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M. Diamond Resources, Inc.

2355 Westwood Blvd. #555


Los Angeles, Calif. 90064
(310) 837-3537 Telephone
(310) 202-7676 Facsimile

IBOS [DOSA/DALP/IAOA] (22nd Century Clouds)


A Knowledge Worker System Proposal for the World’s
First Autonomous Internet-Based Operating System

The Formula Development Structure for Programming within an


Environment for a Internet-Based Operating System
[DOSA/DALP/IAOA]

The structural programming and formula development format involved in instruction lead
autonomous internet-based operating systems, follows a succeeding guideline of multiple
levels by which initially an Investigative Profile is enacted, developed and implemented
upon the presiding needs of those individual issues currently under review. The
importance or vitality of this process should be duly noted, since the investigative profile
contains the database ranges & informational components necessary for multiple genetic
analytical net mapping in developing evolving novel organizational forms.
The next step involves the processes of using the Employment Related Software
Development Guide as a procedural course of action in acquiring formula systems and
technologies that facilitates the service needs of the global information economy.

Secondly, while completing the ERSDG, the procedural guidelines contained within its
components will focus one’s attention toward the Solution Framework. This systems
matrix represents a majority of the processes and procedures associated with managing
and rendering the services of NAME through its subcontractors toward its client-base.
Moreover, within the component structure of the Solution Framework lies the Consul
Cube. Inside this tactical environment, the strategic format of autonomous grammatical
development (IAOA) is accomplished for the purposes of formula acquisition and
evolving novel organizational forms. Also, contained within the body of the Consul

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Cube is a final Matrix Architecture that houses approximately 100 personalized
Forward & Backward Chaining Search Engines, whose overall label of operations and
Method Structures are used in constructing genetic algorithms. These charted GAs are
composed of a number of integrated routines/subroutines whose purposes are to
comprehensively analyze inputted data, and to then, restructure the data into a Change
Equation. Which, in turns creates Chromosomal Alphanumeric Formulas that are
read by Autonomous Agents. Once the autonomous agents read the formulas, their job
will be to either collect, intercommunicate, restructure, reengineer or to distribute and
focused the information that they have within their possession toward those areas or
issues under their operational jurisdiction.

Additionally, as the autonomous agents fulfill their operational regiment within a series
of distributed databases or websites. Their procedural configurations will be confined
within the RAS Virtual Laboratory, from which as virtual entities, they shall create
over 4 billion structural platforms for the purposes of developing written purposeful
hierarchies into virtual biological entities. As the AAs operate within the RAS
Architecture itself, their structural tasks will be further incorporated into the DOSA
systems-wide configuration. Whereby, their functional duties shall enhance the
network’s overall efficiency levels through using the RAS Architecture as an operational
guide within each component of DOSA.

Furthermore, the last procedural chart of this document represents the Auto-Executable
format from which the internal AAs consistently probe the elements of the investigative
profile. Of which the development of evolable instruction sets are created for use by
virtual biological entities in automatically updating systems technologies. Thereafter,
all factors related to researching, developing and implementing a Formula Strung
Chromosome for the purposes of systems development, are simply comprised of using
the FSDC to initially investigate any and all relevant issues related to network operations.
Finally, the FSDC will also reflect how most of NAME’s structural processes and
procedures are integrated into a 5-phase operational format or training solution of which
is initialized and rendered over a period of two years or less.

The Final Analysis

It is the hope of William E. Fields (GCNO), that the information contained within this
proposal will answer or clarify most of the questions or relevant issues discussed
elsewhere within the framework of the contracting and programming standards of
Nascent Applied Methods & Endeavors. Principally, that this document or file is a
summarized version of two systems development guides (Appendices D & F), whose
pages total over 540. The primary focal point of the Structural Programming and
Formula Development Format for ERSD, is to briefly discuss how the programming
strategies and tactics of NAME work in creating a real-time & virtual organization whose
sole purpose is the manufacturing, storage and distribution of strategic and tactical
government, business or personal intelligence. The secondary focal point for ERSD, is
to reveal how NAME’s virtual autonomous workers (programs) will go about the

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processes of analyzing, engineering or enhancing the strategic policies, operations and
technologies for over 200,000 business structures (i.e., the Thomas Registry).

Additionally, the autonomous programming strategies and tactics for NAME’s ERSD
project reflects how over 20,000 individual software applications are developed through
the processes of integrating the Dictionary of Occupational Titles into NAME’s
operational formats. In essence, this means that NAME has within its developmental
capabilities over 4 billion customizable Internet platforms at its immediate deposal. For
a more detailed explanation of ERSD, please see the Request For Proposal and the
Appendices for NAME’s Contractual Agreements.

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Integrated Cross-the-Board Infrastructural Framework
for NAME’s Internet-Based Operating Systems
IBOS [DOSA/DALP/IAOA]
(virtual or real-time evolving, internet, inter-operable, interactive, multi-tasking/multiple application environments)

Evolving Generic Inter-Operable MT/MA Platforms


1. Words, Ideas, and Concepts (Grammatical, Mathematical or Alphanumeric Formulas)
2. Technological Innovations (Psychological, Philosophical, Sociological & Physiological)
3. Global Environment (Educational, Strategical, Tactical, Financial and Logistical Market
Forces)

Individual Generic Interactive MT/MA Platforms


4. High Level Managers (Definitive DOT Occupations and Educational Procedures)
5. Middle Level Managers (Definitive DOT Occupations and Strategical Procedures)
6. Low Level Managers (Definitive DOT Occupations and Tactical Procedures)
7. Worker Level Employee (Definitive DOT Occupations and Logistical Procedures)

Organizational Generic Internet-Based MT/MA Platforms


8. Governmental Institutions (International, Federal & State Constitutional, Regulatory and
Judicial Based Entities)
9. Financial Institutions (Banking, Monetary Markets and Investment Brokerage Firms)
10. Law Firms (International, Governmental, Corporate, Criminal, Torts, Family Law, etc.)
11. Law Enforcement or Intelligence Organizations (Legal or Investigative Entities)
12. Scientific Organizations (Academic, Technical or Medical Research & Development Firms)
13. Educational Institutions (Academic, Professional, Occupational or Technical Entities)
14. Institutional Foundations (Academic, Charitable, Non-profit or Research Associations)
15. Religious Organizations or Foundations (Judaic, Christian, Islamic, Buddhist, Hindu, etc.)
16. Business Ownership Structures (Sole Proprietor, Partnership, Joint Venture or Corporation)
17. Business Operational Classifications (Financial, Educational, Internet, Manufacturer,
Importer, Exporter, Distributor, Wholesaler, Retailer, R&D, R&D Joint Venture and
Administrative Based)
18. Business Infrastructures (Industrial, Hierarchical or Distributed Managerial Resources)
19. Organizational Policies (Structural, Financial and Operational ERP/MRP Procedures)

NAME’s Internal System-Wide Configuration


1. The Inference Charts are singular components of each cell within the System Matrix.
a. The component cells of the inference charts are representative of each cell within the
consul cube, whose purpose is to provide a series of instructions for [systems
development] and information processing.

2. The (systems development chart) and its use of the consul cube.

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a. Through an autonomous process, the [system development chart] uses the consul cube
to guide its processes into developing autonomous agents and organizational structures
from the DOT database systems.

3. The structural components of the NAME organization in its Physical and Logical
Applications.

a. As the autonomous agents processes itself through the systems development chart, they
will automatically integrate their end results into the network’s physical and logical
structures within its multiple layers as a series of alphanumeric computations.

4. The component use of the web-site reference materials.


a. All eight departmental levels of NAME, shall use the contents down-loaded from the
internet as elements in structurally transforming & processing web information and
technology into internal and external user friendly products and services. For instance,
the information related to Strategic Intelligence being used to mimic intelligence
organizations in a virtual reality mode for the purposes of developing autonomous agents
who will act as an information retrieval system for internal and external systems use.
Then, as an additional option, having NAME’s autonomous structures develop and
service the needs of the network by using the contents of the information at hand to
construct individual and whole organizational systems.

5. The Processing Structure.

a. The System Matrix, Inference Chart, Consul Cube and Systems Development
Chart as they are applied in overall systems development.

NAME’s Semantic Network of Operational Duties


(NAME’s Integrated Operational ICBIF for DOSA)

1. The General Contractor of Network Operations (IBM Protocols)


a. Autonomous Profile – 3/Z

2. The Board of Network Representatives (Novell NetWare)


a. Autonomous Profile – 5/I-J

3. The Chief Accounting Officer of Network Implementation (AppleTalk)


a. Autonomous Profile – 5/A-H

4. The Chief Administrator of Network Operations (XNS Xerox Network System)


a. Autonomous Profile – 4/A-G

5. The Chief Information Officer of Systems & Network Development (ISO)

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a. Autonomous Profile – 1/A-D and 2/A-W

6. The Chief Intelligence Officer of Network Security & Special Operations (TCP/IP)
a. Autonomous Profile – 3/A-EE

7. The Chief Logistics Officer of Network Support (DECnet Phase IV)


a. Autonomous Profile – 5/I-J

8. The Chief Organizational Officer of Education & Social Development (Banyan Vines)

a. Autonomous Profile – 5/K

THE MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE


OF
NASCENT APPLIED METHODS & ENDEAVORS

THE GENERAL CONTRACTOR OF NETWORK OPERATIONS


(Salary Range - Classified)

THE BOARD OF NETWORK REPRESENTATIVES


(Salary Ranges - Classified)

THE CHIEF ADMINISTRATOR OF NETWORK OPERATIONS


(Salary Range - $248 to $550,000 per year)

(Subordinate Staff Members)


THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR OF NETWORK OPERATIONS
THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR OF SALES
THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR SECRETARY/TREASURER
THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATIVE COMPTROLLER
THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR OF INDUSTRIAL TRADE & COMMERCE
(Salary Range - $57,116 to $62,400 per year)

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK ADMINISTRATION & COUNSEL


THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK POLICY & UNIT EVALUATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT & PROMOTIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF CONTRACTUAL OPERATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS & MANAGEMENT
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT LEGISLATION & LAW
(Salary Range - $42,520 to $47,808 per year)

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THE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER OF SYSTEMS
AND
NETWORK DEVELOPMENT
(Salary Range - $248 to $550,000 per year)

(Subordinate Staff Members)


THE DEPUTY INFORMATION OFFICER OF SYSTEMS & NETWORK DEVELOPMENT
THE DEPUTY INFORMATION OFFICER RECORDER/DATAMINER
THE DEPUTY INFORMATION OFFICER OF AUTOMATED BUSINESS PRACTICES
THE DEPUTY INFORMATION OFFICER OF ELECTRONIC COMMERCE
THE DEPUTY INFORMATION OFFICER OF ELETRONIC DATA INTERCHANGE
(Salary Range - $57,116 to $62,400 per year)

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK INFORMATION & RECORDS


THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK SYSTEMS IMPLEMENTATION
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS & TECHNOLOGIES
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK EWA ANALYSIS, DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF DALP SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
(Salary Range - $42,520 to $47,808 per year)

THE CHIEF ACCOUNTING OFFICER


OF
NETWORK IMPLEMENTATION
(Salary Range - $248 to $550,000 per year)

(Subordinate Staff Members)


THE DEPUTY ACCOUNTING OFFICER OF NETWORK IMPLEMENTATION
THE DEPUTY ACCOUNTING OFFICER AUDITOR/GENERAL
THE DEPUTY ACCOUNTING OFFICER OF GLOBAL MONETARY ANALYSIS
THE DEPUTY ACCOUNTING OFFICER OF COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS
THE DEPUTY ACCOUNTING OFFICER OF STRUCTURAL DATABANKING
(Salary Range - $57,116 to $62,400 per year)

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL DEVELOPMENT


THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PHASE ONE IN NETWORK OPERATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PHASE TWO IN NETWORK OPERATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PHASE THREE IN NETWORK OPERATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PHASE FOUR IN NETWORK OPERATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PHASE FIVE IN NETWORK OPERATIONS
(Salary Range - $42,520 to $47,808 per year)

THE CHIEF ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICER


OF
EDUCATION & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
(Salary Range - $248 to $550,000 per year)

(Subordinate Staff Members)


THE DEPUTY ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICER OF EDUCATION & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
THE DEPUTY ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICER OF STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT
THE DEPUTY ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICER OF LANGUAGES & PERCEPTION
THE DEPUTY ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICER OF KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE PLANNING
THE DEPUTY ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICER OF INFORMATIONAL DISPOSITION

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(Salary Range - $57,116 to $62,400 per year)

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES DESIGN, CONTRACTING & CONSTRUCTION


THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK GRANTS & SERVICES
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SCHOLASTIC PROGRAMS & ACTIVITIES
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF BIOLOGICAL/MEDICAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF USER PRIORITIZATION & UTILIZATION
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NETWORK INTELLIGENCE & INVESTIGATIVE ACTIVITIES
(Salary Range - $42,520 to $47,808 per year)

THE CHIEF LOGISTICS OFFICER


OF
NETWORK SUPPORT
(Salary Range - $248 to $550,000 per year)

(Subordinate Staff Members)


THE DEPUTY LOGISTICS OFFICER OF NETWORK SUPPORT
THE DEPUTY LOGISTICS OFFICER OF MATERIAL RESOURCES
THE DEPUTY LOGISTICS OFFICER OF NETWORK PERSONNEL
THE DEPUTY LOGISTICS OFFICER OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS
THE DEPUTY LOGISTICS OFFICER OF CONTRACTUAL NETWORK OPERATIONS
(Salary Range - $57,116 to $62,400 per year)

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN ACCOUNTING


THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN AGRICULTURE
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN COMMUNICATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN CONSTRUCTION
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN EDUCATION
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN ENTERTAINMENT
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN HEALTH MAINTENANCE
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN HUMAN RESOURCING
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN LAW & GOVERNMENT
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN MATERIAL RESOURCING
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN TEXTILE MANUFACTURING
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF METHODS IN TRANSPORTATION
(Salary Range - $42,520 to $47,808 per year)

THE CHIEF INTELLIGENCE OFFICER


OF
NETWORK SECURITY& SPECIAL OPERATIONS
(Salary Range - $248 to $550,000 per year)

(Subordinate Staff Members)


THE DEPUTY INTELLIGENCE OFFICER OF SPECIAL TEAMS & OPERATIONS
THE DEPUTY INTELLIGENCE OFFICER OF PLANNING & DESIGN
THE DEPUTY INTELLIGENCE OFFICER OF STRATEGIC STUDIES
THE DEPUTY INTELLIGENCE OFFICER OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
THE DEPUTY INTELLIGENCE OFFICER OF PROCEDURAL WEIGHTS & MEASURES
(Salary Range - $57,116 to 62,400 per year)

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC PSYCHOLOGY


THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS & COMMUNICATIONS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC ECONOMICS & TACTICS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS & TACTICS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF KNOWLEDGE WORKER SYSTEMS
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF ENCRYPTION SERVICES
(Salary Range - $42,520 to 47,808 per year)

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The Structural References or Points & Authorities,
Procedures & Autonomous Agent Development Processes of
NAME’s Organizational (DOSA) Terminologies

(NAME’s Map-Link of Strategic Development )

Autonomous Agent Research & Development Programs and Processes


1. The Biological Analogies, Genetic Codes and Theories in Autonomous Agent
Development and Implementation.

a. Anatomy on the Internet


(http://www.meddean.luc.edu/lumen/MedEd/GrossAnatomy/anatomy.htm)
(http://www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/home.html)
(http://www.kumc.edu/AMA-MSS/study/anatomy.htm)

b. The Genome Symposia


(http://www.fplc.edu/risk/genindx.htm)
(http://golgi.harvard.edu/)
(http://www.ultranet.com/~jkimball/BiologyPages/C/Chromosomes.html)

c. The Genetic Code


(http://psyche.uthct.edu/shaun/SBlack/geneticd.html)
(http://www.front.net/gencode/dnachart.jpg)
(http://wsrv.clas.virginia.edu/~rjh9u/code.html)

d. Genetic Mapping and DNA Sequencing


(http://www-hto.usc.edu/books/msw/gmds/index.html)
(http://outcast.gene.com/ae/AB/GG/)
(http://www-genome.wi.mit.edu/cgi-bin/contig/phys_map)
(http://genome-www.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/SGD/pgMAP/pgMap)
(http://www.chlc.org/)
(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Science96/)
(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Web/Newsltr/aug96.html)
(http://www.public.iastate.edu/~pigmap/edu/gene/glossary.html)

Autonomous Agent Programming Specifications and Engineering Tools


2. The Autonomous Agent Structural Protocols, Software Programs and Engineering Codes.

a. The Introduction to Computational Biology


(http://www-hto.usc.edu/)
(http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~aghitza/suffix/SuffixTreeGrow.html)
(http://www.cbc.umn.edu/VirtLibrary/Bieganski/htree/htree-paper.ss.html)

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b. Bio/Chem LabAssistant
(http://www.dundee.ac.uk/bioscience/dunsci01.htm)
(http://www-genome.wi.mit.edu/)
(http://www.ornl.gov/ORNLReview/rev25-1/intel.html)
(http://www.cbc.med.umn.edu/)

c. Recombinant DNA Technology Course


(http://lenti.med.umn.edu/recombinant_dna/recombinant_flowchart.html)

d. An Object-Oriented Genetics Information System


(http://www.cs.rpi.edu/~szymansk/OOF90/thesis.html)
(http://www.ibm.com/java/education/ooleveraging/index.html)
(http://db.sk.tsukuba.ac.jp/papers/APSEC95/APSEC.html)
(http://www.sm.luth.se/csee/courses/smd/104/lectures/Booch_02_ObjectModel/slide0.html)
(http://www.cbc.umn.edu/VirtLibrary/Shoop/SAC93/SAC93.papers.ss.html)
(http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/tri-dove.html)
(http://www.mathcs.duq.edu/~softeng/index.html)
(http://www.santafe.edu/~aywong/ooga/ooga.html)
(http://axaonl.cern.ch:8000/a_doc%24www/ONLINE/OO_RESOURCES.HTML)
(http://bilbo.ide.hk-r.se:8080/~michaelm/fwpages/fwbibl.html)

e. Cost-Sensitive Classification: Empirical Evaluation of a Hybrid Genetic Decision Tree


Induction Algorithm
(http://www.cs.washington.edu/research/jair/volume2/turney95a-html/title.html)

f. Gensym Intelligent Real-Time Systems


(http://itobor.ee.washington.edu/G2man/g2doc/g2rm/titlepag.htm)
(http://ncgia.umesve.maine.edu/~max/SR.html)
(http://www.uni-koblenz.de/ag-ki/LP/lp_systems.html)
(http://hla.dmso.mil/projects/)

g. Genetic Reports and Statistics


(http://gdb.infobiogen.fr/gdb/report.html)

h. Exploiting System Hierarchy to Compute Repair Plans in Probabilistic Model-based Diagnosis


(http://www.lis.pitt.edu/~dsl/IJCAI95/pradhan.html)
(http://kirchoff.ee.suffolk.edu/~bulyko/barium/Documentation/Reference/tree.html)

i. An Ancient and Occult Genetic Code


(http://ddi.digital.net/~krakowss/code01.htm)

j. The Online Collection of Bibles


(http://www.bibles.net/)
(http://bible.gospelcom.net/bible?version=KJV&passage=all)
(http://bible.gospelcom.net/bible?language=English&version=KJV&passage=1+Corinthians+12)
(http://www.sil.org/linguistics/linguistics.html)

k. The Dictionary of Occupational Titles *


(http://www.wave.net/upg/immigration/dot_index.html)
(http://www.cecer.army.mil/kws/)
(http://www.brooks.af.mil/HSC/products/products.html)

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(http://admin.engr.wisc.edu/quest/CLERIC/CLERIC_c.htm)

l. Artificial-Life Simulators and Their Applications *


(http://www.construct.net/tierra/)
(http://alife.santafe.edu/alife/topics/simulators/dret/dret.html)
(http://alife.santafe.edu/alife/topics/jvn/jvn.html)
(http://www.dcs.ed.ac.uk/ipu/ipunew/ipunew.html)
(http://afrodite.itc.it:1024/research-topics/ML-MC-project.html)
(http://www.isi.edu/isd/AA97/software-demo.html)

m. Evolving Software Using Automatic Program Transformation *


(http://www.cs.qub.ac.uk/pub/TechReports/)
(http://auriga.atnf.csiro.au/library/COMPUTING/starlink/sun61.htx/sun61.html)

n. Prototyping Graphical Interfaces to Networked Information


(http://bliss.berkeley.edu/papers/asis93/asis93.html)
(http://ir.dcs.gla.ac.uk/projects/)
(http://www.oclc.org/oclc/research/publications/review94/part2/xscepter.htm)
(http://huachuca-dcd.army.mil/IEWSYS/asas.htm)
(http://www.gordon.army.mil/doctrine/1143/default.htm)

o. Using an Intelligent Agent to Enhance Search Engine Performance


(http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Aristotle.htm)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/sources.htm)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/core/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/task/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/collect/index.index)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/process/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/disseminate/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/other/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/list.htm)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/index.html)
(http://155.217.58.58/cgi-bin/atdl.dll?type=fm&school=301)
(http://155.217.58.58/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/34-8-2/default.htm)
(http://155.217.58.58/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/query/info/FM/34-10-13)
(http://155.217.58.58/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/34-2-1/toc.htm)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm34-60/)
(http://www.parascope.com/articles/0397/kubark06.htm)
(http://www.parascope.com/articles/0397/kubarkin.htm)
(http://ndcweb.navy.mil/untl/sec5pt2b.htm) ***

p. New Run Parameter Database Library *


(http://rd13doc.cern.ch/public/doc/Note127/Note127_1.html)
(http://rd13doc.cern.ch/public/doc/Note81/Note81.html)

q. Towards a Classification-based Approach to Resource Discovery on the Web


(http://www.scit.wlv.ac.uk/wwlib/position.html)
(http://www.scit.wlv.ac.uk/~ex1253/www7paper/)
(http://sigart.acm.org/proceedings/agents97/A044/A044.html)

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r. Complex Subject Classifications
(http://www.math.niu.edu/~rusin/known-math/index/)
(http://www.acm.uiuc.edu/signet/JHSI/cr.D.3.2.html)
(http://dynamics.bu.edu/InterJournal/areas_CX.html)
(http://bubl.ac.uk/journals/alltitles.html)

s. The Extended Computing Reviews Classification Scheme


(http://www.pmms.cam.ac.uk/MR/Crclass.html)
(http://www.acm.org/class/1998/ccs98.html)

t. Events on Neural Networks, Vision, and Speech: Conferences, Congresses, etc.


