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TRIBAL ART IN SAN FRANCISCO

MUMBAI

SHUFFLE AT SOTHEBYS

NICOLA TYSON

FEBRUARY 2016

THE INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE FOR ART COLLECTORS

LONDON SALES
PREVIEW

DESIGNS
ON LIFE

THE ART OF
ILLUSTRATION

EYES ON
ASIA

A Measured
Market Outlook

Al and Kim Eiber


at Home

A Medium
on the Ascent

Shanghai and
Regional Markets

MODERN & CONTEMPORARY ART


Invitation to Consign

TOM WESSELMANN (1931-2004) | Blonde Vivienne (Filled In), 1985/1995 | Alkyd oil on cut-out aluminum | 50 inches diameter

Sold for: $317,000 October 28, 2015

Inquiries: 877-HERITAGE (437-4824) | Ext. 1444 | FineArt@HA.com

DALLAS | NEW YORK | BEVERLY HILLS | SAN FRANCISCO | CHICAGO | PARIS | GENEVA | AMSTERDAM | HONG KONG

Always Accepting Quality Consignments in 40 Categories


950,000+ Online Bidder-Members
Paul R. Minshull #16591. BP 12-25%; see HA.com. 39536

Irving Penn, Opticians Shop Window (B), New York, 1939 Cond Nast Publications, Inc.

Irving Penn
Personal Work

534 WEST 25TH ST NEW YORK


JANUARY 29 MARCH 5, 2016

EXHIBITION
PARIS: 10 - 11 FEBRUARY
LONDON: 22 - 23 FEBRUARY
COPENHAGEN: 25 - 29 FEBRUARY

Hammershi
AUCTION
COPENHAGEN: 1-10 MARCH 2016
ART, ANTIQUES AND DESIGN

tel. +45 8818 1111


info@bruun-rasmussen.dk
bruun-rasmussen.com

FEBRUARY 2016

FEATURES
56 IN THE STUDIO: NICOLA TYSON
Known for her figurative practice in
a range of media, the British-born artist
prepares for a show of drawings at
Petzel in New York.
BY CHLOE WYMA
ASIAN MARKET FOCUS

64 OPULENCE AND TURBULENCE


In Shanghai, dedicated gallery owners
provide a grassroots counterpoint to the
glitzy city-planned art scene.
BY HUNTER BRAITHWAITE

72 NATIONAL SPOTLIGHTS: PART 1


Reports on art market developments
from Singapore, Indonesia, and India.

76 THE NEXT NEW THING

Al and Kim Eiber of Miami Beach have


built a formidable collection of
postwar and contemporary design works.
BY JUDITH GURA

86 THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION

Original images commissioned for


mass print publication find second lives
in the art market.
BY BRIDGET MORIARITY AND
LIZA M.E. MUHLFELD

DEPARTMENTS
12
14
16
19
27
31
34
38
44

CONTRIBUTORS
FROM THE EDITOR
ART PARTIES+OPENINGS
IN THE AIR
MOVERS+SHAKERS
DATEBOOK
MUST-HAVES
DEALERS NOTEBOOK
CULTURE+TRAVEL
MUMBAI

KRISTINE LARSEN

Blouin Art + Auction (ISSN No. 2331-5342) is published monthly with


a combined July/August issue and a special Fall issue by Art + Auction
Holding, Inc., 88 Laight Street, New York, NY 10013. Vol. XXXIX, no.6.
Copyright 2016 BlouinArt+Auction Magazine. Periodicals postage paid
at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to Fulco, Inc., BlouinArt+Auction, P.O. Box 3000, Denville,
NJ 07834-3000. All material is compiled from sources believed to be
reliable, but published without responsibility for errors or omissions. Blouin
Art+Auction accepts advertisements from advertisers believed to be
of good repute, but cannot guarantee the authenticity or quality of objects
or services advertised in its pages. BlouinArt+Auction assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. Return postage
should accompany such material. All rights, including translation into other
languages, reserved by the publisher. Nothing in this publication may be
reproduced without the permission of the publisher. The name ART+AUCTION
is a registered trademark owned by Louise Blouin Media Group, Inc. and
cannot be used without its express written consent. Printed in the U.S.A.

Part of the fun is mixing different


designers; all of the fun is living with it.
COLLECTOR AL EIBER, SEEN HERE WITH A 1990
YONEL LEBOVICI WELDERS LAMP IN HIS MIAMI BEACH HOME.

76

CURATED AUCTION HOUSE IN PARIS

SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN
& FOCUS ON JOSEF FRANK
Auction: February 17 2016

Axel Johannes Salto (1889-1961)

Poul Kjrholm (1929-1980)

VIEWINGS & AUCTIONS

UPCOMING

PIASA
118 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honor
75008 Paris - France
+33 1 53 34 10 10

Focus on Josef Frank - February 17 2016


Limited Edition III curated by Mathieu Mercier - March 2016
Italian Design - March 30 2016
Design Artists-Decorators : a partnership with the magazine AD - April 2016

PIASA SA - agreement n 2001-020 - Auctioneer: Frdric Chambre

UPCOMING AUCTIONS
AND RESULTS
WWW.PIASA.FR

FEBRUARY 2016

N.C. WYETHS
WILD BILL HICKOK
AT CARDS, 1916,
WHICH SOLD AT THE
COEUR DALENE ART
AUCTION IN JULY 2007
FOR $2,240,000.

MARKETWATCH

TRIBAL ART IN SAN FRANCISCO

MUMBAI

SHUFFLE AT SOTHEBYS

23 REPORTER

Buyouts at Sothebys were just part of


the end-of-year job reshuffle.

94

BY JUDD TULLY

47 ON THE BLOCK

As escalating prices draw long-held


blue-chip pieces to this months
London sales, the buying frenzy appears
to be cooling.
BY JUDD TULLY

AUCTIONS IN BRIEF

Arts of the American West in Denver,


Chinese imperial treasures in
Hong Kong, and in Paris, the library
of Pierre Berg.
BY LIZA M.E. MUHLFELD

98

DATABANK

The numbers behind an overdue


market correction for contemporary
Chinese art.
BY ROMAN KRUSSL

104 THE ACQUISITION


FOR DAILY MARKETWATCH UPDATES,
GO TO BLOUINARTINFO.COM

NICOLA TYSON

FEBRUARY 2016

THE INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE FOR ART COLLECTORS

The Rubin Museum of Art in New York


procures a set of illustrated folios
that illuminate Tibetan astrology,
divination, and cosmology.

LONDON SALES
PREVIEW

DESIGNS
ON LIFE

THE ART OF
ILLUSTRATION

EYES ON
ASIA

A Measured
Market Outlook

Al and Kim Eiber


at Home

A Medium
on the Ascent

Shanghai and
Regional Markets

ON THE COVER:
Le Moteur, 1918, an oil on
canvas by Fernand Lger,
rolls onto the block with an
estimate of 4million
to 6million ($69million)
at the Impressionist and
modern art sale at Christies
London on February2.

FROM TOP: THE COEUR DALENE ART AUCTION; CHRISTIES

COLUMNS

86

TO BENEFIT

Henry Street Settlement

ORGANIZED BY

Art Dealers Association of America

March 16, 2016 PARK AVENUE ARMORY AT 67TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY

F O U N D E D

1 9 6 2

ON PARK AVENUE
Gala Tickets 212.766.9200 , EXT. 248 OR HENRYSTREET.ORG/ARTSHOW
#TheArtShow
ARTDEALERS.ORG/ARTSHOW

Lead sponsoring partner


of The Art Show

FEBRUARY 2016 VOLUME XXXIX NO. 6

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Gilbert Stuart
Portrait of George Washington (detail)
Oil on canvas, 1798
Presale Estimate: $150,000$250,000
Sold: $1.025 Million

2016 AUCTION SCHEDULE


FEBRUARY: he Fine and Decorative Art Auction
APRIL: he Fine Jewelry Auction
MAY: he Fine Art Auction
SEPTEMBER: he Fine and Decorative Art Auction
NOVEMBER: he Fine Art Auction
DECEMBER: he Jewelry and Couture Sale

NOW ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS


FOR ALL SPRING AUCTIONS.
C O N TA C T :
Elaina Grinwald, Director of Consignments
info@dallasauctiongallery.com
214.653.3900

CONTRIBUTORS

Christine von der Linn

Ekta Marwaha

12

After earning a degree in history from Hans Raj College,


University of Delhi in India, and completing graduate
studies in journalism and mass communication at
St. Xaviers College in Mumbai, Marwaha began working
with India Today in 2011. During her tenure with the
magazine, she wrote features on art, travel, fashion, and
food. Today the New Delhibased journalist is destinations
editor for the online publication Blouin Culture+Travel.
On page44, she offers a guide to Mumbai timed to the
Kala Ghoda Arts Festival this month. Its an interesting
time for all art and history enthusiasts, as theres a plethora
of cultural activities taking place across the cityfrom
heritage walks to live art demonstrations, workshops, and
talks on art and literature, along with a whole list of
collections and regional handicrafts on display, she says.

Alasdair Nichol
As vice chairman and head of
the ine art department at
Freemans auction house in
Philadelphia, Nichol is a
regular appraiser on pbss
Antiques Roadshow, where
he specializes in American
paintings, drawings, and
sculpture. Born in Scotland,
Nichol began his career with
Phillips in Edinburgh before
moving to the companys
salesrooms in Glasgow and
London. In 1997 he ventured
to New York to head the
ine art department at Phillips;
he joined Freemans in
1999. Since arriving in the U.S., I have sold many examples of
illustration art and have twice held the world-record auction
price for a work by N.C. Wyeth, says Nichol, who offered
his expertise to Art+Auction for our article on illustration art
(page86). His contribution reminded him what a peculiarly
American collecting area illustration art is, and how relective it
is of the American character and psyche.

Danielle Whalen
Born and raised in Rhode Island, Whalen
moved to New York in 2007 to study
writing at Eugene Lang College. She then
pursued photography at the School of
Visual Arts and graduated with a bfa
degree in visual and critical studies before
joining Art+Auction last year as an editorial
assistant. On page40, she writes about
Modernism Week, the annual design
and architecture event in Palm Springs,
California. Whenever I speak to dealers
and collectors, theres not only a deep
historical knowledge about the objects
they collect but also a strong emotional
connection. Collecting is as much about
feeling as anything else, she says. Whalen
continues to take photographs, inspired
by trips abroad and by the streets of New
York City. She is currently polishing her
foreign language skills, particularly in
German, with aspirations to learn French.

Chloe Wyma
An associate art editor at Brooklyn Rail, Wyma is currently pursuing
her Ph.D. in modern and contemporary art at the City University
of New York Graduate Center. A resident of Queens, she also teaches
art history at Baruch College as an adjunct professor. On page56,
Wyma writes about her visit to the studio of artist Nicola Tyson.
She is as brilliant and funny in person as she is in her paintings,
Wyma says. What I thought would be a straightforward interview
became an hours-long,
digression-illed conversation spanning feminist
art and theory, punk and
the ybas, and the struggle
to develop a personal
artistic idiom apart from
artistic trends. Of
particular interest to the
art historian was their
discussion of Trial
Balloon. The irreverent,
all-female space that
Tyson founded in the 90s
became a lash point for
New Yorks underground
lesbian scene, she says.

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: SWANN AUCTION GALLERIES; KRISTINE LARSEN; CHLOE WYMA; FREEMANS AUCTION; EKTA MARWAHA

A graduate of Bard College, von der Linn has


been head of Swann Auction Galleries art,
architecture, press, and illustrated books
department for 18 years. Since 2013, she has
been organizing the houses sales of illustration
art, a ield she discusses on page86. At press
time she was anticipating Swanns January
auction in the category: In this particularly
colorful presidential race, we enjoyed pulling
together a selection of topical images like
Howard Chandler Christys I Am an American!
and amusing caricatures of Bernie Sanders
and Donald Trump. Illustration is the visual storytelling of our time, so its nice to have
a sale that is relevant and current. Von der Linn has contributed to articles on collecting
and market trends for publications including the New Yorker and the Wall Street Journal.

April 1417, 2016


April 13
Opening Night Preview
Park Avenue Armory
New York

The worlds leading


photography art galleries

The Association of International


Photography Art Dealers

Premier Corporate Partner of AIPAD

FROMTHEEDITOR

In todays sped-up art ecosystem,


contradictions are resolved into soundbites and subtleties are shunted
aside for future study. The nuanced
gets short shrift. Within market
precincts, art history is too often
reduced to a philosophical tug-of-war
between the canonical and the
revolutionary. Reinforcing this
binary reading, many market analysts
would have us believe the rewards
are bestowed only on yesterdays most exalted
names and todays brashest iconoclasts.
No single set of players is to blame. A
growing number of gallerists court the speculative minded by tethering rebel allure to the
fantasy of a quick, outsize payoff. A onetime
casino habitu, I understand the attraction
of long odds. I felt the same irresistible pull
to lay money on the hard eight at the craps
table that many collectors feel when encountering a debut show by a young unknown with
an emphatically signature style. The sparkle of
future possibilities, however unlikely, blind
one to the dull truth of probabilities.
At the other pole, more than a few auction
houses and dealers have grown adept at
associating the familiar with the safe, conlating the best-known with the best. Not that
the linkage is ictional. Economic analyses
continue to conirm that the most secure
art investment is blue-chip work by blue-chip
artists. But caveats abound in these studies,
as they do in the ine print of hedge fund
prospectuses, and are just as seldom read.
Technicalities aside, when passion is drained
from the way collectors look at any artist,
even the most brilliant, the long-term value

of that artists work must surely start to wane.


And blue-chip collecting, except when practiced
by dedicated connoisseurs, engenders all the
passion of signing up for an insurance policy.
So long as the number of new collectors
entering the market outpaces the number
disaffected by unfulilled promises of quick
proits or safe investments, the markets may
maintain a healthy appearance. In the long
run, however, this simplistic view of art history
will corrode the engine that powers those
marketslove of art.
The good news is that thanks to the Internet and a multitude of ofline sources, a
more nuanced version of art history, full of
contradictions and subtlety, is within the reach
of any collector at any level. They need only
commit to investing time and thought in
addition to money. As a irst step, those whose
personal interests are tied to the markets
long-term health should stop fomenting getricher-quick delusions. Just as importantly,
we need to start promoting the idea that
an intellectual investment in art history not
only brings returns in kind, but also may very
well lead to inancial rewards for those
whose studies lead them off the beaten track.

Eric Bryant

KRISTINE LARSEN

14

Editor in Chief

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

ART PARTIES+OPENINGS

WITH PATRICK MC MULLAN

4. Franz Humer
2. Maria Baibakova,
Marc Spiegler

3. Richie Shazam,
Steve Nishimoto

1. Wangechi Mutu,
Isolde Brielmaier

5. Larry Warsh,
Christopher Missling

7. Mathias Rastorfer,
Isabelle Bscher,
Jennifer Flavin Stallone,
Sylvester Stallone,
Krystyna Gmurzynska,
Lucas Bscher
6. Tanya Selvaratnam,
Lucy Walker

11. Njideka Akunyili Crosby

9. Princess Michael of Kent

10. Fabiola Beracasa,


Prabal Gurung,
Vanessa Traina Snow

8. Jean Shafiroff,
Chuck Close
14. Calum Sutton

16. Carole Hall,


Ira Hall
13. Nick Acquavella,
Andrea Glimcher

12. Kyunghwa Kim

16

17. Sara Colombo

21. Victoria Miro

20. Stephen Robert,


Pilar Crespi
19. Mai-Thu Perret

18. Christina Ricci

23. Rujeko Hockley,


Zoe Buckman,
Mark Guiducci
22. Glenn Kaino
24. Andrea Schlieker

MOSTLY IN MIAMI
Eye-popping moments at some of our favorite art world evenings: the New Museums annual Next Generation
dinner, honoring artists Njideka Akunyili Crosby and Josh Kline, at the Bathhouse Studios in New Yorks
East Village (1, 10, 11, 18); a dinner at the home of Don and Mera Rubell for the opening of No Mans Land:
Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection at the familys eponymous museum in Miami (2, 6, 17, 19, 21);
the performance of Dimensions, a collaboration between musician Devont Hynes and artist Ryan McNamara,
at the Prez Art Museum Miami (3, 24); Galerie Gmurzynskas buffet dinner at the Villa Casa Casuarina
in Miami Beach, with Sylvester Stallone and curator Germano Celant (4, 7, 9, 14, 16); the VIPopening of Art
Basel Miami Beach at the Miami Beach Convention Center (5, 8, 12, 13, 15, 20); and the Cultivists first
annual event at the Miami Beach fair, a luncheon for its members at the Setai hotel (22, 23).

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

IMAGES PATRICK MCMULLAN: JARED SISKIN (2, 3, 6, 17, 19, 21, 24); PATRICK MCMULLAN (4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20).
BILLY FARRELL, BFA (1, 10, 11, 18); CARLY ERICKSON, BFA (22, 23)

15. Andrea Fiuczynski

Martin Lewis, Shadow Dance, drypoint and sand-ground, 1930. Estimate $30,000 to $50,000.

19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings


March 8
Todd Weyman tweyman@swanngalleries.com
104 East 25th Street
New York, NY 10010
212 254 4710

SWANNGALLERIES.COM

INTHEAIR

Strength in Numbers
Following last summers announcement by the Syndicat
National des Antiquaires (sna) that the venerable Biennale des
Antiquaires will become an annual event after its 2016 edition
at the Grand Palais in September, the four-year-old Old Masters
centric Paris Tableau fair has decided to team up with its
erstwhile rival.With organizational changes within the sna
The stand of noted Old Masters dealer
and its decision to annualize the biennial, dealers who had been
Didier Aaron at Paris Tableau 2013.
participating in Paris Tableau saw a potential to revive Paris as
a capital of the arts by joining forces to strengthen that event rather than having us continue to
go it alone, says Paris Tableau president and Italian Old Masters dealer Maurizio Canesso.
With a revamp of the biennale spearheaded by Dominique Chevalier, who was elected president
of the sna following the ouster of Christian Deydier, event organizers expect the fair to offer
a formidable alternative to the European Fine Art Fair (tefaf), held each March in Maastricht.

My gift puts women artists front


and center at an institution
known for breaking barriers.

FROM TOP: PARIS TABLEAU; HBO FILMS; STUART FISHER AND THE ESTATE OF RUTH FELICITY KLIGMAN

Philanthropist, collector, and political activist Barbara Lee, commenting on her $42million
gift of works by female artists to the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston in December.

Edward Snowden in a still from


the documentary Citizenfour.

Its a Snow Storm


After receiving her first
encrypted e-mail from Edward
Snowden in January 2013,
Boston-born filmmaker Laura
Poitras became one of
several key players who would
enable the exiled former
CIA whistleblower to connect
with a public audience. In
time, she and journalist Glenn
Greenwald contributed to
Pulitzer Prizewinning reports
published in The Guardian

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

that drew on
Snowdens
leaked classified
documents,
and Poitras made
the Oscarwinning 2014
film Citizenfour,
which brought
the National
Security Agencys
mass surveillance
programs in the
wake of 9/11 squarely into
the American consciousness.
This month, the Berlin-based
Poitras, who trained at the San
Francisco Art Institute and
the New School, underscores
the realities of life in a surveillance state with the opening
of her first solo museum
exhibition, Astro Noise, at
the Whitney Museum in New
York. Portions of the Snowden
archive will be presented
within the five installations.

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

Pollock and
the Polar Bear
All you have to do is look at the
work to know its authentic,
says Colette Loll of Art Fraud
Insights, commenting on
skeptics who question the
attribution of Untitled
(Red, Black, and Silver), 1956,
to Jackson Pollock. Representatives of the estate of Ruth
Felicity Kligman have long
argued that the canvas on panel
was painted as a gift for the
artists mistress just weeks
before his fatal car crash. To
secure the attribution, Loll and
estate trustees invited forensic
scientist Nicholas Petraco
of the John Jay College of
Criminal Justice in New York to
analyze the painting to identify
trace elements that could place
its creation in Pollocks East
Hampton home and studio.
Among the findings was a hair
from a polar bearits skin used

as a rug in the artists living


room. According to Loll and
curator Lisa Ivorian-Jones,
the Pollock-Krasner Foundation never denied the works
authenticity, as some reports
have claimed; they even agreed
to include it in a supplement
to the known corpus of his work.
Unfortunately, the foundations
authentication board was
disbanded before the painting
could be assessed. Weve
done our due diligence in our
investigation of this painting
and devoted the appropriate
amount of time to study it,
says Loll. Our findings, both
scientific and historical, fully
support its authenticity.

19

Untitled (Red,
Black, and
Silver), 1956,
a 20-by-24inch canvas
on panel
attributed
to Jackson
Pollock.

INTHEAIR

Wall Rocket,
2013, a
lithograph by
Ed Ruscha,
is among
recent gifts
the artist has
made to the
Tate museums
in London.

20

In December, Tate
director Nicholas
Serota said
that 78-year-old
American Pop
artist Ed Ruscha
had given
a wonderful
Christmas
present to the
whole nation,
in announcing
a major gift of
his work to the
British institution. The artist has donated 18 print
editions and promised to donate one impression
of all future prints made in his lifetime to the Tate
collection. Currently, the museums hold 7 of
his paintings, 23 unique works on paper, and 111
prints, most of which were donated to Tate by
British dealer Anthony dOffay in 2008.

A Future for the Past


Event producer U.S. Antique
Shows has formed an alliance
with Antiques Young
Guns U.K. to bring the latters
program across the pond.
Mirroring the British initiative,
launched in 2011, Antiques
Young Guns U.S.A. aims
to bridge the generation gap
between millennial antiques
dealers and baby boomer
collectors by promoting
growth, education, and exposure to those in the trade, 39
years old or younger. At its
inaugural event in November,
the organization recognized

Art historian
Andrew
Graham-Dixon
with the
unfinished
Isleworth
Mona Lisa, one
of several
versions of the
celebrated
Louvre painting that some
have claimed
to be the work
of Leonardo
da Vinci.

A half millennium after


Leonardo da Vinci unveiled his
Mona Lisa, the artist continues
to make headlines with a trio
of stories ushering in the New
Year. In November, the English
forger Shaun Greenhalgh
announced in his tell-all book
that it was he, not da Vinci, who
executed La Bella Principessa,
a pen, ink, and chalk portrait of
a young girl in profile that was
attributed to the Renaissance
master in 2010 by the noted
scholar Martin Kemp of Oxford
University. The portrait, which

sold as an anonymous German


19th-century work for $21,850
at Christies in 1998, had been,
according to its consignor, in
the family since 1955. It could
be worth an estimated $150
million with da Vincis name
attached. On December9, art
historian Andrew GrahamDixon told viewers in a BBC
documentary, Secrets of the
Mona Lisa, that French engineer Pascal Cotte used cuttingedge scanning technology to
analyze the layers of pigment
on the paintings poplar panel
and found, much to his surprise,
what appears to be a portrait
of a different woman beneath
the famed visage. Then, in mid
December, reports surfaced
in the Daily Mail of yet another
Mona Lisa painted by da Vinci,
supposedly in the possession
of an anonymous Russian
collector in Saint Petersburg.
A number of Monas have come
to light over the years, none
found to be by Leonardos hand.

its first Antiques Young Gun of


the Year, Margaret Schwartz,
31, owner of the New Canaan,
Connecticut, shop the Summer
House. I look forward to an
exciting year getting to know
other young guns and growing
the program, she says of the
honor. With networking events
and social media platforms,
program coordinators expect
bright young things to
take brilliant old things into
the next generation.

$28,165,000
Price realized for a 24-foot-wide bronze Spider, 199697,
by Louise Bourgeois, on November10 at Christies
New York. It was an auction record for Bourgeois and the
highest price ever paid for a sculpture by a female artist.

Cases Closing
Still Making Waves
After 500 Years

Margaret Schwartz

The dispute between Danh Vo


and the Dutch collector Bert
Kreuk, raging since 2013, was
finally put to rest in December,
when the parties reached a
settlement. Kreuk alleged that
Vo was in breach of contract
when the artist
failed to create an
original work for
a museum exhibition of Kreuks
collection. The
settlement sets
aside a ruling by
a Rotterdam judge
that ordered Vo
to deliver a large
piece to Kreuk. The artist, his
dealer Isabella Bortolozzi,
and the collector have agreed
to part ways completely, each
withdrawing all claims against
the other. Kreuk made a
point of selling the remaining
Vo works in his collection.

