Joshua Christensen

Privacy In a Digital Age: Final Paper  

Why Free Open Source Software is the Best Choice for Maintaining User Privacy 
In the last few decades, we’ve seen explosive growth in technology rivaling that of any 
era in human history. With the rise of the computer, the environment in which mankind lives and 
works has changed drastically. Computers have had an undeniably positive impact on the 
efficiency with which we work, and the interconnectedness of today’s society, but with these 
benefits come major drawbacks. Through the services like Google and Facebook, we’re giving 
up our personal data in exchange for convenience1 2. Certain operating systems like Windows 
10 automatically collect information about what you do on your computer3. Even some software, 
like the Chinese web browsers Baidu Browser4 and QQ Browser5 , have functionality to monitor 
the state of your PC and send it to third parties. Unfortunately, so much of our modern computer 
use is centered around closed source, corporate or government controlled software, leaving us 
powerless to change what information is collected about us. Short of not using the software and 
losing the benefits that it imparts to us, the user’s privacy is entirely in control of these entities.  
Fortunately, there exists a classification of software that is free from these controlling 
influences. Free Open Source Software (or FOSS), is software that’s community developed and 

1

 The Atlantic: “Facebook Is Expanding the Way It Tracks You and Your Data“: 
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/06/facebook­is­expanding­the­way­it­tracks­you­and­yo
ur­data/372641/ 
2
 Salon: “4 ways Google is destroying privacy and collecting your data“: 
http://www.salon.com/2014/02/05/4_ways_google_is_destroying_privacy_and_collecting_your_data_partner

3
 Computerworld: “​
Windows 10 makes diagnostic data collection compulsory​
“: 
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2968288/microsoft­windows/windows­10­makes­diagnostic­data­colle
ction­compulsory.html 
4
  CitizenLab: “Baidu’s and Don’ts: Privacy and Security Issues in Baidu Browser“: 
https://citizenlab.org/2016/02/privacy­security­issues­baidu­browser/ 
5
 Washington Post: “This Chinese browser gathers a crazy amount of your data and then stores it unsafely“: 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/03/28/chinese­browser­gathers­pathological­lev
el­of­personal­data­and­then­stores­unsafely­study­finds/ 

 

controlled, existing as a sort of “democratic” alternative to the autocracies of corporate and 
government controlled software. FOSS is designed, written and maintained by the community, 
freeing it from the control of corporate entities and governments. It’s fully transparent, any user 
can look into the source code (the internal workings of the software) to see exactly what the 
program is doing, and why. Finally, because FOSS is free and often redistributable, it mitigates 
a number of barriers of entry that users might encounter when trying to protect their privacy.  

Technical Background: 
In order to effectively understand this paper, first we must cover a number of topics 
crucial to understanding the FOSS movement. We’ll start off by defining a number of key terms. 
An ​
operating system​
 is a collection of baseline software that you need to use a computer. 
Windows by Microsoft, and OSX by Apple are both operating systems. A program’s ​
source code 
is a human readable version of a computer program. When someone creates something to run 
on a computer, they write source code to describe exactly what the program does. If the source 
code is modified, a programmer can change what the program does. To contrast this, most 
programs these days are distributed in the form of a ​
precompiled binary.​
 This is the result of a 
process called compilation, which takes the source code of a program and turns it into simple 
instructions that the computer executes. These kinds of files are not human readable, so it’s not 
feasible for a person to determine what a program does by reading the binary files, let alone 
change the program by modifying them. ​
Open Source​
 is when a program's source code is 
available to users of the program. ​
Free Open Source Software​
 is software that is free to use, 
and often free to distribute and modify. In this paper, when referring to Free Open Source 
Software, it should be assumed that I am referring to software that is free to use, modify and 
redistribute in all situations.  

 

A Bit of History on Open Source Software: 
The Open Source software movement as it exists today has it’s origins in the early 80’s. 
At the time, AT&T owned and licensed an operating system called UNIX that was widely used in 
academic circles, eventually growing into commercial use because of it’s academic prevalence6. 
Unfortunately, the software was proprietary and under the control of AT&T, who restricted the 
source code and collected licensing fees for its use7. In 1983, Richard Stallman founded the 
GNU (GNU’s Not Unix) Project in order to create a free, community controlled version of Unix. In 
1985 he published the GNU Manifesto8 , which, among other things, outlined his reasons for 
creating the project. Stallman cites primarily his desire for users to be able to control the 
software that runs on their computers, and ultimately to improve the state of the programming 
art through the elimination of redundant work. By 1991, The GNU project had almost completed 
their goal. The last piece, a key component called the kernel, was incomplete9 . Around the 
same time, a software developer named Linus Torvalds started work on one such kernel. 
Linus’s kernel was eventually combined with the other GNU utilities, spawning an operating 
system. This operating system, and its derivatives, commonly referred to collectively as Linux, 
have grown to become some of the largest and most popular open source projects today. 
Google’s Android operating system uses a derivative of the Linux kernel10, and approximately 
35% of all servers on the internet run some version of the operating system11. Linux is a case 

6

 The Unix System ­­ History and Timeline: ​
http://www.unix.org/what_is_unix/history_timeline.html 
 Why Open Source Software / Free Software? Look at the numbers! : 
http://www.dwheeler.com/oss_fs_why.html#history 
8
 The GNU Manifesto: ​
http://www.gnu.org/gnu/manifesto.en.html 
9
History of UNIX, Linux, and Open Source / Free Software 
http://www.dwheeler.com/secure­programs/Secure­Programs­HOWTO/history.html 
10
 Android A­Z: What is the Kernel?:​
 http://www.androidcentral.com/android­z­what­kernel 
11
 Usage Statistics and Market Share of UNIX for Websites (Author’s note: the page title is deceptive, 
w3techs refers to all *nix systems as “UNIX”): ​
http://w3techs.com/technologies/details/os­unix/all/all 
7

 

study in the viability of FOSS, and I’ll repeatedly refer to it throughout this paper as the shining 
example of community collaboration and technological freedom that it is. 