(http://herens.idiap.ch/NN-events/)

u. On the Construction of Selection Systems


(http://bliss.berkeley.edu/papers/analysis/analysis.html)
(http://bliss.berkeley.edu/papers/assoc/assoc.html)
(http://bliss.berkeley.edu/papers/fffff/fffff.html)
(http://bliss.berkeley.edu/papers/mid-year93/mid-year93.html)
(http://bliss.berkeley.edu/papers/sigir93/sigir93.html)
(http://bliss.berkeley.edu/papers/mid-year92/mid-year92.html)
(http://www.csi.uottawa.ca/~tcl/thesis_html/thesis_ToC.html)
(http://www.sresearch.com)
(http://www.storage.ibm.com/press/san/990217.htm)

v. A Strategic Approach to Data Warehouse Development


(http://www.ozemail.com.au/~visible/papers/IW.html)
(http://www.itcompany.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi)
(http://vlib.stanford.edu/Home.html)
(http://www.lib.lsu.edu/govdocs/index.html)
(http://www.slac.standford.edu/library/documents)
(http://www.dtic.mil/c3i/bprcd/mlibtop.htm)
(http://www.fas.org/document.htm)

w. Information Retrieval Systems *


(http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/swain/edcinf/page85.html)
(http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/ir/papers/People/vanRijsbergen.html)
(http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/ir/papers/Year/1996.html)
(http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/Keith/Preface.html)
(http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/kenb/key/unified/unified.html)
(http://ftp.ccs.neu.edu/home/kenb/key)
(http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/kenb/key/highperf/hp.html)

Autonomous Agent Structural Specifications, Devices & Functional Operations


3. The Structural Autonomous Analogies of Intelligence Theories, Strategies, Policies,
Roles, Procedures, Development & Applications.

a. The President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board


(http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/EOP/pfiab/index.html)

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b. The Executive Order – Classified National Security Information
(http://www.army.mil/disc4/aid/nat-sec/execordr.htm)

c. The National Security Strategy for a New Century


(http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/EOP/NSC/Strategy/)

d. IC21: The Intelligence Community in the 21st Century


(http://www.fas.org/irp/congress/1996_rpt/ic21/ic21001.htm)

f. Exposing The Global Surveillance System


(http://www.dis.org/erehwon/echelon.html)

e. The Complete, Unofficial TEMPEST Information Page


(http://www.eskimo.com/~joelm/tempest.html)

g. A Guide to Intelligence
(http://www.gulflink.osd.mil/search/intel_sum.html)
(http://www.specialoperations.com)

h. A Guide to Intelligence Collection Methods and Counterintelligence


(http://www.amintel.com)
(http://www.soaw.org/manuals/)
(http://www.tscmplus.com/precatns.htm)
(http://www.nacic.gov/index.htm)
(http://www.ntis.gov/databases/armypub.htm)
(http://www.iit.edu/~dallmic/bibliography.html)

i. Strategic Intelligence
(http://www.loyola.edu/dept/polysci/html/intel.html)
(http://www.noi.org/fbi1.html)
(http://www.noi.org/fbi2.html)

j. U.S. Government Documents/The U.S. Intelligence Community


(http://www.columbia.edu/cu/libraries/indiv/dsc/intell.html)

k. World Intelligence and Security Agencies


(http://www.fas.org/irp/world/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/links.htm)

l. Military Intelligence
(http://www.fas.org/irp/offdocs/int014.html)
(http://www.fas.org/cgi-bin/AT-FASsearch.cgi)

m. FAS Intelligence Resource Program


(http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/program/list.htm)

n. FAS Military Analysis Network


(http://www.fas.org/man/doctrine.htm)
(http://www.ordnance.cetin.net.cn/usdefense/execsec/adr96/toc.htm)

13
o. NSA/NCSC Rainbow Series
(http://www.fas.org/irp/nsa/rainbow.htm)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/doe/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/other/index.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/hotdocs.htm)

p. Intelligence Resources
(http://www.infomanage.com/international/intelligence/)
(http://www.clark.net/pub/klaatu/home.html)

q. Big Brother Incorporated


(http://www.access.digex.net/~epic/companies.html)

r. Propaganda and Psychological Warfare


(http://www.lafayette.edu/mcglonem/prop.html)
(http://www.specialoperations.com/psyops.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm33-1/index.html)
(http://www.duke.edu/~jrh6/research_home.html)
(http://mprofaca.cro.net/atpcl.html)
(http://carmen.artsci.washington.edu/propaganda/contents.htm)
(http://www.parascope.com/articles/0497/sublimd.htm)
(http://users.aol.com/armysofl/PSYOPS.html)
(http://members.aol.com/gsuscryst/index.html)

s. Chaos Theory
(http://www.tryoung.com/chaos/chaos.htm)
(http://www.brint.com/Systems.htm)
(http://www.specialforces.net/pubs/FM.htm)

t. The Internet as a Tool for Social Engineering


(http://ptmudge.westsound.com/soc-eng.htm)
(http://www.cycad.com/cgi-bin/Brand/quotes/q20.html?nochoice=y)

u. Silent Weapons for Quiet Wars


(http://www.lightlink.com/freezone/mc/swfqw.htm)
(http://home.navisoft.com/entisoft/artofwar.htm)

v. Introduction to Command and Control Warfare


(http://www.navy.mil/homepages/nttc/introduc.htm)
(http://carlisle~www.army.mil/usacsl/org/iw/tutorial/intro.htm)
(http://www.dtic.mil/c3i/)
(http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/infowar/if.htm)

w. Information Warfare Sites


(http://www.ida.liu.se/~guniv/Infowar/)
(http://sac.saic.com/)
(http://sac.saic.com/industrial_base_assessments/information_warfare/iwlinks.htm)
(http://www.teg.saic.com/iw.htm)
(http://www.terrorism.com/infowar/wwwlinks.html)

14
x. Command, Control and Communications Systems
(http://www.cfcsc.dnd.ca/links/milsci/c4.html)
(http://www.disa.mil/)
(http://www.cdsar.af.mil/apj/szfran.html)
(http://www.cdsar.af.mil/apj/szfran.html)
(http://www.fas.org/spp/military/docops/usaf/2025/index.html)
(http://www.ado.army.mil/smrtbook/sbgif18.htm)
(http://www.efdnorth.navfac.navy.mil/cmcs/opening.htm)
(http://www.utilistar.com/industrial/lead.html)
(http://www6.netscape.com/comprod/at_work/white_paper/missioncontrol.html)

y. Information Warfare on the Internet


(http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~alb/misc/infowarDistraction.html)
(http://sac.saic.com/industrial_base_assessments/information_warfare/iwtools.htm)
(http://www.aracnet.com/~gtr/archive/info_war.html)

z. Institute for National Strategic Studies


(http://www.ndu.edu/ndu/inss/siws/cont.html)

aa. Center for Strategic Leadership


(http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usacsl/csl.htm.)

bb. The Terrorism Research Center


(http://www.terrorism.com/cgi-bin/wwwboard3/ctforum.html)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/world/para/index.html)
(http://earthops.org/thewar/assassins.html)

cc. Policy Papers – Hackers and Information Warfare


(http://ink.yahoo.com/bin/query?p=hackers+manuals&hc=0&hs=0)
(http://www.oss.net/Papers/hackers/)
(http://www.hackershomepage.com/index.html)
(http://www.iirg.org/)
(http://www.fas.org/cp/eprint/96/yeary.htm)
(http://www.portcullis-security.com/defuse/defuse.htm)

dd. Criminological Evaluations


(http://home.rogerswave.ca/wyssiwyg/report1.htm)
(http://www.fas.org/irp/offdocs/iccs/iccstoc.html)

ee. Alta Analytics - NETMAP


(http://www.hp.com/stlocgov/locgovpages/alta.htm)
(http://www.altaanalytics.com/products.html)

Autonomous Agents, Enterprise Work Architectures and Functional Personnel


4. The Structural Architectures, Strategies, Engineers and Developmental Institutions.

a. Memetics: On a Conceptual Framework for Cultural Evolution


(http://www.sepa.tudelft.nl/webstaf/hanss/einst.htm)

15
(http://www.sepa.tudelft.nl/webstaf/hanss/orgev.htm)
(http://florin.syr.edu/~crowston/papers/evol-struct.html)

b. Structuring Chromosomes for Total Neural Network Evolution


(http://www.ph.tn.tudelft.nl/PRInfo/reports/msg00153.html)
(http://eseso12.essex.ac.uk/~sml/papers.html)
(http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/~omri/NNUGA/)
(http://alife6.alife.org/abstracts/EV78.html)
(http://nano.xerox.com/nanotech/selfRepNATO.html)
(http://lorenz.mur.csu.edu.au/complex/library/0LearningSystems.html)

c. Enterprise Architectures Five Classes of Technology


(http://www.amsinc.com/Services/EnterpriseWeb/en.html)

d. The National Industrial Information Infrastructure Protocols Consortium


(http://www.niip.org/public-forum/NTR95-01/NTR95-01-HTML/RAShort_2.html)

e. Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) and GroupWare


(http://www.informatik.umu.se/~rwhit/CSCW.html)
(http://www.netlib.org/utk/lsi/pcwLSI/text/node1.html)

f. Comparative Reference of Cognitive Architectures


(http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/cogarch3/)
(http://www.asel.udel.edu/nli/pubs/1995/Zickus95.txt)

g. A Certificate Management System: Structure, Functions and Protocols


(http://www.entegrity.com/papers/cms-ieee.html)

The Strategies for NAME’s Autonomous DOSA Organizational


Development
5. The Autonomous Organizational Strategies for Electronic Commerce and Monetary
Exchanges.

a. Sun Microsystems Launches Frontal Assault On $28 Billion Heterogeneous Enterprise


Storage Market
(http://www.sun.com/smi/Press/sunflash/9801/sunflash.980128.2.html)
(http://www.workframe.com/WFI_Corp/BusProcDesign.htm)
(http://stimap.matrixlinks.ca/STLinks/STPolicyindex1.html)
(http://qsilver.queensu.ca/business/research/work_pap/obir_wp.htm)
(http://www.sun.com/solaris/intranet/wp-interop/)
(http://ai.iit.nrc.ca/IR_public/ids/description.html)

b. Electronic Commerce Theories and Systems *


(http://www.iitf.nist.gov/eleccomm/execsu.htm)
(http://www.fecrc.com/)
(http://www.armyec.sra.com/home_main.htm)
(http://cism.bus.utexas.edu/works/articles.html)
(http://www.ispo.cec.be/ecommerce/introduc.htm)
(http://net.gap.net/content.htm)

16
(http://www.email.demon.co.uk/eees/eees.htm)
(http://www.gvnfo.state.ut.us/sitc/elec-com/elec-com.htm)
(http://www.tapnet.com/ec.htm)
(http://www.oakland.ecrc.org/gloss3.html)

c. PRAXIS – Resources for Social and Economic Development


(http://caster.ssw.upenn.edu/~restes/praxis.html)
(http://www.transactionpub.com/gencat97/series97.html)

d. The Economics of Networks


(http://raven.stern.nyu.edu/networks/site.html)
(http://raven.stern.nyu.edu/networks/top.html)

e. Organizational Measurement & Engineering


(http://www.ome1.com/Theory.TableOfContents.HTML)
(http://www.co-i-l.com/coil/knowledge-garden/oi/books/odp/index.shtml)

f. Organizational Accounting Manuals


(http://www.window.state.tx..us/comptrol/san/fm_manuals/index.html)
(http://www.tns.lcs.mit.edu/uscode/TITLE_26/Subtitle_A/CHAPTER_1/Subchapter_E/
PART_II/toc.html)
(http://www.admin.ufl.edu/DIVISION/FA/hb_c04c.htm)
(http://www.ideas.uqam.ca/ideas/data/Papers/wopprwawp_044.html)

g. Manufacturing Control Systems


(http://www.samsonsindia.com/detail.htm)
(http://www.optika.com/MKTG/Data_Sheet/powerflw.htm)
(http://www.zen.co.uk/cim.inst/research/pdm/pdmindex.html)

h. Data Warehousing in Telephone Networks 1998-2003


(http://www.insight-corp.com/dataware.html)

i. NASA Strategic Management Handbook


(http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codez/strahand/toc.htm)
(http://www.ou.edu/class/busad4013/docs/pptch9/index.htm)
(http://www.ou.edu/class/busad4013/docs/pptch11/index.htm)
(http://www.adis.psu.edu/new/divplan.htm)

j. Strategies & Tactics


(http://www.strategies-tactics.com/index.htm)
(http://caag.state.ca.us/piu/sampreg.htm)
(http://xre22.brooks.af.mil/HSCProject/hsc96spv2.htm)
(http://www.informs.org/Conf/WA96/TALKS/SA17.html)

k. The Total Army Distance Learning Program


(http://www-dcst.monroe.army.mil/adlp/distancelearning/master/toc.html)
(http://www.academy.jccbi.gov/ama300b2/)
(http://www.lucent.dk/cedl/strategy.html)
(http://www.pgc.com/pgc/vtf/vtf-page-00.html)
(http://www.uni-freiburg.de/rz/inet96/c8/c8_2.htm)
(http://mcoeweb.marin.k12.ca.us/reed/tmpphases.htm)

17
The Formula & Systems Development Charts

Employment Related Inference Chart


Systems Research &
Development
Investigative Profile
Inference Structure

Method Structure
Solution Framework

Consul Cube

Change Equation
Systems Matrix

Autonomous Agent

RAS Profile

DOSA

18
N A S C E N T A P P L IE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S

E M P LO Y M EN T R ELA TE D SO FTW AR E D E VE LO PM E N T
G U ID E

3 1 2

TH E
TH E
D IC T IO N A R Y
P L A N N IN G & D E S I G N
TH E O F
AP P R O AC H
IN D IV I D U A L / G R O U P O C C U P A T IO N A L T IT L E S
(D A T A B A S E F O R M A T )
TH E C ELLULAR AU TO M ATA
S YS TE M S (D A T A B A S E S Y S T E M S )
DATABASES T H E IN T E G R A T E D A U T O N O M O U S TH E TYPES O F AU TO N O MO U S
AG ENTS AG ENTS

TH E
TH E M A N U F A C T U R IN G ,
M E TH O D S TR UC TU R E 6 P L A N N IN G & C O N T R O L
T H E E V O L V A B L E IN S T R U C T IO N S E T STR U C TU R E
T H E E V O L V A B L E IN S T R U C T IO N S E T

4 TH E 5
G R O U P O R D E R IN G L O G IC
T H E T IE R R A P R O J E C T P A R T - A

7
TH E TH E
S Y S T E M M A T R IX S O L U T IO N F R A M E W O R K
( S Y S T E M S IN T E G R A T IO N ) S T R A T E G IC
T H E C E L LU LA R A U T O M A T A TH E D EVE LO PM E N T
SYSTEM FO R M U LA FO R M ATS T H E E V O L U T IO N A R Y A L G O R IT H M S
T H E T IE R R A P R O J E C T P A R T - B

3 A /7 A TH E
8 TH E
2 A /7 B
D E S C R I P T IO N O F S TATEM E N T O F
O P E R A T IO N A L D U T I E S O P E R A T IO N S
T H E G E N E T IC A L G O R IT H M S P A R T - A T H E G E N E T IC A L G O R I T H IM S P A R T - B

T H E S T R A T E G IC
P R O G R A M M IN G C H A R T S
( P R O G R A M M IN G V A R IA T IO N S )
3 B /7 A 1 2 B /7 B 1
T H E T IE R R A P R O J E C T P A R T - C
T H E B IO L O G IC A L T H E S T R A T E G IC
P R O G R A M M IN G F O R M A T P R O G R A M M IN G F O R M A T
(S Y S T E M S E N T R Y ) (V A L U E S Y S T E M )
TH E AUTO NO M O US AG ENT
T H E O P E R A T IN G E N V IR O N M E N T S
O P E R A T IO N A L F O R M A T S

TH E
O P E R A T IO N A L F O R M A T
3 C /7 A 2 2 C /7 B 2
(P H A S E -T O -P H A S E )
T H E T IE R R A P R O J E C T P A R T - D
9

TH E
S Y S T E M S A R C H IT E C T U R E
10
(E W A & H A R D W A R E )
T H E T O V E A R C H I T E C T U R A L G U ID E

E M P LO YM EN T
R E LA TE D
SO FTW AR E
D EV E LO PM EN T
S YS TE M S
THE N EURAL
11 N ETW O RK

19
Investigative Profile
(Database Ranges for Analytical Netmapping)

1. Who?
a. Name(s):
b. Date(s) of Birth:
c. Place(s) of Birth:
d. SSN(s):
e. DLN(s):
f. VLN(s):
g. VIN(s):
h. Type of Residence(s):
i. Current Home Phone Number(s):
j. Previous Home Phone Number(s):
k. Type of Business(es):
l. Current Business Phone Number(s):
m. Previous Business Phone Number(s):
n. Current Home Address(es):
o. Previous Home Address(es):
p. Current Business Address(es):
q. Previous Business Address(es):
r. BLN(s):
s. EIN(s):
t. Physical Characteristics:
(i) Individual:
(ii) Group(s):
(iii) Inter-Group(s):
(iv) Social System(s):
(v) Larger-Social System:
u. Physiological Genealogic Structure(s):
v. Current Physical Characteristics of Functional Duties:
w. Current Genealogical Characteristics of Functional Duties:
x. Previous Physical Characteristics of Functional Duties:
y. Previous Genealogical Characteristics of Functional Duties:
z. Forecasted Physical Characteristics of Functional Duties:
aa. Forecasted Genealogical Characteristics of Functional Duties:
bb. Current Physical Classification(s) of Functional Duties:
cc. Current Genealogical Classification(s) of Functional Duties:
dd. Previous Physical Classification(s) of Functional Duties:
ee. Previous Genealogical Classification(s) of Functional Duties:
ff. Forecasted Physical Classification(s) of Functional Duties:
gg. Forecasted Genealogical Classification(s) of Functional Duties:

