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A powerful voice for all children A relevant resource for families and communities

A strong advocate for the education and well-being of every child

Page 1
Table of Contents:
Pg. 1 - Note from the President
Pg. 3 - Advocacy News
Pg. 6 - Reflections
Pg. 6 - 5 Minutes for Life
Pg. 8 - Proposed Bylaws
Pg. 9 - Month of the Military
Child
Pg. 11 - Family Engagement
Pg. 12 - Every Kid Healthy Week
Pg. 13 - Missioned Centered PTA
Pg. 16 - Board of Directors

The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Note from the President...


Greetings Family,

Everywhere you turn you now see political advertisements. Debates on your
television, billboard ads, and messages on your smartphones telling you
who to vote for. Your phone rings and it is a political survey about the
individuals running for an elected office. This time of year is when many
PTAs have questions as to what is their role in the political arena. If you
have a question, where do you turn to first? Your bylaws!!!!!!!!! The
following is a section in all bylaws. It is required that all bylaws contain
the following article. I only included the part of the article that pertains to
PTAs political activity.
*Article IIIBasic Policies
The following are basic policies of PTA:

a.The organization shall be noncommercial, nonsectarian, and


nonpartisan.
b.The organization or members in their official capacities shall not,
directly or indirectly, participate or intervene (in any way, including
the publishing or distributing of statements) in any political campaign
on behalf of, or in opposition to, any candidate for public office; or
devote more than an insubstantial part of its activities to attempting to
influence legislation by propaganda or otherwise.

Ohio PTA
40 Northwoods Blvd Ste A
Columbus, OH 43235-4718
(614) 781-6344
Fax: (614) 781-6349
office@ohiopta.org

Under the Internal Revenue Code, all section 501(c)(3) organizations are
absolutely prohibited from directly or indirectly participating in, or
intervening in, any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any
candidate for elective public office. Contributions to political campaign
funds or public statements of position (verbal or written) made on behalf of
the organization in favor of or in opposition to any candidate for public
office clearly violates the prohibition against political campaign
activity. Violating this prohibition may result in denial or revocation of taxexempt status and the imposition of certain excise taxes.

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Continued...

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Activities or expenditures may not be prohibited depending on the facts and


circumstances. For example, certain voter education activities (including
presenting public forums and publishing voter education guides), conducted
in a non-partisan manner do not constitute prohibited political campaign
activity . In addition, other activities intended to encourage people to
participate in the electoral process, such as voter registration and get-out-tovote drives, would not be prohibited political campaign activity if conducted
in a non-partisan manner. On the other hand, voter education or registration
activities with evidence of bias that
(a) would favor one candidate over another;
(b) oppose a candidate in some manner; or
(c) have the effect of favoring a candidate or group of candidates...
In other words 501(c)(3) organizations cannot endorse or oppose any
candidate for public office. This includes contributions to a political
campaign and even public statements for or against a candidate. This
prohibition is "absolute," meaning that any violation can be cause for the
IRS to strip the 501(c)(3) of its tax-exempt status.
If your unit is unsure about a political activity that you are planning, contact
your District Advisor.
Sheila
Ohio PTA President 2015 - 2017
Information from the IRS Guide

