variety is
an S over inverted S or an S over S over D. Nevertheless, this is among the most popular
varieties among the silver Roosevelt dime series, valued at $750 in grades higher than MS 65.
1953-D
D Over Horizontal D RPM-003 (FS-501) An interesting variety valued at $150 in grades
higher than MS 65.
1962-D
D Over Horizontal D RPM-003 (FS-501) Another D over horizontal D RPM valued at $125
in grades higher than MS 65.
40.

1964-P
DDR-006 (FS-801) A popular DDR among variety collectors, valued at $375 in grades higher
than MS 65.
1964-D
Misplaced Mintmark RPM-006 (FS-502) A very interesting variety with the secondary D
protruding from the left side of the torch. This variety was discovered in 1996 and is valued at
$400 in grades higher than MS 65.
DDR-001 (FS-801) and DDR-002 (FS-802) Popular DDRs among variety collectors valued at
$250 in grades higher than MS 65.
In addition to all these, there is also one additional Roosevelt dime collectors should be on the look-out
for: the 1982 No P Roosevelt dime.
Until 1980, a mintmark was put working dies created to be used at one of the U.S. Mint's branches; In
the case of the Roosevelt dime, a D for Denver and an S for San Francisco (with the exception of
coins dated 1965 through 1967). But in 1980, the Mint began striking a P mintmark on coins that
were produced at the main Philadelphia Mint.
In 1982, however, two Roosevelt dime working dies were used at the Philadelphia Mint that were
missing the P mintmark. These coins were discovered almost immediately by roll searchers.
Approximately 10,000 No P 1982 Roosevelt dimes were found.
The variety created by each of the two working dies is listed by Fivaz-Stanton in The Cherrypickers'
Guide (among others) as FS-501 and FS-502. The FS-501 variety is far more valuable than FS-502
with the main difference being strike quality. FS-501 has a very strong strike, while FS-502's strike is
weaker and carries less interest. For this reason a FS-501 graded MS 66 is valued at $600, while a FS502 at the same grade is valued at about $100. Nevertheless, both varieties are quite popular among
collectors and may be found in pocket change.
Below I've provided a complete list of varieties to be on the lookout for. These include all of the
varieties above and the rest mentioned in this catalog.

41.

Complete List of Notable Roosevelt Dime Varieties

1946-P
DDO-008 (FS-104)
DDR-007 (FS-802)

1946-S
Sans-Serif Mintmark
ODV-002/MMS-006 Combination

1947-S
S/D OMM-001 (FS-501)
S/D OMM-002 (FS-502)

1950-D
DDR-001 (FS-801)
RPM-005 (FS-501)

1950-S
S/Inverted S (RPM-005) or S/S/D (FS-501)

1953-D
D Over Horizontal D RPM-003 (FS-501)

1962-D
D Over Horizontal D RPM-003 (FS-501)

1954-S
No JS FS-901

1964-P
DDR-006 (FS-801)

1964-D
Misplaced Mintmark RPM-006 (FS-502)
DDR-001 (FS-801)
DDR-002 (FS-802)

1968-S
No S Proof

1969-P, 1970-P, & 1970-D


RDV-002 Reverse of '68 (FS-901)

42.

1970-S
No S Proof

1975-S
No S Proof

1982-P
No P FS-501
No P FS-502

1983-S
No S Proof

43.

Grading Standards
All of the coins in this collection are graded based on the Sheldon Coin Grading Scale, the current
standard 70-point grading scale used in the numismatic assessment of a coins quality. This scale is a
general measure of surface preservation, strike, luster, and eye-appeal.
To get a general idea of where a coin grades, I first use a formula constructed by Scott Travers, a wellknown and influential coin dealer. Travers' formula simply breaks down each major aspect of the
assessment into a 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest) point-scoring system for each side of a coin. After a
numerical grade has been assigned to each aspect, the points for each side are added together which
correspond to a grade on the Sheldon Coin Grading Scale.
Travers' formula, reprinted below, can be found online here: www.CoinGrading.com/Grade1.html
Obverse

Reverse

Surface Preservation (1-5)

x2 _____

Surface Preservation (1-5)

x2 _____

Strike (1-5)

_____

Strike (1-5)

_____

Luster (1-5)

_____

Luster (1-5)

_____

Eye-Appeal (1-5)

_____

Eye-Appeal (1-5)

_____

Obverse Total

_________

Reverse Total

_________

Corresponding grades:
5 to 12.99

MS 60

20.5 to 21.99

MS 65

13 to 13.99

MS 61

22 to 22.99

MS 66

14 to 17.49

MS 62

23 to 23.99

MS 67

17.5 to 18.99

MS 63

24 to 24.49

MS 68

19 to 20.49

MS 64

24.5 to 24.99

MS 69

From the grades of both side of a coin we can average out the approximate grade. It's important to note
however, as does Travers, that the obverse of a coin is generally given a little more value. Travers
approximates that the value of a coin's grade is weighted about 60/40, obverse to reverse.
Formulas aside, it should be noted that coin grading is less of a science and more of an art. Some
aspects like surface preservation can be quantified to the number of contact marks, scuffs, pits, etc.
However others like eye-appeal can be extremely subjective. So at least some aspect of coin grading is
opinion and the reader may find that he/she may disagree with the grades I've assigned. Nevertheless, I
believe that the coins in this collection are quite critically graded with some being slightly undergraded.
44.