2. What?
a. Race:
b. Creed:
c. Color:
d. Nationality:
e. Ethnicity:

20
f. Sex:
g. Hair:
h. Eye(s):
i. Height:
j. Weight:
k. Previous Marital Status:
l. Current Marital Status:
m. Previous Sexual Preferences:
n. Current Sexual Preferences:
o. Current Language Skills:
p. Linguistic Profile:
q. Previous Religion:
r. Current Religion:
s. Religious Profile:
t. Previous Education:
u. Current Education:
v. Educational Profile:
w. Previous Psychological Profile:
x. Current Psychological Profile:
y. Forecasted Psychological Profile:
z. Previous Economic Profile:
aa. Current Economic Profile:
bb. Forecasted Economic Profile:
cc. Previous Sociological Profile:
dd. Current Sociological Profile:
ee. Forecasted Sociological Profile:

3. When?
a. Date(s) of Action(s) Committed:
b. Date(s) when Support Personnel were Introduced into Action(s) Committed:
c. Date(s) when Support Personnel Committed Action(s):
d. Date(s) of Documents Involved in Action(s) Committed:
e. Date(s) of when Action(s) Committed were Completed:

4. Where?
a. Previous Location(s) of Action(s) Committed:
b. Current Location(s) of Action(s) Committed:
c. Location of Individuals in Support of Action(s) Committed:
d. Subject(s) of Action(s) Committed:
e. Investigative Profile(s) of Subject(s) of Action(s) Committed:
f. Opinions of Subject(s) of Action(s) Committed:

5. How?
a. Action(s) Committed:
b. Action(s) Committed with Whom:
c. Source or History of Actions(s) Committed:
d. Previous Results of Action(s) Committed:
e. Current Results of Action(s) Committed:
f. Alphanumeric Definitions & Methods of Action(s) Committed:
g. Alphanumeric Impact of Action(s) Committed:
h. Legal Definitions & Methods of Action(s) Committed:

21
i. Legal Impact of Action(s) Committed:
j. Psychological Definitions & Methods of Action(s) Committed:
k. Psychological Impact of Action(s) Committed:
l. Physiological Definitions & Methods of Action(s) Committed:
m. Physiological Impact of Action(s) Committed:
n. Sociological Definitions & Methods of Action(s) Committed:
o. Sociological Impact of Action(s) Committed:
p. Economic Definitions & Methods of Action(s) Committed:
q. Economic Impact of Action(s) Committed:
r. Forecasted Integrated Results of Current Action(s) Committed:

6. Why?
a. Ideological Reasons for Previous Action(s) Committed:
b. Physiological Reasons for Previous Action(s) Committed:
c. Economic Reasons for Previous Action(s) Committed:
d. Sociological Reasons for Previous Action(s) Committed:
e. Ideological Reasons for Current Action(s) Committed:
f. Physiological Reasons for Current Action(s) Committed:
g. Economic Reasons for Current Action(s) Committed:
h. Sociological Reasons for Current Action(s) Committed:

7. Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures and Autonomous Programs used in Profile


a. Autonomous Programs used in Profile:
b. Sources and Performance History of Autonomous Programs used in Profile:
c. Legal Position of Autonomous Programs used in Profile:
d. Documentary Dispensation of Autonomous Programs used in Profile:
e. Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures used in Profile:
f. Sources and Performance History of Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures used in
Profile:
g. Legal Position of Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures used in Profile:
h. Documentary Dispensation of Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures used in
Profile:
i. Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures and Autonomous Programs Ranking
Prior to Investigative Profile:
j. Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures and Autonomous Programs Ranking
During Investigative Profile:
k. Tactical Enterprise Work Architectures and Autonomous Programs Ranking
After Investigative Profile:
l. Legal Position of Enterprise Work Architectures and Autonomous Programs
Prior to Investigative Profile:
m. Legal Position of Enterprise Work Architectures and Autonomous Programs
During Investigative Profile:
n. Legal Position of Enterprise Work Architectures and Autonomous Programs
After Investigative Profile:

8. Internal/External Personnel and Political Tactics used in Profile


a. Internal/External Personnel used in Profile:
b. Sources and History of Internal/External Personnel used in Profile:
c. Legal Position of Internal/External Personnel used in Profile:
d. Economic Dispensation of Internal/External Personnel used in Profile:
e. Political Tactics used in Profile:

22
f. Sources and History of Political Tactics used in Profile:
g. Legal Position of Political Tactics used in Profile:
h. Economic Dispensation of Political Tactics used in Profile:
i. Network Configuration Prior to Investigative Profile:
j. Network Configuration During Investigative Profile:
k. Network Configuration After Investigative Profile:
l. Legal Position of Network Prior to Investigative Profile:
m. Legal Position of Network During Investigative Profile:
n. Legal Position of Network After Investigative Profile:

9. Basis for Investigative Profiling


a. Examination of Power Bases:
b. Barriers to Entry into Certain Fields:
c. Causes of Social Intercourse:
d. Causes of Economic Conflicts:
e. Causes of Legal Conflicts:
f. Causes of Social Conflicts:
g. Causes of Political Conflicts:
h. Causes of Personal Conflicts:
i. Causes of Racial Conflicts:
j. Religious Conflicts:
k. Basis for Human Interactions:
l. Classification Theories:
m. Bibliographic Theories:
n. Structural Analysis Theories:
o. Infrastructural Development:
p. Educational Examination(s):
q. Religious Examination(s):

10. Premise for NAME’s investigative profile is to obtain a review of the history,
objectives, operation, and merits of NAME's investigative profiling and existing
autonomous expert systems. This review serves several purposes. It serves to
describe the many functions that the existing internal internet-based operating
systems can perform, thereby demonstrating the potential breath of future
applications for NAME's investigative profiling and expert operating systems. It also
illustrates the strategic expert systems (search engines) discussed in Appendix - D,
which are organized by the type of strategic or grammatical analysis they perform.
NAME's informational demographics and expert system's procedural manuals are
illustrated by the following list of their potential uses within a focused educational
environment developed by the systems designers at NAME's workshops:

a. Aiding DOT database drafting by testing a textual draft


against a set of related strategic databases and linguistic standards, and having
the computer system(s) or IAOA make the appropriate suggestions;

b. Researching expert DOT databases on the basis of a


statement of facts or concepts (strategic or grammatical retrieval as opposed to
the current key word searches);

c. Generating ideas and advising the client base of the


arguments (program functions) for and against a documented situations and also

23
how to weaken or strengthen the arguments (program functions) in a particular
set circumstances or skills;

d. Advising a client on strategies and tactics in procedure or


structural negotiations;

e. Evaluating a situation as to settlement (final analyses) or


strategic value;

f. Evaluating procedural consistencies with prior decisions of a


proposed administrative decision in a discretionary area;

g. Aiding in the document drafting of contracts, wills, and other


documents by testing for the consistency with existing laws, personal and social
policies, and linguistic standards;

h. Assisting decision making in which little or no discretion is


involved;

i. Planning transactions such as business mergers, with tax


and other strategic consequences by presenting alternative scenarios and
identifying their legal or structural consequences;

j. Predicting the consequences of proposed legislation,


policies, draft contracts, wills, situations, etc.;

k. Finding legal or strategic authorities which are consistent or


inconsistent with proposed laws or consciences;

l. Evaluating the effectiveness of existing procedures, laws or


rules and identifying the procedures, laws or rules, which may govern the need
for organizational modification;

m. Training and disseminating information on related concepts


or skills;

n. Interviewing clients for information relevant to the


identification of the nature of their strategic or procedural problems;

o. Informing client of the consequences of particular acts, in


order to enable their subordinates to know the reality of their proposed or past
acts, and if communication with an expert is required, to obtain a complete
answer;

p. Preserving institutional and instructional expertise;

q. Reviewing conceptual or strategic database systems against


new rules or situations, and modifying them to keep them activated and current;

24
r. Identifying clients whose educational affairs may have been
affected by changes in the network, so that a subcontractor can determine
whether to contact a client regarding the change(s).

The primary application areas for an expert internet operating system (DOSA) or
document development program (IAOA) includes strategic management, organizational
management, monitoring, conceptual or legal interpretation, and document or report
generation for the purposes of structural or strategic investigations in developing novel
organizational forms.

11. Organizational and operational systems for infrastructural management


a. The Personal Systems Training Solutions:
• Application Development (la.);
• Database (2a.);
• DOS, OS/2, OS/400 (3a.);
• Windows & Windows NT (4a.);
• Programming Languages (5a.);
• Transaction Processing (6a.);
• End User Applications (IV. & V.);
• Hardware Operations (7a.);

b. The Midrange Training Solutions:

• Application Development (lb.);


• Database (2b.);
• Office Applications (7b.);
• AIX/UNIX (4b.);
• OS1400 (3b.);
• Programming Languages (5b.);
• Transaction Processing (6b.);

c. The Mainframe Training Solutions:

• Application Development (le.);


• Database (2c.);
• MVS, VM, VSE (3c.);
• Programming Languages (5c.);
• Storage Management (4c.);
• Transaction Processing (6c.);
• Hardware Operations (7c.);

d. The Client/Server, Networking & Object Technology Training Solutions:

• Client/Server (ld.);
• Distributed Databases (2d.);
• Internetworking (3d.);
• Local Area Networking (4d.);
• Network Management (5d.);

25
• Voice Applications (6d.);
• Object Technology (7d.);

e. The Business & Personal Development Training Solutions:

• Business Management (4e.);


• Financial Skills (3e.);
• Industry Applications (2e.);
• Personal Effectiveness (le.);
• Project Management (5e.);
• Total Quality Management (7e.);
• Sales Training (6e.);

12. End product lines of investigative solution frameworks


a. Intercommunicative autonomous software applications and platforms:
b. Organizational and personnel procedural or policy manuals:
c. Computational Intelligence in Industrial Engineering:
d. Consumer Product Design:
e. Economic Engineering & Cost Estimation:
f. Facilities Design & Location:
g. Information Systems:
h. Maintenance Engineering and Management:
i. Materials Handling:
j. Performance Analysis & Simulation:
k. Production Systems Design, Planning and Control:
l. Productivity & Business Strategies:
m. Project Management:
n. Technology Management & Transfer:
o. Total Quality Management & Quality Technology:
p. Work Measurement & Methods Engineering:
q. Industrial Ergonomics & Safety:
r. Applied Operations Research:
s. CAD/CAM:
t. Other Topics of Interest in the Business Engineering Fields:

26
The Solution Framework
The Solution Framework spells out what formulas or conditions are to exist when
implementation is complete, how the in-place conditions or formulas are to operate &
function over time and be improved or updated, and the steps needed to move from
approval to installation & operation. Therefore, any effort through the Solution
Framework will portray itself with these highly interrelated attributes:

1. The details of the condition, structure or function that is to exist when


installation and implementation phases are complete. A structure or
formula refers to an arrangement, configuration, organizational chart,
grammatical string, relationships or physical portrayal. This attribute
describes what the recommended Solution Framework will "look like". It
also concerns the Feasible Ideal Solution Target (FIST) version of the
formula, structure and the adaptive routes that may be pursued in moving
toward the FIST from what is installed.

2. The way the formula, structure or solution will operate or flow over time
once it is in place. This scenario of how the operations will proceed shall
include the steps to improve the whole solution, and to update
periodically, the FIST guide.

3. The major activities & events needed to move from approval of the
recommended Solution Framework to the condition where the formula or
structure & its operation, are in place.

One simple "solution" illustrates the meaning of these attributes:

Annual Corporate Plan (1) Purposes of company, new product developments,


facility improvements, human resource developments, financial status being
sought, organizational chart, five-year plan in all categories (FIST), & so on. (2)
Appointment of project teams or individuals for one-time efforts (new product
change organization, etc.), organizational changes for operating & supervising,
timing for capital expenditures, arranging bank loans, instituting training, & so
on. (3) Preparation of monthly budget allocations by cost profit centers, obtain
warranty claims printouts, schedule departmental meetings to review budget
implications, and so on.

27
N A S C E N T A P P L IE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S

N A M E 's S O L U T I O N F R A M E W O R K

D IM E N S IO N S

M e a s u r e s : O b j e c tiv e s
F u n d a m e n ta l : ( C r i te r i a , M e r i t a n d
V a l u e s : M o ti v a ti n g C o n tr o l : H o w to E v a lu a t e I n te r f a c e : R e l a t i o n o f a l l
B a s i c o r P h y s i c a l, W o r th F a c t o rs ) , G o a ls F u tu r e : P la n n e d
B e l ie fs , G lo b a l D e s ir e s , a n d M o d ify E l e m e n t o r D im e n s io n s to o th e r
C h a r a c te r is t ic s - W h a t, (H o w M u c h , W h e n , C h a n g e s a n d R e s e a rc h
E th ic s , M o r a l M a tte r s S y s t e m a s i t O p e r a te s S y s te m s o r E l e m e n ts
H o w , W h e re , o r W h o R a te s , P e rfo rm a n c e N e e d s fo r a ll D im e n s io n s
( N O R M S /S T A N D A R D S ) (P O W E R /A U T H O R IT Y ) ( M O R A L E / C O H E S IO N )
(G R O U P F O R M A T ) S p e c ific a tio n s )
(G O A L S /O B J E C T IV E S )

T h e D ic t io n a r y o f
P u r p o s e : m i s s io n , a i m , T h e D i c ti o n a ry o f T h e D i c tio n a r y o f T h e D ic tio n a r y o f
N A M E 's C h a r t e d O c c u p a ti o n a l T i t l e s N A M E 's E d u c a t i o n a l
n e e d , p r im a ry c o n c e rn , O c c u p a ti o n a l T i t l e s O c c u p a ti o n a l T it le s O c c u p a tio n a l T it le s
P r o g r a m m i n g V a r i a ti o n s E x p la n a tio n o f D a ta , S e rv i c e s
fo c u s (T i tl e s O n ly ) ( J o b D e s c ri p ti o n s O n ly ) In d u s t ry D e s ig n a ti o n
P e o p le a n d T h in g s

T h e D i c ti o n a ry o f
I n p u ts : p e o p l e , t h i n g s ,
O c c u p a ti o n a l T i t l e s N A M E 's P ro b le m N A M E ' s J o b & S i tu a t i o n T h e E x te r n a l G r o u p S c h e d u le A c q u is i ti o n o f
in f o r m a t io n to s t a rt t h e G r a m m a ti c a l In p u t F a c t o rs
D e ta i ls o f D a ta , F o rm a tt in g S e q u e n c e s P e r fo r m a n c e E v a l u a ti o n s O rd e rin g L o g i c N eeds
sequence
P e o p l e & T h in g s

O u t p u ts : d e s i re d
( a c h ie v e s p u r p o s e ) a n d M a n u a ls o f T h e G e n e ri c T y p e s o f N A M E ' s C o n s u lta tio n T h e In t e r n a l G r o u p
G r a m m a ti c a l O u t p u t F a c to r s T h e S c h e d u le N e tw o r k
u n d e s ir e d o u tc o m e s P r o c e d u r e s & R e p o r ts P r o b le m S o lv i n g P a ra d i g m s O rd e rin g L o g i c
fr o m s e q u e n c e

S e q u e n c e : s te p s fo r
p r o c e s s i n g i n p u ts , f lo w , N A M E 's E x p e r t S y s t e m s N A M E ' s A n a t o m i c a l A n a l o g i e s N A M E 's K n o w l e d g e B a s e s N A M E 's I n f e r e n c e E n g i n e s N A M E 's D a t a b a s e S y s t e m s N A M E ' s S y s t e m s M o d e l in g
l a y o u t , u n i t o p e r a ti o n s

E n v i r o n m e n t: p h y s i c a l & G o v e r n m e n ta l S y s t e m s
I n s ti t u t i o n a l i z e d L a w s P s y c h o lo g ic a l & S o c io lo g ic a l
a tt it u d in a l , o rg a n iz a ti o n , and T h e O b je c tiv e H i e ra r c h y T h e H e a rs a y - 1 2 S y s te m N A M E 's S e m a n t i c N e t s
a n d R e g u l a ti o n s S y s t e m s P r o fil in g
s e tt i n g , e t c . I d e o lo g i e s

H u m a n a g e n ts : s k i l l s ,
N A M E ' s M a n a g e ri a l N A M E ' s O p e ra t io n a l N A M E 's N e t w o r k O p e r a t i o n s
p e r s o n n e l, r e w a r d s , N A M E 's N e t w o r k P r o v i d e r s N A M E 's M a n a g e r i a l F o r m a ts N A M E 's C l i e n t F o r m a t s
T e c h n iq u e s P ro c e d u re s P e rs o n n e l
r e s p o n s ib i lit ie s , e tc .

T h e D i c tio n a r y o f
T h e D i c ti o n a ry o f I n d iv i d u a l, G ro u p , I n te r -G ro u p ,
P h y s i c a l c a ta ly s ts : N A M E 's S o ft w a r e a n d O c c u p a ti o n a l T it le s N A M E 's P E R T N e tw o rk N A M E 's S t r u c t u r a l & T o o l i n g
O c c u p a ti o n a l T it le s S o c ia l S y s t e m s , &
e q u i p m e n t , fa c il it ie s , e t c . C o m p u te r S y s t e m s M e c h a n ic a l & B e n c h D i a g ra m T h e o r y o r P ro fil in g
T ra d e O p e r a t io n s L a r g e r S o c i a l S y s te m s
O p e r a ti o n s

In f o r m a t io n a id s : b o o k s , T h e D i c ti o n a ry o f M a n u f a c tu r i n g , P l a n n i n g a n d N A M E 's P l a n n i n g a n d D e s i g n
C o n s u l ta tio n s O p e r a ti o n a l M a n u a ls N A M E 's N e tw o r k R e p o rts
in s t ru c t io n s , e t c . O c c u p a ti o n a l T i t l e s C o n tro l S y s te m s A p p ro a c h e s

E LE M EN TS

28
The Consul Cube for Establishing Genetic-Based
Concepts within a Consultative P&D Effort

Larger SS
A-1-5
Larger SS
Social Sys A -4-5
A-1-4

Inter-Group
A-1-3 Larger SS
B -4-5
Group
A-1-2
Larger SS
Individual C -4-5
A-1-1

Larger SS
D -4-5

Theory A–1 A–2 A–3 A–4


Principles (A) (C) (D) (E)

Prescriptive B–1 B–2 B–3 B–4 Larger SS


(F) (G ) (H ) (I) E -4-5

Social System
Confronta- E -4-4
tion
Inter-Group
C–1 C–2 C–3 C–4 E -4-3
(K) (L) (M) (N)
Catalytic
Group
E -4-2

Acceptant Individual
E -4-1

D–1 D–2 D–3 D–4


(P) (Q) (R) (S)