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Advocacy News
School Discipline/Truancy Bill
Ohio PTA submitted proponent testimony for HB 410 sponsored by
Representatives Rezabek (R-Clayton) and Hayes (R-Harrison Township). HB
410 seeks to address habitual and chronic truancy and compulsory school
attendance by promoting interventions over suspensions. It would change Ohio
law to embrace best practices and keep students in school.
There are many reasons students miss school but two of the most common are
truancy and out-of-school suspensions and expulsions. Decreased school
attendance reduces students opportunities to learn and is linked to negative
school outcomes, including lower test scores and higher dropout rates, which
can have lifelong effects on employment and earning potential. A growing
body of research shows that students who are suspended or expelled are more
likely to have academic problems, drop out of school, and enter the juvenile
justice system.
Did you know that current Ohio law states that each school district must have a
zero tolerance school discipline policy for violent, disruptive or inappropriate
behavior, including excessive truancy? The problem with the zero tolerance
policies is that they are being used for a wide range of behaviors to
inappropriately push students out of school. Ohio law does not require schools
to determine why a student is truant or take any steps to help the student
before referring them to juvenile court. Juvenile court involvement can lead to
youth who are at low-risk of reoffending getting further involved in the juvenile
court system and not being linked to appropriate services that address the
underlying causes of their truancy. In 2013, there were over 7,000 occurrences
of suspensions and expulsions in Ohio due to truancy. Out of school
suspensions, expulsions and truancy disproportionately affect our most
vulnerable students - students of color, students with disabilities, and lowincome students.
Ohio PTA has partnered with the Juvenile Justice Coalition and other
advocates to support changes to Ohio law that eliminate zero tolerance
policies. We support a comprehensive approach to school discipline that
ensures safe schools conducive to learning without removing students from the
opportunity to learn. This does not mean that schools no longer have the
option to suspend or expel a child when warranted; rather it allows schools to
develop alternatives to out-of-school discipline. It is important for all students to
be engaged in educational opportunities and school.
Continued...

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

State Board of Education Membership


Ohio PTA provided written testimony on the method of selection of State
Board of Education members to the Education Committee of the Ohio
Constitutional Modernization Commission. In 1973, Ohio PTA members
adopted a resolution affirming that the legal responsibility to make decisions
for our public schools has been delegated by the people to elected boards of
education. We oppose all activities that threaten taxpayer control of public
schools. In 1995, an amendment was added to the state budget to give
Ohioans a hybrid board. The 11 elected members were retained; but the
governor was given authority to appoint 8 additional members. Since the
creation of this hybrid elected/appointed board, accountability of the board
members has shifted away from citizens to the executive branch. In other
words, the appointed members are directly accountable to the governor, not to
the citizens of this state. This has contributed to the politicization of public
education in Ohio.
Ohio PTA believes that control of public schools belongs to the people and
must continue to be with the citizens whose tax dollars help support it. Ohio
PTA supports an all-elected State Board of Education. We believe that this is
the best model because elected boards encourage civic engagement and
interest in public education, are a more transparent form of governance,
ensure geographic representation, facilitate an open discussion of education
issues and make state board members directly accountable to voters.
State Legislative Updates:
The House Education Committee held proponent testimony on 2/10/16 on HB
212, sponsored by Rep. Andrew Thompson (R-Marietta). Generally, the bill
seeks to eliminate Ohios Learning Standards and mandated teacher and
principal evaluations, change the states testing requirements, and reduce the
State Board of Educations authority on operating standards.
HB 420, sponsored by Rep. Kristina Roegner (R-Hudson), was amended to
remove a provision added during the committees previous meeting that would
have provided penalties for teachers who encourage parents to opt their
children out of state exams. As the bill currently stands, it would require the
Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to make changes to a few report card
indicators to account for students who chose to opt out of the state
assessments. This bill was placed on hold after ODE announced that it would
issue additional calculations that do not include opted-out students.
Continued...

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The Ohio PTA Voice

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April 2016

National Advocacy News


National PTA's Board of Directors adopted two new position statements.

Position on positive school discipline states that exclusionary discipline


practices should only be used in schools as a last resort effort and on an
individualized basis in schools.

Position on student assessment and opt-out policies calls for all


students to participate in high-quality, comprehensive assessments.