Meanwhile, a long-running
lawsuit filed against New Yorks
Knoedler Gallery, which
was accused of selling a fake
Willem de Kooning painting
to collector John Howard
in 2007, has also been settled.
Amid a flurry of forgery
accusations
that surfaced in
2011, the gallery
shuttered its
operation
after 165 years
in business.
Knoedler and its
former director
Ann Freedman
have settled
the case with Howard for an
undisclosed amount, but they
still face a 2012 suit brought
against them by Sothebys
chairman Domenico De Sole
and his wife, Eleanore, who
purchased a Mark Rothko,
above, from the gallery in 2004.

FOR MORE OF WHATS IN THE AIR, VISIT


BLOUINARTINFO.COM

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ED RUSCHA; U.S. ANTIQUE SHOWS; CLARICK GUERON REISBAUM LLP; RICHARD RANKEN, BBC, AND BRINKWORTH FILMS

Anglophilia

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT


GEORGE D. STURGES RESIDENCE
Designed and completed in 1939
in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles, California
Sold to benefit The Bridges/Larson Foundation
ESTIMATE $2,500,000$3,000,000

BOND # 7900405194

Photo Grant Mudford

This property is listed for sale by Barry Sloane (BRE#01024594) and Marc Silver (BRE#01875513) of Sothebys International RealtyBeverly Hills Brokerage
(BRE#00899496) 9665 Wilshire Blvd #400. Beverly Hills, CA 90212. (310) 786-1844. Licensed Auctioneer Peter Loughrey (BOND#7900405194) of Los Angeles Modern
Auctions (LAMA) is the provider of auction marketing services and is not a licensed brokerage and is not directly involved in selling real property. The services referred to
herein are not available to residents of any state where prohibited by applicable state law. See Auction Terms & Conditions for full details.

FEBRUARY 21, 2016

MODERN ART & DE SIGN


Featuring Frank Lloyd Wrights George D. Sturges Residence and property
from the Estate of Jack Larson to benefit The Bridges/Larson Foundation
PETER LOUGHREY, DIRECTOR | 16145 HART ST., VAN NUYS, CA 91406 | 323-904-1950 | LAMODERN.COM

Opens March 26

ALEX DA CORTE
FREE ROSES

Open seasonally through 2028

ANSELM KIEFER

Through 2033

SOL LEWITT
A WALL DRAWING RETROSPECTIVE

Opens April 16

SARAH CROWNER
BEETLE IN THE LEAVES

Opens February 13

RICHARD NONAS

87 MARSHALL ST. NORTH ADAMS, MASS. | 413.662.2111 | massmoca.org

REPORTER

Slim-down at Sothebys
THE AUCTION HOUSE TRIMS ITS GLOBAL STAFF AND
HIRES A RAINMAKER AMID A DROP IN SHARE PRICE
the highly
publicized $432.8million
multiday sale of works from
the estate of onetime
Sothebys owner A.Alfred
Taubman in November, the
houses newbie CEO, Tad
Smith, sent out a companywide e-mail on November13
announcing a voluntary
program to reduce the head
count of its 1,600-person
workforce and associated
compensation costs. Clearly
the auction giant was reeling
from the relatively lackluster
Taubman sell-off, which it had
guaranteed to the tune of
$515million, anticipating
that the haul would have
brought in a total closer to
the high end of its $420.2million-to-$602.6million presale estimate. As it stands,
the sale total only cleared
the low bar with the buyers
premium included.
Just how much Sothebys
is destined to lose on its
financial bet wont be known
for months to come. Two
pricey buy-ins from the
Taubman Masterworks sale
on November4 were an
Edgar Degas pastel, Femme
nue, de dos, se coiffant,
188688, which failed to sell

IN THE WAKE OF

accounting uncertainty.
Losses from the Taubman
sales may be mitigated
when 300 or so lesservalued lots hit the block this
year at events including
a single-owner sale of Old
Masters in late January,
estimated at $21.2million to
$30.3million. But it is clear
that the projected shortfall
helped hammer Sothebys
stock down to a year-end
low. In mid December, shares
in the house, which trade
on the New York Stock
Exchange under the ticker
BID, had dropped to $26.50,
having already declined
a precipitous 38percent
the month before. The figure
was a far cry from the
share price of $47.28 in
June 2015, two months after
Smiths hire and investor
Dan Loebs successful
boardroom putsch to shake
up management and
shore up the companys
profitability profile.
The gist of Smiths Dear
John letter was that if the
voluntary buyouts fell short
of the intended goal, layoffs
would ensue. I certainly
understand, he wrote, that
announcing a cost reduction

PATRICK MCMULLAN

I certainly understand that


announcing a cost reduction
program after two weeks of dazzling
sales may be unexpected.
against a $15million-to$20million estimate, and
Disappearance I, 1960,
by Jasper Johns, which
carried an identical estimate.
Sothebys now owns both
works, and how long the
house will have to carry
them on their books before
finding buyers remains an

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

program right after two


weeks of dazzling sales may
be unexpected. It is our
hopebut because this is
voluntary we cannot be
surethat this program will
achieve both the efficiencies from which our
organization would benefit,
as well as create enhanced

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

Marc Porter

professional development
and leadership opportunities
for those who will steer
Sothebys into the future.
Along with Smiths staff
lean-out notice, the firm
simultaneously filed a
Securities and Exchange
Commission Form 8-K
formally announcing Costs
Associated with Exit or
Disposal Activities. Then, on
December14, Sothebys
released an amended form
8-K saying that it had
reached its goal of shaving
5percent of its global
workforce (amounting to 80
employees) at a cumulative cost of $40million.
Bundled into that number
which averages out to
approximately $500,000
per employeeare severance costs based on the
participants position, years
of service, and base pay,
as well as, for some, the
continued vesting of equity
rewards, according to
the filing. Those payments
will be made in lump sum
amounts as soon as
possible after termination.
The grand total will no
doubt be reflected in what
is expected to be Sothebys
red inkdrenched fourthquarter results for 2015.
While Sothebys had yet
to identify those taking

buyouts at press time,


Art+Auction learned that
the list includes some of
the top and most seasoned
executives at the house.
Among them is Mitchell
Zuckerman, executive
vice president of global
operations and longtime
president of Sothebys
Ventures LLC, the parent
firms financial services
arm, which has consistently
outperformed the auction
platform. Another is
the canny trusts and estates attorney Warren
WeitmanJr., chairman for
North and South America
and one of the firms
top client handlers, who has
chosen to leave after 37
years with the company.
Other departures include
New Yorkbased senior
international specialist
Aileen Agopian and
specialist Scott Nussbaum,
both in the relatively
lucrative department of
contemporary art.
In the client service and
department specialist
realms, Roberta Louckx, vice
chairman for the Americas
and Middle East; Polly
Sartori, a veteran senior
vice president and head of
19th-century European
paintings, drawings, and
sculpture; and David

23

REPORTER

It was just a terrible but


necessary deal for Sothebys.
The good news is, there
arent other Taubmans
out there. Thats probably
the best news of all.
Taubman, of course,
was the former white knight
savior of Sothebys, who
bought the privately held
company from its British
owners in 1983, staked by
deep-pocketed partners
including Henry FordII. The
shopping mall magnate and
voracious art collector took
the firm public, getting it
listed on the New York Stock
Exchange in 1988, only
to fall into disgrace over a
price-fixing scheme with
archrival Christies, for which
he was indicted in May 2001.
In an interesting twist,
market insiders had
expected Christies, not
Sothebys, to have won what
was viewed as the plum
Taubman trove, following
his death at age 91 last
April. Christies made a
hard charge led by Marc
Porter, the widely respected
chairman of Christies
America and international
head of private sales. This
ultimately pushed Sothebys
to overreach and guarantee
what some observers at

In an interesting twist, market


insiders had expected Christies, not
Sothebys, to have won what was
viewed as the plum Taubman trove.
a hire during the latter part
of former CEO William
Ruprechts reign, has since
resigned after a two-year
stint. He has been replaced
temporarily by Dennis M.
Weibling, a member of
the board of directors at
Sothebys since 2006.
In speaking of the
Sothebys bid for Taubmans
estate, Sutton bluntly noted,

the time believed to be far


more than what the property
was worth. Now, it seems,
Sothebys has hired Porter
to take on a yet-to-beannounced senior management role, trying to pull a
rainmaking rabbit out of
the proverbial corporate hat.
Porter wont officially join
the firm until the fall of this
year, when his mandatory

gardening leave from


Christies expires.
Marc trained as a
lawyer, says attorney Ralph
Lerner of the New York
based Art World Advisors.
Hes charming, hes very
knowledgeable about art,
hes triple A-plus and is
going to be a real assetIt
would be a lot better if they
had got him right away,
Lerner says, in reference
to the enforced leave and
the buyout departures of
Zuckerman and Weitman.
Tad Smith got rid of a lot of
brain power at Sothebys.
They just think the Sothebys
name will carry them over.
The Porter hire does
represent a talent blow to
Christies, which has seen
a surge in specialist
departures since the abrupt
December 2014 exit of CEO
Stephen Murphy. In what
now looks like a prescient
move, in June of last year
Christies hired Brook
Hazeltonthe onetime CEO
of Phillips and, more
recently, a managing partner
in the investment firm
St.James Partnersto a
newly created position
of president, client management Americas. Hazelton,
no doubt, will fill some of
that Porter void.
Marc was very important
to Christies, says Guy
Jennings, the managing
director of the Londonbased Fine Art Fund and
Christies former deputy
chairman of Impressionist
and modern art in New
York. He was a very good
negotiator; he tended to
crack all the big deals, the
big estates and appraisals.
He had a lot of good
contacts with many of the
top lawyers in New York
who dealt with the big
consignments and that sort
of thing. So from that point
of view, its quite a big deal.

Tad Smith

More important, perhaps,


is Jenningss view that
Tad [Smith] lacks some
experience in how the art
market works, and its
possible that Marc fits that
bill quite well and they could
work well with each other.
I told Christies in April
that I was leaving, Porter
says, countering what some
observers erroneously
inferred was a blindsiding
exit to rival Sothebys, and a
discussion about my leaving
has been going on since.
Porter explains that he
had been eager to take
on another complex role at
Christies after the firm,
under the revised leadership
of CEO Patricia Barbizet
and global president Jussi
Pylkkanen, decided to
break up his job as head
of global private sales and
return that part of the
business to individual
specialist departments. It
was the reorganization
of the business that left me
without a significant role,
says Porter. We couldnt
find a similarly complex
one, and when Sothebys
unexpectedly contacted
me in late October, I chose
the role that Tad Smith
offered. While he says hes
leaving Christies with no
rancor or anger, Porter
notes, I think Sothebys is a
great choice for me now to
build a business again.

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

JUDD TULLY

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

SOTHEBYS

24

Redden, the worldwide


chairman of books and
manuscripts, also took
handsome buyout packages.
Matthew Weigman, the
London-based public relations specialist and
Sothebys worldwide director
of sales publicity, also
signed up and was accepted
for release after 30-plus
years of service.
In commenting on the
shake-up, George Sutton,
a senior research analyst at
the Minneapolis-based
Craig-Hallum Capital Group,
who has tracked Sothebys
performance for years, said,
Thats absolutely a move to
try to improve profitability at
the cost level. The challenge
is, the margin pressures
have been significant at the
auction level itself.
That stress on the margin
was no doubt ratcheted
up in mid September when
Sothebys sought to temporarily increase its
credit agreement with an
international lending
syndicate led by General
Electric Capital Corporation to a hefty $800million
to cover the Taubman
sale guarantee. Patrick
McClymont, chief financial
officer at Sothebys and

Somogy Art Publishers since 1937


w w w. s o m o g y. n e t

MOVERS+SHAKERS

LOS ANGELES

Have Artists, Will Travel


On February23, Sprth Magers gallery of London and Berlin expands its
operation to the States with a new outpost at 5900Wilshire Boulevard
helmed by directors Sarah Watson and Anna Helwing. Prior to joining the
gallery in 2013, Watson was a director at Gagosian Gallery, leaving for
Anna Helwing
L&M Arts, where she worked until Dominique Lvy and Robert Mnuchin
parted company three years ago. Swiss-born Helwing, who started with Sprth
Magers last year, ran her own gallery before coming on board as a director at
Hauser & Wirth, where she worked from 2009 to 2014.The decision to open
a space in L.A. depended largely on the needs and interests of our artists, many
of whom live and work here, says Helwing, name-checking John Baldessari,
Lizzie Fitch and Ryan Trecartin, Barbara Kruger, Analia Saban, Sterling Ruby,
and Ed Ruscha. The gallery will open with a show of new work by Baldessari,
mounted in collaboration with Marian Goodman Gallery. BRIDGET MORIARITY
Sarah Watson

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TWO IMAGES, SPRUETH MAGERS; SOTHEBYS; FINE ART AUCTIONS PARIS; PAUL KASMIN GALLERY

NEW YORK

PARIS

TOKYO

Virtual Sphere

French Relations

Crossing Luxury Lines

In November, Paul Kasmin Gallery


launched PK Editions, a virtual exhibition space focused solely on limitededition prints. The venture is headed by
gallery director Eric Gleason. For its
debut show, PK partnered with the
Dedalus Foundation to present a collection of prints by Robert Motherwell,
accompanied by relevant archival material organized in three sections, according
to the master printers the artist worked
with from the 1960s until his death
in 1991: Irwin Hollander, Ken Tyler, and
Catherine Mosley. The benefit of having
it as a digital platform is that theres no
limit to the number of works and, more
important, the amount of context we can
add to the website, says Gleason, who
adds that once an exhibition is released
online, it will remain on the site permanently for web guests to revisit at their
leisure. This is the beginning of a string
of heavily researched and contextualized
digital exhibitions
focusing on the
advancements of
20th-century printmaking, Gleason
promises. Future
projects will explore
prints by Jules
Olitski and
David Hockney.

After three years


as a specialist
at Fine Art
Auctions
Miami (faam),
founded by
Frederic Thut
in 2011, Daniel
Daniel Coissard
Coissard has
set up a similar operation in Paris,
Fine Art Auctions Paris (faap),
which held its irst sale of Impressionist and modern masters this
past January. Coissard, who
studied art history at the Ecole du
Louvre, is no stranger to the
Parisian art and auction scene.
He worked as a director at Galerie
dOrsay during the 1990s, and
in 2002 he founded an art advisory
company that counted the auction
house Drouot among its clients.
faap plans to specialize in Impressionist and modern paintings and
sculptureprimarily by French
and international artists who
worked in France throughout the
20thcenturyalong with design
and jewelry. BM

Mori Seguchi has wasted little time


since assuming the role of president and
managing director of Sothebys Japan
in October, with client engagement his
top priority. In addition to getting up
to speed on the art markets most relevant
to Japan, namely Impressionist and
modern art, contemporary art, and
Chinese works of art, Seguchi says, he
has been meeting with collectors not
only in Japan but also in Hong Kong and
Taiwan. Prior to joining Sothebys,
Seguchi burnished his
reputation
as a business
go-getter
as president
of operations
in Japan
and Mexico
for Maxxium
Worldwide, a
Netherlandsbased wine and
spirits company,
and more recently
as president of
Club Med Japan, where he cultivated new
customers and business channels for
the hospitality chain. On top of expanding the Sothebys client network, I am also
devoted to delivering the highest level
of service to our clients, he says. BM

Eric Gleason

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

DANIELLE WHALEN

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

27

Mori Seguchi

MOVERS+SHAKERS
LOS ANGELES

LONDON

A New Lens

Genevieve Janvrin

Retrograde Motion

After nearly two decades, Derek


Eller Gallery has left New Yorks
Chelsea district for 300 Broome
Street on the Lower East Side;
the space is tentatively scheduled
to open in MarchThis past
December, Vito Schnabels
gallery opened its doors in Bruno
Bischofbergers former space
in St. MoritzPaddle8 has hired
Stefany Morris, former director
of Waterhouse & Dodds Upper
East Side gallery and a specialist
in the Impressionist and modern
art department at Christies,
as head of ine art auctions and
manager of its for-proit sales
This month, Berlin-based Arndt
gallery is moving to the citys
Charlottenburg district, where it
will focus on artist management,
art advising, and curated
exhibitions under the rubric of
Arndt Art Agency; the gallerys
commercial efforts will continue
to operate out of its Singaporebased Arndt Fine Art space.

The burgeoning cultural vibrancy of L.A.


reminds me of the manner in which
the citys art scene attained its voice
in the 1960s and 70s. So says Franklin
Parrasch of his eponymous New York
gallery, explaining its expansion to
the West Coast, where this past fall he
partnered with local dealer Christopher
Heijnen to open Parrasch Heijnen
Gallery. The inaugural show at the downtown space, at 1326 South Boyle Avenue,
is a survey of the late L.A.-based artist Ken
Price, running through March 8. I began
showing his work back in 1989, when he
introduced me to his local artist friends
and colleagues, including Larry Bell and
Peter Alexander, says Parrasch, who
has gained a reputation for championing
California artists. Both Parrasch Heijnen
Gallery and Franklin Parrasch Gallery
will focus on L.A. artists whose careers
emerged in the 1960s, he adds. BM

Christopher
Heijnen

Franklin
Parrasch

NEW YORK AND TOKYO

Bases Covered
Bonhams has hired Ingrid Dudek, who previously served as vice president and
international senior specialist in Asian 20th-century and contemporary art at
Christies. Based in New York, the new director of modern and contemporary art for
Ingrid Dudek
Asia has been charged with developing an American consignment and buyer base
for the houses Hong Kong sales. Meanwhile, Tokyo-based Ryo Wakabayashi has been given a
similar task in Japan and Korea. Wakabayashi, former ceo of Mizuma Art Gallery, joins
Bonhams as senior specialist in modern and contemporary art, Asia. Dudek and
Wakabayashi are also working to cultivate a collector base in Asia for the postwar
and contemporary art sales in New York and London. According to Magnus
Renfrew, deputy chairman and director of ine arts for Asia, the houses efforts on
this front have already been paying off.Thirty-six percent by value of work from
our London sale of postwar and contemporary art earlier this year found buyers
in Asiaa signiicant increase from last year, says Renfrew. DARRYL JINGWEN WEE
Ryo Wakabayashi

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PHILLIPS; ANDREW STANBRIDGE; TWO IMAGES, BONHAMS

28

Phillips has appointed Genevieve


Janvrin head of photographs for Europe,
aiming to grow a department that has
flourished in New York in recent years.
Historically, the market for photographs
has been predominantly New York
focused, but with such a growing number
of collectors in Europe, there is now a
demand for a strong secondary-market
presence for the medium, says Janvrin,
who is working on a sale slated for
May16 in London. Janvrin, who began
her career at Londons Michael Hoppen
Gallery and most recently worked as
a private art adviser after a brief stint
at Rex Irwin Fine Art in Sydney, is no
stranger to Phillips. She joined Phillips de
Pury & Company in 2007 to organize
the houses inaugural London sale of
photographs, and ran its London-based
photographs department until 2009. BM

IN BRIEF

T H R O C K M O R TO N F I N E A R T

NORTHERN DYNASTIES
March 3rd - April 23rd, 2016
Catalogue Available: Northern Dynasties, $50
Image: Standing Buddha, Northern Wei to Eastern Wei Period
ca. 530-550 CE, Marble with Gilt and Polychrome, H: 28 1/2 in. w/base

145 EAST 57TH STREET, 3RD FLOOR, NEW YORK, NY 10022


TEL 212.223.1059 FAX 212.223.1937
info@throckmorton-nyc.com www.throckmorton-nyc.com

DATEBOOK
FEBRUARY 2016

THIS MONTHS CULTURAL AGENDA

31

PA L M S P R I N GS

Mad for Modernism

BEAU MONDE VILLAS

this california oasis has a long history as a getaway for


celebrities looking for respite from Hollywood, which has left the
desert city dotted with homes designed by such midcentury modern
masters as E. Stewart Williams, Albert Frey, and Donald Wexler.
February11 through 21, Palm Springs hosts its annual Modernism
Week, opening up many of these homessuch as the Williamsdesigned 1947 Twin Palms estate, pictured above, built for Frank
Sinatrafor visits, tours, talks, and parties.
The highlight of the week is the 16th edition of the Modernism
Show and Sale, which runs February12 through 15 at the Palm
Springs Convention Center, with more than 80 exhibitors
presenting furniture, decor, and ine art. A lot of modern design

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

is timeless and classic, with clean lines, and it its into houses that
have good eye appeal, says James Claude, a Palm Springs dealer
who has traded in midcentury design for 22 years. His gallery,
A La Mod, co-owned with Miguel Linares, is returning for its
fourth fair.
Many baby boomers are at a position in life now where theyre
able to afford these items, says Claude, who has noted increasing
attention to modernist design. All of a sudden, the 1980s are
popular, he adds. I think its bringing back memories of childhood
for people in my age bracket, or even younger, just like it did for
the people who were buying 1950s furniture and were in their 50s
some 20 or 30 years ago. DANIELLE WHALEN

DATEBOOK: AMERICAS
M EX I CO C I TY

N EW YO R K

Ciudad Caliente!

from a thriving international interest in

traying from
the traditional
semiannual
photography sales
that take place in April and
October, on February17
and 18, Christies offers a
large, off-cycle sale featuring
approximately 200 lots
seized from Philip Rivkin,
who pleaded guilty in
June 2015 to fraud charges
stemming from his ownership of a Houston-based
biodiesel company. The
auction highlights prominent
American photographers
from the late 19th and 20th
centuries, including Alfred
Stieglitz and his followers,
such as Paul Strand,
Edward Steichen, and
Edward Weston, whose
Shell, 1927, pictured here, is estimated at
$250,000 to $350,000. Works by key
European modernists, such as Henri CartierBresson and Josef Sudek, are also available.
Darius Himes, international head of the
department at Christies, is confident that
the sale will bring the top collectors of
the category. The first day, an evening sale
features roughly 50 works, with the remaining
pieces offered in morning and afternoon
sessions the following day. Regardless
of Rivkins status, Himes points out that
provenance should not be overlooked, as
many of the works at one time belonged to

prestigious collectors and institutions. Among


the lots up for auction is Steichens The
PoolEvening: A Symphony to a Race and
to a Soul, 1899 (est. $150250,000), which
sold at Sothebys New York in 2006 for
$296,000 (est. $100150,000) as part of
the sale Important Photographs from the
Metropolitan Museum of Art Including Works
from the Gilman Paper Company Collection.
The remainder of the 2,000-piece trove will be
sold throughout 2016 in a series of online-only
thematic and monographic auctions. The first,
beginning at the end of this month, features
solely American artists. LIZ A M . E. M U HLFELD

Mexican modernism to murmurings within


artist circles of its being the next Berlin,
Mexico City, with the requisite affordable
spaces, rich history, and edgy spirit, seems
poised to step onto the global art stage.
Mexico is a real point of focus at this
particular moment, says Galera OMR
director Cristobal Riestra, who is overseeing the 32-year-old gallerys move from
a colonial home in the Roma neighborhood
to a white cube in Crdoba, with an
inaugural exhibition of works by Jorge
Mndez Blake opening February2.
Mexican collectors are buying abroad
more now, and weve seen a fast-paced,
growing interest in the artists we represent
as well as other Mexican artists, he
notes. And the number of museum
patron groups visiting Mexico City has
grown exponentially.
The inlux of artists and young galleries
to Mexico is one of the driving forces
behind the spike in collector interest. Lulu,
a Kunsthalle-style space under the direction

LOS A N G E L ES

BREAKING
NEW GROUND
Los Angeles Modern
Auctions (LAMA) joins forces
with Sothebys International
Realty to sell the boutique
houses i rst-ever real estate
lot. The George Sturges
House, designed by Frank
Lloyd Wright in 1939, leads
LAMAs February21 modern art and design sale, which includes more than
75 lots from the estate of Jack Larson, the actor and playwright best known
for his role as reporter Jimmy Olsen in the 1950s TV series Adventures of
Superman, who passed away this past September. In addition to the house,
lots from the collection of Larson and his partner, the late James Bridges,
include works by Andy Warhol and Alex Katz, whose 1962 oil on Masonite
Heres to You is estimated at $80,000 to $120,000. DW

of Chris Sharp and Martin Soto Climent,


is one of the best-known newer spaces.
Were one of the few places in Mexico
City where you can see non-Conceptual,
medium-speciic workpainting, for
instanceby serious emerging and
midcareer artists, says Sharp.
omr is at the 14-year-old blue-chip
Zona Maco fairbringing works by
artists including Jose Dvila, whose untitled
print from 2015 is pictured above
February3 through 7 at the Centro Banamex,
while Lulu is at 3-year-old satellite
Material Art Fair, February4 through 7
at Expo Reforma. SARA ROFFINO

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FROM TOP: CHRISTIES; GALERIA OMR, MEXICO CITY; GRANT MUDFORD

32

Flash Mob

DATEBOOK: MUSTHAVES
2

34

6
5

ETHNIC ARTS
The San Francisco Tribal & Textile Arts Show, which runs February19 through21 at the Fort Mason Center, provides
ample opportunity for collectors to expand their holdings of ethnographic art from around the globe
1. PRESTIGE HAT, from the Bamileke or Bamun people, in cotton and wool,

Cameroon, 20thcentury; $1,800 from exhibitor Andres Moraga Textile Art,


Berkeley, California. 2. TJI WARA HEADDRESS, in wood with metal fittings,
from the Bamana people of Mali, early 20thcentury; $35,000 from Berz
Gallery of African Art, New York. 3. TUTSI COIL-SEWN AGASEKE BASKET with
conical lid, Burundi, ca.1950; $950 from Amyas Naegele, New York.
4.POLYCHROME NAZCA VESSEL , Peru, A.D.200600; $1,200 from Morgan
Oakes Tribal, San Francisco. 5.TURKANA LEATHER SHIELD, Kenya, early
20thcentury; $950 from Farrow Fine Art Gallery, San Rafael, California.