29
E–1 E–2 E–3 E–4
(T) (V) (W) (Y)

Power/ Morale/ Norms/ Goals/


Authority Cohesion Standards Objectives

30
The Consul Cube Genomic Configurations for Establishing
Genetic-Based Concepts within a Consultative P&D Effort

1. A-1 ^A^ 31. B-2 ^G^ 61. C-3 ^M^ 91. D-4 ^S^
2. A-1-1 ^AAA^ 32. B-2-1 ^BGC^ 62. C-3-1 ^CMD^ 92. D-4-1 ^DSE^
3. A-1-2 ^AAF^ 33. B-2-2 ^BGG^ 63. C-3-2 ^CMH^ 93. D-4-2 ^DSI^
4. A-1-3 ^AAK^ 34. B-2-3 ^BGL^ 64. C-3-3 ^CMM^ 94. D-4-3 ^DSN^
5. A-1-4 ^AAP^ 35. B-2-4 ^BGQ^ 65. C-3-4 ^CMR^ 95. D-4-4 ^DSS^
6. A-1-5 ^AAT^ 36. B-2-5 ^BGV^ 66. C-3-5 ^CMW^ 96. D-4-5 ^DSY^
7. A-2 ^C^ 37. B-3 ^H^ 67. C-4 ^N^
8. A-2-1 ^ACC^ 38. B-3-1 ^BHD^ 68. C-4-1 ^CNE^ 97.E-1 ^T^
9. A-2-2 ^ACG^ 39. B-3-2 ^BHH^ 69. C-4-2 ^CNI^ 98. E-1-1 ^ETA^
10. A-2-3 ^ACL^ 40. B-3-3 ^BHM^ 70. C-4-3 ^CNN^ 99. E-1-2 ^ETF^
11. A-2-4 ^ACQ^ 41. B-3-4 ^BHR^ 71. C-4-4 ^CNS^ 100. E-1-3 ^ETK^
12. A-2-5 ^ACV^ 42. B-3-5 ^BHW^ 72. C-4-5 ^CNY^ 101. E-1-4 ^ETP^
13. A-3 ^D^ 43. B-4 ^I^ 102. E-1-5 ^ETT^
14. A-3-1 ^ADD^ 44. B-4-1 ^BIE^ 73.D-1 ^P^ 103. E-2 ^V^
15. A-3-2 ^ADH^ 45. B-4-2 ^BII^ 74. D-1-1 ^DPA^ 104. E-2-1 ^EVC^
16. A-3-3 ^ADM^ 46. B-4-3 ^BIN 75. D-1-2 ^DPF^ 105. E-2-2 ^EVG^
17. A-3-4 ^ADR^ 47. B-4-4 ^BIS^ 76. D-1-3 ^DPK^ 106. E-2-3 ^EVL^
18. A-3-5 ^ADW^ 48. B-4-5 ^BIY^ 77. D-1-4 ^DPP^ 107. E-2-4 ^EVQ^
19. A-4 ^E^ 78. D-1-5 ^DPT^ 108. E-2-5 ^EVV^
20. A-4-1 ^AEE^ 49.C-1 ^K^ 79. D-2 ^Q^ 109. E-3 ^W^
21. A-4-2 ^AEI^ 50. C-1-1 ^CKA^ 80. D-2-1 ^DQC^ 110. E-3-1 ^EWD^
22. A-4-3 ^AEN^ 51. C-1-2 ^CKF^ 81. D-2-2 ^DQG^ 111. E-3-2 ^EWH^
23. A-4-4 ^AES^ 52. C-1-3 ^CKK^ 82. D-2-3 ^DQL^ 112. E-3-3 ^EWM^
24. A-4-5 ^AEY^ 53. C-1-4 ^CKP^ 83. D-2-4 ^DQQ^ 113. E-3-4 ^EWR^
54. C-1-5 ^CKT^ 84. D-2-5 ^DQV^ 114. E-3-5 ^EWW^
25.B-1 ^F^ 55. C-2 ^L^ 85. D-3 ^R^ 115. E-4 ^Y^
26. B-1-1 ^BFA^ 56. C-2-1 ^CLC^ 86. D-3-1 ^DRD^ 116. E-4-1 ^EYE^
27. B-1-2 ^BFF^ 57. C-2-2 ^CLG^ 87. D-3-2 ^DRH^ 117. E-4-2 ^EYI^
28. B-1-3 ^BFK^ 58. C-2-3 ^CLL^ 88. D-3-3 ^DRM^ 118. E-4-3 ^EYN^
29. B-1-4 ^BFP^ 59. C-2-4 ^CLQ^ 89. D-3-4 ^DRR^ 119. E-4-4 ^EYS^
30. B-1-5 ^BFT^ 60. C-2-5 ^CLV^ 90. D-3-5 ^DRW^ 120. E-4-5 ^EYY^

31
The Systems Matrix

M e a s u re s : O b je c ti v e s
F u n d a m e n ta l : (C rite ria , M e ri t a n d
V a lu e s : M o tiv a tin g C o n tro l: H o w to E v a lu a te In te rfa c e : R e la ti o n o f a ll
B a s i c o r P h y s ic a l , W o rth F a c to rs ), G o a l s F u tu re : P la n n e d
B e lie fs , G lo b a l D e s i re s , a n d M o d ify E l e m e n t o r D i m e n s io n s to o th e r
C h a ra c te ris tic s - W h a t, (H o w M u c h , W h e n , C h a n g e s a n d R e s e a rc h
E th ic s , M o ra l M a tte rs S y s te m a s i t O p e ra te s S y s te m s o r E le m e n ts
H o w , W h e re , o r W h o R a te s , P e rfo rm a n c e N e e d s fo r a ll D im e n s io n s
(N O R M S/S TA N D AR D S ) (PO W E R /AU TH O RITY ) (M O R A LE/C O H E SIO N )
(G RO U P FO R M A T) S p e c ifi c a tio n s )
(G O A LS/O B JEC TIV ES )

P u rp o s e : m is s i o n , a im ,
n e e d , p rim a ry c o n c e rn ,
fo c u s

In p u ts : p e o p le , th i n g s ,
in fo rm a ti o n to s ta rt th e
se q ue n ce

O u tp u ts : d e s ire d
(a c h ie v e s p u rp o s e ) a n d
u n d e s ir e d o u tc o m e s
fro m s e q u e n c e

S e q u e n c e : s te p s fo r
p ro c e s s in g in p u ts , flo w ,
la y o u t, u n it o p e ra ti o n s

E n v iro n m e n t: p h y s ic a l &
a tti tu d i n a l , o rg a n i z a tio n ,
s e tti n g , e tc .

H u m a n a g e n ts : s k i ll s ,
p e rs o n n e l , re w a rd s ,
re s p o n s i b i liti e s , e tc .

P h y s ic a l c a ta ly s ts :
e q u i p m e n t, fa c i litie s , e tc .

In fo rm a ti o n a id s : b o o k s ,
in s tru c tio n s , e tc .

The System Elements

1. Purpose The mission, aim, need, primary concern, or function of or results sought
from a system. The purpose is the contribution made to or necessary for a larger system
in the hierarchy(ies). A purpose is what the system is to accomplish, with no emphasis on
how it is to be accomplished.

2. Inputs Any physical items, information, and/or human beings on which work,
conversion, or processing takes place to arrive at the output(s). Physical items could be
coils of steel, powdered plastic, money (the actual currency and coins), the mark-sense
punch card, the sales order form, and so on. Information could be a bank account balance
(printed on a piece of paper), whereabouts of the president (secretary's explanation),
number of toasters ordered (sales order form), amount of production on machine 472
(orientation of iron particles on a magnetic tape), history of the conflicts between key
managers (perceptions in the minds of people), etc. Human beings relevant in this
context could be sick people entering a hospital, a housewife shopping at a grocery store,
a family wanting house plans, a student attending a college, an overweight person visiting
a reducing salon, etc.
A combination input is the return of previous outputs of the system. For example, a
large system for manufacturing airplanes includes the reentry of each airplane for major
periodic maintenance. A patient may reenter a hospital after having been discharged.
User information about product performance serves as new input to the product design
system.
Every system requires at least two of the three types of input. A manufacturing system,
for example, will require information about alloy, tensile and yield strengths, gauge, and
width to accompany the physical input of a coil of steel. A patient entering the system of
a hospital represents human (previous medical history and symptoms), and physical
(personal belongings) information inputs. A system, which is a board of directors
meeting, needs inputs of information and humans.

3. Outputs Desired (and undesired) physical items, information, humans and/or services
(response, event, policy, reaction, safety level, correction, etc.) which result from
working on or converting inputs. Desired outputs achieve the selected and bigger
purposes by adding net value to the inputs. Undesired outputs include such things as
dislocations, pollutants, scrap, and trash, for which provisions must be included in the
system specifications. Outputs also include substantive properties, performance, and
physical or chemical characteristics of the output when actually being used. For example,
the dynamic characteristics (cornering, power pickup, shock absorption ability, or
acceleration) of an automobile output are a part of output itself.

4. Sequence The conversion, work, process, transformation, or order and cycle of steps
or events by which the inputs become the outputs. The basic steps are the essential "unit
operations" or identifiable changes in the state of the inputs which lead to their
transformation into outputs. Additional steps include causal bonds, movement, storage,
meeting, decision, and control, which enable the unit operations to take place. Parallel
channels for processing different inputs are often included, along with various connective
points to interrelate the channels.

5. Environment The physical and sociological (psychological, legal, political,


economic) factors or ambiance (as the French call it) within which the other elements are
to operate. These are always changing. Many are usually outside the influence of the
system itself, yet others can be modified or specified for the system. Physical or
"climatic" factors include temperature, humidity, noise, dirt, light, colors of machines and
walls, and so forth. Ecological physical factors "outside" the system include spatial
aspects, accessibility, and shapes and relationships in the design of the physical facilities
and equipment.
Sociological factors include the state of technology within which the organizational
unit operates, the cultural and historical determinants of attitudes, and the society's
economic conditions. More specific factors concern the attitudes of the managerial and
supervisory personnel, morale and "reality" disposition of working forces, the operating
controls and rules for personnel, and the social interactions and communications of the
people involved. Sociological environment forms the larger context of externalities which
"own" or "set the stage" for the system. The Japanese, for example, do not build factories
or plants with an entrance on the northeast side, the devil’s gate. The managerial style
and organizational structure sets another environmental factor: autocratic, paternalistic,
bureaucratic, permissive, diplomatic, or democratic

6. Human Agents Human beings on differentiated levels who are aids in the steps of
the sequence, without becoming part of the outputs. Human agent activities or methods to
aid in the sequence include the whole range of human capabilities: talking, writing,
expending energy in manipulating controls and/or changing input items, reasoning,
performing dexterous tasks, decision making, evaluating, learning, creativity, and acting
as a diligent monitoring and sensing device. Human beings are either inputs and outputs
(patients in a hospital), or human agents (nurses). Overlap exists in most cases, for
example, as patients can be human agents aiding other patients, and nurses can be inputs
into the cafeteria system.

7. Physical Catalysts Physical resources that are aids in the steps of the sequence
without becoming part of the outputs. Typical items are chalkboards, machines, vehicles,
chairs, computers, filing cabinets, energy, buildings, tools, jigs, automatic devices, paper,
lubricating oil, projector, desks, self-measuring sensors, and pallets. A chicken on an egg
farm is a physical catalyst. Each of these illustrative items could be a physical catalyst in
one system, or input or output in another system. A computer, for example, may be a
physical catalyst in an accounts payable system, an input in a maintenance system, and an
output in a production system.

8. Information Aids Knowledge and data resources that help in the steps of the
sequence, without becoming part of the outputs. Computer programming instructions,
equipment operating manuals, maintenance instructions, standard operating procedures
for human agents, and policy manuals are typical information aids. These may also be
inputs and outputs in other systems. On occasion, an expert consultant, media advisor, or
corporate legal advisor could embody the role of this element.

Summary

Systems can vary in size. Thus, bigger levels in the hierarchy of systems incorporate
smaller systems, which are subsystems or components.
Because a hierarchy is often a size-based order of systems, with no superior- inferior
relationship implied, a vertical channel of systems can be extended for the area of
interest. Each system shows the related horizontal or parallel systems, either within or
outside the organizational unit. System levels do not always correspond with
organizational divisions.
Each system is thus a complex set of interrelated elements. The basic set defines the
broad purpose and values of the larger entity or organizational unit within which the
system does or will exist. Each system achieves an end. Thus, the purpose, function, or
result sought from a system is the first element, and each system has at least one purpose.
Each system receives physical, informational, and/or human items from smaller, larger,
and parallel systems to process into a desired state that will achieve it's purpose.
Therefore, every system has inputs.
Each system provides physical, informational, and/or human items or services to it's
smaller, larger, and horizontal systems. These outcomes represent the means whereby the
purposes of the system are achieved. Therefore, each system has outputs.
Similarly, five other elements can be developed from this Axiom: sequence,
environment, human agents, physical catalysts, and information aids. The words used for
names of elements are unimportant and can vary, whereas the ideas represented by each
are critical.

System Dimensions

1. Fundamental This dimension must exist or no others can be specified. It is the


identity or context of a system. Also referred to as the existence, real-life, or
manifestation dimension, it concerns tangible, overt, observable, physical, and/or basic
structure characteristics. It includes the basic "what-who-how-where" specifications,
along with associated quality levels. It states specifically the intensity, degree to which
the specific condition is distinguishable from others, and/or the operation of each
element.
Determining the specific fundamental attributes is what the P&D approach seeks to
accomplish, so that the conditions thus identified can be implemented. Many terms
describe the specific numbers, descriptions, drawings, and so on, including specifications,
parameter variables, estimates, relationships, properties, characteristics, and
identifications.

2. Values This is the situation-specific form of the values part of this appendix. It also
embodies and enlarges on the "satisfy" part of Axiom 8 by stating both the solution
values and the human values (disposition to behave in certain ways).
Motivating beliefs, human expectations, global desires, ethics, equity, and moral
concerns can be ascribed in some form to each element. The most global values are
likely candidates for the purpose element. Other descriptions concern how people and
organizations "feel" about desirable results in specifying each element: preferences, basic
(unyielding?) or important assumptions (e.g., democratic society), concern with societal
life and civil liberties, disposition to a behavior, pleasures, productivity, justice, concern
with individual life, relevance, sensitivities, preferred modes of conduct, involvement of
others, essential beliefs, sentiments, convenience, human dignity, willingness to shape
societal acts and conscience, emphases on successes rather than failures and wrongs,
comprehensiveness, safety, and cultural or esthetic properties. Values could thus be said
to capture the "standards" that a solution is expected to continue.
Perhaps the most important benefit of the values dimension for each element is the
forced review of what the value standards are and how they need to be part of the
solution and the decisions in selecting the solution. "On all sides," one sees evidence
today of cop-out realism-ostensible efforts to be sensible in dealing with things as they
are but that turn out to be a shucking of responsibility.... It is now possible to assess the
effect of [the] legalization [of off-track betting and the numbers game].... New York State
itself has become a predator in a way that the Mafia could never hope to match....
Millions of dollars are being spent by New York State on lavish advertising on television,
on radio, on buses, and on billboards. At least the Mafia was never able publicly to
glorify and extol gambling with taxpayer money...[Also consider the] cop-out realism [in]
dealing with cigarette-smoking by teenagers and pre-teenagers. Special rooms are now
being set aside for students who want to smoke.... The effect of [the] supposedly 'realistic'
policy is to convert a ban into benediction. By sanctioning that which [people] deplore,
they become part of the problem they had the obligation to meet... The function of [value]
standards is not to serve as the basis for mindless repressive measures but to give
emphasis to the realities of human experience.

3. Measures Measures change the values dimensions into particular objectives and
operational goals. They embody the "achieve" part of Axiom 8, and concern how much
and when, including what is needed to overcome entropy. Measures in general concern
effectiveness, time, performance, cost and other factors of importance concerning the
fundamental specifications. They are indicators of the success of the eventual solution.
They include any associated confidence limits.
The word objectives identifies the specific categories, units, verifiable indicators,
scales, factors of merit, criteria or parameters that are considered the important measures.
Forecasts, financial matters and quantitative factors are almost always included. They
should conform to what people consider useful for attaining the values and fundamental
dimensions, but should also be clear, capable of being measured, reproducible,
unequivocal in interpretation, and as accurate as needed. Some typical measures are cost
per month, time per service or output per hour, reject rate, reliability life, expense ratio,
and profit per year.
Goals assign specific amounts and time and/or cost factors to each objective. Assume
that one value is "Improve safety record in the department." An objective might be
"decrease accidents," and a goal "reduce monthly accident rate by 30% within a year."
Here is another illustration: the value is to improve manpower services; one objective of
several is to increase placements of disadvantaged people; one goal of several would be
to increase by 25% per year the number of disadvantaged placements. No number of
objectives or goals will ever capture exactly what is meant by the specific values. In
addition, some goals will be set by external groups, such as the standards or threshold
levels defined by the Bureau of Standards, Underwriters Laboratory, Environmental
Protection Agency, Consumer Product Safety Commission, and American National
Standards Institute.

4. Control Control comprises methods for ensuring that the fundamental, measures, and
even value specifications are maintained as desired (at or within limits around a specified
condition) during the operation of the system. Dynamic control of each specification
involves (a) making measurements of the performance of the specification as the solution
or system is in operation, (b) comparing the actual measurements to the desired
specification, and (c) taking actions to correct significant deviations if necessary, through
human corrections, automated response, advance modifications of equipment, or by
changing a desired specification, or planning and designing an overall improvement. A
significant deviation between performance and desired specification is interpreted as
meaning that the error of taking action when none is really needed is minimal compared
to the error of not taking action when it should be taken.
All three parts of the control dimension may be carried out within the system itself, or
any one or more may become the responsibility of another system or group. Government
regulations illustrate one form of external measurement, comparison, and/or corrective
action. Licensing, accrediting, peer review, receiving room inspection, customer surveys
and complaints, board of directors review, and outside auditing firms are also possible
outside controls. Cost control, waste control, internal audits, and productivity
improvement programs illustrate major efforts that may be designed into a solution or
activated after implementation. On the other hand, all three parts of the control dimension
may be an integral part of the fundamental and measures dimensions of a particular
element. For example, a part produced by a machine may be inspected by the operator, or
inspection may be done automatically. The effectiveness of corrective action is judged by
measuring the extent to which actual performance recovers to the desired specification
level. Correction is measured by stability, as when the significant differential disappears
as elapsed time increases; accuracy, or closeness of recovery to desired specification; lag
time, or speed of response to the action; and performance oscillations as the control-
reaction-control-reaction cycles take place.

5. Interface The interface constitutes the relationships of the fundamental, values,


measures, and control specifications to other elements and to other systems. Some
illustrations of interfaces are inspection of materials received from a vendor, the impact
of a changed grading system on parents, shared services with other hospitals, and
government reporting regulations related to personnel actions. Illustrations of intrasystem
interfaces are process control interactions with human agents, physical catalysts, and
information aids. Some of these cause difficulties with element specifications and vice
versa.
Interface dimension specifications help in the avoidance of difficulties in getting a
system to operate well by anticipating and assessing consequences of negative and hostile
interactions. What additional or how much less work will result for other system? What
costs will the other system incur? Can the other system be modified to let this system be
implemented, or even to have the other system take advantage of the ideas? Perhaps a
substitute or add-on "technological shortcut" might be located by such searching for
interfaces. What possible disturbances and forces from other systems (lobbying, special
interest groups, oil embargo, supreme court decision) will impact on this system (delay
service, increase cost)? Can a model (differential equation) express the interrelationships
of the factors or variables? How does the P&D professional or team interact with
managers/administrators, users/clients/customers, people working in the current system,
and so on? Are there cause-effect research results describing how one factor (element or
dimension) changes as another varies?

6. Future Anticipated changes in each specification of the other five dimensions at one
or more points of time in the future. The future dimension defines the growth, learning
rate (evolution, homeostasis) or decay of the specifications. Forecasts of all types (e.g.,
social attitudes, costs, weather, population) express possible "future" specifications. Also
included are specifications on how the specific element dimension is to get to the
anticipated stage (a transfer function). The arrival at the desired stage may be planned
(obsolescence or gradual termination). May be due to learning and duration, or may
require a new P&D effort. Sunset laws and zero-based budgeting illustrate two broad
ideas for describing how arrival at the future point might be accomplished.
Combining this corollary with Axiom 8 forms the system matrix or morphological box
shown on the first page of this section. It represents the prescriptive, universal, and
understandable definition of the word system. Different words can be used to represent
the same ideas as the elements and dimensions. One version in policy making, for
example, uses these elements: purpose-relevant reference system, inputs, outputs,
structure and process, and operating, information, and human communication
requirements. These are detailed by the following dimensions: physical, values,
measures criteria, analysis procedures, elemental interfaces, model interfaces, systems
interfaces, and anticipated changes.
Another version of the system matrix is shown in next graph on the following page to
portray the time component aspects of the future dimension. The lines denoting the cells
in the first and second charts are not firm divisions, for there are both overlapping and
interrelationships among the cells. Each cell, rather, connotes the major thrust of the
element/dimension intersections.
The representational matrix provides an orderly way of denoting all possible types of
information to consider in specifying a system. Not all elements or dimensions need to be
specified in a particular system. Nor is it necessary to have the same amount of
information in each cell. The amount can range from an empty set to some large, almost
infinite number of models or sets of data. Similar or identical accuracy is not required for
the information in each cell. The system matrix is very seldom, if ever, used in exactly
this form as a basis for recording information needed in designing a system.
The questions raised by probing what specifications should be developed for each cell are
almost all-inclusive. They number far more than the usually suggested who, what, why, where,
when, and how. They are also much more specific than the usual questions because more than
the 48 questions the matrix appears to suggest a available. In addition to the 16 fundamental
and values dimension questions, there are at least 16 measures dimension questions about the
fundamental and values specifications, 24 control dimension questions, 32 interface, and 40
future, or a total of at least 128 system view of each system matrix cell.