To read the full position statements, please go to www.pta.org/advocacy under


the resolutions and position statements tab.
The Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry unanimously
passed bipartisan legislation in JanuaryImproving Child Nutrition Integrity
and Access Act of 2016to reauthorize the Child Nutrition Act/Healthy
Hunger-Free Kids Act for five years. Read more about the reauthorization bill
in PTAs One Voice blog at http://onevoice.pta.org.
Also, go to www.pta.org to read National PTAs statement on President
Obamas 2017 Budget Proposal.
Contact the Ohio PTA office or advocacy@ohiopta.org if you are interested in
being a part of Ohios grassroots advocacy efforts.
Tandra Rutledge
Director of Advocacy

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Reflections Update
Congratulations to all who participated in this years Reflections Program. The
Ohio winners will be on display at Ohio PTA Convention in April. The Reflections Roadshow will continue throughout the summer months and the artwork
will be returned in September.
Next years theme is What is Your Story?
There has been a change in the Reflections Program next year Ohio PTA will
be accepting 3D visual artwork starting January 2017. The Visual Arts category
will now include both 2D and 3D artwork. For two-dimensional artwork, the
works will be sent into the Ohio PTA office as usual. For three-dimensional
works, the student will submit 3 photographs (different views) of the piece as
one entry. Local units can choose to display 3D artwork at the local level judging, if they wish, but only the 3 photos of the piece will be sent to Ohio PTA for
judging. Other states have already implemented this and it is working well.
More details will be available in the Reflections Handbook available later this
summer.
Pam Bonnett
Director of Family-School Partnership

An effort is underway throughout Ohio to prevent drug abuse among Ohios most
vulnerable citizens our children. Within this initiative is a program called Five
Minutes For Life (5M4L). This is a collaborative effort between the Ohio National
Guard and the Ohio State Highway Patrol. 5M4L is an anti-drug message that
uses positive reinforcement to encourage youth to make strong life choices. This
educational campaign aims to reduce, and ultimately eliminate, illegal drug use
among youth. 5M4L is a tangible way for students to contribute to a safer Ohio.
The positive message does not stop after the 5M4L presentation. The Ambassador
Program ensures that an elite group of students will help promote living a drug and
alcohol free lifestyle. Utilizing these student ambassadors, we expand our footprint
and ensure our future leaders continue to receive an ongoing positive message from
these volunteers.

Continued...

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The Ohio PTA Voice

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April 2016

5M4L Frequently Asked Questions

How long will a presentation take?


Typically, a presentation will last between 10-20 minutes.
The intent is to deliver a short, concise message. Its
primary purpose is to energize the kids to take
responsibility to combat this problem themselves
and get them to recognize the power of peer
interaction.
Can this presentation be added to already scheduled assemblies?
Absolutely! As stated, if there is roughly 15 minutes
available in a schedule, a 5M4L presentation can be
delivered.
How do we schedule a presentation?
Contact MSG Douglas Spain at 614.336.6000 ext 7509 /
douglas.a.spain2.mil@mail.mil
Is this a military recruiting event?
No. Although an ONG Recruiter may be present, the
intent is to spread a positive message, not to enlist
youth.
Where can I find more information?
Visit www.starttalking.ohio.gov for more information. A recorded

5M4L presentation can be viewed at


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xfrqj-iyv-g&feature=youtu.be

Typical presentation will only include a representative from


the Ohio State Highway Patrol and an ONG Guardsmen.
Mark Scherer
Child and Youth Program Coordinator
Ohio National Guard

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Proposed Dues Increase


1) Why is Ohio PTA proposing a 75 cent dues increase?
The recommendation to increase the state portion of dues by 75 cents
is based on careful analysis and the critical need to be fiscally
responsible. With current membership challenges and increased
general operating expenses over the past 20 years, revenue
generated from Ohio PTAs current dues to its members no longer
supports vital services. We cannot cut any more from our budget
without negatively impacting our efforts to advocate for Ohios
children. The proposed increase will fund the work of Ohio PTA.
2) When was the last dues increase passed by the Ohio PTA?
It has been 20 years since Ohio PTA last increased the state portion
of your PTA membership dues. The last dues increase went into
effect in 1996. Some non-profit organizations routinely increase dues
every two years.
3) Who decides how much dues to charge members?
PTA members decide the dues amount, both locally and at the state
level. Every PTA in Ohio is encouraged to send delegates
representing their members to the state PTAs annual convention to
participate in the business of Ohio PTA, which includes voting on the
amount of the state portion of membership dues. Each PTA sets the
amount of their own unit dues (which include the state and national
portions) by amending their bylaws. If the Ohio PTA dues increase is
approved, units may wish to consider increasing their dues this
spring to be ready for their fall membership campaigns.
4) What portion of the Ohio PTA budget comes from membership
dues?
Membership dues are Ohio PTAs primary source of revenue and it
has steadily declined over the years.