6.BERBER STONE INKWELL from the Atlas Mountains, Morocco, late


19thcentury; $850 from Robert Morris Fine Art, Santa Fe. 7.TEA KETTLE,
in brass or bronze, Brunei, ca.1800; $2,200 from Mark A. Johnson Tribal
Art, Marina del Rey, California. 8.BOARS TUSK MOUTH ORNAMENT, with
cowrie shells, shell rings, red seeds, and beads, from Collingwood Bay,
Oro Province, Papua New Guinea, early 20thcentury; $2,000 from Michael
Hamson Oceanic Art, Palos Verdes Estates, California. 9.NETSUKE IN
THE FORM OF A SNAIL , in boxwood, Japan, Edo period; 2,200 ($3,300)
from Brandt Asian Art, London. ANGEL A M . H . SCH USTER

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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William N.

The World
According
to
CPLY

COPLEY

THE MENIL COLLECTION February 19July 24, 2016 menil.org


1533 Sul Ross Street, Houston, Texas 713-525-9400 Free admission, always.
This exhibition is organized in collaboration with Fondazione Prada.
William N. Copley, Los Angeles Angels, 1962. The Menil Collection, Houston. 2015 The Estate of William N. Copley / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

DATEBOOK: EUROPE & AFRICA

D E N BOSC H , N ET H E R LA N DS

Fanfare for the Grotesque


Center panel
The Dutch hamlet is pulling out all the stops with a host
of The Last
of events to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the death
Judgment,
14951505, by
of Hieronymus Bosch, medieval master of the macabre.
Hieronymus
Foremost among them is Jheronimus Bosch: Visions
Bosch.
of Genius, the largest exhibition of his works ever held,
running February13 through May8 at the Noordbrabants Museum.
Drawn from collections around the globe, the 20 paintings and 19
drawings on view depict all manner of fanciful igures presented along
with works that contextualize the artist and his oeuvre.
Bosch probably never saw so many of his works together at one
time, says museum director Charles de Mooij. Nearly 100 events and
projects are planned in the Netherlands for the quincentennial, including the world premiere of Requiem for Bosch, composed by Detlev
Glanert and performed by the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. AMHS

ON THE RISE
36

Art Week Cape Town


returns for its fourth edition
February16 through 21,
while Cape Town Art
Fair runs February19
through 21. Art+Auctions
Sara Rofi no checked in
with Jonathan Garnham,
owner of Blank Projects (one of the citys
i rst contemporary art spaces) and founder
of Art Week Cape Town, about where the
city has been and where its going.
You opened Blank Projects in 2005. How has
art in Cape Town changed since then?

In 2003 I returned to South Africa after


10years in Berlin, and I discovered that Cape
Town had two or three galleries devoted to
contemporary art. Their programs, although
brave at the time, were very commercially
driven and focused on local audiences. Since
then, the sector has grown, and grown
up. There are now several galleries in addition
to Blank, like Stevenson, Goodman, and
Whatiftheworld, with quality programs
supporting the artists they represent and
taking their work to international audiences.
Who are the collectors in South Africa?

We have a small collector base, mainly from


Cape Town and Johannesburg. It is a quite
conservative market, but that is changing as
people become more familiar with contemporary art. Many of the collectors we deal

with are based in Europe and America, and


there is a lot of potential to access new markets
in fellow developing economies in Africa and
in other parts of the world.
What are the highlights of Art Week this year?

Im particularly excited about commissioned


projects happening within the fabric of the
city: Artists and architects will be reacting
to contested spaces inherited from the apartheid era, when the city was planned around
separate development. The Cape Town Art
Fair promises to be the best yet. Now in
its third year, the fair brings together the best
galleries from the region along with some
exciting international participants. At Blank,
were presenting two new sound installations
by James Webb, and Stevenson will be
showing an installation by Meschac Gaba.

MADRID

Spain Stays in Step

ounded in 1982, ARCOmadrid has built an international reputation that has consistently attracted
dealers and collectors from throughout Latin America, Europe, and North America. In the past
five years, weve especially emphasized the link between Latin America and Europe, says fair
director Carlos Urroz, highlighting one of the ways in which the fair has buoyed itself against
the Spanish economic crisis, which started in 2008 and didnt begin to wane until mid 2015. The result,
according to Urroz, is that more than 60percent of sales at the fair are to non-Spanish clients.
As Madrid regains its footing following several years of economic turmoilwhich saw the closing of
long-standing galleries including Soledad Lorenzo and Oliva Arauna in the historic art district of ChuecaJusticiaa younger generation of dealers is setting up shop around Doctor Fourquet Street, close to the
Reina Sofa. Its both generational and geographic that the gallery scene is changing, says Urroz. Galleries are coming from Barcelona and other parts of Spain. Its really becoming a hub for contemporary art.
ARCO runs February24 through 28 at the Feria de Madrid, with nearly 200 galleries, including Madrids
La Caja Negra, which is bringing Jos Pedro Crofts 2015 Untitled etching and collage, seen at left.
Additional programming throughout the city to mark the fairs 35th edition includes contemporary art
interventions in non-contemporary venues such as the museums of Romanticism and archaeology. SR

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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FROM TOP: GROENINGE MUSEUM, BRUGES, BELGIUM; JONATHAN GARNHAM; JOSE PEDRO CROFT AND LA CAJA NEGRA, MADRID

CA P E TOW N

DATEBOOK: AMERICAS
QDEALERS NOTEBOOK

Stephen Ongpin
THE ESSENTIALS

IN THE BEGINNING

38

I majored in art history at the University of


Manchester and fell in love with the subject. After
taking the Sothebys Institute of Arts Works of
Art course in London, I knew that I wanted to
work in the art market, particularly in the ield of
Old Masters. I got a job as a porter in the New
York branch of the Old Master gallery Colnaghi,
where I wound up staying for 15 years. In 1988
I began working with Jean-Luc Baroni, who ran
the drawings business there. I knew that one day
I wanted to deal in drawings on my own, and
in 2006 I inally took the plunge. I teamed up with
my colleague Guy Peppiatt, who dealt in British
drawings and watercolors, and we opened a
gallery in Masons Yard in St. Jamess, where
we remain to this day. Guy and I have completely
separate businesses, but we share the gallery.
MAJOR MILESTONE

My irst signiicant sale was a superb drawing of


the head of a youth, in red chalk on blue paper,
by 18th-century Venetian artist Giovanni
Battista Tiepolo. It was a very striking,
quite modern image, and I put it on the front
cover of my irst independent catalogue
in 2007. It was sold to a private collector in
Chicago, and I still remember receiving
a check for the drawing with what was
at that time the biggest number I had ever
seen on a check with my name on it.
BRANCHING OUT

Unlike, say, the contemporary


market, the drawings ield
remains much less prone to
wild luctuations and
hype. Collectors of
drawings tend to
be driven by a genuine
love of the works
and dont view
them as a means of
investment. Still,
as collectors of Old
Master drawings
begin to ind fewer
works in their
chosen ield, they
may begin to look
farther aieldat
19th-century drawings,

AGE: 53
HAILS FROM: Manila, Philippines
PRESIDES OVER: Stephen Ongpin Fine Art,
London
GALLERYS SPECIALTY: Drawings, watercolors,
and oil sketches from the 15th to the
20thcentury
MOST RECENT SHOW: Master Drawings
from the 16th to the 20thCentury, Dickinson
Roundell Inc., New York, January 2016
LO N D O N

for example. Im seeing more Old Master collectors


also moving into the 20th century. In many
ways a drawing by Lucian Freud would appeal as
much to someone who also loves the drawings
of Degas or Ingres. Similarly, a drawing by a
contemporary artist like Jenny Saville, who draws
superbly, can attract a collector of Old Masters.
FAIR PLAY

The wonderful thing about the Works on Paper


fair is that it attracts all sorts of people, not just
collectors of drawings but also museum curators
and scholars. I shall be bringing a mix of mainly
19th- and 20th-century drawings, with some big
names (Henri Lebasque, Camille Pissarro, Ben
Nicholson) and many works by lesser-known but
equally gifted artists, as well as a handful of Old
Master drawings. When one looks
beyond the obvious names, there are
many artists who are less well
known but can still be recognized
and admired as superb draftsmen.
TWO FOR THE SHOW

I will be exhibiting a very striking


image by Ren Gruau, which was
his design for a 1953 advertisement
for Cinzano vermouth. Very often
such commercial artists do not get
rated as highly as ine artists,
but I believe that he fully
deserves to be recognized
as a great draftsman.
Another drawing I will be
exhibiting is an orientalist
landscape, Sunset in
Egypt, with Two Bedouin
on Camels, by the
19th-century French
artist Louis Amable
Crapelet. Crapelet went
to Egypt between 1852
and 1854, traveling
down the Nile as far as
the Third Cataract, and
this journey provided
him with material for
much of his later career.

Paper Source
A distinctive feature of our fair is
that no one period dominates, says
Lucy Russell, a director of Works
on Paper, the seventh edition
of which runs February11 through
14 at its new venue, the Royal
Geographical Society. Visitors
seem to enjoy the juxtaposition
of something quite earlylike the
15th-century woodcut by Albrecht
Drer brought by Elizabeth
Harvey-Leeand something by,
say, a contemporary Japanese
artist like Toko Shinoda, whose
work is being shown by the Tolman
Collection. Russell says that
there has been a rising interest in
20th-century material. Another
trend to emerge, she adds, is the
increasing presence of dealers who
lack a brick-andBooks for the
mortar gallery;
Paris Review,
1998, by Howard in fact, more
Hodgkin at
than half of the
Zuleika Gallery.
44 participants fit
this descriptionamong them the
Oxford-based, online-only Zuleika
Gallery, which debuted its collection
of 20th- and 21st-century art in
October, and Freya Mitton,
who since 2012 has specialized in
20th-century British art. Mitton
returns to the fair this year with a
range of works by the likes of Julian
Trevelyan and Mary Fedden. An
oil by Fedden can fetch between
15,000 and 20,000 [$2230,000],
but a work on paper, while not
cheap, is in the range of 5,000
to 15,000 [$7,00022,000],
says Mitton. A loan exhibition of
never-before-shown paintings and
drawings by the popular British
author Laurie Lee accompanies the
works for sale.
BRIDGE T MORIARIT Y

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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FROM LEFT: JULIE FROUGE; HOWARD HODGKIN AND ZULEIKA GALLERY

Armed with a mix of 19th- and 20th-century


drawings, the London dealer returns this month to
Works on Paper after a hiatus from the fair.
Ever in quest of the rare, the sought-after, and the
undiscovered, Ongpin spoke with Art+Auction
about his evolution in the trade, his market predictions, and his inds for the fairs current edition.

CALDER FOUNDATION

IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE 2015 CALDER PRIZE LAUREATE

HAROON MIRZA

Haroon Mirza, The National Apavilion of Then and Now, 2011. Courtesy hrm199 Ltd and Lisson Gallery. Photo: Omar Mirza

CALDER FOUNDATION

DATEBOOK: ASIA PACIFIC

M A N I LA

A BRIGHT LOCAL LIGHT


Art Fair Philippines (AFP), which started from humble beginnings in 2013, returns for its
fourth edition February18 through 21 at the Link, a multistory parking facility in downtown
Makatis Ayala Center. Although the fair is largely seen as a local event, its casual setting
makes for a lively and dynamic show that benefits from the loyal support of a staunch
cadre of Filipino collectors. Cofounder Trickie Lopa notes that the momentum generated
by the fair has led to a frothy gallery scene throughout the year. Galleries that specialize
in younger artiststhose out of art school for no longer than three yearsdont find it
difficult to attract an audience for their shows, and their viewers can be just as young as
their artists, says Lopa. We also see seasoned collectors constantly on the lookout for
less established talents, artists they dont need to get on a waiting list for.
Among the 40 galleries participatingup from 33 last yearare Galerie Michael Janssen
of Berlin and Singapore, Nunu Fine Art of Taipei, Edouard Malingue Gallery of Hong
Kong, and West Gallery of Manila, whose booth includes the diptych Skyshade, below, a 2015
thread on canvas by Raffy Napay. DARRYL JINGWEN WEE
TA I P E I

Early Expat
40

D H A KA , BA N G LA D ES H

Cultivation
of the New

commercial artists, which makes


it challenging for emerging artists
to build their careers.
How does the summit address
this situation?

international artists,

das is the largest research

curators, historians, and other


scholars convene in Bangladesh
February5 through 8 for the
third edition of the Dhaka Art
Summit (das), a research platform
sponsored by Nadia and Rajeeb
Samdani and their art foundation.
The couple checked in with
Art+Auctions Sara Rofino about
their efforts to build support
for artists in South Asia.

platform for South Asian art


and the only one of its kind with
no commercial agenda in the
region. Most of the South Asian
countries, except for India, face
challenges similar to Bangladeshs
when it comes to local art scenes.
There are few galleries in the
region that represent and promote
artists internationally, and few
that participate in important art
fairs where artists work can be
visible to an audience of collectors
and arts professionals who can
support them. das was created
as a facilitator for international
museums, institutions, and
curators to learn about the regions art scene. As we are
noncommercial, no one can pay
for space within the summit, so
all the artists who are exhibited
are selected by a team of curators

What are the big challenges


facing artists in Bangladesh?

Basic art infrastructure is yet


to be developed. Very few
of the galleries in Bangladesh
represent artists, nor is there
a contemporary art museum.
Appreciation for contemporary,
cutting-edge art is growing,
but still rare. Galleries tend
to show more established and

without any motivation other


than the quality of the work.
How has the summit evolved since
its first edition in 2012?

The i rst edition of das presented


only Bangladeshi artists, but
with the second edition, in 2014,
the focus shifted to the entire
South Asian region. For the
upcoming edition, the summit
is also focusing on diaspora
artists and those who have strong

connections to the region. One


example is American artist Lynda
Benglis, who has a solo project
curated by Diana Campbell
Betancourt. Benglis spent more
than 30 years living between
India and the United States, and
she still has a studio in India.
Her work also has a very strong
Indian inluence.
Are collectors involved with
the summit?

das is a noncommercial public


event with a free and ticketless
format, and the artworks are
on loan for exhibition only. It
attracts museums, institutions,
galleries, curators, journalists,
critics, and collectors from
all over the world. It is also a
platform for Bangladeshi and
South Asian collectors to see and
learn about the art from their
own region. In the upcoming
edition, over 50 speakers from
26 countries will take part
in panel discussions, which is a
great way for collectors to learn
more about South Asian art.

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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FROM TOP: TINA KENG GALLERY; RAFFY NAPAY AND ART FAIR PHILIPPINES; MANIR MRITTIK

Opening February27 and running


through March27, Tina Keng Gallery
presents a solo exhibition of works
by Chinese painter Wu Dayu, one
of the countrys i rst artists to study
in Paris. Dayus Portrait of Son,
a mid 20th-century oil on canvas,
is pictured above. SR

The Art World


At Your Fingertips
Blouin Gallery Guide is now on the go.

CHECK US OUT AT*

www.blouingalleryguide.com
*NYC only for a limited time

DATEBOOK

ALSO THIS MONTH


A

> NEW YORK

42

Up through February 27 at
Dag Modern is The Naked
and the Nude: The Body in
Indian Modern Art. Bringing
together 96 works by 37
artists, the exhibition surveys
the diverse ways in which
Indian artists have used
the nude, in its variant forms,
as a vessel for a diverse
range of ideas and emotions.
F F.N.Souza, Untitled, 1965

4
> NEW YORK
A two-volume irst edition
of the Federalist Papers
from 1788 hits the block
with an estimate of $90,000
to $120,000 as part of
the Printed & Manuscript
Americana sale at Swann
Auction Galleries. Also offered
is a newly discovered seventh
edition of the Bay Psalm

Book, 1693, believed to be the


irst book printed in North
America (est. $3040,000).
Offering 320 lots, the sale
carries a total high estimate
of $990,000. B John Andr,
A Representation of Major
John Andrgoing from
the Vulture Sloop of War,
circa1781 (est. $1525,000)

6
> BOSTON
One of the best collections
of Western art in Montana
goes under the gavel at
Skinner. The holdings of
the late Van Kirke Nelson
a prominent Montana
physicianand his wife,
Helen, comprise approximately 175 lots of Plateau
and Plains Indian artifacts,
including a Blackfoot
mans shirt from around
the 1870s, with an estimate
of $125,000 to $175,000.

D Lakota Beaded Hide


Womans Dress, circa1870s
(est. $6,0008,000)

> CLINTON,
NEW YORK
The Wellin Museum of Art at
Hamilton College presents the
largest survey in the United
States of Yun-Fei Ji, a Beijingborn watercolor painter.
His compositions, made in the
style of landscape paintings
from the Song Dynasty,
depict contemporary issues
of Chinese society. Yun-Fei
Ji: The Intimate Universe,
running through July 17,
includes more than 25 of
Jis pieces, made since 2006.
A Yun-Fei Ji, The Village
and Its Ghosts, 2014

12
> LOS ANGELES
Now in its fourth year, the
LA Art Book Fair runs
February 12 through 14 at

14
> CHICAGO
Van Goghs Bedrooms at
the Art Institute of Chicago
centers on the troubled artists
famed stay in a violet-walled
room in a yellow house
in southern France. Drawing
on three paintings Vincent
van Gogh made of this space
between 1888 and 1889, the
show includes nearly 36 works
B

11
> ROTTERDAM
Art Rotterdam Week runs
February 10 through 14 with
pop-up shows, an architectural
tour of the 1920s-era Van
Nelle Fabriek, the irst
exhibition of Ugo Rondinones
sculptures in the Netherlands,
and an evening dedicated
to Allen Ginsberg, hosted
by Galerie West and held at
the Arminius conference
center with a performance by
the Mondriaan Quartet. Also
part of the weeks events
are two fairs: Art Rotterdam
and the Rotterdam Contemporary Art Fair.

> CHICAGO
C

block, including pieces by


Charles and Ray Eames and
George Nelson. G Set of
three Steelframe cabinets by
George Nelson & Associates
(est. $2,0003,000)

Wright brings another


selection of 20th-century
American design to the

the Geffen Contemporary


at moca . Some 300
independent publishers
from the United States and
abroad present an array
of artist books for sale,
including monographs,
zines, and catalogues.
Organized by New Yorks
Printed Matter, last years
Los Angeles spinoff of the
fair, which has taken place
in New York since 2005,
attracted nearly 35,000
visitors. Among this years
exhibitors are Oaklands
Creative Growth, Onestar
Press of Paris, and Japans
Komiyama Tokyo.

by the artist as well as items


he owned. This look into Van
Goghs intimate space runs
until May 8. C Vincent van
Gogh, The Bedroom, 1889

15
> MUSCAT, OMAN
idf Oman, now in its third
year, includes exhibitors
both local and international
showing examples of interior
design, decor, and furnishings,
with a special section of more
than 50 Italian vendors. The
fair will occupy Muscats
Oman International Exhibition
Centre through the 17th.

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: YUN-FEI JI AND JAMES COHAN, NEW YORK; SWANN GALLERIES; THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO

NOW ON VIEW

> STOCKHOLM
The Stockholm International
Antiques Fair hosts a roster
of more than 200 dealers
in ine art, contemporary
design, antiques, and
curiosities at the Stockholm Exhibition and
Congress Center, running
through February 21.

18
> PALM BEACH
Georgia OKeeffe, Marguerite
Zorach, Florine Stettheimer,
and Helen Torr are the
subjects of a survey at the
Norton Museum of Art
exploring the role played by
identity and gender in the
work of these four female
modernists and the inluence
each had on the others.

19
> HOUSTON
The work of the late William
N. Copley is the focus of The
World According to CPLY at
the Menil Collection through
July 24. The artists irst
museum retrospective in the
United States, the show traces
the self-taught painters career
from the 1950s to the 90s,
with roughly 100 examples
of his paintings and works
on paper. Copley was also
an avid collector, and the
exhibition is complemented by
artworks that he once owned.

24
> MADRID
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: SKINNER; PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART; WRIGHT; DAG MODERN

Their art is being displayed


together for the irst time in
OKeeffe, Stettheimer, Torr,
Zorach: Women Modernists
in New York, open
through May 15. E Florine
Stettheimer, Spring Sale
at Bendels, 1921

Almost 40 galleries are


participating in this years
Art Madrid fair, which
marks its 11th edition at
the Galera de Cristal de
CentroCentro Cibeles
through February 28.
Galleries displaying 20thcentury and contemporary
art include Barcelonas
Galera Alonso Vidal,

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

43

the local Galera Kreisler,


and Gallery Kaplanon 5
of Athens. Participating
in the One Project section,
which brings speciically
curated and commissioned
exhibitions to the space,
are Galerie Voss of
Dsseldorf, Espacio Nuca
from Salamanca, and
six other galleries.

> MARRAKECH
The sixth Marrakech
Biennale is organized around

the theme of Not New


Now, an exploration of
arts role in the present,
rather than the future or
past. Curated by Reem
Fadda, associate curator of
Middle Eastern art for the
Solomon R. Guggenheims
Abu Dhabi project, the
event takes place in venues
throughout the city, with
site-speciic commissions by
international artists at the
El Badi and Bahia palaces.
Through May 8.

26
> VIENNA
Chagall to Malevich: The
Russian Avant-Gardes,
running until June 26 at the
Albertina, includes 130 works
by 20th-century Russian artists,
such as Natalia Goncharova
and Wassily Kandinsky alongside Kazimir Malevich and
Marc Chagall. The exhibition
traces the creative processes
of the artists and their varied
stylistic development.

CULTURE+TRAVEL

44

Mumbai

Home to the Bollywood film industry, the city previously known as Bombay also serves as Indias financial powerhouse while containing Asias
largest forest in an urban space. Amid extremes of rich and poor, the community comes to life during the annual Kala Ghoda Arts Festival, a nine-day
event commencing February 6 and showcasing a display of art, music, theater, and literature in venues across South Mumbai. BY EKTA MARWAHA

SEE

the Tao Art Gallery,


February9 through 15.