Listing of Techniques by Cells of P&D System

The techniques and models listed in each cell illustrate some that may be useful in
accomplishing the functions of the cell. Others may well be applicable, but the following
listing is an appropriate stimulator:
(1) Purpose, fundamental. Brain writing, couplet comparison technique, ends-mean
chain, intent structures, interviews, map of activity and thought chains, multilevel
approach, needs analysis, nominal group technique, objective trees, purpose expansion,
relationship chart, relevance trees, sensitivity analysis, scenarios, semilattice tree,
surveys, system pyramid.
(2) Purpose, values. Brainstorming, climate analysis, dialectical process, ends-
means chain, intent structures, interviews, objectives tree, questionnaire, utility theory.
(3) Purpose, measures. Budgets, correlation analysis, financial investment
appraisal, Gantt chart, index analysis, indifference curves, interpretive structural
modeling, measurement model monthly operating statement, needs analysis, nominal
group technique, objectives or goals survey, objectives pyramid, Planning, Programming,
and Budgeting System, profit/volume analysis, return on investment, single-factor and
multiattribute utility assessment, subjective probability assessment, subjective 0-100
scaling, variance analysis.
(4) Purpose, control. Annual report of P&D system activities and achievements,
board of director review, budget control sheets, control charts, data transformation,
external peer evaluation, influence diagram, management style questionnaire,
participative review and control, Planning, Programming, and Budgeting System, trend
analysis, value analysis, worst/best case analysis, zero-base budgeting.
(5) Purpose, interface. A fortiori analysis, arbitration and mediation planning,
cause/effect assessment, correlation analysis, cross-impact matrix, digraphs, ends-means
chain, graph theory, hierarchical structure, influence diagram, intent structures,
interaction analysis, interpretive structural modeling, intersectoral analysis, negotiation,
objectives tree, ombudsman, opportunity identification, policy graphs, purpose network
analysis, relationship chart, sensitivity analysis.
(6) Purpose, future. Each of those in cells 1-5. Conditional demand analysis,
extended scenarios, futures research, objectives tree, profits progress (learning function,
sociological projection techniques.
(7) Inputs, fundamental. Budgets, conditional demand analysis, contingency
forecasting, demographic forecasts monthly operating statements and balance sheets,
nominal group technique, partitioning techniques, questionnaire, regression analysis,
technological forecasting, telephone polling, time series analysis.
(8) Inputs, values. Brainstorming, dialectical process, group process technique,
interviews, questionnaires, sociological projection technique, utility assessment, and
utility theory.
(9) Inputs, measures. Budget, checklists, cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness
analysis, data transformation, information acquisition preference inventory, judgment
analysis technique, judgment policy analysis, measurement model, planning and control
technique, preference ordering, psychological scaling, sampling theory, sensitivity
analysis, simulation, statistical model, subjective probability assessment, subjective
scaling, voting techniques.
(10) Inputs, control. Attitude surveys, board of directors review, budget, checklists,
citizen honoraria, control charts for human involvement measures and for information
quality and quantity norms, control method, correlation analysis, data base system,
employee panels, external peer evaluation, focus group testing, a fortiori analysis, Gantt
charts, group process technique, influence diagram, operational games, organization
analysis, planning and control technique, program planning budgeting system, probability
assessment, productivity circles, questionnaire, replicate information collection, role
playing, sensitivity analysis, simulation, statistical model, task force, team building,
telephone polling, use testing, value analysis, worst-case analysis, zero-base budgeting.
(11) Inputs, interface. Interface with outputs: charette, computer graphics,
correlation analysis, drop-in centers, fishbowl planning, input-output analysis, media-
based issue balloting, meetings, open-door policy, public hearing workshops. Others:
arbitration and mediation planning, cross-impact matrix, influence diagram, interaction
analysis interaction matrix, inter-sectoral analysis, interpretive structural modeling,
negotiation, ombudsman, profit/volume analysis, system pyramid, technology
assessment.
(12) Inputs, future. Each of those in cells 7-11. Conditional demand analysis,
contextual mapping, extended scenarios, forecasting, futures research, new-product early
warning system, opportunity identification, progress ("learning") function for quality and
quantity measures of effectiveness, regression forecasting, simulation, social indicators,
technology assessments and forecasts, time series analysis.
(13) Outputs, fundamental. All available ones are possible as output representations,
but a sample of them includes computer graphics, drawings, drop-in centers, fishbowl
planning, hotline, input-output analysis, intent structures, interpretive structural models,
media-based issue balloting, meetings, open door policy, oval diagrams, photographs,
policy graphs, pro forma balance and operating statements, public hearing, public
information program, scenario, system matrix, system or semilattice pyramid, workshops.
(14) Outputs, values. Brainstorming, dialectical process, intent structures,
questionnaires, sociological projection technique, utility assessment.
(15) Outputs, measures. Benefit-cost analysis, break-even analysis, budget,
correlation analysis, data transformation, a fortiori analysis, measurement model, PPBS,
product or service life cycle analysis, profit/volume analysis, progress functions,
psychological scalings, reliability theory, sensitivity analysis, simulation, subjective
probability assessment, variance analysis.
(16) Outputs, control. Budget, cause-effect analysis, central location testing,
checklists, control charts, control model, correlation analysis, counter planning, data
transformation, decision matrix, employee panels, financial investment appraisal,
influence diagram, return on investment, simulation, tables reporting variance to norms,
use testing, worst case analysis, zero-base budgeting.
(17) Outputs, interface. With inputs: computer graphics, correlation analysis, drop-in
centers, fishbowl planning, input-output analysis, media-based issue balloting, meetings,
open-door policy, public hearing, and workshops. With other elements: arbitration and
mediation planning, cause-effect analysis, charrette, cross-impact analysis, diagraphs,
environmental impact statements, fault tree analysis, impact analysis, influence diagram,
interaction analysis, intersectoral analysis, negotiation, new business project screening
summary, ombudsman, policy graphs, PPBS, profit/volume analysis, system or
semilattice pyramid, and technology assessment.
(18) Outputs, future. Each of those in cells 13-17, plus additional techniques in cell
12.
(19) Sequence, fundamental. Because the P&D system sequence involves all aspects
of time-based P&D, all of the techniques could be involved, especially the change
principles. The following just illustrate the differing types for each phase:

1. Delphi, forecasting techniques, function expansion, purpose hierarchy, intent


structures, oval diagrams, semi-lattice, system pyramid, tree diagrams.
2. Analogies, bisociation, brain resting, brainstorming, brain writing, dialectical
process, morphological box, search for diverse sources of options.
3. Cash flow analysis, causal diagram, cost effectiveness analysis, decision matrix,
DELTA chart (decision, event, logic, time, activities), feasibility study, financial
investment appraisal, flowchart, goals-achievement matrix, input-output matrix,
layout-diagram, multilevel digraph, operations research, optimization, pair
comparison, Pareto analysis, return on investment, scenario, social cost benefit
analysis, system matrix.
4. Same as 3 plus contingency analysis, cost-benefit analysis, decision tables,
forecasting, multiple attribute utility assessment, parameter analysis, program
planning method, simulation.
5. Same as 1, 2, 3, and 4 plus control charts, questionnaires (cells 21, 22, 23).

(20) Sequence, values. Brainstorming, dialectical process, group process technique,


questionnaires, and utility theory.
(21) Sequence, measures. Activity balance line evaluation, break-even analysis,
budget, correlation analysis, data transformation, decision tree, Gantt chart, life cycle
phasing, line of balance, management operations systems technique, measurement model,
milestone chart, network analysis, operations chart, PERT or critical path method
(manual or computerized), PERT/COST, precedence diagram method, process chart,
RAMPS, statistical model, subjective probability assessment, timeline budget for phases,
variance analysis.
(22) Sequence, control. Activity balance line evaluation, activity matrix, budget
variance analysis, client/user/citizen/ P&D peer review panels, contingency/worst case
analysis, control charts, correlation analysis, data transformation, decision tables, DELTA
chart, Gantt chart, influence diagram, line of balance, management operations systems
technique, milestone chart, network analysis, operation chart, PERT/COST, PPBS,
precedence diagram methods, process chart, RAMPS, scheduling model, simulation,
statistical model, task force, zero-base budgeting.
(23) Sequence, interface. Arbitration and mediation, cause/ effect assessment, change
principles, contingency tables, correlation analysis, cross-impact analysis, decision tables,
digraphs, force field analysis, improvement program, influence diagram, interaction
matrix analysis, interface event control, intersectoral analysis, multiple criteria utility
assessment, negotiation, ombudsman, policy graphs, scenarios, subjective probability
assessment, surveys.
(24) Sequence, future. Each of those in cells 19-23. Some newer techniques are
emerging: computerized Delphi, contingency forecasts, a fortiori analysis, parameter
analysis, technological forecasting, worst-case analysis.
(25) Environment, fundamental. Causal diagrams, community attitude survey,
Delphi, demographic analysis, dialectical process, dynamic model, gaming and
simulation, goals program analysis, intersectoral analysis, interviews, matrix structure,
organizational climate analysis, organizational sensing, oval diagrams, parameter
analysis, productivity circles, project teams, preference ordering, scenarios, semilattice
pyramid, telephone polling, tree diagrams, utility assessment, volunteer group status.
(26) Environment, values. Brainstorming, climate analysis, dialectical process,
questionnaires, technology assessment, utility theory.
(27) Environment, measures. Budget, bureaucracy level analysis, cause/effect
assessment, climate analysis, correlation analysis, counts and/or ratios of public
attendance at P&D meetings, data transformation, demand analysis, econometric models,
factor analysis, frequency of P&D system meetings, frequency of updating "pulse" of
external environment aspects, magnitude of external pressure, management grid analysis,
measurement model, network analysis of P&D system, PPBS, regression analysis,
rigidity versus openness analysis, role analysis, statistical model, subjective probability
assessment, variance analysis.
(28) Environment, control. Budget, climate analysis trends, control charts, control
model, correlation analysis, critical incidence review, data transformation, influence
diagram, P&D peer review, PPBS, statistical model, utility assessment, zero-base
budgeting.
(29) Environment, interface. Arbitration and mediation planning, cause/effect
assessment, correlation analysis, demographic analysis, digraphs, environmental impact
statement, factor analysis, fault-tree analysis, force field analysis, graph theory, human
development continua, impact analysis, influence diagram, ISM, interaction analysis,
intersectoral analysis, interviews, negotiation, ombudsman, organization mirror,
organizational sensing, policy graphs, regression analysis, role analysis, surveys,
technology and managerial control analysis, tree diagrams, trend analysis.
(30) Environment, future. Each of those in cells 25-29. Adaptive forecasting,
contextual mapping, demographic forecasting, forecasting, Markov chains, probabilistic
system dynamics, regression forecasting, sales force composite, smoothing, sociological
projection technique, substitution analysis, technological forecasting, time series analysis.
(31) Human agents, fundamental. Attitude tests, contingency analysis, creativity
techniques (analogy, morphological box, bisociation, brainstorming, brain writing, etc.),
interviews, nominal group technique, ombudsman, oval diagrams, personality tests,
personality type analysis, role analysis, semilattice pyramid, scenarios, subjective
probability assessment, task analysis, task force, wage scale.
(32) Human agents, values. Brainstorming, dialectical process, group process
technique, questionnaires, utility theory.
(33) Human agents, measures. Activity sampling, aptitude test, budget, correlation
analysis, critical incident technique, data transformation, external examiner to assess
performance, financial plans, Gantt chart, historical time/cost data in P&D, information
content analysis, job evaluation, measurement model, performance measures tally, PPBS,
progress functions and learning curves, quality of working life autonomy, salary versus
job education curves, statistical estimation, statistical model, subjective probability
assessment, user satisfaction surveys, variance analysis, wage scale, wage surveys, work
measurement.
(34) Human agents, control. Aptitude test, budget, contingency analysis, control
charts, control model, correlation analysis, counseling interviews, critical incident
technique, critical path method, data transformation, Gantt charts, influence diagram,
organizational analysis, peer review, PPBS, performance appraisal, RAMPS, regular
retraining courses, semi-annual sample tests or games, statistical model, task force, team
building, training, zero-base budgeting.
(35) Human agents, interface. Arbitration and mediation planning, cause/effect
assessment, correlation analysis, counseling interviews, cross-impact analysis, decision
tables, digraphs, educational curriculum formats, group processes techniques, influence
diagram, interaction analysis, interactive computer languages, intersectoral analysis, ISM,
negotiation, ombudsman.
(36) Human agents, future. Each of those in cells 31-35.
(37) Physical catalysts, fundamental. Flow path diagrams, layout drawings,
nomographs, photographs, physical and mathematical equations describing operating
characteristics, physical model, specification listing, templates, three-dimensional
models.
(38) Physical catalysts, values. Brainstorming, dialectical process, group process
technique, questionnaires, utility theory.
(39) Physical catalysts, measures. Break-even analysis, budget, cash flow analysis,
correlation analysis, cost benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, data
transformation, downtime distribution, machine-loading charts, maintenance network,
maintenance schedule graph, measurement model, PPBS, progress function, queuing
models, social cost-benefit analysis, statistical model, subjective probability assessment,
and variance analysis.
(40) Physical catalysts, control. Activity sampling, budget control sheets, control
charts, control model, correlation analysis, critical path method, data transformation,
influence diagram, interview surveys, maintenance charts, PPBS, RAMPS, replacement
model, statistical mode, utilization indices and charts, value analysis, zero-base
budgeting.
(41) Physical catalysts, interface. Arbitration and mediation planning, cause/effect
assessment, climate analysis, contingency analysis, correlation analysis, cross-impact
analysis, digraphs, graph theory, influence diagram, interaction analysis, interaction
matrix diagram, intersectoral analysis, ISM, negotiation, ombudsman, semilattice
pyramid, telecommunications.
(42) Physical catalysts, future. Each of those in cells 36-41. Modeling of
conferences based on technologically advanced physical catalysts, technology
assessment, technological forecasting.
(43) Information aids, fundamental. Abstract dimensioning, analysis of variance,
career path analysis, case histories, charts, computer graphics, contingency analysis,
continuing educational path, decision tables, decision trees, drawings, expected free cash
flow model, graphics, graphs group process techniques, hierarchical clustering,
histograms, information content analysis, information flowcharts, lattice theory,
mathematical and statistical tools (correlation analysis, factor analysis, histogram,
Laplace transforms, risk distribution, variance, etc.), mathematical model, mathematical
programming technique, modeling, performance/time measurement estimate, physical
model, probability assessment, programming languages, recursive programming model,
risk analysis, simulation languages, software in structures and packaging, standard
operating procedures, system pyramid, time study, utility theory.
(44) Information aids, values. Brainstorming, dialectical process, group process
technique, questionnaires, utility theory.
(45) Information aids, measures. Activity sampling, budget, cast flow analysis,
computer simulation, contingency analysis, correlation analysis, cost-benefit analysis,
cost-effectiveness analysis, data transformation, decision tables, downtime
measurements, fault analysis, forecasting, a fortiori analysis, measurement model,
morphological analysis, objective tree, PPBS, probability assessment, sensitivity analysis,
social cost-benefit analysis, statistical model, subjective probability assessment, surveys,
time between request and response, variance analysis.
(46) Information aids, control. Auditing technique, budget, budget control sheets,
control charts, control model, correlation analysis, critical path analysis, data base
system, data transformation, decision tables, decision trees, flowcharts, forecasting, Gantt
charts, influence diagram, PPBS, priority setting or voting, replacement models, RAMPS,
standard data charts and tables, statistical model, utilization indices, value analysis, zero-
base budgeting.
(47) Information aids, interface. Cause-effect matrix, computer graphics,
contingency analysis, correlation analysis, cross-impact matrix, digraphs, a fortiori
analysis, influence diagram, interaction analysis, interaction matrix diagrams,
intersectoral analysis, ISM, negotiation, ombudsman, parameter analysis, programming-
computer interaction analysis, sensitivity analysis, survey questionnaires and interviews,
telecommunications.
(48) Information aids, future. Each of those in cells 42-47. Computer programming
research, computerized Delphi, cost-benefit analysis, forecasting, gaming, and subjective
probability.

Techniques and Models in P&D

The marvelous ability of humans to develop symbols, signs, and abstractions has led to
a huge number of models, techniques, and tools. Most were proposed for the analysis and
research methods of conventional P&D approaches. Yet most of them can be converted
into valuable aids for all five factors of the total P&D approach. All of factors in the P&D
scenario need the abstracting and estimating assistance models and techniques.
This section provides a broad introduction to such techniques models, and tools by
means of:

* A listing of some of the available techniques by purposes or functions to be achieved


in P&D

* A listing of techniques by cell of the P&D system matrix

* Some selected references containing descriptions of many of the techniques

LISTING OF SOME AVAILABLE TECHNIQUES, MODELS,


AND TOOLS BY PURPOSES/FUNCTIONS TO BE ACHIEVED

Analyze Alternative Options/Plans/Policies/Programs/Contingencies/Functions


Contingency analysis
Contingency tables
Function analysis diagram
Gaming
Goals-achievement analysis
Implementation, planning, and control technique (IMPACT)
Judgment analysis technique
Judgment policy analysis
Mathematical model
Mathematical programming technique Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Nominal group technique
Planning council
Planning, programming, and budgeting system (PPBS)
Queuing theory
Utility assessment
Value analysis
Voting technique
Zero-base budgeting (ZBB)
Also see Appraise/assess alternative options/
plans/policies/programs/contingencies/
functions

Analyze Investments
Break-even analysis
Mathematical model
Operations research
Optimization
Performa cash flow analysis
Risk analysis
Also see Appraise/assess investments

Analyze Job Methods and Motions


Control charts
Critical incident technique
Job evaluation
Maintenance chart
Operations chart
Process chart
Productivity circles
Relationship (Rel) chart
Simultaneous motion (Simo) chart
Task analysis
Task timeline
Time study
Training
Work measurement

Analyze Policy Setting and Decision-Making Variables


See Analyze investments
Analyze projects
Analyze systems
Appraise/assess investments
Appraise/assess projects
Appraise/assess systems
Analyze Product Quality
See Identify (Product) opportunities
Analyze Projects
ABC analysis (Pareto model)
Critical path method
Feasibility studies
Gantt chart
Map of activity and thought chains (MATCH)
Management operations systems technique (MOST)
Mathematical model
Milestone chart
New business project screening summary
Network analysis
Precedence diagram method
Program evaluation and review technique (PERT)
Purpose network analysis
Resource allocation and multi-project scheduling (RAMPS)
Risk analysis
Also see Appraise/assess projects

Analyze Project Impacts on Society


Cost-effectiveness analysis
Cross-impact analysis
Delphi
Environmental impact statements
Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Nominal group technique
Planning balance sheet analysis
Social cost-benefit analysis
Utility assessment
Voting technique

Analyze Systems
Curry's model
Decision worksheet
Decision tree
Function analysis diagram
Gaming
Gravity model
Index numbers
Linear models
Mathematical model
Mathematical programming technique
Opportunity identification
Optimizing model
Path analysis
Physical model
Planning balance sheet analysis
Planning council
Planning model
Planning, programming, and budgeting system (PPBS)
Queuing theory
Recursive programming model
Relative space model
Resource constrained scheduling heuristics
Simulation model
Value analysis
Zero-base budgeting (ZBB)
Also see Appraise/assess systems