Correction: The March


Voice article on the proposed bylaws amendments
stated that dues had not
been increased in 10 years.
It should have read 20
years.

5) What do my child and my PTA receive for the membership dues


we remit annually to the Ohio PTA?
The Ohio PTA offers a wide scope of resources, programs and services to our PTAs and our members, including but not limited to:

National child advocacy and government relations

Leadership development

Program planning and execution

Resource development

Member Perks, benefits and discounts for our members

The Reflections Arts Recognition Program

The Ohio PTA Voice and Our Children magazine

Counterpart support and training for PTA leaders

Cindy Schanz
Director of Bylaws and Standing Rules
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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

APRIL: MONTH of the MILITARY CHILD


Take a look around, and you will see them. Military Youth are in every county in the
state of Ohio. There are approximately 2 million Military Children, ranging in ages
from newborn to 18 years old (1.3 million are school-aged) in the United States. In the
state of Ohio alone, there are about 33,000 Military Connected Youth and close to
40,000 when you include aunts, uncles, brothers and sisters.
Military Children face challenges that are unique to their situation, such as having a
parent deployed for extended periods of time and moving frequently. Due to frequent
moves, many military children experience disrupted relationships with friends, and
must adapt to new schools and cultivate new community resources. The National Child
Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) states that care of military children sustains our
fighting forces, and strengthens their health and security. In 1986, the Secretary of
Defense designated each April as The Month of the Military Child and all branches
of services provide special days and events to honor their children. To show
appreciation and support for our military children, the Department of Defense
Education Activity (DoDEA) encourages school systems to wear purple. The color
purple was chosen because it symbolizes all branches of the military, as it is the
combination of Army green, Coast Guard blue, Air Force blue, Marine red and Navy
blue.
April is an excellent opportunity to recognize Military Children and Youth for their
heroism, character, courage, and sacrifices. Because of their resilience and ability to
deal with life-changing events, Military Children are an inspiration and a source of
pride for our nation.
Do you know of any military families within your school or district? If so, please
encourage them to take advantage of the many resources and programs available to
them by visiting http://www.ohio4h.org/statewide-programs/ohio-military-kids or
http://www.ong.ohio.gov/frg/frg_youthprograms.html for more information.

Continued...

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Im a Military Child,
Where Im from,
Im a child of the world,
I bloom anywhere.
Im on an incredible journey,
I know once we leave here, I will probably never walk this way again,
Im an un-rooted child.
My life is mostly in brown boxes.
One more time again Im going to say goodbye to all that I know.
At this moment I dont belong anywhere;
Not in this place, and not in the new place Im moving to.
Its a puzzle of a thousand pieces that has been turned upside down,
Its up to you to put the puzzle back together again.
Im facing the unknown one more time,
My roots are short.
Unexpected separations,
Saying goodbye to friends.
Some lessons are harder than others.
But at the end, I have yet another success story.
Im flexible,
Im not going to bend out of shape.
Being strong is the only choice I have.
Im walking this path.
We are heading to a bright future together as a family and as a nation.
I proudly contribute to the peace and freedom we all enjoy.
Sleep peaceably in your beds at night United States of America,
My family and I got your back.
~Laura C. Marin, 11, Military