Q Located in the citys


cultural hub, the
Jehangir Art Gallery is
globally recognized as a
center for contemporary
Indian art. The gallery
sponsors the Monsoon
Art Show, which takes
place between July
and August, to promote
the work of emerging
artists across India.
Look for The Scape
and Scope, a group
show of paintings,
sculptures, and installations at Jehangir and

161 KALAGHODA
91-22-2284-3989
jehangirartgallery.com

Q The National Gallery


of Modern Art, Mumbai
exhibits an eclectic
mix of works by M.F.
Husain, Raja Ravi Varma,
and Pablo Picasso,
among others. Housed
in a historic building,
the venue was a prominent location for
concerts and meetings
through the 1950s. However, it suffered from

years of neglect until an


extensive restoration
saw it reopen in 1996 as
a gallery intended to
promote evolving trends
in Indian culture.
MAHATMA GANDHI
ROAD
91-22-2288-1969
ngmaindia.gov.in

Q The Chhatrapati
Shivaji Maharaj Vastu
Sangrahalaya is a
museum that appeals to
both art and history
enthusiasts, situated
across from the National
Gallery of Modern Art

at the citys southern


edge. The building,
designed in the IndoSaracenic style, is home
to a collection of more
than 60,000 art objects
and is always abuzz
with activity. Ancient
Indian art is on display in
the Stone Sculpture
Gallery, which includes
works from the nearby
Elephanta Caves.
Pieces from Nepal and
Tibet are also on show.
159-161 MAHATMA
GANDHI ROAD
91-22-2284-4484
csmvs.in

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FROM TOP: TRUSTEES, CHHATRAPATI SHIVAJI MAHARAJ VASTU SANGRAHALAYA, MUMBAI; GARRETT ZIEGLER VIA FLICKR

1 The Chhatrapati Shivaji


Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya museum. 2 Indian
cuisine is the specialty
of Masala Kraft at the
Taj Mahal Palace hotel.
3 The Oberoi, Mumbai
hotel overlooking the
Arabian Sea. 4 The Kala
Ghoda Arts Festival
features displays such as
these ceramic shoes.
5 A suite at the Trident,
Nariman Point. 6The
Jehangir Art Gallery
entrance. 7Camouflage
Harvest, an installation
by Lalit Patil at the 2011
Kala Ghoda Arts Festival.

45

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: OBEROI HOTELS & RESORTS; HARINI CALAMUR VIA FLICKR;
OBEROI HOTELS & RESORTS; JUST.IN VIA FLICKR; WIKIPEDIA

STAY
Q Set in the citys
heritage precinct, the
Residency Hotel is
less than a mile from the
Chhatrapati Shivaji
Terminus station
and a short walk from
attractions like the
Colaba Causeway. The
hotels faade evokes
an old-world charm
with its triumphal stone
architecture. The on-site
restaurant has a colonial feel with wooden
seating and arched openings to the street; inside,
vintage photographs
decorate the walls.
26, CORNER OF D.N.
ROAD AND RUSTOM
SIDHWA MARG
91-22-6667-0555
residencyhotel.com

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

Q The 35-story Trident,


Nariman Point provides
panoramic views
of Marine Drive (or the
queens necklace,
as the promenade
is popularly known).
The hotel offers spacious
rooms, impeccable
service, and the awardwinning restaurants
Frangipani and India
Jones. Guests can
pamper sore muscles
at the spa.
NARIMAN POINT
91-22-6632-4343
tridenthotels.com

Q Next door to the


Trident, the Oberoi,
Mumbai is a luxe
hotel that enjoys similar
Marine Drive views.
The propertys centerpiece is a white-marble-

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

wrapped lobby featuring


floor-to-ceiling windows,
and the hotels rooms,
restaurants, and spa,
with their emphasis on
sleek surfaces and
natural light, follow the
same stylish aesthetic.
NARIMAN POINT
91-22-6632-5757
oberoihotels.com

EAT
Q The Kala Ghoda Caf
is a quaint coffee
shop located in the heart
of Mumbais cultural
district. Its cozy,
art-lined interiors create
a gallery-like setting.
On offer are a range of
coffees, teas, and
small bites, along with a
breakfast menu that
includes both traditional

RAMPART ROW

QDont miss the chance


to take a culinary tour
around the historic
fort area to discover the
host of Persian-style
cafs tucked along the
narrow lanes. Serving
distinct and intricate
Parsi cuisine, these
vintage establishments
were the irst to introduce Irani chai and bun
maska. As Bombay
expanded under British
rule, so did the cafs,
but today the legacy is
fast disappearing.
Britannia and Company
Restaurant offers the
opportunity to indulge
in classics such as patrani
machi and berry pulav.

QNo visit to South


Mumbai is complete
without seeing the
Gateway of India, a
monument overlooking
the Arabian Sea, and
when there, its almost
impossible to miss the
nearby Taj Mahal Palace
hotel. The iconic property exudes opulence,
and houses some
of the inest restaurants
in the city. One such
spot is Masala Kraft,
known for exquisite
North Indian cuisine with
a modern twist. The
fusion of Western
ingredients and traditional Indian flavors
makes this a must-visit.

LEVEL 2, 30K

BALLARD ESTATE,

THE TAJ MAHAL PALACE

DUBASH MARG

OPPOSITE NEW

APOLLO BUNDER

91-22-4915-0000

CUSTOM HOUSE

91-22-6665-3366

theirishhouse.in

91-22-2261-5264

tajhotels.com

Indian cuisine and


Continental options.
10 ROPEWALK LANE
91-22-2263-3866
kgcafe.in

Q After a long day


walking through
galleries, head to the
Irish House, located in a
charming heritage
building in Mumbais
cultural center, for
a refreshing respite.
Choose from fresh draft
beers straight out of
wooden kegs and
sample fare like ish and
chips while watching
local and international
sports on the big screen.

THE WORLDS
LEADING MEDIA GROUP
FOR ART, CULTURE, TRAVEL, LUXURY & STYLE

For more information, visit us at LouiseBlouinMedia.com

@artinfodotcom

@ARTINFO

@blouin_artinfo

@blouinartinfo

@blouinartinfo

ONTHEBLOCK
BY JUDD TULLY

FEBRUARY 2016

WHAT TO LOOK FOR AT AUCTION

47

HENRI MATISSE
La leon de piano, 1923

Oil on canvas
IMPRESSIONIST
& MODERN ART
EVENING SALE
SOTHEBYS LONDON
February 3
EST. 12MILLION
TO 18MILLION
($17.826.7MILLION)

LO N D O N

SOTHEBYS

Assuming a Quieter Profile

s 2016 dawns, the auction


specialists usual hyperbole
predicting record prices
for their hard-won wares
is strikingly absent. The
combination of unrelenting art market
action and tumultuous world events has
coalesced into a less conident market,

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

populated by experts that are acutely


aware of its long-running success.
Jay Vincze, the Christies London head
of Impressionist and modern art, links
the tentative atmosphere to the glut
of quality material lured to the block by
ever-climbing prices. Theres so much
choice around these days that buyers can

afford to be selective and wait for something that really ticks the boxes for
people, Vincze observes. If something is
not quite right, theyll wait for another
moment and let other pieces slide.
Despite the cautious atmosphere, the art
market soldiers on, collectors ready to pick
and choose whatever is best and brightest.

ONTHEBLOCK

FEBRUARY 2

CHRISTIES

IMPRESSIONIST & MODERN ART

Unlike its New York relation,


Christies London is still
staging its evening sale the same
week as that of archrival Sothebys.
Star lots include Paul
Czannes ravishing oil Ferme
en Normandie, t (Hattenville),
1882 (est. 4.56.5million;
$6.79.7million), depicting the
garden of the house belonging to
Victor Chocquet, an early Czanne
champion and the subject of
numerous portraits, who once
owned 33 of the artists works.
Its trademark Czanne for that
period, says specialist Jay
Vincze. The painting last sold at
Sothebys London in June 1997
for 2.8million ($4.7million).
Just on the cusp of the artists
move to abstraction, a transitional period Wassily Kandinsky,
Strasse in Murnau, 1908, depicts
a bustling street scene and
carries an estimate of 1.5million
to 2.5million ($2.23.7million).
The house is also offering
Fernand Lgers Cubist-style
LeMoteur, 1918, left (est.

46million; $69million),
brimming with strong color, crisp
geometry, and the symbolic power
of the postwar Machine Age.
In November 2001 a larger version
with the same title and from the
same year sold for $16.7million,
then an artist record, at Christies
New York as part of the Ren
Gaff single-owner sale.
Another highlight from the
WorldWarI era, Ernst Ludwig
Kirchners Expressionist Bahnhof
Knigstein, 1916, is pegged at
1.5million to 2million
($2.23million). The valuation
reflects the fresh-to-market
status of the work, which has
been in the same German
collection since it was acquired
directly from the artist the
year it was painted.
An iconic 1928 Marc Chagall,
Les maris de la Tour Eiffel,
depicting the artist and his wife,
Bella, flying across Paris, the Eiffel
Tower prominent in the background, is estimated at 4.8million
to 6.8million ($710million).

<

Theres so much choice around


these days that buyers can afford to
be selective and wait for something that really ticks the boxes,
observes Jay Vincze of Christies.
FEBRUARY 2 O CHRISTIES
THE ART OF THE SURREAL

BOTH IMAGES: CHRISTIES

In the houses separate-catalogue Surrealist sale, held the same


evening as the Impressionist and modern art auction, the scale
and period fast-forwards significantly to Joan Mirs exuberantly giddy
and color-charged Femme et oiseaux dans la nuit, 1968, right,
measuring nearly four feet wide. Reflecting this seasons moderated
expectations, the painting carries an estimate of 3million to 5million
($4.57.5million), despite having earned 5.2million ($7.8million)
on an estimate of 4million to 6million ($5.98.9million) in its last
appearance on the block, in June 2010, at the same house.
In somber contrast, thanks to its unusual gray, black, and white
palette, Pablo Picassos small-scaled yet power-packed Arlequin, 1926,
is estimated at 1.5million to 2.5million ($2.23.7million).
Organized under the direction of Christies deputy chairman Olivier
Camu, this 15th edition of the Surrealism sale also features a firstrate Ren Magritte, Mesdemoiselles de lIsle Adam, 1942, dazzling with
its trompe loeil devices and the outlines of two cloud-covered
women admiring a dove in flight (est. 23million; $34.5million).

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 3 O SOTHEBYS O
IMPRESSIONIST & MODERN ART

Sothebys, and has been in the same collection since 1927.


It carries an estimate of 12million to 18million ($1827million).
The house is also championing a large-scale Franz Marc landscape from 1909, Grosse Landschaft I (Large Landscape I), above,
depicting a verdant pasture dominated by a group of four magnificent
stallions. Estimated at 4million to 6million ($5.98.9million),
the work predates Wassily Kandinskys 1911 Blaue Reiter treatise yet
captures the spirit and boldly chromatic palette of the movement
that would take that name. Writing later of Marc, who died during
WorldWarI, Kandinsky observed that the artist had a direct, intimate
relationship with nature like a mountaineer or even an animal.
Also on the modern front, Francis Picabias striking machinist
composition from his experimentally rich Dada period, Le ventilateur,
1917, is estimated at 1.8million to 2.5million ($2.73.7million).

Top-shelf works by Henri Matisse of almost any stripe are


increasingly rare to market, so the entry of La leon de piano,
1923, is a welcome highlight. The painting captures the remarkable,
densely patterned and outfitted interior of the artists apartment
and studio, the intimate setting animated by Henriette Darricarrre,
the artists favorite model of the period, who is seated and playing
at the upright piano, accompanied by her two brothers in striped
shirts. Painted not long after the artists move to Nice, the canvas
is rarer still for its Scottish provenance, having belonged to noted
collector Royan Middleton. It is in perfect condition, says James
Mackie, London deputy head of Impressionist and modern art at

FEBRUARY 3

SOTHEBYS

THE ART OF THE SURREAL

ALL IMAGES: SOTHEBYS

The evening features a


separate-catalogue Surrealist
component, led in part by
Magrittes page-size gouache-onpaper Shhrazade, from 1956,
featuring the penetrating eyes and
lipsticked mouth of a disembodied
pearl woman hovering in a pink
sky. It was acquired directly by
Chicago collector Barnet Hodes as
a commissioned work. Last sold
at Sothebys London in June 2006
for 400,000 ($740,000), it is
currently estimated at 500,000
to 700,000 ($745,0001million).
Weve seen a real depth in the
market for the later gouaches,
says Mackie. Theres a refinement
of what Magrittes about.
Sothebys is also offering
sculptures by Salvador Dal and
Man Ray, making for a fascinating
case study on the subject of the
Greco-Roman goddess Aphrodite/

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

Venus as a Surrealist object.


Dals interpretation, Venus de
Milo aux tiroirs (est. 400
600,000; $600900,000), left,
with the torso consisting of a chest
of drawers, is a painted bronze
with ermine pompons and is dated
1964. It stands 38 inches high.
Dal painted the bronze white
so it deceptively appears to be
made from marble, as was the
2ndcentury B.C. Greek original on
which it was based. When it was
first conceived, in 1936, the
sculpture was modeled in plaster.
An example from the edition
of five last sold at Christies
London in February 2007 for
240,000 ($471,000).
Man Rays kissing cousin,
Vnus restaure, right, an assemblage comprising a readymade
plaster set on a metal base
and restrained by rope, is dated

1936/71, indicating that this iteration hails from a later Arturo


Schwarz edition of 10, plus artist
proofs (est. 350500,000;
$687981,000). Ray was closely
involved with the regeneration of
the 1936 object. The work, based
on the Medici Venus in the Galleria
degli Uffizi in Florence, is bound
by rope, instilling a Marquis de
Sade element to the classic figure,
Rays play on sexuality and beauty.

49

ONTHEBLOCK

FEBRUARY 9 O PHILLIPS O
20TH-CENTURY & CONTEMPORARY ART

The mix, says Hugues


Joffre of Phillips,
is more postwar,
principally European,
so its going to have
a very different look.

BOTH IMAGES: PHILLIPS

50

Usually freighted with cutting-edge


contemporary art, sales at Phillips are
changing course, thanks in part to the
guidance of Hugues Joffre, the ex-Christies
specialist who is now European and U.K.
chairman for the house.
This sale is topped by a stunning and
pristine kaolin-on-canvas Achrome by Piero
Manzoni, dating from around 1958 and
bearing a 5.5million-to-6.5million ($8.2
9.7million) estimate. It last sold in October
2000 at Sothebys London for 465,500
($675,000). Phillipss strong suit of postwar
Italian art also includes Alberto Burris Legno,
1959, a flame-heated abstraction in oil and
wood on canvas estimated at 1.8million
to 2.5million ($2.73.7million), and Marino
Marinis classic bronze Cavaliere, 1947,
at 800,000 to 1.2million ($1.21.8million).
Other European front-runners include
a brawny, black Pierre Soulages, Peinture:
14Avril 1962, below, at 2.5million to
3.5million ($3.75.2million), as well as a
thickly impastoed painting Tower Block
Hampstead Road, 2007, right, by School of
London icon Frank Auerbach, pegged
at 700,000 to 1million
($11.5million).
The mix, says Joffre,
is more postwar, principally
European, so its going to
have a very different look.
All of it is privately sourced
and hasnt been seen
for 15 years. An exception
is a 2011 text-saturated
painting in oil, charcoal,
and graphite by Glenn Ligon,
Stranger in the Village. It
was inspired by James
Baldwins smoldering essay
of the same title, penned
in 1955, about his
experience visiting a tiny,
remote Swiss village.
The work is estimated at
1.2million to 1.6million
($1.82.4million).

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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FREE
UNLIMITED SEARCHES OF

5.7 MILLION LOTS


DATING BACK TO 1922.

basi.artinfo.com

ONTHEBLOCK

52

Hoping to continue the houses


extraordinary run from the November
sale in New York of Alexander Calder works
from the Arthur and Anita Kahn collection,
Christies this time offers the artists Crag
with Yellow Boomerang and Red Eggplant,
below, a standing mobile in painted sheet
metal and wire from 1974. The nearly eightfoot-tall piece is estimated at 500,000
to 700,000 ($745,0001million).
The houses star lot is the rare-to-market
Francis Bacon Two Figures, 1975, right,
consigned by the artists close friend and
biographer Michael Peppiatt, whose Francis
Bacon in Your Blood: A Memoir was published
last year. The painting depicts two nude
male figures entwined in a passionate embrace
and seemingly tumbling downward at top
speed, as if miming the sexual abandonment
of their embrace. They are contained in
a kind of gridded cage reminiscent of Alberto
Giacomettis Palace at 4A.M. The painting
brings to mind both Michelangelo and
Eadweard Muybridge, with its fleshy curves
and locomotion, capturing the intensity of the
artists relationship with George Dyer, his
muse and lover who committed suicide on the
eve of Bacons major retrospective at the
Grand Palais in 1971. The painting followed a
harrowing series, the so-called Black
Triptychs, which reflected Bacons grief over
the death of Dyer; this work appears to
break off from that tragedy. The canvas
originally contained another section depicting
a male dwarf watching the lovers in what
must have been a disturbing and voyeuristic
vein. That separated section is now titled
Portrait of a Dwarf. After Peppiatt acquired
the work in its entirety directly from Bacon in
1975, the artist took it back, cut the canvas,
and returned the revision to Peppiatt, who
has owned it ever since. It is estimated
at 5million to 7million ($7.510.4million).

A mini single-owner sale of painting and


sculpture from Belgian architect Marc
Corbiaus collection of Minimalist-flavored
work is led in part by Lucio Fontanas purewhite Concetto spaziale, attese, 1964, at
1.2million to 1.8million ($1.82.7million).
There is also Yayoi Kusamas Infinity Nets
OQWWS, an oil on canvas from 2006 bearing
the artists dense, allover-patterned abstract
style of gray-white dots, set at 500,000 to
700,000 ($745,0001million), and an
apartment-scale Donald Judd relief sculpture,
Untitled (Menziken 87-52), 1987, estimated at
200,000 to 300,000 ($298447,000).
Even with the dramatic Bacon, Christies is
taking a cautious approach to the season,
according to Francis Outred, the firms
European head of postwar and contemporary
art. Were shooting for less flashy, more
humble sales, and taking relatively few risks,
Outred says. Well have fewer lots and lower
overall value but potentially higher overall
return in the end. In that respect the auction
catalogue itself will be downsized from
Manhattan-telephone-book scale to something
more modest, old-style, and easy to carry.

BOTH IMAGES: CHRISTIES

FEBRUARY 11 O CHRISTIES O
POSTWAR & CONTEMPORARY ART,
INCLUDING WORKS FROM THE
COLLECTION OF MARC CORBIAU

Were shooting for less lashy, more humble


sales, and taking relatively few risks, says
Francis Outred, European head of postwar
and contemporary art at Christies.
ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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ONTHEBLOCK

54

Highlights range from Adrian


Ghenies Sunflowers in
1937, 2014, above, a more-thannine-foot-square oil on canvas
infused with the terrible history of
Nazi-era destruction of
degenerate art (est. 400
600,000; $596895,000), to
Jean-Michel Basquiats late but
energized Despus de un puo,
1987, right, in acrylic, oil stick, and
Xerox collage on canvas (est.
68million; $8.911.9million).
The seven-foot-tall canvas
featuring a top-hatted, skeletal
figure amidst a blizzard of cryptic
text and invented symbols
somehow escaped notice when it
was displayed in the Modern
section of the Armory Show in
March 2013 by Tokyos Galerie
Sho Contemporary Art, where it
was offered at $13million.
The house is also offering a
grandly scaled Gerhard Richter,
Abstraktes Bild (725-4), 1990,
right. More than seven feet wide
and six feet tall, it carries an
estimate of 14million to
20million ($20.829.8million).
Sothebys set Richters record last
February when a 1986 abstract
painting fetched 30.4million
($46.3million). People probably
think theres a never-ending
supply of large Richter abstracts,

says Alex Branczik, head of


contemporary art at Sothebys
London, but of the larger
paintings, a lot are in museums.
Theres also a star School of
London offering with Lucian
Freuds captivating portrait
Pregnant Girl, 1961, depicting the
cropped visage of the napping
18-year-old Bernardine Coverley,
bare-breasted, her face in profile,
a coverlet over her abdomen.
Coverley died in 2011 at age 68,
four days after Freuds own death.
Its a modern-day Venus,
observes Branczik, embracing
the theme of birth and life. The
painting (est. 710million; $10.4
14.9million) was last publicly
exhibited as one of 130 works in
the Freud show in Londons
National Portrait Gallery in 2012.

ALL IMAGES: SOTHEBYS

FEBRUARY 10 O SOTHEBYS
CONTEMPORARY ART

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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INTHESTUDIO

Nicola Tyson in her New Paltz,


New York, studio, 2015,
surrounded by her first largerscale sculptural works.

BY CHLOE WYMA

PHOTOGRAPHS BY KRISTINE LARSEN

57

the Body
From photographs of Londons postpunk scene in the early 1980s to
sculptures hewn from an apple tree that fell in her yard in Upstate NewYork,
Nicola Tysons work has long challenged the limits of the figure
BLOUINARTINFO.COM

| FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

INTHESTUDIO

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: TWO IMAGES, NICOLA TYSON AND PETZEL, NEW YORK

58

ITS OFTEN SAID that Nicola Tysons work explores gender,


sexuality, and the body. But it doesnt so much explore these
issues as cannibalize them, excreting heady, unnerving images
illed with playful invention and excoriating humor.
Born and raised in London, Tyson relocated to New York
in 1990, where she became known for her paintings of
anatomically scrambled, acid-hued iguresoften, though
not exclusively, femalein various states of bodily ecstasy
and disintegration. Known primarily as a painter, Tyson
is putting down her brush for the time being, preparing
drawings for her upcoming show at Friedrich Petzels uptown
space in NewYork, which runs March2 through April9.
The artists rustic, Shaker-style farmhouse in New Paltz,
New York, is outitted with multiple work spaces to
accommodate her protean practice, which over the years has
included photography, ilm, sculpture, writing, and
performance. Off the hallway is Tysons drawing depot,
where the walls and worktables are covered with variously
sized works on paper teeming with alien landscapes and
willowy creatures. Downstairs is a painting studio where
the artist is experimenting with acrylic works painted onto
glass and transferred to paper. In a freestanding cottage a
stones throw from the main house, Tyson has a wood shop,
where she is working on ive larger-than-life anthropomorphic sculptures made from wood salvaged from a felled
apple tree, the stump of which is still visible in her front yard.
Tysons home and studio seem worlds away from NewYork
City, though they are only a two-hour drive north. In front
of her house is a barn where she keeps
Clockwise from top:
donkeys, and the dining room windows
Figure and Ploughed
look out onto a brook. When I visited
Field, an oil on linen,
1994; Pre non snow
in December, Tyson showed me
storm self-portrait, in
photos of the spot where an enterprising
graphite on paper,
2015; the basement
beaver had recently constructed an
studio where the artist
architecturally imposing dam.
is perfecting her
monoprint technique.
Tysons surroundings are undeniably

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

59

idyllic, but theres nothing at all quaint about her drawings.


Some of her characters are hulking and tuberous, with oversize
hands and feet; others are spidery and attenuated. Playing
on the outskirts of iguration, these creatures are imbued with
a strange liveliness. I really try to have the drawings be
somehow sentient, even if theyre not clearly a recognizable
thing, she says. Tysons golems and grotesques seem
suspended in Brownian motion, an effect achieved through
her fast-paced, improvisational working method.
When I start drawing I dont know whats going to
happen, she explains. I want to stay ahead of the decisionmaking, rational mind, of language, of anything thats

her relationship to drawing, something she used to conceive of


as a private practice. Theres a slightly performative aspect to
it now. It is no longer this reclusive thing that I am doing alone.
Downstairs, Tyson is revisiting the monoprint technique
she started experimenting with in the early 2000s. Working
rapidly with acrylic, she paints directly onto a glass plate
and then uses an ink roller to apply the image onto paper
using varying degrees of pressure to achieve different textures
and effects. Her early explorations of this technique
culminated in a series of emotionally raw, physiognomically
unhinged portraits shown at Petzel in 2003. Several of
these Portrait Heads will be included in her upcoming
show there. Revisiting this
method, with its combination of
fast-drying paint and lack
of preparatory drawing, allows
Tyson to remain intuitive. Im a
colorist, too, she says.
In the cottage, Tyson is fashioning the sculptures out of the
apple tree wood. These twisted, carbuncular igures, which
will be freestanding once they are inished, could easily have
walked out of one of Tysons drawings. Apple wood is so
expressive and beautiful, she says. Its pink, and all the
bugs that were underneath have made these traceries.
Enchanted with their natural textures, Tyson is assembling the
lumber piecesmany of which already resemble torsos and
limbsinto deliberately crude skeletons, manipulating her
raw materials as little as possible. Building on the delicate

Tysons golems and grotesques seem suspended in


Brownian motion, an effect achieved through
her fast-paced, improvisational working method.
about naming things or directing me. I have no idea what
Im going to draw until something starts to appear. In order to
avoid fussiness and pedantry, Tyson starts and inishes her
smaller drawings in one go. One of my rules is that I do it in
one sitting, and that is that. There is no going back in.
In early 2015, Tyson began posting one of her drawings
every day on social media, and she even made a group of square
drawings to accommodate the Instagram format. Social
media was a way to share them and have a conversation beyond
the gallery, she says. Moreover, the experience transformed

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| FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

Preparing a suite
of works for the
upcoming show at
Petzel gallery.