Appraise/Assess Alternative Options/Plans/Policies/Programs/Contingencies/Functions


Contingency analysis
Contingency tables
Failure analysis
Function analysis diagram
Gaming
Goals-achievement analysis
Index analysis
Indifference curves
Judgment policy analysis
Measurement model
Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Needs analysis
Nominal group technique
Pair comparison
Planning council
Planning, programming, and budgeting system (PPBS)
Probability assessment
Program planning method
Psychological scaling
Subjective probability assessment
Utility assessment
Utility theory
Variance analysis
Value analysis
Voting technique

Appraise/Assess Investments
Cash flow model
Expected free cash flow model
Financial investment appraisal
Profit/volume (P/V) analysis
Return on investment
Risk analysis
Sensitivity analysis

Appraise/Assess Projects
Cash flow analysis
Critical path method
Demand analysis
Impact analysis
Input/output analysis
Map of activity and thought chains (MATCH)
Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Network analysis
New product early warning systems
Observation model
Pair comparison
Precedence diagram method
Program evaluation and review technique
Purpose network analysis
RAMPS
Resource constrained scheduling heuristics
Risk analysis

Appraise/Assess Systems
A fortiori analysis
Cost-benefit analysis
Cross-impact analysis
Decision worksheet
Environmental impact statement
Gaming
Pair comparison
Planning balance sheet analysis Planning council
Planning, programming, and budgeting system (PPBS)
Relative space model
Replacement model
Resource constrained scheduling heuristics
Sensitivity analysis
Simulation model
Social cost-benefit analysis
Utility theory
Value analysis
Zero-base budgeting (ZBB)

Approach Problems
Case histories
Conference
Counter-planning
Delphi
Digraphs
Function analysis diagram
Feasibility studies
Flow chart
Group process technique
Interviews
Meetings
Negotiation
Nominal group technique
Project teams
Purpose expansion
Questionnaire
Task force
Workshops

Categorize/Classify Alternatives
Abstract dimensioning
Classification
Control charts
Data dictionary
Fuzzy sets
Hierarchical clustering
Index analysis
Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Pair comparison
Partitioning
Person-card sorting technique
Task timeline
Utility assessment

Collect and/or Organize Performance Information


Case histories
Cash flow analysis
Control charts
Critical incident technique
Delphi
Flow chart
Gantt chart
Histograms
Learning curves
Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Management operations system technique (MOST)
Nominal group technique
Progress function
Time study
Training
Work measurement
Also see Analyze job methods and motions
Collect data and/or information
Identify new product opportunities

Collect Data and/or Information Activity sampling


Attitude surveys
Case histories
Central location testing Charrette
Checklist
Citizen referendum
Climate analysis
Computer graphics
Counter planning
Critical incident technique Data base system
Delphi
Ends-means chain
Environmental impact statements Interviews
Job interviews
Learning curves
Managerial grid analysis
Media-based issue balloting
Meetings
Numbering/identification schemes
Nominal group technique
Observation model
Opportunity identification
Questionnaire
Standard data, charts, tables, and equations
Standard operating procedures
Telecommunications
Telephone polling
Time study
Training
Use testing
Wage scale
Work measurement
Workshops

Describe/Establish/Measure Relationships
Cause/effect assessment
Computer graphics
Correlation analysis
Data dictionary
Data transformation
Digraphs
Dynamic model
Factor analysis
Fault-tree analysis
Flow chart
Interaction analysis
Interpretive structural modeling
Mathematical model
Modeling
Network analysis
Oval diagrams
Pareto analysis
Physical model
Planning model
Profit/volume (P/V) analysis
Purpose network analysis
Statistical model
System matrix
Tree diagram

Detail Proposed Solution


See Analyze job methods and motions
Analyze systems
Collect data and/or information
Describe/establish/measure relationships
Determining human ability and skill requirements for tasks
Involve people
Predict future conditions
Provide graphic representations

Determine Human Ability and Skill Requirements for Tasks


Aptitude test
Critical incident technique
Information content analysis
Interviews
Job evaluation
Operation chart
Performance/time measurement estimate
Role analysis
Task analysis
Therblig chart
Training
Tree diagram
Work measurement

Develop and Analyze Structure


Computer graphics
Critical path method
Interpretive structural modeling
Network analysis
Precedence diagram method
Program evaluation and review technique
System matrix

Develop (Enhance) Creativity


Bisociation
Brainstorming
Delphi
Nominal group technique
Morphological analysis
Person-card sorting technique
Synectics
Also see Generate alternative/ideas

Establish Priorities
See Categorize/classify alternatives
Organize alternatives Rank alternatives
Rate conditions
Weight criteria or factors

Establish Project Schedules and Basis for Measuring Progress and Performance
Activity line balance evaluation (ABLE)
Gantt chart
Learning curves and progress functions
Line of balance (LOB)
Management operations systems technique (MOST)
Milestone chart
Network analysis
PERT/cost
Precedence diagram method
Resource constrained scheduling heuristic
Task timeline

Estimate Budget and Dollar Requirements Budget


Cash flow analysis
Expected free cash flow model
Planning, programming, and budgeting system (PPBS)
Zero-base budgeting
Also see Analyzing investments

Evaluate Alternatives
See Analyze alternative options/plans/policies/programs/contingencies/functions
Analyze investments
Analyze job methods and motions
Analyze policy setting and decision making variables
Analyze product quality
Analyze project impacts on society
Analyze projects
Appraise/assess alternative options/plans/
policies/programs/contingencies/functions
Appraise/assess investments
Appraise/assess projects
Appraise/assess systems

Evaluate Interpersonal Relationships, Performance, and Effectiveness of an Organization


Auditing
Force field analysis
Index analysis
organization mirror
Organizational sensing
Role analysis
Training

Generate a list of Possible Purpose/Function Statements


Brainstorming
Brain writing
Function analysis diagram
Nominal group technique
Purpose expansion
Also see Generate alternatives/ideas

Generate Alternatives/Ideas
Analogies
Bisociation
Brain resting
Brainstorming
Brain writing
Case histories
Charrette
Citizen advisory committee
Conference
Counseling interviews
Delphi
Dialectical process
Fishbowl planning
Focused group interview
Forced connections
Interviews
Judgment analysis technique
Meetings
Morphological analysis
Nominal group technique
Productivity circles
Purpose expansion
Questionnaire
Random selected participation groups
Synectics
Team building
Telephone polling
Use testing workshops

Identify Management Styles


Attitude survey
Auditing technique
Interviews
Managerial grid analysis
Questionnaire

Identify (Product) Opportunities


Abstract dimensioning
Central location testing
Employee panels
Focus group testing
New-product early warning system
Opportunity identification
Product/service life cycle analysis
Substitution analysis
Use testing

Identify Problems, Overlaps, Conflicts Bisociation


Brainstorming
Data dictionary
Delphi
Group process techniques
Interviews
Meetings
Morphological analysis
Nominal group technique
Person-card sorting technique
Purpose expansion
Questionnaire
Also see Approach problems
Identify management styles
Identify Project Opportunities
See Analyze projects
Identify (product) opportunities

Identify Regularities
Classification
Person-card sorting technique
Priority setting
System matrix
Also see Weight criteria or factors

Inform and Involve Citizens Citizen honoraria


Drop-in centers
Fishbowl planning
Group process technique
Judgment policy analysis
Media-based issue balloting
Meetings
Negotiation
Ombudsman
Open-door policy
Planning balance sheet analysis Planning council
Public hearing

Involve People
Activity matrix
Brainstorming
Conference
Delphi
Interpretive structural modeling
Judgment analysis technique
Judgment policy analysis
Nominal group technique
Opinion polling
Planning council
Planning model
Productivity circles
Program planning method
Scenario writing
Telecommunications
Utility assessment
Value analysis
Also see Inform and involve citizens

Measure Error
Control charts
Sensitivity analysis
Variance analysis
Measure Project Progress and Performance
See Establish project schedules and basis for
measuring progress and performance

Organize Alternatives
Classification
Couplet comparison technique
Data dictionary
Data transformation
Decision tables
Fuzzy sets
Hierarchical clustering
Hierarchical structures
Intent structures
Logical framework
Numbering/identification schemes
Objective tree
Person-card sorting technique
Program planning method
Purpose expansion
Psychological scaling
Scaling, subjective
Scheduling model
Specification listing
System pyramid
Team building

Plot and Analyze Data about the Performance of an Existing Installation


Budget analysis
Control charts
Index values
Learning curves and progress functions
Variance analysis

Predict Future Conditions


Adaptive Forecasting
Budget
Contextual mapping
Control charts
Cross-impact analysis
Demographic forecasting
Econometric model
Forecasting
Index numbers
Learning curves
Markov chain
New-product early warning system Operations research
Path analysis
Performance measures tally
PERT/cost
Probabilistic system dynamics
Probability assessment
Product/service life cycle analysis Progress function
Queuing theory
Resource constrained scheduling heuristic Regression analysis
Regression forecasting
Reliability theory
Risk analysis
Role playing
Sales force composite
Scenario writing
Scheduling model
Simulation model
Smoothing
Sociological projection technique
Subjective probability assessment
Substitution analysis
Technological assessment
Technological forecasting
Time series analysis
Trend analysis

Preserve an Image
Computer graphics
Data dictionary
Graphics
Modeling
Photographs
Physical model
Planning model

Portray an Order of Events


Critical path method
Decision tables
Delta charts
Flow chart
Gantt charts
Interpretive structural modeling
Machine-loading charts
Maintenance charts
Milestone chart
Network analysis
Operations chart
PERT/cost
Precedence diagram method
Process chart
Program evaluation and review technique
Resource constrained scheduling heuristic
Specification listing
Task timeline

Produce Consensus
Arbitration and mediation planning
Group process technique
Judgment analysis technique
Meetings
Negotiation
Nominal group technique
Ombudsman
Team building
Voting technique

Provide Graphic Representations


Computer graphics
Decision tree
Delta charts (cell 19)
Digraphs
Flow chart
Graphics
Graphy theory
Histogram
Influence diagram
Intent structure
Interpretive structural modeling
Network analysis
Objective tree
Oval diagrams
Partitioning technique
Performance measures tally
Physical model
Policy graphs
Progress function
Purpose network analysis
System pyramid
Templates
Tree diagram
Also see Preserve an image
Portray an order of events

Rank Alternatives
Contingency analysis
Cost effectiveness analysis
Goals-achievement analysis
Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Measurement model
Nominal group technique
Pair comparison
Scaling, subjective
Social cost-benefit analysis
Utility assessment
Value analysis

Rate Conditions

Delphi
Job evaluation
Multiattribute utility (MAU) models
Questionnaire
Time study
Also see Weight criteria or factors

Stimulate Creativity of People


See Develop (enhance) creativity

Test Impact of Different Values of an Attribute/Parameter/Variable


A Fortiori analysis
Scenario writing
Sensitivity analysis

Weight Criteria or Factors


Nominal group technique
Questionnaire
Subjective judgment
Utility theory
Voting
Also see Rate conditions
Phase One

I. Collect and/or Organize Performance Information, Collect Data and/or Information,


Identify New Product Quality, Analyze Job Methods and Motions, Identify Project
Opportunities, Identify (Product) Opportunities

II. Analyze Projects, Appraise/Assess Projects, Analyze Project Impacts On Society

III. Measure Project Progress and Performance, Establish Project Schedules and Basis
for Measuring Progress and Performance

IV. Appraise/Assess Systems, Analyze Systems

V. Identify Problems, Overlaps, and Conflicts, Identify Management Styles, Approach


Problems

VI. Weight Criteria or Factors, Rank Alternatives, Organize Alternatives,


Categorize/Classify Alternatives, Establish Priorities, Identify Regularities

VII. Provide Graphic Representations, Preserve an Image, Portray an Order of Events,


Plot and Analyze Data about the Performance of an Existing Installation

Phase Two

VIII. Rate Conditions, Describe/Establish/Measure Relationships, Evaluate Interpersonal


Relationships, Performance, and Effectiveness of an Organization

IX. Analyze Alternative Options/Plans/Policies/Programs/Contingencies/Functions,


Develop and Analyze Structure

X. Generate a List of Possible Purpose/Function Statements

Phase Three

XI. Estimate Budget and Dollar Requirements, Determine Human Ability and Skill
Requirements for Tasks, Predict Future Conditions, Detail Proposed Solution

Phase Four

XII. Generate Alternatives/Ideas, Develop (Enhance) Creativity

XIII. Produce Consensus, Stimulate Creativity of People


Phase Five

XIV. Involve People, Inform and Involve Citizens

XV. Test Impact of different Values of an Attribute/Parameter/ Variable

XVI. Analyze Investments, Appraise/Assess Investments, Analyze Policy Setting and


Decision-Making Variables, Appraise/Assess Alternative Options/Plans/Policies/
Programs/Contingencies/Functions, Evaluate Alternatives, Measure Errors

CHARTING THE PROGRAMMING STRATEGIES

This section illustrates the format by-which most, if not all, of this network's
programming strategies shall be graphically represented. The chart titled, the Systems
Theory Infrastructural Process System, reflects the incorporation of a total of one-
hundred (100) separate programming variations (search engines) that are housed within
the procedural format of Nascent Applied Methods & Endeavors. Also, following this
area are the names and titles of these processing variations, as well as their 3, 4, 5 and 12
part operational formats, that are the individualized components of each chart.
Furthermore, the Chaining Sequences involved in the search engines of these charts, have
been supplied with some additional terms that represent the technic of integrating the
System Matrix into the procedural structure of this network's programming strategies.
Additionally, the terms under the Backward Chaining heading, account for the
method of infusing the processes of a chart into the cellular techniques of the System
Matrix. While those terms under the Forward Chaining heading account for the same
procedure. It also represents the strategical embodiment of the Organizational Profile, of
which within itself, reflects the 5-Phase operational format of a series of training
solutions (Exhibit - J, Section 9).

THE DEPTH-FIRST vs. BREATH-FIRST


SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES

In addition to the distinction between the backward chaining and forward chaining
strategies mentioned above, there also exist the need to distinguish between the depth-
first and breath-first search strategies of this network's programming variations. In the
depth-first search strategy, the inference engine takes every opportunity to produce a
subgoal. From "action" the engine backs up to "means" and then "distance" (e.g.,
E=cm2. (E) meaning economic order quantity [economy of scales], (=) meaning
equilibrium price [evc buyer value & demand], (c) meaning cost analysis [cost of goods
& services], and (m) meaning integrated market prices [squared global markets]).
Searching for detail first is the theme of back-chaining in a depth-first manner. A breath-
first search strategy sweeps across all premises in a chart before digging for greater
detail. Breath-first search strategies will be more efficient if one rule succeeds and the
goal attribute's alphanumeric value is obtained.
If the system wanted to draw a loose analogy to human problem solvers, it would say
to itself that "generalists" use a breath-first strategy. It would begin by inquiring in a
general way about the aspects of a problem. "Specialists," on the other hand, would tend
to focus toward a specific aspect of a problem and then probe for a lot of details
regarding that aspect. Overall though, if all states are examined, then the search is
exhaustive. If the search is suspended when a singular alphanumeric value is obtained,
then the search is nonexhaustive.
T H E S Y S T E M S T H E O R Y IN F R A S T R U C T U R A L P R O C E S S
and
CH ART O F PRO C EDUR ES

(X L V III)
F O R W A R D C H A IN IN G S E Q U E N C E S

A P P R A IS E /A S S E S S S Y S T E M S (IV )
T H E S Y S T E M S T H E O R Y IN F R A S T R U C T U R A L P R O C E S S
and
C H AR T O F PR O C ED U R ES

D e c is io n D e c is io n D e c is io n D e c is io n D e c is io n D e c is io n D e c is io n

( X L V III)
B A C K W A R D C H A IN IN G S E Q U E N C E S

IN F O R M A T IO N A I D S , I N T E R F A C E ( 4 7 )
The Structural Components

3 - PART PROCESSING FORMATS

I. Computerized Operations (Power/Authority)

1. Appendix - D, Sections XXX & XXXIV


2. The Database Strategies of NAME
3. The Measures of Effectiveness (143F)
4. The Solution Framework (273F)
5. The S.1 Artificial Intelligence Format
6. The Management of Organizational Behavior (112 & 184)
7. The Manufacturing, Planning & Control Systems (133)
8. The Structure of the Spread-Sheet Windows (DF)
9. The Theories of & in Planning & Design (92 - 96F)
10. The Expert Systems (245)
11. The People Side of Systems (271)
12. Language & Perception (374)

II. Procedural Operations (Norms/Standards)

1. Appendix - D, Sections XXIX - A (XIX & XXX) & XLIII


2. The People Side of Systems (121, 192 & 248)
3. People - Oriented Computer Systems (42, 59, 112 & 237)
4. The DSM (758)
5. The Manufacturing, Planning & Control Systems (27)
6. The Planning & Design Approach (XI)
7. The Expert Systems (196)
8. The Entry Format
9. Appendix - E (34 - 39)
10. The Problem Format (86F)
11. Selecting Planning & Design Projects (113 - 115F)
12. The Decision Making Processes (167F)

III. Structural Operations (Goals/Objectives)

1. The Structural Areas of a Business


2. The People Side of Systems (135)
3. The Principles of Pharmacology (50)
4. Appendix - E (27)
5. The Structure of Economic Systems
6. The Systems Areas of NAME
7. The Ego-State Contributions (44F)
8. The Indicators of Ego States (45F)
9. The Structuring Function Statement (58F)
10. The Concept of a Problem (88F)
11. The Planning & Design Organization (140F)
12. The Relationship of Activities (159F)

IV. Support Operations (Morale/Cohesion)

1. Appendix - D, Section XXIV


2. The People Side of Systems (123 & 158)
3. The Information & Decision Making Processes (288F)
4. The Principles for Data Security (260F)
5. The Integrity Management Techniques (261F)
6. The Techniques for Auditing, Validation & Testing (262F)
7. The Illustrative Sensitivity Scale (265F)
8. The Operating Formats of a Business
9. The Handbook of Strategic Expertise (178 & 200)
10. The Problem Tracing Format
11. The Management of Organizational Behavior (98)
12. The Manufacturing, Planning & Control Systems (446)

4 - PART MANAGERIAL FORMATS

I. Computerized Operations (Power/Authority)

1. Appendix - D, Sections XXX & XXIX


2. Appendix - C (7 - 11)
3. People - Oriented Computer Systems (108)
4. Consultation (37, 119, 213, 311 & 481)
5. The Expert Systems (94)
6. The Analysis of Data (36, 46, 63 & 80)
7. The Managerial Programming Sheet XXXII
8. The Chromosomal Processing Factor - A XXXVIII
9. The Planning & Design System Matrix - A (84 - 90)
10. The Characteristics of Information & Knowledge (243F)
11. The Processes & Profiles
12. The Integrated Windowing Sheet XXXV

II. Procedural Operations (Norms/Standards)

1. Consultation (306)
2. Appendix - D, Sections XXX & XXIII
3. Consultation (81, 175, 245, 393 & 533)
4. The People Side of Systems (121, 198 & 223)
5. The Documentary Structure XXXIV
6. The 4 - Part Psychological Effects Systems XX
7. The Planning & Design System Matrix - B (102)
8. The Chromosomal Processing Factor - B XXXIX
9. The Other Purposeful Activities (84F)
10. Operationalizing a Strategy (177F)
11. The Personal Infrastructural Processes III
12. Language & Perception (154 & 160)

III. Structural Operations (Goals/Objectives)

1. The Network Operations (Part XX)


2. People Oriented Computer Systems (67 & 84)
3. The People Side of Systems (4, 13, 47, 94 & 97)
4. Consultation (11, 19, 97, 189, 275, 435 & 539)
5. Appendix - D, Section XXXIV
6. The Planning & Design System Matrix - D (193)
7. The Chromosomal Processing Factor - D XL
8. The Different Levels of Planning & Design (97F)
9. The Threats to Public Databanks (257F)
10. The Managerial Problem Format
11. The Planning & Design Abstraction Format (77)
12. The Handbook of Strategic Expertise (68 & 74)