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The Ohio PTA Voice

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April 2016

Looking for Ways to Promote Family Engagement


and Student Learning?
National PTA has developed an online series: Parents Guides to Student
Success. These guides were developed by teachers, parents and education
experts. The guides provide clear and consistent expectations for students in
grades K-12 including what students should be learning at each grade in order
to be prepared for college and career. These guidelines can be found at
www.pta.org (see For Parents section). The Ohio Department of Education
has also published parent guides for Math, English and Language Arts for
grades K-12. These guides can be found on the ODE website, see http://
education.ohio.gov (click on the Parent tab at top of page). There you will
also find helpful information about the new learning standards and how families
can actively engage in their childs education.
PTAs can play a pivotal role in how the learning standards are put in place at
the state and district levels. PTA leaders are encouraged to have conversations
with their school, district and/or state administrators to discuss their plans to
implement the standards and how their PTA can support that work. Through
this collaboration, families can continue to build and strengthen their
relationships with schools. In general these guides include:

Key items children should be learning in each grade.


Activities that parents can do at home to reinforce and support their
childs learning.
Methods for helping parents build stronger relationships with their child's
teacher.

Tips for planning for college and career (high school).


See National PTA website (www.pta.org) and Ohio Department of Education
(www.education.ohio.gov) for more information.
By promoting family engagement in the schools in these ways, we are building capacity to promote positive development and learning for every child!

Pam Bonnett
Director of Family-School Partnership
fsp@ohiopta.org
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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Every Kid Healthy Week:


April 25-29, 2016
What is Every Kid Healthy Week?
Launched by Action for Healthy Kids (AFHK) in 2013, Every Kid Healthy Week is
an annual observance designed to celebrate school wellness achievements and is
also recognized on the calendar of National Health Observances. Observed the last
week of April each year, this special week shines a spotlight on the great efforts
schools are doing to improve the health and wellness of their students and the link
between nutrition, physical activity and learning because healthy kids learn better!
Everyone can get involved and be a part of the celebration to help support sound
nutrition, regular physical activity and health promoting programs in schools.
How can my childs school join the celebration?
To celebrate Every Kid Healthy Week, schools can implement wellness initiatives
to promote and reinforce healthy eating, nutrition education, physical activity and
physical education in order to better student health and academic achievement.
Anyone who cares about reversing the trend of childhood obesity and helping kids
succeed in school can make a difference. Is your PTA hosting an existing school
event in April? Why not make the focus on healthy kids and families to show your
schools commitment to wellness? Looking for a new idea to participate in Every
Kid Healthy Week? Visit EveryKidHealthyWeek.org for free resources, activities
and inspiration.
Ways schools and PTAs can partner to celebrate Every Kid Healthy Week
Host a healthy foods taste test with fruits, vegetables, whole grains and
low-fat dairy products.
Invite a local fitness instructor to volunteer to lead a family Zumba or
yoga class.
Plant a school garden or refresh an existing one.
Plan a school-wide Walk-a-Thon or Fun Run.
Still not sure how to get started?
Check out Game On for more activity ideas, resources and tips, including ways to
engage parent volunteers to help with planning and organizing.
Register your Event
Demonstrate your schools commitment to healthy kids and healthy families. Make
your school wellness activities a part of the national movement by registering your
event at EveryKidHealthyWeek.org.
Share your story
Ohio PTA would love to hear how your school and PTA celebrated Every Kid
Healthy Week. Email hws@ohiopta.org and tell us all about it!
Source: www.actionforhealthykids.org

Lisa Catalano
Director of Health, Welfare & Safety

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Mission-Centered PTA Spending