INTHESTUDIO

A collection of
Portrait Heads
from 200203, right,
being compiled
for inclusion in the
catalogue for the
exhibition at Petzel.
Below, from left:
Tysons explorations
of the figure include
Nude, a 2005
oil and charcoal on
linen, and Kiss,
a 2015 graphite on
paper piece.

avian sculptures molded from Crayola Model Magic (a lightweight, fast-drying childrens clay) that she exhibited in 2011,
the timber sculptures are Tysons irst serious foray into
making large-scale objects. I dont want to be pigeonholed
as a painter because I actually want to develop sculpture
now, she says. I really want to make things in space.
In 1979, at the age of 18, Tyson enrolled at the Chelsea
School of Art in London to study graphic design. Just
before enrolling there, she began photographing the nascent
postpunk scene surrounding Billys nightclub, a gay dive
and discotheque in the Soho neighborhood. Exhibited at
White Columns in New York in 2012 and at Sadie Coles HQ
in London in 2013, her snapshots of Londons young,
broke, and glamorousincluding a teenage Boy George
document a transitional moment in British subculture,
as the dark nihilism of punk gave way to the sartorial theater
of the New Romantics. Punk had gone mainstream and
most of the big players were off touring, Tyson explains.
The younger fan base, people like myself and Boy George,

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BOTTOM TWO IMAGES: NICOLA TYSON AND PETZEL

60

wanted that energy. So it became about dressing up.


Tyson would sell her photographs back to her subjects for
beer money, but she remained merely an observer of the pageantry. I didnt dress up like they did, she says. It came out
later in my painting. Im interested in reinventing the body,
but that comes up in my work rather than in my appearance.
After a year in art school, Tyson dropped out and fell in
with Londons underground art and music scene, freelancing
as a music photographer, making Super 8
ilms (posey, early-80s things she
calls them), and playing backup percussion
in an art band. It was a performance
thing, she remembers. We used to
enrage people at clubs. Theres this Gertrude Stein poem
called If I Told Him thats several minutes long, and
the front man, Bertie Marshall, would recite it and Id just
be banging a cymbal or something.
It was all really exploratory, Tyson says of this period.
I wasnt working within any kind of artistic framework.
There was just a lot of aesthetic indulgence and general
mucking about. Before the era of Saatchi, Tate, and the
yba s when art became the thing that truckloads of

people were coming to seethis unoficial underground


scene offered an alternative to Britains small, sclerotic
art world. There wasnt really an art scene in London.
It was really fusty, she remembers. Art schools were
churning out all these people every year, but there
was nowhere to go because the art scene was so tiny and
academic. All the energy was in fashion and music and
design. Meanwhile, Britains art establishment still

Im interested in reinventing the body, but that comes


up in my work rather than in my appearance.
constellated around two towering male igures: this
weird, old-fashioned, cliquey, alcoholic, gay world around
Francis Bacon and the horrible straight world around
Lucian Freud and his many children and women.
In 1986 Tyson returned to art school to study painting at
Central Saint Martins. There, she had a generative encounter
with feminist theory in the writings of Judith Butler, Hlne
Cixous, and Luce Irigaray. It was like discovering a new
continent, she says. Instead of that weird feeling of having

The artist in her


monoprint studio.
Tyson began developing her monoprint technique
in the early aughts,
and has recently
revisited the process
one that enables
her to make decisions intuitively.

61

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| FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

INTHESTUDIO

Right: Self-Portrait
Singing, 2002, one
of Tysons first
monoprint works,
from the Portrait
Heads series.
Below: A selection
of works on paper.

showing other artists, Tyson returned to


painting, struggling to ind a way of
writing the body, as she puts it, that was
informed by feminist theory and politics
without being overdetermined by them.
When I inally stopped doing the gallery,
she says, I found that I was wanting
to work in this completely unguided way,
to clear away the language to see what
would come in.
Today Tyson is counted, in the
company of the late Maria Lassnig, her
contemporary Eisenman, and the younger
painter Dana Schutz, in a group of female
artists who have revitalized igurative
painting from what was once seen as a
dowdy anachronism to a seemingly bottomless source of creative expression and
experimentation. After a 1998 solo
exhibition of Tysons paintings at the
Kunsthalle Zurich, her work has been
acquired by major art museums including

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TOP: NICOLA TYSON AND PETZEL

62

to work in the margins of mens worlds, to be an


honorary man and work out how you can make a
little space for yourself in the big argument,
suddenly this whole thing busted open.
Tyson has engaged with feminism throughout
her career. Since her irst commercial show in 1995,
her work has been regularly compared to that
of Bacon, Egon Schiele, and Hans Bellmer, famous
male modernists known for emotional histrionics
and corporal dismemberment. Keenly aware of
this irony, over the past several years Tyson authored
a series of witty, often scathing irst-person letters
to dead male artists, among them Pablo Picasso,
Edouard Manet, and Bacon. Tyson has read these
missives aloud as a performance and collected them
in Dead Letter Men, a limited-edition book
published last year by Petzel and Sadie Coles HQ.
Put off by Britains parochial, male-dominated
art world, Tyson left London for New York in
1990, shortly after graduating. With the patronage
of a girlfriend, she opened Trial Balloon, a project
space exclusively showing female artists, out
of her downtown studio loft. It was an all-woman
space, but not in an old-school feminist way,
Tyson explains. It was a kind of punky, British
fuck youtaking the feminism to an excessive
extreme to make it more rebellious. It was cheeky.
We were having a good time, and we werent
going to waste time promoting men, because they
have already had enough breaks. The space
became a hub for New Yorks then emerging scene
of lesbian artists and writers, among them
Nicole Eisenman, Patricia Cronin, and Tysons
current partner, writer Laurie Weeks.
After three years running Trial Balloon and

the Museum of Modern Art in


New York, the Philadelphia
Museum of Art, and Tate
Modern in London. She shows
regularly in New York and
London and has exhibited extensively in museums and
galleries worldwide. In 2014 she joined Susanne Vielmetter
Los Angeles Projects and had her irst solo exhibition at the
gallery, Trouble in Happiness.
In the early 1990s, however, Tysons anthropophagic
iguration was hardly a recipe for commercial or critical
success. Painting was uncool, and autobiography and
expression were also considered completely redundant,
she remembers. I thought it was suicide in a sense, and
I thought nobody would be interested commercially, but I
ended up with Friedrich Petzel because he happened to
come to my studio and was really interested in some of the
weird things that were going on in the images.
I was incredibly intrigued by her paintings, which
seemed so enigmatic and inaccessible to me, says Petzel,
who began representing Tyson in 1995. Painting was
almost invisible in those years. She was not only one of the
irst artists I asked to join my very new gallery, but she
was certainly the irst successful painter in my program.
We had many discussions about women artists in those
years and she encouraged me to visit Lassnig in Vienna.
This inexhaustible weirdness is what keeps Tyson inspired,
whatever her medium. Figuration can so easily go wrong,
she says. I like that kind of risk of embarrassment. With
abstraction, to do it really well you have to be really good, but
at the same time theres sort of a set of moves that are familiar.
Its this game where you do really well or you fail, but with
iguration you can keep inventing and pushing it. It can easily
be hokey or just crap. Walking on that edge is fun.

Below: Untitled (sketch


book page) #35, 2006, which
was completed in a single
sitting, as are all of Tysons
smaller drawings. Right:
At work in the studio.

63

RIGHT: NICOLA TYSON AND PETZEL

Today Tyson is counted, in the company


of the late Maria Lassnig, her contemporary
Nicole Eisenman, and the younger painter
Dana Schutz, in a group of female artists
who have revitalized igurative painting
from what was once seen as a dowdy anachronism to a seemingly bottomless source
of creative expression and experimentation.
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| FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

64

BY HUNTER BR AITHWAITE

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

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The waterfront Bund


district; below, the
Art021 after-party,
with artist Hayden
Dunham performing as QT at
Qiao Zhibings KTV.
Opposite, from top:
The third edition of
Art021 Shanghai, in
the Shanghai Exhibition Center; the
citys skyline, 2015.

FROM TOP: WIKICOMMONS; ART021 SHANGHAI CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR.


OPPOSITE FROM TOP: ART021 SHANGHAI CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR; JASON MRACHINA VIA FLICKR

65

66

Right: Mustafa Hulusis


Pomegranates No.1,
2014, on view that year
in the exhibition Bites
Back, at Art Labor.
Below: Installation view
of Rania Hos 50 Ways
to Leave Your Lover,
2013an inflatable
car, a video installation,
ripstop nylon, an airblower, and Velcroin
the 2014 exhibition
Topophilia, at Bank.

BANK/MABSOCIETY

n a rainy Friday night in November,


busloads of art world vip s sat in
gridlocked trafic on their way to a
massive ktva karaoke nightclubin
the southern reaches of Shanghai. The
occasion was the oficial after-party
of the third edition of Art021, Shanghais
newest contemporary art fair. In the
cheap glitz of the club, two worlds came together: the bourgeois
hedonism that Shanghai is known forescorts wearing
numbered badges, trays of whiskey and green teawas given a
high-art sheen by Sterling Rubys stalagmite sculpture towering
over the main lobby. ktv (featuring, in the Chinese style,
private rooms where anything goes) is one of many nightspots
owned by Shanghai collector Qiao Zhibing. As dealers,
collectors, and artists wandered through the clubs many loors,
performances by Cheng Ran (who was in the 2015 Istanbul
Biennial) and Hayden Dunham (in character as the energy
drinkpowered pop star QT) rocked the lower levels. It was,
as novelist and onetime Shanghai resident J.G. Ballard described
the city, a cross between ancient Babylon and Las Vegas.
Todays international focus on Shanghai has been understandably top-down. Its hard not to pay attention to the antics
of mega-collector Liu Yiqian, who spent $36million on a
porcelain chicken cup and then posted a selie of him drinking
out of it, who spent $170million on a Modigliani and then
went on record saying that he knows nothing about art. Then
there are museums being dragged-and-dropped all over
town like in a cultural SimCity. However, there is another story,
one that exists in galleries across Shanghaiplaces where
locals and expats have worked tirelessly to set the timbre of
Chinas most international city.
Though it might not be discernible from the sprawl one sees
from the observation decks of Shanghais many skyscrapers, the
city is a collection of small neighborhoods, each with a distinct
history and sense of place. Excluding the current development
in the West Bundthe location of some of those drag-and-drop
museumsShanghais art scene is roughly split among the

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ART LABOR

67

Bund, the old city center that is home to the Rockbund Art
Museum, Bank, and other spaces sequestered in the colonial
buildings lining the waterfront; the industrial M50 district,
a few miles northwest of the Bund with a collection of studios,
commercial spaces, stores, and places like Vanguard Gallery;
and the French Concession, the citys garden district in the
southwestthe site of several spaces, including Art Labor,
James Cohan Gallery, and Leo Xu Projects. These three neighborhoods represent different moments in Shanghais evolution
an international banking and trade hub, a colonial outpost,
and a manufacturing center. While todays art spaces in these
districts do not identically mirror these classiications, they
offer their own refracted portrait of the citys history, its present
moment, and predictions for its future.
Set in a colonial villa halfway down an unassuming lane off
Yueyang Road is the Shanghai branch of the James Cohan
Gallery, which has been directed by Arthur Solway since its
inception in 2008. Known for a program that dovetails artists
from the West, greater Asia, and China as perfectly as the
gallery loors period parquet woodwork, it has long set the bar
for contemporary art in the city. When the gallery opened,
Shanghai was an unexpected choiceWestern galleries had
already set up shop in Beijing and Hong Kong, but James Cohan
was the irst New York gallery to build an outpost in mainland
China, three months ahead of Pace. To me, it seemed the ideal
place to base ourselves and to travel throughout the region,
Solway says. Beijing didnt really appeal to me. Shanghai felt
much more international, with its long history of commerce and

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

LIKE EVERYTHING IN
CHINA, ITS WILDLY
UNREGULATED, STILL
FILLED WITH A LOT
OF COWBOYS AND
OUTRIGHT SCAM
ARTISTS, BUT THERE
IS A STALWART AND
SERIOUS LITTLE
SCENE CARRYING ON.
MARTIN KEMBLE OF ART L ABOR

FIVE SHANGHAI
ARTISTS TO WATCH
3

XU ZHEN

JIN SHAN

Spanning a variety of media, Jins practice is unified by a piercing wit that


skewers the ideological makeup of contemporary China. Born in 1977 and
educated at East China Normal University, he has been in exhibitions
including the 2006 Singapore Biennale, the 2007 Venice Biennale, and a
group show at the Van Abbemuseum in the Netherlands in 2010. His
November 2015 exhibition Divine Ruse, at Bank, depicted here, turned
the gallery into a fictional war zone filled with atrophying Classical forms.

68

YING YEFU

Using traditional ink painting


techniques to create comically subversive mlanges of
historical and contemporary
Chinese culturesuch as with
this Gongbi ink painting on
Chinese bast paper Samurai
Driving Guide, 2015, Ying is
one of Chinas most traditional
iconoclasts. His pictures of schoolchildren, gymnasts, kung fu fighters,
and space capsules are united by hair-thin line work and meticulous gradations in color. Born in 1985, he lives in Xian and is represented by Art Labor.

5
ZHANG DING

AAAJIAO

Xu Wenkai (aaajiao) is one of Chinas up-and-coming new-media artists.


Born in 1984 in Xian, he creates work that blends the natural world
with the digital, often returning to algorithmically driven cloud scenes
and landscapes, such as in Limited Landscape, Unlimited Wave, 2015
(detail shown above), providing a serene antidote to the turmoil of the
Chinese Internet. His work also engages social media, as he acts not as
a producer of content but as a conduit.

Zhang, born in 1980


in Gansu, is known
both for largescale installations
such as Opening,
2011, where he
turned the cavernous
ShanghArt
H-Space into a
nightclub-cumgymnasium, and for objects using soundabsorbing materials and speakers. Above is the
2015 The Kind of Need-1, made of mineral wool,
aluminum plate, and paint. He is represented
by ShanghArt and had a solo project at the 2014
Armory Show.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BANK/MABSOCIETY; XU ZHEN AND JAMES COHAN GALLERY, SHANGHAI; SHANGHART GALLERY; AAAJIAO AND LEO XU PROJECTS; YING YEFU AND ART LABOR.
OPPOSITE: BOTH IMAGES, JJY PHOTO AND LEO XU PROJECTS

Born in 1977, Xu is one of contemporary arts


canniest critics of artistic production. He
incorporated his artistic practice into the MadeIn
Company, which in turn released a brand called
Xu Zhen. His objects themselves are more
straightforward, with altered classical statuary
and paintings made with pastry bags, barbed
wire, and stuffed animals composing one of
the countrys most protean practices. Pictured
below is Eternity-Aphrodite of Knidos, Tang
Dynasty Sitting Buddha, 2014, incorporating
glass fiber-reinforced concrete, marble grains,
sandstone grains, mineral pigments, and steel.

particularly with the laowai [foreigners] doing business here


since the early 1800s. The city had an incredible energy, barely
controlled by its international gentility. Every day it felt
like you were in the midst of a constant collision with history
and the overwhelming sense of untapped potential.
James Cohan Gallerys arrival did much to assert Shanghais
continued art world relevance. Since opening, it has staged
exhibitions with leading Chinese artists, as well as Westerners
Francesco Clemente, Richard Long, Alex Katz, and Mark
diSuvero, who was born in Shanghai. This blend of international and local is in keeping with the history of the city, which
has been a site of considerable European inluence since the
First Opium War (183942). Today, the international inluence
is across the board, with the arts being no exception. One
early pioneer, the Swiss Lorenz Helbling, has made a lasting
impression with his ShanghArt gallery, which was launched
in a spare room of a Shanghai hotel in 1996 (now the Portman
Ritz-Carlton). With branches also in Beijing and Singapore,
Helbling today shows some of the biggest names in the country.
Over the past two decades, the local art community has
grown exponentially, but such growth is always a mixed bag.
Costs have tripled in the last ive years, but they were dirt cheap
nine years ago when we opened, says Martin Kemble, the
owner of Art Labor. Now in its second location in the French
Concession, the gallery has made a name for itself through an
incisive program that blends emerging Chinese with Western
artists like Douglas Coupland. (Both Coupland and Kemble
hail from Vancouver.) About Shanghai, Kemble doesnt mince
words. Like everything in China, its wildly unregulated, still
illed with a lot of cowboys and outright scam artists, but there
is a stalwart and serious little scene carrying on. Part of this
evolution owes to increased awareness of art history. Speaking
and engaging with local people about contemporary art has
changed dramatically.One day you can speak in broad terms
of Picasso with someone, and the next, the same guy is telling
you about his favorite artists from the Zero movement.
Though still not as large as Beijing, Shanghai is seen by many
as the future of Chinas art world. The overall art scene is
moving down here, says Jacob Dreyer, a writer and editor at
Leap, a contemporary art publication that just moved its ofices
from the capital to an upper loor of Adrian Chengs K11 Art
Mall, which blends retail and exhibition space, especially with

69

Above: Exterior view of Leo Xu


Projects. Below: Chen Weis The
Drunken Boat (Shanghai), 2015,
of acrylic, LED screens, mirrors,
reinforced glass, silicone mask,
and fluorescent tubes, on view
last year at Leo Xu Projects.

Opposite: Installation
view of Mu Jin and
Tobias Rosenbergers
Gas Station VII, 2014,
at Vanguard Gallery.

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FROM TOP: JAMES COHAN GALLERY; SHI JINSONG AND JAMES COHAN GALLERY

Below: The exterior of


James Cohan Gallery
in Shanghais southwest
district; Shi Jinsongs
Short Pine Tree, 2007,
composed of various
types of tree roots,
trunks, branches, and
steel, inside the gallery.

a national government that is vocally hostile and socially


conservative. Beijing is about government-funded institutions,
Shanghai about private collectors.
And where there are collectors, there are fairs. Art021
cofounder Kelly Yingambitious, connected, and youngis
the face of this new breed of collectors. Three years ago the
contemporary art market in Shanghai was almost dead. Now,
contemporary art in Shanghai is booming, she says. We have
purchasing power. This power has attracted international
galleries like Gagosian, Chantal Crousel, and Galerie Perrotin
to the fair, and it has also provided sales for locals who both
represent the traditional gallery model and test its boundaries.
Lise Li founded Vanguard Gallery in 2004, and the space has
remained relevant in the past decade because of its insistence
on supporting and promoting innovative and experimental
art creation, says Li. This means a program dependent on a
constant inlux of new voices, which can be a challenge, because
while Shanghai is less than two hours away from Hangzhou,
which boasts one of the countrys best art schools, the lions
share of young artists still move to Beijing. Vanguard Gallery
specializes in multimedia artists, and in 2008 launched the
Gas Station project, which invites unafiliated artists to use the
space as an incubator of ideas and exhibitions. Though exciting,
the model is problematic for a commercial gallery that depends
on sales. After almost 12 years, we have more experience
dealing with different things, which makes the whole process
look easier, Li says. However, the cost of running a gallery
is still a hardship at present, especially for a gallery like ours,
which works with young generations.
Newer spaces are also balancing a market-friendly program
with more experimental projects. After two years directing
the Shanghai Gallery of Art, American writer and curator
Mathieu Borysevicz established Bank in 2013 as a curatorial
project, an alternative to the conventional gallery that could
be tailored to the conditions of China, one of those conditions
being the lack of public support for alternative spaces.
Striving for a mix of emergent and well-known, Western and
Chinese, male and female, from young to dead, the gallery
has shown Paul McCarthy and Howard Hodgkin alongside
upstarts Liao Guohe and Matthew Brandt. As the gallery
begins consolidating a roster, Boryseviczs strategy is largely
intuitive. Basically I go with my gut instincts and try to keep
it unexpected. Art is about discovery, not predictability.
Borysevicz depends on a for-proit business model, though
programming and relationships are more open than in a
traditional gallery. While not entirely alternative, Bank, with
its curatorially driven programming and primary market sales
structure, represents a new model that has proved sustainable over the past three years and shows no signs of slowing.
Another space banking on the unpredictable is Leo Xu
Projects. Started in 2011 by the former associate director
of James Cohan Shanghai, the space has made a splash globally, exhibiting at Frieze London and at Art Basel in both
Switzerland and Hong Kong. Though the gallerys brick-andmortar space is in the French Concession, the program, heavy
in new media, inds itself deployed both in the virtual realm
and in a variety of places around the city, including shopping
malls, schools, and vacant sites pegged for future development.
My idea was that a new model of gallery in a heavily digitized
and globalized age should seize the advantages of new media
and tech and take chances to grow beyond a mere system
of selling artworks from gallery space and art fair booths to
being a liaison between artists and institutions, says Xu.
Shanghais young collectorsthose whom Kelly Ying
proclaimed had the purchasing powerare thinking about

VANGUARD GALLERY

71
purchasing art in different ways as well. Some are still conservative in their choices, sticking to paintings, but Borysevicz
points out that the game is changing. Many have branched
out into video or other media, and they are all watching one
another. WeChat social media has intensiied the dialogue and
buying trends, he says, referring to the countrys latest social
media app. They compare, launt, get advice, and make
purchases instantaneously.
The social aspect is not to be overlooked. Much of Art021s
success has been due to the society connections of cofounders
Ying, her partner David Chau, and Bao Yifeng, a PR powerhouse entrenched in luxury branding and celebrity. Leo Xu
identiies the new generation as smart and casual. Many
collect wine, design pieces, and contemporary art at the same
time. They start with local artists and more accessible works
but constantly engage themselves in activities to see and hear.
After a while they extend to international and then understand
they should select for their own interest and personal relevance.
This is not to say that they take collecting lightly. More and
more, Solway says, I see that these midlevel collectors are
discerning and educated; they do their homework. They want
to understand the person, the artist, who is making the work.
Thats good news.
Most of the murmurs in town have to do with sustainability,
but perhaps this city isnt the proper case study for stability in
the art world. For centuries it has been marked by both opulence
and turbulence. I arrived in Shanghai in 2007 and have never
felt a heightened sense of stability, Borysevicz says. Right now
Shanghai is on an upswing. There are a lot of resources being
reshufled and channeled here, but sustainability has always
been an odd elephant in modern Chinas room.

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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

MORE AND MORE


I SEE THAT THESE
MIDLEVEL COLLECTORS
ARE DISCERNING
AND EDUCATED; THEY
DO THEIR HOMEWORK.
THEY WANT TO
UNDERSTAND THE
PERSON, THE ARTIST,
WHO IS MAKING
THE WORK.
ARTHUR SOLWAY OF JAMES COHA N G ALLERY

72

NATIONAL
SPOTLIGHTS:

SINGAPORE
INDONESIA
INDIA

In the first of a two-part series, three prominent


gallerists talk to Art+Auction about art market
developments in their respective regions
ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

Singapore

Since founding the Singapore-based Gajah Gallery in


1996, Jasdeep Sandhu has promoted some of the regions
leading artists, as well emerging talents. In addition to
a warehouse space in Tanjong Pagar, he opened a second
venue, Yogya Art Lab, in 2012 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
THE LOCAL MARKET

PUBLIC SUPPORT

READING THE TEA LEAVES

The art scene in Singapore has


progressed rapidly over the past ive
years, with more platforms and opportunities for artists and galleries than
ever before, which is very encouraging.
While the economic downturn of
recent times softened the market a bit,
on the whole we have seen phenomenal
growth. In response, we have expanded
our gallery. Just last month we moved
to a 6,000-square-foot industrial warehouse in Tanjong Pagar.