IV. Support Operations (Morale/Cohesion)

1. Appendix - D, Section XXX


2. Consultation (77, 159, 239, 367 & 505)
3. The Biblical Research Structure (30Kj)
4. The 3 - Part Operational Format
5. The 4 - Part Operational Format
6. The 5 - Phase Operational Format
7. The 12 - Phase Operational Format
8. The Planning & Design System Matrix - D (323)
9. The Chromosomal Processing Factor - D XLI
10. The Steps in System Building
11. The Application Process Flow Chart IV
12. The Handbook of Strategic Expertise (313)
5-PHASE FORMATS

I. Computerized Operations (Power/Authority)

1. The Planning & Design Databases (310 & 311)


2. The Planning & Design Sequence (324)
3. The Expert Systems (139, 168, 178 & 245)
4. Consultation (19, 31, 117, 211, 292 & 477)
5. The DSM (25 & 758)
6. Appendix - D, Sections XXX & XLIII or XXIX
7. Appendix - E
8. Medical Physiology (I)
9. The Netweaver's Sourcebook (171)
10. The DSM Decision Tree (689 & 752)
11. Language & Perception (I)
12. The Formula Formats

II. Procedural Operations (Norms/Standards)

1. The Planning & Design Approach (181)


2. The Planning & Design Scenario (264)
3. The Nursing Approach (147) - (NET 123)
4. The Phases in Consulting (548)
5. The Consultive Interventions (573)
6. Strategic Modeling Consultation (103)
7. Appendix - C (Team Organizers)
8. The Netweaver's Sourcebook (97)
9. The DSM (34)
10. Appendix - F
11. The Synopsis - Managerial Applied Numerics
12. Law Enforcement (I)

III. Structural Operations (Goals/Objectives)

1. Appendix - A & B
2. The Planning & Design Approach (46)
3. Consultation's Action Research (304)
4. Consultation (552)
5. Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists (4 & 26)
6. The Software Formats 5/12/5
7. The Manual of Nursing Practice (11, 13, 22 & 1352)
8. Critical Care Nursing (36)
9. Planning Nursing Research (1 & 19)
10. The People Side of Systems (6 & 18)
11. Appendix - H
12. The MSDLC Phases

IV. Support Operations (Morale/Cohesion)

1. Store Location & Assessment Research (302)


2. People - Oriented Computer Systems (112, 175, 91, 62 & 36)
3. The Teaching Guide (I)
4. Appendix - J
5. Appendix - D, Section XI
6. The Manual of Nursing Practice (20 & III - VII)
7. Critical Care Nursing (53, 222 & 20)
8. The People Side of Systems (99)
9. Planning Nursing Research (19)
10. Appendix - E (I5)
11. Appendix - G (I)
12. The Anatomical or Biblical Formula Format

12 - PHASE FORMATS

I. Computerized Operations (Power/Authority)

1. The Analysis of Data Tables (471)


2. People oriented Computer Systems (128)
3. The Expert Systems (94)
4. Roget's Thesaurus (921)
5. The 12 - Part Procedural Sub-Systems of NAME
6. The Database Structure of NAME Collegic Sub-Systems
7. The Principles of Planning & Design (19F)
8. The Profile Worksheet (79F)
9. The Immutable Timeline (149 - 154F)
10. The Logic Programming Sheet (164F)
11. The Documents & General Controls (255F)
12. The Handbook of Strategic Expertise (337 - 347)

II. Procedural Operations (Norms/Standards)

1. Appendix - E (27 - 31)


2. The Report Structure (Part XX)
3. The People Side of Systems (9, 18, 199 & 250)
4. The Manufacturing, Planning & Control Systems (6)
5. The King James Bible (1509)
6. The Rainbow Study Bible (I)
7. The Manual of Nursing Practice (428)
8. The Merck Manual (I - 4)
9. Gray's Anatomy (I)
10. The Function Hierarchy (58F)
11. Pursuing the Planning & Design Strategy (82F)
12. The Steps in Systems Development

III. Structural Operations (Goals/Objectives)

1. Appendix - D, Section XXIII


2. The Rainbow Study Bible (XII, XIII & XIV)
3. Pharmacology in Nursing (IX - XI)
4. The Federal Reserve Banking System
5. The Biblical Hierarchy Structures
6. The Structure of the Federal Government Systems
7. The Structure of the State Government System
8. The Structure of the County or Local Government System
9. The Business Organizational Chart System
10. The Child or Elder Care Organizational Chart System
11. The Various Planning & Design Fields (179F)
12. The Handbook of Strategic Expertise (338)

IV. Support Operations (Morale/Cohesion)

1. Appendix - D, Section XXXI


2. The King James Bible (12)
3. The Ascension Process of the Concordance
4. The Yearly Procedural Processes XIV
5. The Testing Systems (64F)
6. The Grids, Matrixes & Flow Chart Systems (241F)
7. The Ideal Alternatives (250F)
8. The Facilities Planning Model IV
9. The Format of the Request for Proposal
10. The Project Management Schematic V
11. The Problem Analysis Format XXX
12. The Store Location & Assessment Research (196)
THE METHOD STRUCTURE
Preliminary 1. Develop preliminary project plan and schedule for Phase 1
2. Management review and approval
3. Assign staff, review plan and schedule

A. Problem Analysis and Definition

1. Schedule and perform initial data gathering


-interviews
-observation of operations
-documentation collection
-questionnaires
-research

2. Perform initial data analysis


-identify and verify problems
-determine organization's information and data needs
-determine scope or requirements, limitations and constraints

3. Prepare Design Requirements Statement (DRS)

4. Presentation of (DRS) to management

5. Management review and direction/approval

6. Identify alternative approaches and complete feasibility analysis for each

7. Prepare Design Proposal

8. Presentation to management

9. Management review and decision

10. Prepare expanded Project Plan and Schedule (PPS) for the alternative approach
authorized by management

B. Data Gathering

1. Schedule and perform expanded data gathering in areas identified by initial data
gathering

2. Organized data and identify to facilitate analysis

3. Complete Data Element Description Sheet for each data element identified

4. Collect information on requirements for decision-making, operational directives, and


reports (both formal and informal)
5. Prepare Inventory of Existing Data Elements

6. Prepare Inventory of Existing Reporting Requirements

7. Perform supplemental data gathering as needed

8. Present inventories to management for review

9. Management review and direction/approval

C. Data Analysis

1. Working with the inventories of elements and reports and using classification analysis
work sheets, classify each individual data element by
-type: controlling, reporting, and supporting
-use: generic grouping, i.e., descriptive, computational, and quantitative -reports:
managerial, operational, and recordkeeping
-timeliness: operational, transitory, archival, and historical
-system requirements: size, data retention, updating, maintenance, response
requirements, and security -logical/functional relationships with other data
-current format and media
-name, synonym, and definitions

2. Prepare Master Classification Lists of data elements

3. Prepare Performance Requirements and Characteristics Lists

4. Review findings with management

5. Management direction/approval

D. Development and Implementation of Standards

1. Identify and organize the contents of the standards manual

2. Define and incorporate the Administrative and Environmental Standards

3. Develop and incorporate the method standard, for the Data Definition Control
System (DDCS)

4. Assemble current data element definitions in a Corporate Glossary

5. Review Glossary and DDCS with management

6. Management direction/approval

7. Train all users in Standards, DDCS, and Corporate Glossary

8. Implement DDCS, Corporate Glossary, and CDB Standards

9. Continue to improve and complete Corporate Glossary


E. Development and Implementation of the Data Integrity and Quality Assurance
Program

1. Determine organizational or functional component responsible for the integrity and


contents of every data element

2. Establish program, plan and schedule for cleaning up all currently existing files

3. Develop Methods for Auditing Data Element Content and Quality

4. Functional management establishes reliability parameters for each data element

5. Establish data audit management report requirements

6. Present program to all affected managers and top management

7. Management review and direction/approval

8. Institute program and commence cleanups and audits

F. Preliminary Design

1. Develop logical design alternatives based upon data classifications

2. Develop logical design alternatives based upon system and functional requirements

3. Develop physical design alternatives based upon


-file structures
-access methods
-available hardware
-available software

4. Perform trade-off analysis between various design alternatives

5. Prepare Trade-off Analysis Report

6. Management review, decision and direction

7. Prepare Detailed Design Project Plan and Schedule

8. Management review and direction/approval

G. Detailed Design and Testing

1. Prepare the detailed Design Specifications for the optimum design approved by
management in the previous Phase

2. Management review and direction/approval of the detailed design

3. Prepare Test Plan and necessary Test Data to test specifications and processes
4. Management review and direction/approval of test plan

5. Perform test and evaluate results

6. Management review and direction/approval of test results

7. Modification and retest as necessary

H. Data Conversion and Implementation

1. Develop Conversion Plan and Schedule

2. Management review and direction/approval

3. Conduct training as necessary

4. Convert data and establish new database

5. Maintain converted data

6. When data conversion is complete, implement operations

7. Management review, direction/approval of conversion and implementation

I. Post-implementation Evaluation

1. Plan and staff for the Post-implementation Evaluation study

2. Conduct the study

3. Prepare the Study Report and present Study Report to management

4. Management review and direction

5. Development phase terminates. Routine maintenance and support begins


The Prototype Format

3 – PART PROCESSING FORMATS

P/A N/S G/O M/C

A. 8=5 A. 10 = 3 A. 3 = 10 A. 3 = 10
B. 9=4 B. 9=4 B. 12 = 1 B. 7=6
C. 3 = 10 C. 8=5 C. 5=8 C. 5=8
D. 4=9 D. 2 = 11 D. 4=9 D. 9=4
E. 11 = 2 E. 11 = 2 E. 2 = 11 E. 12 = 1
F. 2 = 11 F. 5=8 F. 1 = 12 F. 11 = 2
G. 6=7 G. 12 = 1 G. 6=7 G. 10 = 3
H. 10 = 3 H. 1 = 12 H. 7=6 H. 1 = 12
I. 1 = 12 I. 3 = 10 I. 9=4 I. 6=7
J. 7=6 J. 4=9 J. 11 = 2 J. 4=9
K. 5=8 K. 7=6 K. 10 = 3 K. 2 = 11
L. 12 = 1 L. 6=7 L. 8=5 L. 8=5

4 – PART MANAGERIAL FORMATS

P/A N/S G/O M/C

A. 5=8 A. 9=4 A. 8=5 A. 5=8


B. 2 = 11 B. 4=9 B. 1 = 12 B. 12 = 1
C. 10 = 3 C. 10 = 3 C. 2 = 11 C. 10 = 3
D. 12 = 1 D. 8=5 D. 7=6 D. 6=7
E. 11 = 2 E. 3 = 10 E. 10 = 3 E. 7=6
F. 1 = 12 F. 2 = 11 F. 5=8 F. 8=5
G. 7=6 G. 7=6 G. 4=9 G. 9=4
H. 8=5 H. 12 = 1 H. 6=7 H. 3 = 10
I. 9=4 I. 5=8 I. 12 = 1 I. 4=9
J. 4=9 J. 6=7 J. 11 = 2 J. 2 = 11
K. 3 = 10 K. 11 = 2 K. 9=4 K. 1 = 12
L. 6 =7 L. 1 = 12 L. 3 = 10 L. 11 = 2
5 – PHASE FORMATS

P/A N/S G/O M/C

A. 3 =10 A. 3 = 10 A. 12 = 1 A. 1 = 12
B. 4=9 B. 4=9 B. 1 = 12 B. 4=9
C. 8=5 C. 12 = 1 C. 3 = 10 C. 2 = 11
D. 9=4 D. 5=8 D. 11 = 2 D. 3 = 10
E. 1= 12 E. 6=7 E. 8=5 E. 7=6
F. 10 = 3 F. 7=6 F. 7=6 F. 12 = 1
G. 6=7 G. 8=5 G. 10 = 3 G. 11 = 2
H. 7=6 H. 10 = 3 H. 9=4 H. 6=7
I. 5=8 I. 1 = 12 I. 2 = 11 I. 8=5
J. 2 = 11 J. 2 = 11 J. 6=7 J. 10 = 3
K. 11 = 2 K. 11 = 2 K. 4=9 K. 9=4
L. 12 = 1 L. 9=4 L. 5=8 L. 5=8

12 – PHASE FORMATS

P/A N/S G/O M/C

A. 6=7 A. 9=4 A. 6=7 A. 11 = 2


B. 4=9 B. 12 = 1 B. 4=9 B. 3 = 10
C. 11 = 2 C. 11 = 2 C. 3 = 10 C. 4=9
D. 9=4 D. 10 = 3 D. 7=6 D. 5=8
E. 12 = 1 E. 4=9 E. 5=8 E. 12 = 1
F. 7=6 F. 5=8 F. 8=5 F. 10 = 3
G. 1 = 12 G. 8=5 G. 9=4 G. 6=7
H. 3 = 10 H. 7=6 H. 10 = 3 H. 8=5
I. 2 = 11 I. 6=7 I. 12 = 1 I. 9=4
J. 5=8 J. 3 = 10 J. 11 = 2 J. 7=6
K. 8=5 K. 2 = 11 K. 1 = 12 K. 1 = 12
L. 10 = 3 L. 1 = 12 L. 2 = 11 L. 2 = 11
THE CHANGE EQUATION
(THE FORMULA SYSTEM)

1. User (Autonomous Agent) request(s)/application selections [Morale/Cohesion 3 part format-


right-side]
2. Feasibility study [Goals/Objectives 4 part format-right-side]
3. Investigation [Goals/Objectives 3 part format-left-side]
4. Analysis [Norms/Standards 5 part format-left-side]
5. Systems design [Goals/Objectives 4 part format-right-side]
6. Programming [Morale/Cohesion 5 part format-left-side]
7. Systems testing [Power/Authority 3 part format-right-side]
8. Documentation [Norms/Standards 3 part format-left-side]
9. Conversion and implementation [Goals/Objectives 3 part format-right-side]
10. Maintenance [Goals/Objectives 4 part format-left-side]
11. Evaluation [Norms/Standards 3 part format-left-side]

1. Project initiation (Hardware/Software) Power/Authority


2. Project development (The Project) Norms/Standards
3. Project implementation (The User Climate/Autonomous Agent Conditions of Configuration)
Goals/Objectives
4. Post project evaluation (The Systems Analysts/Autonomous Agent Activities)
Morale/Cohesion

1. Input subsystems [3 part Norms/Standards]


2. Computer subsystems[3 part Norms/Standards]
3. Output subsystems[3 part Norms/Standards]

1. Method Phase-One [5 part Goals/Objectives (The Dictionary of Occupational Titles)]


2. Method Phase-Two [5 part Goals/Objectives (The Dictionary of Occupational Titles)]
3. Method Phase-Three [5 part Goals/Objectives (The Dictionary of Occupational Titles)]
4. Method Phase-Four [5 part Goals/Objectives (The Dictionary of Occupational Titles)]
5. Method Phase-Five [5 part Goals/Objectives(The Dictionary of Occupational Titles)]
N A S C E N T A P P L IE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S

T H E P R O C E D U R A L M A P O F G R A M M A T IC A L D E V E L O P M E N T

T H E D IC T I O N A R Y O F O C C U P A T I O N A L
T IT L E S J O B N U M B E R S U C H A S
26
:0 1 1 .0 6 1 -0 1 0 , A S R E P R E S E N T IN G T H E 150 210
I N I T I A T IO N O F T H E S E A R C H &
D E VE LOPM E N T S EQ U E N C ES

18 19 20
130 170

T H E SE N U M B ER S R E PR ESE N T T H E A LPH AN U M E R IC
V A L U E O F A P E R F O R M A N C E E V A L U A T IO N , A N D T H E
D IR E C T I O N O F IT S I N F E R E N C E S E A R C H S T R A TEG Y 22
180 220
W IT H I N T H E N E T W O R K ' S D I S T R I B U T E D D A T A B ASE S

7 8 12
50 70

10 9 14 17 28 29 30 31
90 110 140 160 190 230 240 250 260

13

10 24
3 21

11 16
20 120 200

8 15
1

4 6 25
40 60 80 100

5 D E N O T E S T H E N O D E 'S (E V E N T ) A L P H A N U M E R IC V A L U E
30 10
O F W IT H IN A N E N T IR E O R G A N IZ A T IO N A L F O R M A T

D E N O T E S T H E A C T I V IT Y N U M B E R O F A N A L P H A N U M E R I C
V A L U E , T R A N S IT IV E V E R B (S ) A N D T R A N S F O R M E D N O U N (S )
7
W IT H I N A P U R P O S E F U L H I E R A R C H Y , S Y S T E M M A T R I X O R
S O L U T IO N F R A M E W O R K O F T H E N A M E N E T W O R K

D E N O T E S T H E G R A M M A T I C A L IN T E G R A T I O N O F O F A
P R O C E D U R E O R O R G A N IZ A T I O N A L F O R M A T

D E N O T E S T H E C R IT IC A L P A T H O F A S E R IE S O F G R A M M A T IC A L
S T R I N G S I N T H E I R F I N A L A L P H A N U M E R IC C O N F I G U R A T I O N ( S )
N A S C E N T A P P L IE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S
T H E S T A T IS T IC A L A L P H A N U M E R IC
FO R M U LA FO RM AT

T H E S T A T I S T IC A L
R E P R E S E N T A T IO N O F
AN E V ALU ATE D
A L P H A N U M E R I C L IN E
O F TEX T

TH E S TATU S AN D
A C T IV I T I E S O F T H E
AU TON O M O U S A G E N TS

P ro ce ss P ro c e s s P ro c e s s
C o Ft Ch
T H E JO B TY P E T O BE
FO R M ATE D
(D A T A BA S E S Y ST E M )

P ro c es s P ro ce ss P roc e s s
O P E R A T IO N S
L IN E A R D E C I S I O N
Yt C r Ht RU LE
(L D R )
A C T IO N S
A N D
STA TES
(T H E G RO U P
T H E IN T E G R A T E D O R D E R IN G L O G IC )
S T A T IS T I C A L
R E P R E S E N T A T IO N S O F P ro ce s s P roc e s s P roce ss
T H E A L P H A N U M E R IC
D A TAB AS E S C l Xt Cf

( U t C u + It C l + Y t C o + X t C r + F t C f + H t C h ) E = z = 6 5 2 .3 8 2 -0 1 0 = F

W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T C O N F O R M IT IE S
S IX FO U R TW O ( C O N S T R A IN T S )

P E R S O N A L IT Y
( C H A R A C T E R IS T IC S )

W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T
SEVEN F IV E THR EE O NE

T H E O P E R A T IO N A L
T H E IN T E G R A T E D A N D FO R M AT
(T H E G O A L S /O B J E C T IV E S )
E M B O D I E D O P E R A T IO N A L
C O N F IG U R A T IO N S
T H E M U L T IP L E S P R E A D -
SH EE T FO R M AT
(W IN D O W S ) O F T H E
FO R M U LA S Y STE M

T H E B A C K W A R D C H A I N IN G S E Q U E N C E S
( T H E A N A T O M I C A L R E P R E S E N T A T IO N O F T H E P E R I P H E A L N E R V O U S S Y S T E M )

T H E S T A T I S T IC AL
R E P R E S E N T A T IO N O F
AN E V ALU ATE D
A L P H A N U M E R IC L IN E
OF TEX T

TH E STA TU S A N D P ro c ess P ro ce ss P ro ce s s
A C T I V IT IE S O F T H E
A U TON O M O U S AG EN TS Ch Ft C o

P ro ce s s P roce ss P ro ce ss
H t C r Yt
O P E R A T IO N S
L IN E A R D E C I S I O N
R ULE
(LDR )
A C T IO N S
A N D
STA TES
(T HE G R O U P T H E JO B T Y P E T O B E
O R D E R IN G L O G IC ) FO R M ATE D P roce ss P ro c e s s P ro c ess
(D A T A BA S E S Y ST E M )
Cf Xt C l
T H E IN T E G R A T E D
S T A T IS T IC A L
R E P R E S E N T A T IO N S O F
T H E A L P H A N U M E R IC
D A TA BA SE S

F = 6 5 2 .3 8 2 -0 1 0 = z = E (C h H t + C f F t + C r X t + C o Y t + C l It + C u U t)

C O N F O R M IT I E S W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T
( C O N S T R A IN T S ) TW O FO UR S IX