PTAs often ask questions about the proper use of PTA funds. They need help
in determining what types of programs and projects can be funded according
to the IRS rules for use of funds by 501(c)(3) organizations and how to protect
themselves from liability. Remember, the general rule is to collect and spend
money solely for PTA purposes based on the official PTA mission and
purposes.
Question #1: So often in our schools, there are children and families living in
poverty situations. PTA is often asked to help fund or create and lead a
program to assist those families in need. These situations always pull at our
heart strings and we, as a PTA, feel we should help. After all, we are in
support of helping children and families.arent we? Is there a way to
incorporate these type of programs into our PTA budgets? Or, is this
something better left to other organizations; and we as PTA should stay
clear?
Answer: PTAs need to stay mission-centered, especially as it pertains to how
we spend our monies. Maintaining our 501(c)(3) status depends upon us
being good stewards of our memberships direct giving which is based on their
assumption we use their giving toward the PTA misson and purposes
outlined in Article II of our bylaws.
Section 1. The purposes of PTA are:
a. To promote the welfare of children and youth in home, school,
community, and place of worship,
b. To raise the standards of home life,
c. To secure adequate laws for the care and protection of children
and youth,
d. To bring into closer relation the home and the school, that parents
and teachers may cooperate intelligently in the education of
children and youth, and
e. To develop between educators and the general public such united
efforts as will secure for all children and youth the highest
advantages in physical, mental, social, and spiritual education.
Section 2. These purposes are promoted through advocacy and educational
programs directed toward parents, teachers, and the general public; developed
through conferences, committees, projects, and programs; and governed and
qualified by the basic policies in Article III.
Section 2 shown above clearly states that the PTA purposes are to be
achieved through advocacy and education. As a PTA, you have the power to
provide your own programs which will carry out the PTA mission and you will
then need the time, talent, monies and other resources available to YOU to
better serve your membership and live up to the expectations of your school
and home communities. These are tough decisions that your board will need
to grapple with as part of your budgeting process.
Fulfilling our purposes means serving all children in our schools and
communities. It means we cannot donate to an individual child or family
Continued...
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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

regardless of the circumstances. In the case of a particular child or family in


need, PTA can publicize community fundraisers for them, ask for volunteers
to assist with those fundraising events or to provide meals or items for them.
However, PTA funds cannot be used.
What about helping all families in poverty in your school or community? Some
PTAs want to buy coats or shoes for needy students or adopt-a-family
during the holidays. PTA volunteers can hold coat, shoe or book drives and
also volunteer their own time to assist other organizations fundraising. Also,
a Giving Tree could be set up in your school so that staff and PTA members
can donate the items from an adopt-a-familys wish list. Most importantly, your
PTA can construct your budget so that most or all of your programs are free
to all families. You can develop a list of organizations that assist families in
poverty and publish it on your website or school newsletter.
It may also be permitted to make a small donation from your general fund (if
approved by your membership) to another 501(c)(3) which helps needy
children and families providing that their mission is similar to our own. This
may or may not be the best use of funds and your members should seriously
consider whether making a monetary donation is something your membership
supports. Remember, it is never appropriate for your PTA to collect monetary
donations for the purpose of giving those funds over to another organization.
You may also consider doing an assessment of needs in your school
community by providing a survey to your membership and others in
partnership with various community stakeholders. This may help you to
identify which organization is best suited to help the individual needs of
families who may need more than you can feasibly provide. By working
collaboratively with the school administrator, counselor and other agencies
and businesses, I am confident that your PTA will find the support needed to
make the biggest impact in helping students and families.
Question #2: Is there liability to a PTA that chooses to make a direct
payment by school invoice for a school-sanctioned field trip? Or is it better for
a donation to be made to the school administration and have them pay for the
buses directly? And if it is a school event, rather than a PTA-sponsored event,
is it okay to collect and deposit monies from parents for that purpose if the
PTA has voted to pay for the field trip or bus expenses?
Answer: First, I would suggest that your PTA, on any liability issue, should
consult your liability insurance provider. As liability is a complicated issue,
your PTA should be aware that legal advice may also be needed. Here is my
best answer in consultation with National PTA. If someone sued your PTA
because of a transportation/bus issue, we are not sure there is much
difference in potential liablility whether you paid the bus invoice directly or
indirectly through the school administration. Typically, PTAs are not covered
for liability for transportation/bus under the blanket policies they purchase.
And definitely if the event/field trip is not a PTA function, PTAs should not be
collecting and co-mingling those funds in the PTA account regardless of what
is eventually paid with the funds (buses or field trips directly).
Continued...