The Singapore government has had a


pretty remarkable relationship with
the arts scene, especially considering
that just two decades ago it banned
performance art. We have seen a
complete turnaround and a sincere
desire to not only understand but also
support the development of the arts.
At the institutional level, the governments various initiatives are certainly
impressive. The Singapore Art Museum
has provided a strong platform for
Southeast Asian contemporary art,
while the National Art Gallery, which
opened in late November, promises
to be a game changer for the regional
arts scene. The building itself is magnif-

Singapore has just established itself


as a pivotal point of introduction, exhibition, and commerce in the regional
art world. For now, the auction houses
and museums will continue to lead
the industry, but the resulting ripple
effect will enable galleries to strengthen
the scope of their activities, which
holds strong potential for the local and
regional scene. If I dare say, weve
only just begun to come to terms with
our history. I see collectors turning
their attention to regional artists with
a renewed appreciation for our own
cultures. I also anticipate gallery
programs playing a bigger part in
the arts scene.

THE COLLECTORS

BOTH IMAGES: GAJAH GALLERY, SINGAPORE

icent, its architecture and history


placing it among the most formidable
institutions in the world. It is now
up to the curators to i ll the space and
make good sense of art from the region.

Collectors here have been small in


number, but they are discerning and
loyal. They are mainly Singaporeans
and expats, many of whom have been
with us for quite a number of years.
Recently, however, we have also noticed
that younger art appreciators are
becoming aware of the joy, depth, and
breadth of collecting. Some of them
have been acquiring works by our
artists. It is very interesting to see the
ideas that engage this audience; they are
well educated, curious, and very much
drawn to regional voices in contemporary artamong them Sabri Idrus,
Ng Joon Kiat, and Ugo Untoro. It bodes
well for the art market that collectors
continue to be patrons of Southeast
Asian art. With the rise of collectors,
there has also been an increase in art
prices, which has helped local galleries
to lourish and extend their presence
to international art fairs such as
Art Stage Singapore and Art Basel. Art
Stage, which held its i rst edition in
2011, is still in its infancy, but has
already become a solid platform for
showcasing Asian art. We have participated every year since its inception.

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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

Installation view of an exhibition at Gajah Gallery of work


by Sabri Idrus, which ran through January 15, 2016.

73

Indonesia

Jun Tirtadji is cofounder of Jakarta-based ROH Projects,


which works to support the development of contemporary
Indonesian artists, including Erwin Windu Pranata,
Gede Mahendra Yasa, Triyadi Guntur Wiratmo, Syaiful
Garibaldi, Reggie Aquara, and Yuli Prayitno.
THE LOCAL MARKET

Theart market in Indonesia, Jakarta


in particular, can be divided into two
distinct categories: modern Indonesian artthat is, works produced by
artists whoembrace more traditional
ways of thinking in terms of beauty
and aestheticsand contemporary
Indonesian art. The market for
modern Indonesian art is continuing
to perform well, especially for works

Indonesian contemporary art is


at an interesting crossroad. In the late
2000s, the sector bubbled when collectors in the region took a sudden interest
in our artists. Prices rose dramatically
within a very short time, and galleries
started to emerge with consistent
programming in order to capture this
interest in contemporary art. At the
same time, however, there was also a
great deal of speculation, which fueled

base and the market for their works


in the years since.
THE COLLECTORS

Today there seems to beless of an


emphasis on speculation and art as
investment (although it is still prevalent in some respects), and more on
patronage and collecting as passion.
The collector base in Indonesia is
multilayered and diverse, and it
is growing. Young collectors tend
to view collecting with a sense of
responsibility and patronage in mind.
I have a sensethat they are much
more interested in younger emerging
artists with new pathways and
futures in mind.
A LACK OF PUBLIC SUPPORT

Government support is sorely lacking.


We have neither a museum of contemporary art with consistent programming
nor an extensive collection available
to the public. It is interesting that
signiicant works of modern Indonesian art are being collected abroad
by the National Gallery Singapore,
which just opened, and by the
Singapore Art Museum, which presents contemporary Indonesian art.

Installation view of Family and


Friends at ROH Projects last fall.

considered to have particular historical signiicance. We lack galleries


with programs to procure works
of modern Indonesian art, so most
of the movement has been in the
secondary market, which has been
buoyed by foreign auction houses
with a Southeast Asian focus, such
as Sothebys and Christies.

an inlation in prices in both the


primary and the secondary markets.
Without the infrastructure and
support of public cultural institutions, this growth was unsustainable.
As a result, artists who were part of
this boom found it dificult to maintain their practices. Only a few have
been able to hold onto their collector

It is our hope that younger artists


will ind a new market that emerges
in a sustainable manner. We are also
encouraged by recent investments
in cultural activities on the part of the
Indonesian government. The Jakarta
Biennale was able to secure both
governmental and private funding to
assemble an international-quality
presentation. The government has
also been more willing to allocate
funding and support for Indonesian
contemporary arts on an international
level through grants and sponsorship.
Unfortunately, this is sometimes done
seemingly arbitrarily and without a
sustainable road map.

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BOTH IMAGES: ROH PROJECTS, JAKARTA, INDONESIA

READING THE TEA LEAVES

India

Kishore Singh is head of exhibitions and publications at


Delhi-based DAG Modern, which also has galleries in
Mumbai and New York. Founded by Rama Anand in 1993,
the gallery has been a force in the promotion of Indias most
prominent 20th-century artists, from early masters such as
Raja Ravi Varma to contemporary artists like M.F. Husain.

BOTH IMAGES: DAG MODERN, DELHI

THE LOCAL MARKET

It is somewhat ironic that a country


with an unbroken tradition of art,
handicraft, and culture that stretches
back more than 5,000 years should feel
somewhat alienated from its art practice
over the past 200, yet such is the case.
The reasons are obvious. First, art in
India has historically lain in the domain
of temple architecture, religious art,
and hand-painted books. And until
fairly recently, the concept of visiting
museums and galleries remained
somewhat alien. Second, while societies
tend to grow organically, in the case
of colonial India, Western art was
preached from the pulpit, so to speak.
As a result, it became the acquired taste
of the elite. Conversely, because of
Indias luency in the English language,
its recent colonial history, and its
links with the West, particularly with
Europe, its artists have enjoyed
success there.
While the complexion of the art
market changed in the wake of economic reforms in 1991, it has become
more vibrant since the turn of the millennium, with more galleries springing
up, the launch of an art fair, and the
founding of private museumsthe
Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, the Devi
Foundation, and more recently, the
Piramal Museum of Artwhich are
open to the public. Today the major
markets are in Mumbai and New
Delhi, while art is avidly followed and
discussed in Calcutta and has found
a younger following in Bangalore.

opened to Western brands, those with


means have aspired to acquire homes,
cars, and luxury goods and spend
money on travel and education rather
than art. That said, new collectors have
been entering the fray. Auction houses
have increased the visibility of art
through price benchmarking, and
there is both quality and talent on offer.
For the most part, collector interest
is limited to the moderns. The contemporary art market, which peaked
around 2008, collapsed with the
global recession, and though contemporary artists are well recognized,
the market remains wary of putting its
money there.
PUBLIC SUPPORT

The government has been focused on


more pressing social concerns such
as development; poverty elimination;
providing nutrition, water, and electricity; and so on. Art and culture
therefore get short shrift. Still, there are

THE COLLECTORS

Traditionally, the collecting base in


India has been quite small. And as a
developing economy that has recently

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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

Untitled (Famine Series), above, from the


1960s, was among the works by Ramkinkar Bali
on view at DAGs Delhi space this past fall.

museums, some good, others less so.


Recently, private collectors have begun
to open private museums, and more
are in the making. But Indian families
and students need to be encouraged
to visit museums and galleries, which
they rarely do.
READING THE TEA LEAVES

While some of the vitality of the art

market was lost on account of failed art


funds and falling prices, there has been
a course correction in pricing, particularly the works of Indian moderns, and
there are signs of a reviving market. I
think we are on the cusp of an explosion
of the art market hereand not merely
in terms of prices but also in terms of its
visibility and ability to provoke sentiment
as well as debate. Recent exhibitions of
Indian artists such as V.S.Gaitonde at
the Guggenheim, as well as upcoming
events like Nasreen Mohamedis
work inaugurating the Metropolitan
Museum of Arts new Breuer building
exhibition space in March, and
Bhupen Khakhars retrospective at
Tate Modern, are also creating some
excitement around these and other
Indian artists for a global audience.
dags opening in New York has
added to this optimistic outlook.

75

76

The Eibers in their living


room, where furnishings
include, from left, a
custom Pictures at an
Exhibition cabinet,
1997, by Gaetano Pesce;
Eero Aarnios Bubble
chair, 1968; and a 2009
Starbrick installation
by Olafur Eliasson.
Al stands in front of a
Safari sofa, 1968,
by Archizoom Associati,
and Kim is seated on
Joris Laarmans Bone
chair lounge from 2006.

For collectors Al and Kim


Eiber, Miami Beach provides
an ideal backdrop for their
vast collection of 20th
and 21stcentury design
BY JUDITH GURA
PHOTOGRAPHS BY KRISTINE LARSEN

THE
NEXT
NEW
THING
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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

he pert postmodern mailbox by Michael Graves at the entrance to Al and Kim


Eibers Miami Beach home is just a hint of whats insideone of the most
intriguing collections of postwar and contemporary design in the United States.
Married 32 years, the Eibers have been collecting avant-garde design
for 32, and though Al is the high-proi le spokesman for the couple, the
acquisitions have essentially been collaborations. I call my wife the curator,
Eiber says. I buy things with her approval, and she makes it all look good.
Their taste and their collections have migrated from midcentury American
design to embrace an international range of furniture, lighting, artwork,
and decorative objects with a pronounced Italian accent.
Though illed with iconic and unique objects by world-renowned designers,
the Eiber home is neither museumlike nor unduly cluttered. Skillfully placed in a
congenial mlange of lively colors and striking shapes, each look at me work
serves as complement to its equally attention-grabbing neighbors. The foyer,
appointed with pieces by Gaetano Pesce, Harry Bertoia, Ron Arad, and Ettore
Sottsass, and a collection of mostly Memphis objects, leads to a 20-by-60-foot
living room. There, Italian design igures prominently amid an international roster
of artists from Claire Falkenstein to Joris Laarman to Yonel Lebovici and Olafur
Eliasson. Furnishings in the other rooms are similarly eclectic and equally
noteworthy. Among the few conventional pieces of furniture is a clean-lined gray

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A Willow sculpture,
ca.1960, by Harry
Bertoia, cascades
into a corner of the
sun-drenched foyer.
Opposite: Among the
works in the Eibers
60-foot-long living
room are, from left:
Pillola lights, 1968, by
Studio Da; a 1996
Iride Metamorfosi lamp
by Pierluigi Nicolin
for Artemide; a 1970
Paramount lamp by
Lapo Binazzi; a one-ofa-kind desk, 1987,
by Ettore Sottsass;
Binazzis Scarica
Elettrica lamp from
1970; and a ca.-1988
Knife lamp by Pesce.

79

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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

In the foyer, from left,


Shiro Kuramatas acrylic
Feather stool,1990, is
displayed along with the
artists 1989 Cabinet
de Curiosit and Pesces
slender Industrial Skin
in resin, 1986. Opposite:
The faade of the Eibers
Morris Lapidusdesigned
house, built in 1958, one
of only two private homes
ever designed by the
flamboyant architect.

leather sectional in the living room, which anchors the space


and allows comfortable viewing of the surrounding works.
Gesturing at the array of design pieces from the 20th and
21stcenturies, Eiber says, When we started buying all
this stuff, nobody wanted it. He decries the changes in the
market that have made good design largely unaffordable
to all but the most afluent, citing as an example the worldrecord 269,000 ($415,000) price for a Shiro Kuramata
Miss Blanche chair at Sothebys London in November.
Though they clearly possess an eye for design, neither of the
pair was trained in the ield. Al is a retired radiologist, and
Kim has an mba in inance from Columbia University. Born in
Cuba, Al came to the United States with his parents when he
was just eight and grew up in Cleveland, graduating from Ohio
State University and later New York Medical College. He met
Kim, a Cleveland native and Wellesley graduate, during his
medical training, and began his design education going to lea

markets with his iance and her parents, Ralph and Terry
Kovel, publishers of a well-known series of price books for the
antiques market. Before that, I thought only poor people
bought used furniture, he recalls. Newly married and unable
to afford the Art Deco pieces they admired, the couple began
buying midcentury design long before the term came into
use. Their irst collections included Russel Wright brushedaluminum and Chase chrome piecesacquired for ive
dollars eachand furniture by George Nelson and the
Eameses. It was so cheap it wasnt listed in our price book,
comments visiting mother-in-law Terry.
The Eibers moved to Miami in 1988, when the area was
just beginning its explosive growth, before its emergence
as an art center. They purchased a 5,000-square-foot house
on Biscayne Bay designed by Morris Lapidus, the architect
best known for the Fontainebleau Hotel and the comment
Too much is never enough. One of only two private homes

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81

that Lapidus designed (out of 2,000 buildings in his lifetime),


the asymmetrical structures living room has an undulating
wall of windows that frame sweeping views and admit
generous light, and it offers ample space to show off the
couples furniture collection. Though clearly modern
an aberration in the Spanish colonialdominated Miami
landscapethe house has quirky Lapidus touches, like
sculptured exterior walls, carved wood doors, and curlicues
on brass stair railings.
According to Eiber, the 1958 home was considered a
teardown, but it just needed a little cosmetic surgery.
The surgery took 10 years, and as it progressed, the couple
began to ill the interiors with a highly personal collection
of furniture, trading up to costlier pieces as they could afford
them, but consistently focusing on designs of their own
time, an area not then noticed by most collectors. When hed
explain that they collected 20th-century decorative art,

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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

Eiber says, Nobody knew what I was talking about.


The progression from midcentury American to
innovative Italian came by chance shortly after their move
to Miami when Eiber walked into the gallery of dealer
Ric Emmett and saw a Canap (Lido Modle), designed
by Michele de Lucchi for Memphis in 1982. It was so
ugly that it was cool, he recalls. Attending New Yorks
Modernism Show that fall, he found that most dealers
had heard of the Memphis Group, whose irst collection
had debuted at Milans Salone di Mobile in 1981, but
nobody was selling it. On his return to Florida, Eiber
purchased the piece for $300 (a Lido sold in March 2014
at Sothebys New York for $5,000). He then found a
book in a secondhand bookstore and began to educate
himself about Memphis and Italian design, a category
whose appeal was not only in its distinctive style, but
also in its limited production, compared with American

A quartet of works
by Pesce leading into the
living room includes
his Aida lamp, 2004, on
the floor beneath an
Industrial Skin piece from
2000, and a 1991 wall
sculpture of Caravaggio
glass overlooking a resin
bowl table, ca.2002.
Opposite: In the expansive
living room is a custom
Miami Sound bookcase, by Pesce, from
1996, on the back wall;
Yonel Lebovicis
Welders lamps, 1990, at
far right; and a 1980
glass-topped Tavolo con
Ruote, by Gae Aulenti.

82

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midcentury furniture: You dont like to walk into a


neighbors house and see your Eames chair, Eiber comments.
Furnishing their home was an evolutionary process, and
the collectors made most of their purchases at antique shows,
auctions, and from the few dealers who shared their interest
in as-yet-undiscovered designs. In the mid 1990s, Eiber was
bidding by telephone at Bonhams sales in London for lots
that nobody else wanted. I was buying this Italian stuff, and
the shipping was more expensive than the furniture, he says.
Everything in the house is design, Kim notes, pointing
out the Raymond Loewy dishes and Robert Venturi
cutlery, much of which was found at the Lincoln Road lea
markets in Miami Beach. Dealers would call us when
they found something. A rare break in their collaboration
came with Als purchase of an assertive pair of tall iron
lamps by Lebovici. Kim hated them when I bought them,
Al says, and she still hates them.
Al clearly relishes the experience of acquisition almost as
much as he does the objects themselves. A unique Sottsass
postmodern desk at one end of the living room, commissioned by New Yorks Blum Helman Gallery, came up at a
Rago auction almost two decades ago, after the initial buyer
died. I was the only bidder, Eiber says. There was not

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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

a big market for this kind of thing. The most imposing


works in the room are two custom units by Pesce, whom
Eiber met more than 20 years ago on a private tour of a Park
Avenue apartment Pesce had designed. Taken by the
architects originality, the Eibers persuaded him in 1995 to
make a 17-foot-long, irregularly shaped bookcase of
multicolored resin that showcases part of their encyclopedic
collection of design books and exhibition catalogues. The
commission was followed by a second storage unit, and then a
witty rubber rug designed to survive spills by the Eibers two
young daughters (now both adults, and neither a collector).
Almost everything else is used furniture, comments Kim.
The Eibers have met most of the designers whose work
they collect and hosted many in their home, along with
a constant flow of design-industry luminaries, museum
curators, fellow collectors, and students. When Alessandro
Mendini visited and noticed that there was nothing of his
in the collection, the architect made them one of his Proust
chairs in Miami-appropriate pastel colors; it sits in the
master bedroom, sharing honors with a Gio Ponti bed, the
de Lucchi Canap, and a Pesce Pratt chair. Show me a
cool chair, Al says, and I get goose bumps. The Eibers are
also great lighting enthusiasts and count some 90 lamps

in their collection, including many Memphis examples,


which Al calls great looks, but terrible lights.
Almost every major acquisition in the Eiber collection comes
with a story. The Archizoom Associati Safari sofa at one end
of the living room arrived in a swap for a set of eight Gyro chairs
by Eero Aarniothe chairs having been received by Eiber
in exchange for a donation to a local school looking to dispose
of them. American Dan Johnsons Gazelle dining table and
chairs from the late 1950s were purchased on the last day
of a Coconut Grove antiques show from a dealer who sold
them at a bargain price rather than shipping them back north.
A small sculpture by Claire Falkenstein, another American,
came up for sale at Wright and failed to attract bids, so Eiber
bought it. He then sought out two equally striking but far
larger works by the same artist. A probably Danish storage
unit in the dining room was obtained in trade for Super Bowl
tickets that the Eibers won in a lottery and gave up because
their favorite team, Cleveland, hadnt made the playoffs.
But perhaps the pice de rsistance in chance-encounter
collecting is an imposing light sculpture by Danish-Icelandic
artist Eliasson, which was commissioned for the vip
lounge at Art Basel Miami Beach several years ago. A
complicated work of randomly stacked cubic elements with
yards of yellow-coated wire, it connects to an electronic
board that changes light intensity in random sequence. Eiber
spent the entire show persuading the sponsors to contact
the artist for permission to sell the piece.

Although they dont purchase to invest (We like living


with these things, Al says), the Eibers have rearranged and
occasionally sold pieces over the years to make room for new
acquisitions. Als current enthusiasm is Dutch designer Joris
Laarman, whose Bone chair Al saw at Design Miami in 2006.
As a radiologist, I was taken by bones, he explains. With
two versions to choose from, he purchased the larger one,
later adding its companion, and today both occupy a central
place in the living room. A Laarman table, surrounded by
Eames chairs, was later commissioned for the breakfast room.
The peripatetic Eiber thinks nothing of hopping on a
plane to Groningen or Paris for an exhibition opening
or to New York for a museum board meeting. In addition
to collecting, both Eibers have been involved with the
Wolfsonian-fiu and the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian
Design Museum. Al is on the Cooper Hewitt board, and he
inds time to write a regular blog (scoopondesign.com)
and articles for design magazines. In addition to running
the family business, Kovels Antiques, Kim is board
chairman of ArtCenter South Florida and treasurer of the
private K8th-grade Cushman School.
Relecting on the unusual diversity of their collection,
Al says that, part of the fun is mixing different designers;
all of the fun is living with it. With that, he departs for
a meeting of the vetting committee for the Design Miami
show, clearly relishing the opportunity to see the next
new thing, whatever that might be.

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In the dining room, a


ca.-2004 buffet and 1988
chandelier by Sottsass,
along with a 2002 wall
sculpture by Carlos Alves,
complement a Gazelle
dining table and chairs
from 1958 by DanJohnson.
Opposite: Alessandro
Mendinis custom-painted
Proust armchair, 2000,
holds pride of place in
the bedroom, providing
a counterpoint to a 1986
Golf Ball by the Italian
design firm Gufram.

85

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FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

The Golfer, by
Norman Rockwell,
created ca.1920
as a cover for the
Saturday Evening
Post, was one of very
few cover illustrations by Rockwell
to be rejected. Its
currently for sale at
M.S. Rau Antiques
in NewOrleans
for $5.85million.

86

THE ART OF
ILLUSTRATION
llustration art is a vast ield, one that encompasses the original art commissioned for mass-produced
print publications, including comics, picture books, magazines, posters, advertisements, and more.
Unlike other art forms, these images are produced with a speciic commercial purpose, such as
illustrating a story or gracing the cover of a magazine. In the current marketplace, illustration arts
high-end practitioners, such as Norman Rockwell, Maxield Parrish, and Jessie Willcox Smithall
of whom worked during what is considered the golden age of illustrationhave a reputation for
stealing the show in sales of American art. The record for a representative work belongs to Rockwell,
whose 1951 painting Saying Grace garnered $46million at Sothebys New York in December 2013.
But trying to pinpoint what uniies illustration art visually and thematically is challenging. Inevitably it will be of a
igurative nature, but other than that, in terms of chronology and subject matter, it can embrace anything from ancient times
to science iction, says Alasdair Nichol, vice chairman and head of ine art at Philadelphia-based Freemans auction house.
What unites all the artists, he says, is a shared skill in draftsmanship: Ultimately, these were commercial artists
working to a brief, and so the ability to draw welland quicklywas paramount. Today, collectors prize these works for
their technical precision, their evocative images, and their vibrant colors.

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M.S. RAU ANTIQUES, NEW ORLEANS

BY BRIDGET MORIARITY AND LIZA M.E. MUHLFELD

Prized Period
The golden age of magazine and book
illustration spanned the years from
roughly 1890 to the 1960s. This growth
arose from advances in printing, such as
the development of high-speed presses,
the increased abundance of pulp-based
paper, and the evolving sophistication
of wood engraving
Howard Pyles undated
techniques. Howard
Washington with a visitor
Pyle is widely credited
at Valley Forge, My dear,
said General Washington,
as the father of
Captain Prescotts
American illustration
behavior was inexcusable,
sold for $66,000 at
art. Already well
Northeast Auctions in
established by the
NewHampshire in 2008.
1890s, he turned
to teaching, founding the nations first
illustration school at Drexel University
in Philadelphia in 1894. He went on
to establish his own school, and his
students, who included Parrish, Smith,
and N.C. Wyeth, became known as the
Brandywine School. Pyle started with
these great, swashbuckling narratives
that set the stage for Rockwell, J.C.
Leyendecker, and Parrish, says Aviva
Lehmann, director of American art,
New York, for Heritage Auctions.
Today, of course, work by Rockwell

is the most coveted from this era.


According to Elizabeth Beaman, head
of American art at Christies New York,
there is a premium on the iconic pieces
that he executed as covers for the
Saturday Evening Post. Rockwells best
period would be roughly from the mid

1940s to the mid 1950s, during which


he tended to produce his largest-scale
and most complex compositions,
she says. And, of course, those years
are during wartime and the immediate
aftermath, so they tend to be the most
important and poignant of his subjects.

Growth Indicators
FROM TOP: NORTHEAST AUCTIONS, PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE; SWANN AUCTION GALLERIES, NEW YORK

The market for illustration art, according to


Beaman, has experienced a tremendous uptick
in recent years. Rockwells work first broke
the $1million mark in 1996. And now hes among
the top three highestMeasuring 9 by 8
selling American artists at
inches, A Pair of Llamas
auction, alongside Georgia
in Peru, undated, in pen,
ink, and watercolor on
OKeeffe and Edward
board by well-known
Hopper, she says.
childrens book illustrator
and author Dr. Seuss,
For $5,000 or $10,000,
took in $21,600 at Swann
you can get a beautiful
Auction Galleries in New
York in January 2013.
example [of illustration art]
from the 1920s, 30s, or
40s, says Lehmann. But a good Saturday Evening
Post cover from an important artist will cost at
least six figures, and if youre looking at a
Rockwell, expect to pay upwards of $10million.
Whereas illustration art used to languish at
the tail end of the American art auction
catalogues, observes Nichol, it is more likely now
to be front and center and often provides the
star lots. Nichol credits Rockwell with the surge
in interest.