P E R S O N A L IT Y
( C H A R A C T E R IS T IC S )

W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T W IN D O W S H E E T
O N E TH REE F IV E SEVEN

T H E O P E R A T IO N A L T H E IN T E G R A T E D A N D
FO R M AT E M B O D I E D O P E R A T IO N A L
( T H E G O A L S /O B J E C T IV E S ) C O N F I G U R A T IO N S

T H E M U L T IP L E S P R E A D -
SH EE T FO R M AT
(W IN D O W S ) O F T H E
FOR M U LA S YS TEM

T H E F O R W A R D C H A IN IN G S E Q U E N C E S
(TH E A N A T O M I C A L R E P R E S E N T A T IO N O F T H E A U T O N O M IC N E R V O U S S Y S T E M )
INTERNAL & EXTERNAL
OPERATIONAL FUNCTIONS

DESCRIPTIVE OPERATIONAL
ROUTINES & SUBROUTINES

FORWARD CHAINING BACKWARD CHAINING


SEQUENCES SEQUENCES
PAST AND PRESENT GRAMMATIC PRESENT AND FUTURE GRAMMATIC
TENSE – ACTIONS OF RESEARCHING AND TENSE – ACTIONS OF RECORDING AND
RECORDING FORECASTING

INITIAL DATA INPUT FACTORS STORED INFORMATION AND


ALPHANUMERIC VALUES DATABASES VALUES
SYSTEMS MACRO AUTO-EXECUTION FILES
(AUTONOMOUS FORMULAS STRINGS)
ORGANIZATIONAL AND
PROCEDURAL MANUALS CASCADE EFFECTS FOR
OPERATIONAL OR TECHNICAL MULTIPLE SPEAD-SHEETS
MANUALS AND DOCUMENTS BRANCHES OF INTEGRATED MACROS

PROBLEM FORMAT PROBLEM FORMAT


PAST-TENSE FUTURE-TENSE

COMBINATION FILE SYSTEM


LIBRARY OF MACRO SYSTEMS
FOR TRANSITIVE DATABASES

DATABASE DIRECTORIES STRUCTURAL RULE FORMAT


ALPHANUMERIC VALUES MAP OF INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE
EVALUATED TERMINOLOGIES EVALUATION(S)

COMMUNICATIONS AND OPERATIONAL RULE FORMAT


DATABASE DIRECTORIES PROCEDURAL PERFORMANCE
STRUCTURAL DATABASE EVALUATION(S)
SETTINGS
ANALYSIS OF DATA VALUES TABLE
INTERPRETATION AND LOCATION OF SIMLARITIES

GRAMMATIC DIAGRAMS AND STRINGS


SPREAD-SHEET LOCATIONS (CELLULAR ADDRESSES)

ALPHANUMERIC RELATIONAL DATABASE OF INTERNAL AND


EXTERNAL FUNCTIONS & VALUES

MATHEMATIC STRATEGIC
COMPUTATIONAL FUNCTIONS COMPUTATIONAL FUNCTIONS

RULES GOVERNING RULES GOVERNING


MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES GRAMMATIC STRUCTURES

INTEGRATED NUMERIC INTEGRATED GRAMMATIC


FORMULA SYSTEMS FORMULA SYSTEMS

DIRECTORY OF CELLULAR DICTIONARY OF GRAMMATIC &


ADDRESSES MATHEMATICAL TERMS

SYSTEMS ENTRY FORMAT AND DATA SORT INTERNET


ENCRYPTION GENERATOR COMMUNICATION PROTOCOLS
T H E A U T O N O M O U S A G E N T M A N A G E R IA L P R O C E S S E S S H E E T , S Y S T E M S
and
CHART O F PRO CEDURES

N A M E 's I N T E G R A T E D
O P E R A T IO N A L P L A N N IN G
A N D D E S IG N A P P R O A C H E S G R A M M A T IC M A N A G E R IA L
PR OC ESS SH EET

G /O
I. II. III. IV . V . V I. V II. V I I I. IX . X . X I. X II. X III. X IV . X V . X V I.

P /M

P O W E R /A U T H O R IT Y N O R M S /S T A N D A R D S M O R A L E / C O H E S IO N G O A L S / O B J E C T IV E S

A D M IN I S T R A T IV E N E T W O R K
O P E R A T IO N S

9. M ETH OD STR U CTU R ES

IN T E G R A T E D N U M E R IC A L IN T E G R A T E D G R A M M A T IC A L
W O R KS H E E T W O R K SH E E T
SE C / SYS/
S A LE S CO NT. N E T /R E
TRE M AN
(S E E S Y S T E M S W O R K S H E E T ) (S E E S Y S T E M S W O R K S H E E T )

N /S

P /M

D IS T R IB U T E D D A T A B A S E S D I S T R IB U T E D N E T W O R K S
(F IL E C O M B IN A T IO N S ) ( C O M M U N IC A T IO N S P R O T O C O L S )

D IC T IO N A R Y O F O C C U P A T IO N A L E N T E R P R IS E W O R K
T IT L E S A R C H IT E C T U R E S
(A U T O N O M O U S S T R U C T U R E S ) (O R G A N I Z A T IO N A L F U N C T I O N S )

P R O C E D U R A L S U B R O U T IN E S S IT U A T IO N S U B R O U T IN E S
I II III ( IN D IV ID U A L IZ E D F O R M A T S ) (G R O U P F O R M A T S )

S O C I O L O G IC A L P H IL O S O P H IC A L P S Y C H O L O G IC A L P H Y S I O L O G IC A L
M ETHO DS M ETHO DS METHO DS METH O D S
A S S IS T A N T D IR E C T O R S
N E T W O R K IN F R A S T R U C T U R A L
O F P L A N N IN G & D E S IG N
L E V E L S I - I II
F U N C T IO N A L A R E A S

N E TW O R K SY S T E M S
S T A T IS T IC S & S T R A T E G IC A L
D E V E LO PM E N T
ENTR Y FO RM AT
C A T E G O R IE S 1 - 5
P /A M /C

S /M P /M

S E C . S E C . SE C .
D SM P H Y P S Y 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
1 2 3

(X X X II)
F O R W A R D C H A IN IN G S E Q U E N C E S

I D E N T IF Y M A N A G E M E N T S T Y L E S ( V )
T H E IN T E G R A T E D A U T O N O M O U S A G E N T F O R M U L A S H E E T S , S Y S T E M S
and
CHAR T O F PRO CEDURES

C O O P E R A T IV E A U T O N O M O U S
A GE N T FO R M U LA S YS TE M
A U T OH NE OA MU OT OU SN OA MN OA UT OS MA I GC EA NL T
F AO NR AMT UO LM A I CC AO L N CF OI GN UF RI GA UT RI OA NT SI O N S

T H E T R A N S IT IV E A U T O N O M O U S
A G E N T C O N F IG U R A T IO N S

T H E IN T E G R A T E D A U T O N O M O U S
A G E N T C O N F IG U R A T IO N S

T H E IN T E G R A T E D IN F R A S T R U C T U R A L
A UT ON O M O US AG E N T
C O N F IG U R A T IO N S

T H E S T A T IS T IC A L A N A L Y S IS
A U TO NO M O U S A G EN T
C O N F IG U R A T IO N S

T H E D IS T R IB U T E D D A T A B A S E
AU TO N OM O U S A G EN T
C O N F IG U R A T IO N S

TH E AU TO N O M OU S AG EN T
C O M M U N IC A T IO N C O N F IG U R A T IO N S

TH E A U TON O M O US AG E N T
D IA G N O S T IC & D E V E L O P M E N T A L
C O N F IG U R A T IO N S

(X X X V )
F O R W A R D C H A IN IN G S E Q U E N C E S

I D E N T IF Y N E W P R O D U C T Q U A L IT Y ( I)
T H E A U T O N O M O U S A G E N T T IM E L I N E P E R F O R M A N C E , M E A S U R I N G , P R O C E S S S Y S T E M S
and
C HAR T O F PRO CEDURES

AU TON O M O U S AGE NT D ATA BASE S TR U CTU RE

IN D IV ID U A L D E V E L O P M E N T F O R M A T O R G A N IZ A T IO N A L D E V E L O P M E N T F O R M A T

AAAC TAAC IA A C IIA A C AAAC TAAC IA A C IIA A C

SAAAC D DAAC AACC AAD DC SAAAC DDAAC AACC AAD DC

N A S C E N T A P P LIE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S

N A M E 's IN T E G R A T E D
O P E R A T IO N A L P L A N N I N G
A N D D E S IG N A P P R O A C H E S G R A M M A T IC M A N A G E R IA L
PRO CESS SH EET

G /O
I. I I. II I. IV . V . V I. V I I. V I II . IX . X. X I. X I I. X II I . X IV . XV. X V I.

P /M

P O W E R /A U T H O R IT Y N O R M S /S T A N D A R D S M O R A LE/C O H E SIO N G O A L S /O B J E C T I V E S

A D M IN IS T R A T I V E N E T W O R K
O P ER A TIO N S

Process 9. M ETH O D STR UC TU RES

I N T E G R A T E D N U M E R IC A L IN T E G R A T E D G R A M M A T I C A L
W O RK SHE ET W O RK SHE E T
SEC / SYS /
SALES CO N T. N E T /R E
TRE M AN
(S E E S Y S T E M S W O R K S H E E T ) (S E E S Y S T E M S W O R K S H E E T )

N /S

P /M

D IS T R IB U T E D D A T A B A S E S D IS T R I B U T E D N E T W O R K S
( F I L E C O M B IN A T IO N S ) ( C O M M U N IC A T IO N S P R O T O C O L S )

D I C T IO N A R Y O F O C C U P A T IO N A L E N T E R P R IS E W O R K
T IT L E S A R C H IT E C T U R E S
(A U T O N O M O U S S T R U C T U R E S ) (O R G A N I Z A T IO N A L F U N C T IO N S )

P R O C E D U R A L S U B R O U T IN E S S I T U A T IO N S U B R O U T IN E S
I II II I (IN D IV ID U A L IZ E D F O R M A T S ) (G R O U P F O R M A T S )

S O C I O L O G IC A L P H IL O S O P H I C A L P S Y C H O L O G IC A L P H Y S IO L O G I C A L
M ETHO D S M ETH O DS M ETH O DS M ETHO D S
A S S I S T A N T D IR E C T O R S
N E T W O R K IN F R A S T R U C T U R A L
O F P L A N N IN G & D E S IG N
L E V E L S I - I II
F U N C T IO N A L A R E A S

N ET W O R K SYSTE MS
S T A T IS T I C S & S T R A T E G I C A L
D EVELOP MENT
ENTRY F OR M AT
C A T E G O R IE S 1 - 5
P /A M /C

S /M P /M

SE C . S EC. S EC .
D SM PH Y P SY 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
1 2 3

( X X X II I)
B A C K W A R D C H A I N IN G S E Q U E N C E S

IN F O R M A T I O N A ID S , M E A S U R E S ( 4 5 )
Interface Services
Human Resources
Organizational Chart
General Ledger
Business Rules Telephone Directory
NON-SECURED Vendors
FORMS Private Net Contractors
INTERFACE Separation of Duties

Data Index

Mass Updates
Private Net FUNCTIONALITY
RAS Enterprise Add
Change
Assignments Suspend
USER INERFACE Delete
Private Net Restore
IntraNet
Password (R/S)
Exclusions

IntraNet TIER 1:
Forms Explorers
Systems/Servers
RAS Applications
Enterprise “Purchased”
“In-House”
Reciprocal Spanning
ExtraNet Agents DBMS
E-Mail

Encryptio TIER 2 (future):


ENTERPRISE n InterNet SSO Servers
Web Servers
SERVER DES Token Servers
DES3 Firewalls
RC2 Gateways
DB RC1 Routes
Sync OCE Servers
ENTERPRISE DB ENTERPRISE IDEA
SERVER Sync SERVER RAS(p)
XDR

Report Pack: Activity


Assessment
Compliance

RAS Enterprise RAS Enterprise RAS Enterprise


Database Database Database
Exceptions: Active Responses
Reactive
Responses
The Physical Network Architecture

First Tier Structural Management Level (5' -> 3')


1. Nascent Applied Methods & Endeavor's (NAME) internal organizational network, which
consists of a General Contractor of Network Operations (GCNO), Board of Network
Representatives, Chief Systems Officers, and their Subordinate Deputies & Directors of
Network Operations.

Second Tier Structural Management Level (3' <- 5')


2. NAME's external organizational network, which consists of a number of subcontractors
whose duties are to render the educational services under the supportive management of the
internal network, and its Logical Design Architecture.

Third Tier Structural Management Level (5' -> 3')


3. NAME's client-base, which consists of individual(s), group(s), inter-group(s)
(quasi-organization(s)), social or business system(s) (small & medium scale operations), and
larger social or business system(s) (corporations or governmental agencies or institutions).

NAME’s Overall Organizational Base


4. NAME's overall organizational base, which primarily consists of the managerial,
subcontractor & client network, existing in one physical intra-networking structure of seven
inter-operative layers, which are as follows;

a. The Physiological Layer


•Interfaces between organizational medium and associated devices
•Defines genetic bio-electrical and bio-mechanical characteristics

b. The Logical Link Layer


•Frames genetic alphanumeric packets
•Controls physiological layer data flow

c. The Organizational Layer


•Addresses and routes genetic alphanumeric packets
•Exhibits points of grammatical origin through a chromosomal PERT network diagram

d. The Logistical Layer


•Manages ideological, interdepartmental and organizational layer connections
•Provides reliable genetic alphanumeric packet delivery mechanism

e. The Session Layer

86
•Facilitates and supports computerized autonomous agent intercommunications
•Incorporates auto-execution protocols in EWA formats

f. The Presentation Layer


•Specifies enterprise work architecture-independent data transfer format
•Genetically encodes and decodes data; encrypts and decrypts data, compresses data

g. Application Layer
•Provides strategic or tactical interface to end-user processes
•Provides standardized services to integrated autonomous office applications

The Logical Network Architecture


1. The initial logical architecture consists of actualizing NAME's physical structure into an
Enterprise Work Architecture (EWA), as guided or instructed through the DOSA manual.
Secondly, NAME's logical designs exists within a virtual reality setting as a manufacturer,
whose goal is the manufacturing of information through the use of the logistical formula
system called the Group Ordering Logic or Development (GOL or GOD) or Manufacturing
Resource Planning Program (MRP). Whereas, the inventory factor does not consists of
tangible products, but of stored or accessible information (files or databases), whose labels
are genetically encoded alphanumeric values of evaluated work routines (processes &
procedures).

Third, as information is manipulated and structured in accordance to the MAN synopsis, the
application of NAME's autonomous agent format (artificial life program) shall use an genetic
alphanumeric formula system that represents the research, development & implementation of
an information retrieval system as its instruction set, in conjunction with the Thomas Ray's
Tierra Project scenarios. The rational behind this process, is to facilitate a biological analogy
in adequately providing accessible information regarding the network's past, current or future
real-time issues related to business operations. Additionally, NAME's operational guide shall
also reflect the act of focusing the instruction set in a direction of developing operational
tactics and policies. As well as consisting of an entire string of replicative data, whose
alphabet represents the lettering of genetic materials. Which by-the-way, furnishes another
way of storing information through using the graphical genome sequences as bar codes.

Finally, while the autonomous agents operate within the EWA format. They shall also form
definitive associations that will require the further application of a program called NETMAP.
Which is designed, developed and sold through a company named ALTA ANALYTIC
(check the WWW for its web-site and product information). Furthermore, NAME's unique
Distributed Operating Systems Architecture (DOSA), incorporates the entire Software
Development Guide (SDG) as its instruction set (Tierra Project). Whose functions are that
of an autonomous agent with self-replicative qualities updating itself on a minute-to-minute
basis. This enhancement process will also provide NAME's client-base with a personalized
internet-based operating system (IBOS) as a security measure, in conjunction with a universal
compiler application, for the purposes of global electronic communications or file transfer
protocols (FTP). Moreover, the structure of the DOSA configurations consists of applying an
entire EWA format as an autonomous agent that operates in the background mode of other

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currently running operating systems or systems applications (please refer to the DOSA
graphical chart).

2. NAME's subcontractual network facilitates the client-base operations, through providing


access to the network's NPMIS structure, which contains their operational instructions. The
NPMIS system is basically a computerized version of the network's operational guide. This
configuration only exists, as it applies toward the subcontractors rendering the five phased
educational services of NAME over a time-period of two years.

3. The factors facilitating NAME's client-base through its subcontractors are structured to
operate from a process of incorporating a client's business operations into a virtual reality
setting (EWA), while additionally inputting his/her's subordinate staff and workers as
autonomous agents within the same EWA format. We may also replace the client's
organizational structure with that of NAME's as well, in order to enhance the client's business
operations and expedite the processes of problem resolution. This process involves not only
inputting into the subcontractor's computer system(s) the client's operational base, but
his/her's competitors as well. Whereby which, the actions of the client's competition can be
predicted through computer generated artificial scenarios. Since their competitors actions are
mere reactions to the client's decision and/or policy making practices.

Final Comments
The entire NAME network can be operated from a single NPMIS workstation through the use of
an alphanumeric cascade effect and a graphical interface window, which contains a single
systems matrix. The Alphanumeric Cascade Effect (ACE) is a process by which each
operational routine or sub-routine that exists within the entire operational capabilities of NAME,
is evaluated until a single alphanumeric value is achieved. Which within itself represents the
managerial effectiveness of the General Contractor of Network Operations (GCNO) from one
time period to another.

Additionally, the window containing the graphical interface systems matrix is also use to trace the
structural conditions under-which information is formed and applied. While in its database
format, refers to how words, sentences, paragraphs, etc., are formed or used under one scenario to
another. (Please refer to the Network Procedural and Software Development Guides, and the
Managerial Applied Numerics Synopsis for further information).

The explanation of NAME's operational formats can be summed up into three brief statements.
Of which are as follows:

1. The NAME network is represented as an Enterprise Work Architecture (EWA) within a


virtual reality setting, while mimicking the organizational structure of the human
anatomy, so as to incorporate a new managerial style in business operations and logistical
analysis.

2. The distributed autonomous agent program (DALP) within the NAME Virtual Reality
Network (VRN), operates as an individual model worker within the EWA structure under
artificial scenarios. Under this setup, the DALP application is subjected to a number of
artificially induced scenarios through a series of inference engines, which are charted
within a systems matrix.

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3. At the user station, the entire program can be manipulated through the use of statistical
analysis, which represents the performance evaluation of previous case scenarios that may
apply to the user's queries.

89
N A S C E N T A P P L IE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S
T H E E N T E R P R IS E W O R K A R C H IT E C T U R E
(T H E G L O B A L A R E A N E T W O R K )

T H E C L IE N T /S E R V E R N E T W O R K T H E A D M IN IS T R A T IV E N E T W O R K
or O F
B U S IN E S S E N T E R P R IS E N A S C E N T A P P L IE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S

S a t e ll it e S a t e ll it e
M i n ic o m p u t e r M i n ic o m p u t e r

M u lt ip le x e r M u lti p le x e r

IB M A S /4 0 0
I B M 3 2 6 2 p r in t e r

S a t e l li t e d i s h S a t e ll it e d is h

C r a y S u p e r c o m p u te r

P B X /P A B X P B X /P A B X

D i s k a r ra y D is k a rra y
P B X /P A B X

B A T T L E F I E L D IN F O R M A T I O N T E C H N O L O G Y L i n k b u i ld e r B A T T L E F IE L D IN F O R M AT IO N T E C H N O L O G Y
W O R K S T A T IO N & C O N T R O L L E R W O R K S T A T IO N & C O N T R O L L E R
D is k a rra y
C r a y S u p e rc o m p u te r

T H E E D U C A T IO N A L N E T W O R K
O F
I B M 3 2 6 2 p r in t e r I B M 3 2 6 2 p r in t e r
N A S C E N T A P P L IE D M E T H O D S & E N D E A V O R S
( T H E D IS T R I B U T E D D A T A B A S E S )

IB M A S / 4 0 0
IB M A S / 4 0 0

LO CAL AREA N ETW O RK S

90