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The Ohio PTA Voice

April 2016

Question #3: Our PTA collects a Sunshine Fund for the purposes of
providing cards and/or other small token gifts to fellow PTA board members or
school staff members who have experienced an illness, death of a family
member or other unfortunate life event. Is this an appropriate line item in our
budget, or should this be kept separate from PTA funds?
Answer: Again, I will answer this question having consulted with National
PTA. Sunshine Funds should not be part of the general fund and should not
be a line item in the PTA budget. These direct contributions to individuals
could jeopardize your PTAs 501(c)(3) status. In most organizations, including
National and Ohio PTA, individual board members will make personal
contributions on a case by case basis as those situations arise.
We realize that not all circumstances are the same and that not all situations
may have been covered in this article. These areas are complicated and the
best way for your PTA to address them is to focus on the PTA mission and
purposes.
Thank you for all the great questions you and your PTAs bring forward that
help us all understand our finances and legal practices so much better! Keep
them coming!!
Suzie Smith-Rios
Secretary / Treasurer

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The Ohio PTA Voice

Page 16

April 2016

Your PTA Board of Directors


EXECUTIVE BOARD

DIRECTORS

President
Sheila Ragland
614-351-8083
president@ohiopta.org
President-elect
Susan Hans
440-243-8776

Advocacy
Tandra Rutledge
216-860-4575
advocacy@ohiopta.org

Diversity
Jeanne GroetzShockling
330-313-1544
diversity@ohiopta.org

FSP
Pam Bonnett
440-781-2927
fsp@ohiopta.org

Bylaws & SRules


Cindy Schanz
330 329-6335
bylawsandstandingrules@ohiopta.org

Education
Jackie Arendt
440-230-1567
education@ohiopta.org

HWS
Lisa Catalano
440-498-9545
hws@ohiopta.org

Communications
Venezuela Robinson
440-786-9855
communications@ohiopta.org

Events
Linda Read
330-923-7248
events@ohiopta.org

Membership
Angela Revay
216-328-9668
membership@ohiopta.org

District 3
Lois Monroe
937-653-8741
da3@ohiopta.org

District 11
Debbie Tidwell
440-779-7141
da11@ohiopta.org

District 17
Carol Beasley
216-383-1963
da17@ohiopta.org

District 7
Dana Paul
440-843-6951
da7@ohiopta.org

District 12
Maria Lang
440-289-9696
da12@ohiopta.org

District 18
Shannon Weber
440-781-0036
da18@ohiopta.org

District 10
Terry Hickey
614-870-9570
da10@ohiopta.org

District 13
Rebecca Gawsyszawski
440-315-9097
da13@ohiopta.org

OFFICE
Sue Owen
office@ohiopta.org

presidentelect@ohiopta.org
VP Leadership-Interim
Venezuela Robinson
440-786-9855
vpleadership@ohiopta.org
VP Field Service
Lisa Weaver
330-825-8252
vpfieldservice@ohiopta.org
Secretary/Treasurer
Suzie Smith-Rios
614-878-3596
Sec-treasurer@ohiopta.org

Immediate Past President


Lisa Mack
216-691-2990
pastpresident@ohiopta.org

DISTRICT ADVISORS

Jeri Gookin
jerigcr@sbcglobal.net

Vacant Advisor Positions: 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 19.


If anyone is interested in serving on the Ohio PTA Board of Directors, contact Venezuela Robinson at communications@ohiopta.org. Job descriptions and an application are posted on the Ohio PTA website.
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