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87

International Flavor

Collectors of the Category


Despite the genres international history, work from the golden
age of American illustration attracts primarily American collectors.
Theres a much deeper and wider collector base for American
illustration. British is less well-known, says Lehmann. Wedont
see a lot of people outside America purchasing the art, she says.
However, the audience is becoming more international, and there
are collectors in Europe and Asia. When Norman Rockwells Saying
Grace set the record for the category, notes Bill Rau, owner of
M.S.Rau Antiques in New Orleans, it was sold to an American,
but of the two underbidders, one was from
Howard Chandler
England and the other was from Japan.
Christys I Am an
Prestigious collectors include Steven
American!, 1941, a
charcoal and pastel
Spielberg and George Lucas. The fact that
on board (est.
many Hollywood personalities are avowed
$2535,000) was
featured in Swanns
collectors has undoubtedly led to a higher
sale of illustration
profile for illustration art, says Nichol.
art late last month.
Museums and galleries have also taken
an interest in the category, and specialists concur that the
audience for the genre is broadening on a year-by-year basis.
Its a rising market, says von der Linn. A lot of museums overlooked illustration art. When the prices rose exponentially, they
felt they had missed the boat, and more museums and galleries
are now scrambling to fill the gaps in their holdings.

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FROM TOP: SWANN AUCTION GALLERIES; CHRISTIES

88

The genre of illustration art extends across the globe, from the
Americas to the U.K. to the rest of Europe and beyond. The tradition of illustration art is an international concept, says Beaman.
You have artists who were commissioned in the U.K. in terms
of story illustrations, and in the Russian tradition you have a lot
of propaganda art, she says. In Britain, there is a long tradition
of illustration art dating back to the Middle
A Rabbits Tea Party,
Ages and even earlier. England during the
189293, below, set
10thcentury was one of the most productive art
a record for the iconic
British childrens
centers in the world at the time, and illustrated
illustrator Beatrix
manuscripts have famously carried on since
Potter when it landed
a price of $117,000
then, says John Huddy, founder, owner, and
at Christies London
managing partner of Illustrationcupboard, a galin December 2014.
lery in London. Christine von der Linn, director of
art, architecture, press, and illustrated books with Swann Auction
Galleries, also points out that there are Czech and Polish artists
who make up the category.
When Nichol studied fine art in the U.K. during his youth, he
noticed that the art form was being looked down upon in standard
academic training. I was once told that one of my canvases was
too illustrative. This was not intended as a compliment, he says.
There is less snobbery in the States, and this may be because
many of the greatest exponents of American fine artWinslow
Homer, Edward Hopper, all the way through to Andy Warholwere
at some point in their careers illustration artists.

Top Artists and


Their Auction Records
Norman Rockwell

Saying Grace, 1951


$46,085,000 Sothebys New York DECEMBER 2013
Rockwell is one of the most important and sought-after American artists. His
style and subject mattersmall-town American lifewere largely inluenced
by the careers of N.C. Wyeth, J.C. Leyendecker, and Howard Pyle. He illustrated more than 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post, the works most
coveted by collectors. (Saying Grace was the cover of the November 24, 1951
issue.) Rockwell has a large collector following in the United States and abroad.

Maxield Parrish

The Lantern Bearers, 1908


$4,272,000 Christies New York MAY 2006

Parrish is one of the best-known artists in the categoryand of the 20th century.
His distinctive technique, using layered paint and varnishes in hues including
the Parrish blue seen in the background of this piece, used as a cover for Colliers,
make his whimsical works immediately recognizable. Cinderella, Sleeping
Beauty, Poems of Childhood, and Arabian Nights are among his notable works.

N.C. Wyeth

Wild Bill Hickok at Cards, 1916


$2,240,000 Coeur DAlene Art Auction JULY 2007
Considered one of the best illustrators of all time, Wyeth created almost 4,000 magazine
and book illustrations, many of them for the Saturday Evening Post. He studied under
Howard Pyle between 1902 and 1904, and many of his works depict igures of the
American West, such those seen here, created for a 1916 series in Hearsts magazine.
He illustrated books for Scribner Classics, including Robin Hood, Robinson Crusoe,
The Last of the Mohicans, and 21 others.

FROM TOP: SOTHEBYS; CHRISTIES; THE COEUR DALENE ART AUCTION; TWO IMAGES, SOTHEBYS

Howard Pyle

Captain Kett, 1907


$702,400 Sothebys New York MAY 2004

Experts consider Pyle the father of American illustration art. He founded the irst
school in the United States for illustration, and his familiar subjects include pirates,
cowboys, and knights. He produced work for approximately 3,500 publications,
including the Saturday Evening Post, Colliers, Harpers Weekly, Harpers
Monthly, and Ladies Home Journal. Also a writer, Pyle made the image at right to
go with a story of his own, The Ruby of Kishmoor.

Jessie Willcox Smith

How Doth the Little Busy Bee, undated


$386,500 Sothebys New York APRIL 2011
Smith is one of the few female artists in this male-dominated category. She
is known primarily as an illustrator of childrens booksher auctionrecord work was reproduced in A Childs Book of Old Verses, published by
Dufield&Company in 1910but she also created advertisements for
Kodak, Procter& Gambles Ivory soap, and others. Smith produced more than
200 magazine covers for Good Housekeeping and Ladies Home Journal.

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

89

What you get for...


over $1.5million

Maxield Parrish, Land of Make-Believe, 1905


This oil was irst reproduced in a 1910 issue of Colliers.
Among the highest-priced works by the artist to sell at auction,
it sold for $3,525,000 (est. $35 million) at Christies New
York in November 2014.

over $500,000

N.C. Wyeth, The Deacon and Parson Skeeters /


In the Tail of a Game Draw, 1912
Featured in a 1912 reprinting of Pike County Ballads by
John Hay,1871, the painting sold for $905,000 (est. $200
300,000) at Sothebys NewYork in May 2014.

90

over $350,000

J.C. Leyendecker, Thanksgiving, 16281928: 300 Years


(Pilgrim and Football Player), 1928

over $150,000

John Falter, Golf Driving Range, 1952


One of more than 120 covers the artist illustrated for the
Saturday Evening Post, this one, for the July 26, 1952, issue,
sold for $197,000 at Bonhams NewYork in November 2014.

over $50,000

Douglas Crockwell, untitled cover for the


Saturday Evening Post, April 4, 1942
This work took in $71,700 at Heritage Auctions in Dallas in February
2011. Crockwell produced several illustrations for the magazine,
along with advertisements for Welchs Grape Juice, Republic Steel,
General Electric, and the Brewing Industry Association.

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FROM TOP: CHRISTIES; SOTHEBYS; HERITAGE AUCTIONS; BONHAMS; HERITAGE AUCTIONS

The Saturday Evening Post cover of November 24, 1928, Pilgrim and
Football Player, set an artist record when it realized $365,000 (est.
$100150,000) at Heritage Auctions in Dallas in May 2015. Between
1907 and 1928, Leyendecker created a variety of Thanksgivingthemed covers for the publication.

Naughty and Nice


Pinup art is a popular subcategory in the field of illustration. It generally depicts pneumatic young ladies in various states of undress, often
in situations of a perilous nature or coyly vamping it up in a domestic
setting, says Nichol. Designed to appeal to the mid 20th-century male
libido, they have considerable appeal to young collectors today with
a keen sense of kitsch and are often acquired, one
In May 2011,Gay Nymph,
suspects, with a postmodern wink, he adds, noting
1947, by Gil Elvgren, set
that Gil Elvgren, Enoch Bolles, and Alberto Vargas
an artist record when it
sold for $286,800 at
a regular in the pages of Esquire and later, Playboy
Heritage Auctions. Elvgren
are the major names in the field.
created images for the
Saturday Evening Post
According to Rau, some buyers might surprise
and Good Housekeeping;
people. Pinup girls are liked more by women than by
this one was made for
Brown & Bigelow, a
men today, he contends. And the market is growing,
commercial distributor
though prices pale in comparison with Rockwells, for
of cards and calendars.
example. In 2011, Elvgrens Gay Nymph, 1947, realized
$286,800 at Heritage Auctions, a record for the artist, a graduate of
the American Academy of Art in Chicago. The work had belonged to
Charles Martignette, whose collection of illustration art sold for more
than $21.7million over the course of nearly six years at Heritage.

91

Where to Find Them

FROM TOP: HERITAGE AUCTIONS; SOMERVILLE MANNING GALLERY, GREENVILLE, DELAWARE

Examples by leading artists in the category are found


in several notable museum collections across the
countryamong them, the National Museum of American
Illustration in Newport, Rhode Island; the Metropolitan
Museum of Art in New York; the Smithsonian American
Art Museum in Washington, D.C.; and the Philadelphia
Museum of Art. The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art is
slated to open in Chicago in 2018 and will only add to its
luster as a collecting area, says Nichol.
N.C. Wyeths 1918 oil
Established dealers in the category
The Bonaventure was
produced to illustrate
include the American Illustrators
The Mysterious Island
Gallery in New York; M.S. Rau Antiques
by Jules Verne. It was
available at Somerville
in New Orleans; the Illustrated Gallery
Manning Gallery in
in Philadelphia; Somerville Manning
Greenville, Delaware.
Gallery in Greenville, Delaware;
R.Michelson Galleries in Northampton, Massachusetts;
and the Illustrationcupboard Gallery in London.
Auction houses that regularly host illustration sales
include Christies and Sothebys, where buyers can find
works by Rockwell, Wyeth, Leyendecker, and others at
the American art auctions each fall and spring. Freemans
in Philadelphia also hosts regular sales, including its
American Art and Pennsylvania Impressionists auction,
which totaled $4 million in December 2015, as does
Swann Auction Galleries in New York, which hosts a sale
each January. Heritage Auctions, based in Dallas,
is another market leader in the category, for which it
hosts semiannual sales.

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MARKETWATCH
THE BUSINESS OF ART
FEBRUARY 2016

AUCTIONS IN BRIEF

94

DATABANK

98

Old Master and British paintings in London, watches in


Hong Kong, African and Oceanic art in Paris, and more.

Amid recent economic turmoil, the market for Chinese


contemporary art continues to grow, albeit at a slower pace.

THE ACQUISITION

PHILLIPS

Elena Pakhoutova on the 18th-century Tibetan astrological


illustrations now at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York.

To kick off New Yorks winter design sales on December15, Phillips presented three distinct
auctionsdesign, design masters, and a special sale of works by late 19th-century ceramicists
R.W. Martin & Brothersbringing in $7.3million. Ron Arads 1993 prototype for D-Sofa,
above, jumped handily over its $150,000 high estimate in the design masters sale, going for
$257,000. The following day at Sothebys, the important design sale totaled $9.4million,
with Alberto Giacomettis Grande Feuille, Version Fine floor lamp also surpassing its high
estimate to sell for $442,000 (est. $200300,000). Christies mini sale of 15 design masterworks
on December17 totaled $1.7million, with Claude Lalannes Les Grandes Berces bench,
designed in 2000, hitting $425,000 on an estimate of $250,000 to $350,000, while the houses
December18 design sale brought in a total of $5.2million.

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

104

AUCTIONSINBRIEF
BY LIZA M.E. MUHLFELD

HONG KONG
TOKYO CHUO AUCTION
NOVEMBER 2526: 2015
HONG KONG AUTUMN SALES
254 LOTS SOLD FOR
$HK120,555,075 ($15.6million)
TOP LOT: In the Classical

Chinese Paintings sale on


November25, Flower Basket,
a hanging scroll in ink and
color on silk attributed to
LiSong, and created during
the Song to Yuan (9601368)
Dynasties, was the top-selling
lot of the series, realizing
$HK19,320,000 ($2.5million),
24 times its $HK800,000
($103,000) high estimate.
From the same era, Young
Birds, a hanging scroll in ink
and color on silk attributed
to Li Di, took second place,
commanding $HK14,260,000
($1.8million) (est. $HK600
900,000; $77,000116,000).
From the Imperial
Treasures auction the next
day, a blue-and-white Chinese
dragon vase from the Kangxi
period (16621722), estimated at $HK6.5million to
$HK8.5million ($839,000
1.1million), sold for $HK9.2million ($1.2million). Reaching
the same price was an imperial

celadon-glazed, squaredform vase from the


Yongzheng period (172235)
(est. $HK1.82.8million;
$232361,000). A poem
in seal script by Deng Shiru,
dated the 55th year of
Qianlongs reign (1790) and
with an estimate of
$HK600,000 to $HK1.2million
($77,000155,000), took
in $HK7,015,000 ($905,000).
At the Ichigo IchieThe
Art of Tea Ceremony auction,
an undated piece of Kyara
agarwood measuring 20.6
inches, achieved $HK2,185,000
($282,000) (est.$HK2
2.2million; $258284,000).
The same day, a horizontal
scroll with calligraphy in
running script by Zhao Zhiqian
from the mid 19thcentury
led the Enchantment of
Chinese Ink sale when it
achieved $HK3,450,000
($445,000) (est. $HK300
400,000; $3952,000).
The auction series
offered lots spanning several
categories, including fine
Chinese modern and classical
paintings, calligraphy, scholars
objects, and more. In all,
254of 470 lots were sold.

94

LONDON

Old Master
and British
Paintings
Christies kicked off this
semiannual sale series on
December8, when the house
offered 45 lots featuring
Northern Renaissance
and Flemish works. Pieter
Brueghel the Youngers
The Birdtrap, above, painted
during the late 16th to mid
17thcentury, and considered
by experts the artists

most popular subject among


collectors, sold for the
highest price of the evening
when it achieved 1,202,500
($1.8million), within its
estimate of 1million to
1.5million ($1.52.3million).
Although several works
on offer had been estimated
at or above 1million
($1.5million), it was the only
lot in the sale to cross the
seven-figure threshold. The
17th-century Aeneas and
the Cumaean Sibyl Presenting
the Golden Bough to Charon,
in oil on canvas by Pietro
Testa (sometimes called Il

Lucchesino), notched
746,500 ($1.1million),
comfortably exceeding its
500,000 ($754,000)
high estimate. A Winter
Carnival with Figures on
the Ice Before the
Kipdorppoort Bastion in
Antwerp, an oil on oak
panel produced by Flemish
painter Sebastian Vrancx
during the late 16th to mid
17thcentury, surpassed
its 250,000 ($377,000)
high estimate to sell for
410,500 ($619,000). Only
26 lots (58percent) found
buyers, realizing a total take

of 6,455,000 ($9.7million).
Sothebys crushed that
total the following day, when
29out of 44 lots garnered
22,633,750 ($34million).
John Constables The Lock,
below, completed in 1824 and
one of the artists best-known
works, hit the market for
the first time in more than
150years and led the
sale, landing at 9,109,000
($13.7million) on an estimate
of 8million to 12million
($1218million). The masterpiece sold to a
European private
collector. The
Virgin and Child, an
oil on oak panel
by Jan Gossaert,
called Mabuse, and
painted sometime
during the 16th
century, set
an auction record
for the artist
when it took in
4,629,000
($7million)
(est.46million;
$69million).
The left wing
of the Dreux Bud
Triptych, The
Betrayal and
Arrest of Christ,
with the Donor
Dreux Bud
and his Son Jean
Presented by Saint

Christopher, presumably
painted by Andr dYpres
during the mid 15thcentury,
also set an artist record
at auction when it captured
965,000 ($1.5million),
solidly exceeding its
600,000 ($902,000) high
estimate. Museum-quality
works by the usual names
in the category also made an
appearance; they included
pieces by Pieter Brueghel the
Younger, Willem Claesz
Heda, and Francesco Guardi.

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

PARIS
PIERRE BERGE & ASSOCIES
DECEMBER11: THE LIBRARY
OF PIERRE BERGE
148 LOTS SOLD FOR 11,687,380
($12.8 million)
TOP LOT: The French auction

house sold off the library


of its founder, Pierre Berg,
in association with Sothebys,
in a sale that was led by
an assortment of plans,
drafts, and abstracts from
Gustave Flauberts LEducation
sentimentale, from 1869. It
realized 587,720 ($645,000),
not quite reaching its
600,000 ($659,000) high
estimate. Following close
behind was a first edition of
works by Louise Lab (also
called Charly or Charlin) from
1555, which sold for 524,845
($576,000), exceeding its
400,000 ($439,000) high
estimate. Ruines gothiques,
a drawing on paper of pen
wash in black ink and
watercolor, circa1855, by
Victor Hugo, drew 500,500
($549,000) (est.50
80,000; $5588,000). The
collection Comedies,
Histories, and Tragedies of
William Shakespeare
sold for 245,101 ($269,000)
(est. 200300,000; $220
329,000). A first edition of

TOP

5
MUNICH

MODERN ART,
POSTWAR,
CONTEMPORARY
ART
KETTERER KUNST
DECEMBER35
At the houses threeday sale series,
approximately
700 of 895 lots
found buyers,
for a sell-through rate
of 78.2percent
by lot. The series
totaled $25.5million
and topped last
years sales total by
more than $2million.

1
OTTO PIENE
Dynamisches Volumen,
oil, smoke, and fire
on canvas, 1961
$875,000
(est. $127,000)

2
ERICH HECKEL
Hgellandschaft,
oil on canvas, 1913
$796,000
(est. $467,000)

3
OTTO PIENE
the Confessions of Saint
Augustine, published in
Strasbourg circa1470, landed
at 318,078 ($349,000)
(est.150200,000; $165
220,000). In total, Bergs
trove includes 1,600 books,
manuscripts, and musical
scores dating from the 15th to
the 20thcentury. However,
only 182 works spanning
six centuries were offered
here, which attracted buyers
from 15 countries and 3
continents. The remainder
of the collection will be
sold in a series of thematic
auctions taking place
through next year.

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

Wave of Darkness,
oil, fire, and smoke
on canvas, 1964
$663,000
(est. $318,000)

4
GUNTHER UECKER
Dunkles Feld, nails
and black paint on
canvas on wood, 1980
$530,000
(est. $159,000)

5
LYONEL FEININGER
The Baltic (V-Cloud),
oil on canvas, 1946/47
$504,000
(est. $297,000)

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

DENVER
LESLIE HINDMAN
AUCTIONEERS
NOVEMBER 1112:
ARTS OF THE
AMERICAN WEST
552 LOTS SOLD FOR
$442,835
TOP LOT: Painting

dominated this twoday sale of American


Western art, led
by Gerard Curtis
Delanos oil Navajo
Sheep3, painted
during the mid
20thcentury.
The pastel-colored
landscape sold
for $30,000,
at the midpoint of
its $20,000-to$40,000 estimate.
Also from the
20thcentury, Olaf
Wieghorsts Wrangling the
Ponies, an undated oil
depicting a group of horses in
a rugged mountain landscape,
took in $18,750, within its
$15,000-to-$25,000 estimate.
From the 19thcentury, Helen
Henderson Chains undated oil
painting Chamita Pueblo,
Near Espanola, New Mexico
more than tripled its $5,000
high estimate when it secured
a final price of $17,500. Two

HONG KONG
PHILLIPS
DECEMBER1: THE HONG KONG
WATCH AUCTION: ONE
278 LOTS SOLD FOR
$HK117,760,750 ($15.2million)
TOP LOT: The houses inaugural

sale of watches in Hong


Kong, held in association with
Bacs & Russo, was led by
an extremely rare and important white-gold perpetualcalendar wristwatch with moon
phases by Patek Philippe from
1985. With an estimate of
$HK8million to $HK16million
($12.1million), the watch sold
for $HK12,040,000 ($1.6million), the highest price ever
paid for a wristwatch in Asia.
A 1924 example by the same
makera stainless steel, openface watch with one-minute
tourbillon regulator, awarded
first prize at the Geneva
Astronomical Observatory
timing contest in 1931took in
$HK4,840,000 ($624,000).
A Cosmograph Daytona Paul
Newman watch by Rolex, a rare
stainless steel chronograph
wristwatch bracelet from 1974,
sold for $HK2,320,000
($299,000), almost meeting its
$HK2.4million ($310,000)
high estimate. Rolex secured
several of the highest prices at
the sale, as did Cartier and
Audemars Piguet. The auction
concluded with a sell-through
rate, by lot, of 78percent.

works by the living artist


Robert Daughters secured
solid results: The artists wintry
Mountainous Landscape,
undated, sold for $13,750 (est.
$6,0008,000), and Abstract
Mountain, also undated,
realized $6,875 (est. $6,000
8,000). An undated 51-by69-inch Navajo weaving from
the Bisti area of New Mexico,
made in a classic oriental
design and featuring two

central medallions with


a snowflake pattern on the
border, climbed beyond
its $6,000 high estimate to
earn $6,875. A large Klickitat
carrying basket from the
early 20thcentury, decorated
with an eight-point star, soared
beyond its $600 high estimate
to land at $4,000. The sale
found buyers for 85percent of
the 652 lots, with the majority
selling for less than $1,000.

95

AUCTIONSINBRIEF
483,000 ($512,000), more
than double its 200,000
($212,000) high estimate. All
of the 19 lots from the
collection sold for a total of
2.9million ($3.1million).
Not from the Delenne trove,
a carved statue of a young
man from Madagascar
set an auction record for a
piece originating from
that island nation when it
commanded 363,000
($385,000) (est.120
180,000; $127191,000).
The following day,
Christies sold only 65 out
of 100 lots offered, for a total
of 7,325,650 ($7.8million).
Unlike its competitor, the
house failed to secure a
leading collection to spearhead its sale. An undated
Fang reliquary figure
from Gabon, left, was the
star lot, cruising beyond its
3million ($3.2 million)
high estimate to realize
3,793,500 ($4million). A
mask from Saibai Island, off
the coast of northern Australia,
set a record for an Oceanic
mask when it went for
1,665,500 ($1.8million)
(est.750,0001.2million;
$796,0001.3million).

96

PARIS

African &
Oceanic Art
Perhaps due to a selection of
works from notable private
collections, on December2
Sothebys drove the two-day
sale series when 68 out of 84
lots found new homes for a
sales total of 5,932,500
($6.3million). The auction
was led by several works from
the collection of Ren and
Odette Delenne of Belgium,
who began acquiring African
art in 1958 after visiting the
Congolese pavilion at the
Brussels Worlds Fair. Undated
carved portraits of King
Pokam and his wife, Yugang,
right, rulers of the Bamileke
kingdom of Batoufam,
which were acquired by the
Delennes in 1970, secured
the top spot in the sale when
the hammer came down at
1,443,000 ($1.5million),
squarely within the carvings
estimate of 1.3million to
1.6million ($1.41.7million).
Also from the Delenne
collection was a statue of a
male figure from the Kopar
village on the Sepik River of
Papua New Guinea. It brought

TOP

5
COLOGNE

MODERN
AND
CONTEMPORARY
ART
VAN HAM
NOVEMBER26

This sale, dedicated


to leading
names in the category,
saw 894 out
of 1,072 lots
find new homes for
a sales total
of $10.5million.

1
GABRIELE MUNTER
Farmhouse in the Rain, oil
on cardboard, 1914
$407,000
(est. $266372,000)

2
HEINZ MACK
Dynamic Structure White
on Grey, artificial
resin on canvas, 1958
$299,000
(est. $213319,000)

3
LOVIS CORINTH
Roses and Lilac, oil on
canvas, 1918
$285,000
(est. $106159,000)

4
KARL HOFER
Still Life with Lute, oil on
canvas, 1929/30/31
$272,000
(est. $213319,000)

5
ANTONI TAPIES
Ochre with Six Collages,
mixed media
on wood, 1973
$252,000
(est. $106159,000)

PARIS
PIASA
NOVEMBER25:
KINETIC ARTLIGHT SHOW
73 LOTS SOLD FOR 736,661
($784,000)
TOP LOT: Honors for the

LONDON
SOTHEBYS
NOVEMBER24:
BERNHEIMER EVENING
22 LOTS SOLD FOR 1,362,000
($2.1million)
TOP LOT: Nicolas Lancrets

oil Le Menuet, 1732, an outdoor


scene featuring five individuals
in a forest, was the highestselling lot of the collection on
offer, a trove of art and design
from one of the most prized
family-run art dealing businesses of the 19th through 21st
centuries. But while the
painting led the auction, selling
for 197,000 ($299,000),
it failed to meet its 200,000
($303,000) low estimate.
The Valkhof at Nijmegen, with
a Coach on a Ferry on the
River Waal, an oil-on-oak panel
from 1646 by Jan Josefsz
van Goyen, inched past
its 180,000 ($273,000) high
estimate to take in a final
price of 185,000 ($280,000).
A 19th-century walnut
armchairupholstered in a
carpet dating to the
16thcenturymatched its high
estimate when it sold for
100,000 ($152,000). The
chair once served as a
throne for Pope John PaulII
when he visited Munich in
1980. An imperial Roman
marble sarcophagus from the
3rdcenturyA.D., the front
of which is carved with erotes,
or winged gods of love,
enacting the scene of Dionysos
discovering Ariadne on the
beach of Naxos, more than
doubled its 35,000 ($53,000)
high estimate when it
achieved a price of 77,500
($117,000). It was displayed
in the Italian courtyard
of the Bernheimer Palace in
Munich until 1987. Although a
number of historic pieces hit
the block, including Old Master
and 19th-century paintings,
textiles, and furniture, the
house realized mixed results:
only 52.4percent of lots
offered were sold, and 20 out
of 42 lots were bought in.

