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Scenario 2: A student is being chased by a rabid dog

1. Endocrine: Adrenal glands release Adrenaline, which increases heart


rate and alertness with the fight or flight response
2. Respiratory: Breathing rate increases to supply more oxygen to the
muscles
3. Circulatory: Heart rate increases to move the oxygen faster and
remove carbon dioxide faster as well
4. Excretory: Sweat glands excrete sweat to cool down the body while it
heats up from running
5. Digestive: Nutrients and glucose absorbed by the digestive system fuel
the cells in the muscular system
6. Nervous: The brain tells the muscles to fire at certain moments to
continue the running.
7. Immune: White Blood Cells are on standby to fight rabies if the student
fails in running away from the dog.
8. Reproductive: Testosterone production increases, which improves
athletic performance overall
9. Muscular: Muscles expand and contract to propel the body forward
10.Skeletal: Bones ensure the muscles have something to pull on to
generate force and movement
11.Integumentary: Skin sweats to help cool the muscles, which are
pumping furiously
Scenario 4: A student is standing outside in 100 degree weather and is
hot!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Endocrine: Thyroid releases hormones to decrease metabolism


Respiratory: Breathing rate increases to enhance dissipation of heat
Circulatory: Blood vessels dilate to help dissipate heat
Excretory: Sweat is excreted to help cool down the body
Digestive: The small intestine absorb nutrients and glucose that help
sustain the body through the heat
6. Nervous: The hypothalamus senses that the body temperature is
elevated, and directs the other systems to respond
7. Immune: White blood cells protect the student from pathogens such as
viruses and bacteria
8. Reproductive: An egg was fertilized by the students parents, which
eventually developed in the mothers womb to form the student, so the
student could actually stand outside in 100 degree weather
9. Muscular: muscles in the lower back keep the body upright and not
hunched over
10.Skeletal: Bones keep the student upright so he isnt sitting outside in
100 degree weather
11.Integumentary: Skin acts to remove heat by functioning as a radiator
and sweating
Scenario 5: Student is skiing in the Rockies and is freezing!
1. Endocrine: Thyroid releases thyroxine to increase metabolism

2. Respiratory: Breathing rate increases to help feed the muscles with air,
which keeps the body warm
3. Circulatory: Heart rate increases to keep the muscles from failing which
would lead to a crash, which would further freeze the student
4. Excretory: The kidneys actively filter the blood, preventing
5. Digestive: Nutrients and glucose absorbed by the digestive system fuel
the muscle cells making goosebumps and keeping the student skiing
6. Nervous: The brain keeps adjusting signals to the muscles so the
student doesnt crash, which would destabilize homeostasis
7. Immune: Dry winter air makes flu viruses improves transmission of the
Flu, so the immune system has to increase white blood cell production
to keep up
8. Reproductive: Testosterone improves the strength of the students
muscles, so the student has some measure of control over the skis
9. Muscular: Muscles keep the body skiing and shiver as well as make
goosebumps, which all keep the body warm
10.Skeletal: The bones ensure that the student doesnt collapse and
careen off course, which would result in being buried in snow
11.Integumentary: The hairs in the skin raise to form an air pocket that
warms the body
Scenario 6: A student just ate a piece of chocolate cake
1. Endocrine: Pancreas releases insulin to ensure blood sugar doesnt
skyrocket
2. Respiratory: Lungs exchange CO2 for O2 so there is sufficient oxygen
for cellular respiration
3. Circulatory: The bloodstream distributes sugars and nutrients from the
cake to the rest of the body
4. Excretory: Kidneys start filtering out unnecessary molecules from the
cake that made it into the bloodstream
5. Digestive: Villi absorb nutrients from the cake to provide sustenance to
the body
6. Nervous: Taste buds tell the brain that the cake tastes good, and that it
should eat more
7. Immune: White Blood Cells kill pathogens carried by the cake
8. Reproductive: An egg was fertilized by the students parents, which
eventually developed in the mothers womb to form the student
9. Muscular: Muscles in the stomach physically digest the food
10.Skeletal: The spine prevents the torso from collapsing, destroying the
digestive system
11.Integumentary: Salivary glands dissolve any remaining particles of the
chocolate cake in the mouth
Scenario 8: A student had to skip lunch as is starving!
1. Endocrine: Pancreas releases glucagon to ensure blood sugar doesnt
plummet
2. Respiratory: Lungs exchange CO2 for O2 so there is sufficient oxygen
for cellular respiration

3. Circulatory: The bloodstream distributes glucose released by the liver


to the cells
4. Excretory: The lungs remove CO2 from the body to prevent further
fatigue
5. Digestive: The small intestine continues extracting nutrients from
breakfast, so some nutrients are still delivered to the cells
6. Nervous: Receptors in the digestive system tell the student to keep on
the lookout for food
7. Immune: White Blood Cells keep pathogens from exploiting the
decreased blood sugar and weakened body cells
8. Reproductive: An egg was fertilized by the students parents, which
eventually developed in the mothers womb to form the student
9. Muscular: Muscles in the stomach contract to form hunger pangs and
consciously alert the student of the lack of food
10.Skeletal: The body taps into calcium deposits for help make up from
the deficit of calcium stemming from not eating lunch
11.Integumentary: Skin acts as a barrier against pathogens who could
easily spread while the body is in a weakened state caused by hunger