BLOUINARTINFO.COM

highest-selling lot of the sale


went to Contorsions No. 12,
by Conceptual artist Franois
Morellet. Made in 2008
from acrylic on canvas and
wood with neon, the piece
brought a price of 70,600
($75,000), exceeding its
65,000 ($69,000) high
estimate. Italian artist
Gregorio Vardanegas untitled
work made of painted
wooden casing, glass, and
a light system, from the
artists key period of 195758,
took in 61,824 ($66,000),
within its 50,000-to70,000 ($5374,000)
estimate. An electric light
system comprising Plexiglas
and metal in a wooden
casing by the same artist,
from 1964, secured a final
price of 45,080 ($48,000)
against an estimate of
40,000 to 50,000 ($43
53,000). Newspaper, by
Greek-American artist Chryssa,
an oil on canvas with a neon
light from 197073, sold for
37,352 ($40,000), just shy

TORONTO
HEFFEL FINE ART
AUCTION HOUSE
NOVEMBER26: POSTWAR &
CONTEMPORARY
ART, FINE CANADIAN ART
135 LOTS SOLD FOR
$C23.4million ($17.6million)

FEBRUARY 2016 ART+AUCTION

of its 40,000 ($43,000)


high estimate. Alberto Biasis
Politipo, 1968, a mixed-media
work made of ribbons and

TOP LOT: Mountain and Glacier,


an oil on canvas by Lawren
Harris from 1930, set an artist
record when it went for
$C4,602,000 ($3.5million),
more than tripling its
$C1.5million ($1.1million) high
estimate. The painting

nails on a painted background,


more than tripled its 7,000
($7,500) high estimate when it
earned 22,000 ($23,000).

In all, 73out of 120 lots


found buyers, resulting in a
sell-through rate by lot
of 60.8percent.

became the second most


valuable Canadian work
of art ever sold at auction
behind Paul Kanes oil Scene
in the NorthwestPortrait, mid
19thcentury, which sold for
$C5,062,500 ($3.8million) at
Sothebys in association with

Ritchies in Toronto in 2002.


Two other works by Harris also
found buyers: Winter
Landscape, an oil circa191617,
realized $C3,658,000
($2.7million) (est. $C1.2
1.6million; $902,0001.2million), and Winter in the
Ward, an oil circa1920, sold
for $C1,121,000 ($843,000)
(est.$C500700,000;
$376526,000), bringing the
artists total for the sale
to approximately $C9.4million
($7.1million). Alex Colvilles
Harbour, 1975, an acrylic
polymer emulsion on board,
fetched $C1,888,000
($1.4million) (est. $C500
700,000; $376526,000),
also setting an artist record.
Thomas John Thomsons
landscape After the Storm, an
oil on board from 1917 said
to be the last work the artist
produced before his death,
sold for $C1,298,000
($976,000), exceeding its
$C700,000 ($526,000)
high estimate. The houses
semiannual live auction set 13
artist records and concluded
as the highest-grossing
fine art auction in Canadian
history, with six works selling
for more than $C1million
($752,000). The sales total
blew away the presale
estimate of $C10million to
$C15million ($7.511.3million).

97

DATABANK

A Mutable Market
LIKE THE BROADER MARKET for postwar and contemporary art, the market for works by

Chinese contemporary artists has been on the rise since the financial crisis of 200809. An analysis
of more than 100,000 auction lots sold since the beginning of 2000 shows the same strong
growth from 2009 through 2013 as was experienced in the pre-crisis years of 2005 through 2007.
By 2014, it was clear that the pace of growth had begun to slow. This led consignors to withhold works,
and as a result by the third quarter of 2015 we witnessed a precipitous drop in the number of works
hitting the auction blocka 37 percent decline in dollar volume compared with the same period a year

The Last Supper, 2001,


a riff on Leonardo da
Vinci by Beijing-based
ZengFanzhi, sold
for an artist record
$23.3million (est.
$10.515.5 million)
at Sothebys Hong
Kong in October
2013, the year of peak
market growth
for Chinese contemporary art.

earlier. From our analysis, it is clear that this category correction is due largely to socioeconomic
conditions within mainland China, a result first and foremost of the draconian anti-corruption regulations initiated by President Xi Jinping. Secondly, there has been a pronounced slowdown in economic
growth and a drop in Chinese stock markets over the past 12 months. Yet such a correction was long
overdue, given the enormous increases in asset valuation since 2005, driven by a booming population
of local buyers and Western collectors and speculators, who envisioned the economic potential
for what had hitherto been a largely grassroots market for Chinese contemporary art. Despite the
downturn, the category is still popular with collectors. Of the top 100 contemporary artists worldwide

98

ranked by turnover, 31 are Chinese.

BY ROMAN KRUSSL

CHINESE CONTEMPORARY ART INDEX, 200015


Since 2005, when the market for works by all Chinese artists began to see an increase in demand from local collectors as well as Western collectors
and art market speculators, Chinese contemporary art has been on the rise, dipping only during the global economic correction of 2008, when the
All Artists index dropped from 515 to 358. At that time, the Top 50 index dropped from 642 to 405. Just as the decline in 2008 was felt more
sharply among the top 50 artists, the rise since 2009 has been more dramatic for this group. While both indices had rebounded by 2009, it is clear
that the market grew more slowly in 2014 and 2015.
1,400
All artists

Top 50 artists

1,200

1,000

800

600

400

200

0
2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

2014

2015

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

99

MARKET FOR ZENG FANZHI, 200515


Born in 1964, the painter is Chinas most successful living artist, both in terms of the performance of his works on the block and overall sales volume. Prior to
2000, he was collected exclusively by Western enthusiasts such as Myriam and Guy Ullensfounders of Beijings Ullens Center for Contemporary Art (UCCA).
When they first purchased Zengs work in the 1990s, canvases sold for less than $10,000. The artists prices began to climb dramatically in 2005 as more
Chinese collectors entered the market for contemporary works by their compatriots. Since June 2007, Zeng has generated more than 120 auction sales
above the million-dollar mark. More than 560 of his pieces earned a cumulative value of over $336million from January 2005 through mid December 2015.
1,000

90
Pricing index

Sales volume

900

80

800

70

700
60
600
50
500
40
400
30

300

20

200

10

SOTHEBYS

100
0

0
2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

FOR OTHER INDICES AND MORE THAN 4.8 MILLION FINE ART AND DESIGN AUCTION RESULTS, GO TO ARTSALESINDEX.ARTINFO.COM

2014

2015

GALLERY
LISTINGS
ACA Galleries
529 West 20th Street
5th Floor
New York, NY
+1 212 206 8080
info@acagalleries.com
www.acagalleries.com
Jack Stuppin:Homage to the Hudson
River School, through February 20.
Jack Stuppins vibrant, undulating
landscapes are passionate reactions
to nature and ardent appeals for
environmental consciousness. Nature is
the soul of his art. Stuppins conception
and execution are highly individual and
original. Using thick impasto, energetic
brushwork and brilliant colors he has
created his own particular style

Jack Stuppin, Catskill Moon, 2013

Acquavella Galleries
18 East 79th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 734 6300
info@acquavellagalleries.com
www.acquavellagalleries.com
Hours: Monday through Saturday,
10-5pm
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
Alexandre Gallery
724 Fifth Avenue
4th Floor
New York, NY
+1 212 755 2828
inquiries@alexandregallery.com
www.alexandregallery.com
Martha Diamond: Recent Paintings
and Vincent Smith: Seventies New York,
through February 13. Lois Dodd: Night
and Day, February 25 through April 2
Bernd Goeckler Antiques, Inc.
30 East 10th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 777 8209
bgantiques@mac.com
www.bgoecklerantiques.com
Modern lighting, furniture, and accessories, specializing in 20th century
masters, including Max Ingrand,
Andr Sornay, Axel Salto and Gabriella
Crespi. Featuring select antiques from
the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as
the contemporary designs of Franco
Deboni, Roberto Rida, and Simone
Crestani

Blondeau & Cie


5 rue de la Muse
Geneva
Switzerland
+41 22 544 95 95
muse@blondeau.ch
www.blondeau.ch
Jonathan Monk: The Life Sized Black
(a Porsche for RH), March 17 through
April 30
Christian Duvernois Gallery
648 Broadway
Suite 804
New York, NY
+1 212 268 3628
info@christianduvernois.com
www.christianduvernois.com
Hours: Monday through Saturday,
10-6pm
A Paper Affair, through February 13.
Works by Clytie Alexander, Vicky
Colombet, Barbara Edelstein, Philippe
Gronon, Eric Poitevin and Guy de
Rougemont. Wildscapes: Ivan Stojakovic and Paula Winokur, February 24
through April 23
Coeur dAlene Art Auction
8836 North Hess Street
Suite B
Hayden, ID
+1 208 772 9009
info@cdaartauction.com
www.cdaartauction.com
Largest auction house in the country
specializing in Western American
Paintings and Sculpture with over
$250 million in sales over the last ten
years. Now taking consignments for
our 2016 auction to be heldJuly 23at
the Peppermill Resort in Reno.For
more information please call or visit our
website
Crown Point Press
20 Hawthorne Street
San Francisco, CA
+1 415 974 6273
info@crownpoint.com
www.crownpoint.com
Winter Group Show and Wayne
Thiebaud: New Etchings, through
February 27
Dallas Auction Gallery
2235 Monitor Street
Dallas, TX
+1 214 653 3900
info@dallasauctiongallery.com
www.dallasauctiongallery.com
Dallas Auction Gallery is a leading
international antiques, fine art and
jewelry auction house. DAG is known
for integrity, straightforwardness and
personal service for both buyer and
seller
Doyle New York
175 East 87th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 427 2730
info@doylenewyork.com
www.doylenewyork.com
Please check our website for current
and upcoming sale information as well
as hours of operation

Gagosian Gallery
976 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
+1 212 744 2313
newyork@gagosian.com
www.gagosian.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation
Gagosian Gallery
980 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
+1 212 744 2313
newyork@gagosian.com
www.gagosian.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation
Gagosian Gallery
821 Park Avenue
New York, NY
+1 212 796 1228
parkand75@gagosian.com
www.gagosian.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation

Galerie Patrick Seguin


45-47 Brook Street
London
United Kingdom
+44 (0)207 499 7766
lucy@patrickseguin.com
www.patrickseguin.com
Hours: Monday through Saturday
10-6:30pm
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
Galerie Patrick Seguin
5 rue des Taillandiers
Paris
France
+33 1 4700 3235
info@patrickseguin.com
www.patrickseguin.com
Hours: Monday through Saturday,
9-7pm
20th century furniture & architecture:
Jean Prouv, Charlotte Perriand, Pierre
Jeanneret, Le Corbusier and Jean
Royre, through March 5

Gagosian Gallery
555 West 24th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 741 1111
newyork@gagosian.com
www.gagosian.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation
Gagosian Gallery
522 West 21st Street
New York, NY
+1 212 741 1717
newyork@gagosian.com
www.gagosian.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation
Gagosian Gallery
456 North Camden Drive
Beverly Hills, CA
+1 310 271 9400
losangeles@gagosian.com
www.gagosian.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation
Gagosian Gallery
4 rue de Ponthieu
Paris
France
+33 1 75 00 05 92
paris@gagosian.com
www.gagosian.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation

Galerie Patrick Seguin

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac


Mirabellplatz 2
Salzburg
Austria
+43 662 881 393
salzburg@ropac.at
www.ropac.net
Daniel Richter, Half-Naked Truth,
through March 12
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac
7 rue Debelleyme
69 Avenue General Leclerc
Paris
France
+33 1 4272 9900
paris.pantin@ropac.net
www.ropac.net
Paris/ Marais: XYZ- Robert Mapplethorpe curated by Peter Marino, through
March 5. Paris/Pantin: Jean-Marc
Bustamante, through March 5. Tony
Cragg, February 21 through July 30

special advertising section

Tony Cragg, Hardliner, 2013 at Galerie


Thaddaeus Ropac

Gooding & Company


1517 20th Street
Santa Monica, CA
+1 310 899 1960
info@goodingco.com
www.goodingco.com
Gooding & Company is recognized as
the leading auction house specializing
in antique, classic, sports and racing
cars. We are committed to conducting
auctions of distinction, private sales,
appraisals and estate planning. Our
qualified experts are ready to assist you
Heritage Auctions
445 Park Avenue
at 57th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 486 3500
info@ha.com
www.ha.com
Hours: Monday through Friday, 10-6pm
Heritage Auctions serves more than
900,000 online bidder-members in 40
total collectible categories, specializing
in fine and decorative art, and coins.
Visit HA.com for information on upcoming auctions and preview events,
and stop by our ever-changing display,
Windows on Park Avenue
Heritage Auctions
3500 Maple Avenue
Dallas, TX
+1 800 872 6467
+1 214 409 1444
fineart@ha.com
www.ha.com
Since 1976, Heritage has held more
than 4,000 auctions, selling more than
$4 billion worth of art, coins and other
collectibles on behalf of more than
45,000 consignors. Visit our awardwinning website, HA.com, for
information on upcoming auctions,
as well as our new offices in Beverly
Hills, New York and San Francisco
Heritage Auctions
9478 West Olympic
First Floor
Beverly Hills, CA
+1 310 492 8600
info@ha.com
www.ha.com
Hours: Monday through Friday, 9-5pm
Heritage Auctions has experts in
over 34 unique categories, including
California Art, Photographs, Fine Silver
& Vertu, Luxury Real Estate, Arms &
Armor, currency and other collectibles.
Visit www.HA.com for a full list of
categories and information on
upcoming auctions

Heritage Auctions
478 Jackson Street
San Francisco, CA
+1 800 872 6467
info@ha.com
www.ha.com
Monday through Friday, 9-5pm
Heritage Auctions has experts in
over 34 unique categories, including
California Art, Photographs, Fine Silver
& Vertu, Luxury Real Estate, Arms &
Armor, currency and other collectibles.
Visit www.HA.com for a full list of
categories and information on
upcoming auctions
Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc.
The Crown Building
730 Fifth Avenue
4th Floor
New York, NY
+1 212 535 8810
gallery@hirschlandadler.com
www.hirschlandadler.com
Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 9:30am
5:15pm; Saturday, 9:30am 4:45pm
Frank Walter: Lonely Bird, through
February 13. Frederick Brosen,
Recent Watercolors: Rome & Florence,
February 4 through March 12.
Eschewing tourist views of the oftdepicted Rome and Florence, Brosen
paints the ancient Italian cities as one
who calls them home. The rooftops
and back alleys, the corners of public
gardens and forgotten statues are
celebrated by this master watercolorist

Jack Shainman Gallerys


The School
25 Broad Street
Kinderhook, NY
+1 212 645 1701
info@jackshainman.com
www.jackshainman.com
Winter in America, group exhibition
including Yoan Capote, Marc di
Suvero, Hayv Kahraman and Hank
Willis Thomas, among others. Please
visit gallery website in advance for
pertinent information
James Goodman Gallery
41 East 57th Street
8th Floor
New York, NY
+1 212 593 3737
info@jamesgoodmangallery.com
www.jamesgoodmangallery.com
New Acquisitions: Calder, Chagall,
Chamberlain, Cornell, Dubuffet,
Francis, Gleizes, Hofmann, Jenkins,
Kline, Lger, Maillol, Moore, Picasso,
Rauschenberg, Warhol, Wesselmann
and others
Leonard Hutton Galleries
790 Madison Avenue
Between 66th & 67th Streets
Suite 506
New York, NY
+1 212 751 7373
art@leonardhuttongalleries.com
www.leonardhuttongalleries.com
Drawings and Watercolors: To Observe and Imagine, 20th century European and American works on paper
Marian Goodman Gallery
24 West 57th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 977 7160
goodman@mariangoodman.com
www.mariangoodman.com
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
and hours of operation

Frederick Brosen, Piazza delle Cinque


Scole, 2015

Jack Shainman Gallery


513 West 20th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 645 1701
info@jackshainman.com
www.jackshainman.com
El Anatsui, Maya Lin, Bernd and
Hilla Becher | Of A Different Nature,
February 4 through March 12
Jack Shainman Gallery
524 West 24th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 337 3372
info@jackshainman.com
www.jackshainman.com
Claudette Schreuders | Notes to Self,
February 4 through March 12

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street
2nd Floor
New York, NY
+1 212 541 4900
mny@marlboroughgallery.com
www.marlboroughgallery.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday,
10-5:30pm
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information
Marlborough Chelsea
545 West 25th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 463 8634
info@marlboroughchelsea.com
www.marlboroughchelsea.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday,
10-6 pm
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information

Nancy Hoffman Gallery


520 West 27th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 966 6676
info@nancyhoffmangallery.com
www.nancyhoffmangallery.com
Robert Zakanitch: In the Garden of
the Moon, through March 5

Robert Zakanitch, Night Desert Bloomings,


2014

Neal Auction Company


4038 Magazine Street
New Orleans, LA
+1 800 467 5329
clientservices@nealauction.com
www.nealauction.com
Considered the Souths leading auctioneer, Neal Auctions sales regularly
establish record prices for American,
English and Continental paintings,
furniture and decorative arts. Each
auction offers a wide variety of material
including unreserved estate collections
and museum deaccessions. Next
Auction: February 19, 20 & 21
Pace/MacGill Gallery
32 East 57th Street
9th Floor
New York, NY
+1 212 759 7999
info@pacemacgill.com
www.pacemacgill.com
Christer Strmholm, through February 20. Irving Penn: Personal Work,
through March 5, at 534 West 25th
Street. Hiro, February 25 through
April 2. Opening reception: Thursday,
February 25
RoGallery.com
47-15 36th Street
Long Island City, NY
+1 718 937 0901
+1 800 888 1063
art@rogallery.com
www.rogallery.com
Fine Art Auctions, bid online or on our
new iPhone / Android app. Art Buyers
and Consignments. Over 5000 artists
paintings, prints, photographs, and
sculptures. View entire collection at
RoGallery.com. World-wide shipping.
Specializing in Op-Art, Modern & Contemporary Art, Pop Art & more. Pablo
Picasso Estate Collection. Gallery by
Appointment

GALLERY LISTINGS
Scholten Japanese Art
145 West 58th Street
Suite 6D
New York, NY
+1 212 585 0474
www.scholten-japanese-art.com
By appointment Monday through
Friday 11-5pm; some Saturdays
Scholten Japanese Art offers paintings,
screens, woodblock prints and netsuke
in a private setting
Swann Auction Galleries
104 East 25th Street
New York, NY
+1 212 254 4710
art@swanngalleries.com
www.swanngalleries.com
Swann was founded in 1941 specializing in Rare and Antiquarian Books
and today is the largest specialist
auctioneer of Works on Paper in the
world. Swann conducts approximately
40 sales a year, with departments
devoted to Books, Autographs, Maps
& Atlases, Photographs & Photobooks,
Prints & Drawings, Vintage Posters and
African-American Fine Art

Throckmorton Fine Art


145 East 57th Street
3rd Floor
New York, NY
+1 212 223 1059
info@throckmorton-nyc.com
www.throckmorton-nyc.com
Christian Cravo: Twenty Five Years,
through February 27

Van Doren Waxter


23 East 73rd Street
New York, NY
+1 212 445 0444
info@vandorenwaxter.com
www.vandorenwaxter.com
Richard Diebenkorn: Early Color Abstractions 1949-1955, through March 5

Richard Diebenkorn, Untitled, c. 1952-53


Christian Cravo, Untitled, Bahia, 2003

Vallois
27 East 67th Street
Mezzanine level
New York, NY
+1 212 517 3820
valloisamerica@aol.com
www.vallois.com
Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 106pm; Saturday, 10-5pm
Please visit our website or contact the
gallery for current exhibition information

Zane Bennett Contemporary Art


435 South Guadalupe Street
Santa Fe, NM
+1 505 982 8111
info@zanebennettgallery.com
www.zanebennettgallery.com
New Acquisitions by Tong Zhengang,
Zhang Xiaogang, Jim Dine, Joseph
Cornell, Roberto Matta, Robert Motherwell, Richard Serra, Akira Yamaguchi.
Works available by Bacon, LeWitt,
Martin, Stella, Rauschenberg. Please
contact gallery for current exhibition
information

Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Hotel du Nord),


1972

To be included in Art+Auctions paid


gallery listings, contact Alexis Smith at
asmith@artinfo.com

Andy Warhols Liz #5


Whats it worth? Find out at

Unlimited Searches. Millions of Auction Records Dating Back to 1922.


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THEACQUISITION

Elena Pakhoutova on
the White Beryl
THE CURATOR OF HIMALAYAN ART MUSES ON THE RUBIN MUSEUMS
RECENT PURCHASE OF A TIBETAN ASTROLOGICAL MASTERPIECE
THE RUBIN MUSEUM of Art in New York has acquired a unique set of 96 painted

ART+AUCTION FEBRUARY 2016

THE RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART, NEW YORK

104

folioselaborate illustrations of a Tibetan astrological treatise known as the


White Berylthat were commissioned by Sakya Buddhist clergy and executed
by the master artist Sonam Peljor in the early to mid 18th century. The text
of the treatise itself was composed in the 1680s by a great Tibetan polymath,
Desi Sangye Gyatso, who was a regent to both the ifth and sixth dalai lamas.
What is most remarkable about this set of paintings is that none other exists of
such complexity and representation of the subject and of such quality. Although
the noted scholar Gyurme Dorje has undertaken a detailed study of the content
of the folios, art historical
research on them has yet to
be carried out. They provide
a great opportunity for
studying the art and culture of
18th-century Tibet. Moreover, the folios were painted
on cloth, like Tibetan scroll
paintings (thangka), rather
than on paper, as is usual
for manuscripts. It is probable
that they were painted
irst on a stretched canvas
and then cut to form
traditional Tibetan folios.
The painted folios cover
the full breadth of the
astrological knowledge of the
time, which is still in use
today. Each aspect of
material existence is considered within this comprehensive system, in the belief
that the environment can
be evaluated and manipulated
to ensure a more favorable
outcome in such areas as
birth, marriage, and health.
Among the elements included
in the manuscript are
year-speciic divination
charts, geomantic considerations to determine when and
A detail, above, from a painted
folio of the White Beryl, a Tibetan
where to construct a new building, forecasts of natal horotreatise on divination that depicts
scopes and marriage compatibility, and calculations of
the pure land of Buddha Amitabha.
On the folios lower portion is a
obstacle years and other portents of ill health and death.
table that determines individual
With the acquisition of this manuscriptpurchased from
dispositions based on combinations
London dealer Sam Fogg late last yearthe Rubin Museums of birth years and elements.
collection has become an unequaled source for the art
of Tibetan astrology, divination, and cosmology, offering
unprecedented possibilities for exhibitions and scholarship.
Folios from the manuscript go on view this month when
Masterworks: Jewels of the Collection opens February10.

| BLOUINARTINFO.COM

Gagosian Gallery February 9April 23, 2016


624 Britannia Street London WC1X 9JD +44.207.841.9960 www.gagosian.com
Left: Richard Avedon, Louis Armstrong, musician, Newport Jazz Festival, Newport, Rhode Island, May 3, 1955 2016 The Richard Avedon Foundation
Right: Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli, 1979, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh 2016 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society, NY