The Question of Control 
In general, one of the greatest benefits of FOSS is that, due to the fact that it’s often 
community created and controlled, it’s more free from corporate and state influence than 
software created and maintained by those groups. This extends to protect personal privacy in a 
few ways. This lessened state and corporate influence minimizes incentives to violate user 
privacy in exchange for monetary gain, or in defense of “public safety”. Lastly, the fact that the 
creators of the software will very often be using the software themselves, there exists a positive 
incentive for developers to create the most secure software they can.  
Data brokering, the buying and selling of user’s personal data, is a $200 Billion industry12
. In 2014, Facebook, who targets advertisements based upon information collected from users, 
made $2.96 Billion in advertising revenue13. With this sort of financial incentive, one can readily 
expect that corporations are looking to exploit this emerging market. Even when companies 
promise not to sell your data to marketers, that’s no guarantee that your personal information is 
safe. Radio Shack, an electronics store, collected customer names, phone numbers, and 
addresses, but their privacy policy stated that they wouldn’t sell the data. However, in their 
bankruptcy proceedings, they listed those customer databases in the list of assets they were 
auctioning off to pay their debts14. In the end, most of this data was destroyed rather than sold, 
but according to CNN Money, “ the court could have allowed the sale of the data despite the 

12

 Pando: “What Surveilance Valley Knows About You”: 
https://pando.com/2013/12/22/a­peek­into­surveillance­valley/ 
13
 VentureBeat: “Facebook's Q3 ad revenue hits $2.96B, with 66% coming from mobile“: 
http://venturebeat.com/2014/10/28/facebooks­q3­ad­revenue­hits­2­96b­with­66­coming­from­mobile/ 
14
 Bloomberg: “Radioshack’s Bankruptcy Could Sell Your Data to the Highest Bidder”:  
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015­03­24/radioshack­s­bankruptcy­could­give­your­customer­dat
a­to­the­highest­bidder 

 

promises that RadioShack had previously made to customers”15 . In order to be in complete 
control of one’s personal information, a user could make efforts to replace proprietary software 
and services they use with FOSS alternatives. While Google collects information from their 
online services, a user could instead install and use their own version of the FOSS OwnCloud16, 
a community driven, Open Source software suite that performs many of the same functions, 
without having to expose personal information to some corporate third party.  
Corporate data collection isn’t the only threat to the user’s personal privacy. Data 
collection by the state has the potential to be significantly more damaging to a user’s life than 
corporate data brokering, because of the extra legal powers the state has over its citizens. 
Edward Snowden’s 2013 leaks about the PRISM program17 demonstrate the efforts that 
governments will go through in order to collect information on their own citizens. The PRISM 
program collected information from a multitude of online services, such as Microsoft’s Hotmail 
and Google’s Gmail services. While the Stored Communications Act18  still requires the 
government to have a warrant to access the content of E­Mails between US citizens newer than 
180 days, the NSA was still able to collect metadata19  as long as “communications with at least 
one communicant outside the United States or for which no communicant was known to be a 
citizen of the United States”20. This surveillance behavior isn’t exclusive to the US government 
either. The Chinese version of Skype, known as TOM­Skype, was found to automatically censor 
messages containing certain keywords, as well as forward a copy of the message to Chinese 

15

 CNN Money: “RadioShack sale protects most customer data“: 
http://money.cnn.com/2015/06/10/news/companies/radioshack­customer­data­sale/ 
16
  "OwnCloud Website." ​
OwnCloud​
. Web. 27 Apr. 2016. ​
http://www.owncloud.com/ 
17
 The Verge: “Everything You Need to Know About PRISM”: 
http://www.theverge.com/2013/7/17/4517480/nsa­spying­prism­surveillance­cheat­sheet 
18
 Stored Communications Act:​
 https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/2701 
19
 Metadata is data regarding the E­Mail, not including the content of the E­mail itself. Examples of metadata 
can include the sender, other recipients, when the E­mail was sent, and more. 
 
20
 The Register: “​
Senate votes to continue FISA domestic spying through 2017”: 
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/12/29/senate_fisa_extension_vote/ 

 

Government servers21. When using FOSS like the aforementioned OwnCloud, a user is often in 
complete control of the software installation, protecting against unnotified, unauthorized access 
by state agencies. In order for a user to ensure that their chat messages aren’t being 
intercepted, a user could use any number of FOSS clients that communicate over the open 
source Tox protocol22, a system of communication that features full end­to­end encryption. 
Examples of such clients are µTox and qTox, both of which are FOSS. When using these 
community developed clients, users can be assured that they weren’t developed by a 
corporation legally forced to comply with state regulation. 
Lastly, perhaps the most powerful benefit of the community contributed aspect of FOSS 
is the fact that the developers of the software are often the same people who use that software 
day to day. Many FOSS projects were started because some user needed a tool, and the tool 
wasn’t available. In fact, Richard Stallman’s GNU project, mentioned in the introduction of this 
paper, was in part started because of Stallman’s lack of substantive access to the software 
controlling a printer 23. This stakeholder status means that software developers are developing 
the kind of software they would want to use, without the restrictions of corporate feature or legal 
requirements. As such, there is a multitude of FOSS that takes important steps to protect user 
privacy and security.  

21

 Bloomberg: “Cracking China’s Skype Surveillance Software”: 
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013­03­08/cracking­chinas­skype­surveillance­software 
22
 Wired: “Out in the Open: Hackers Build a Skype That’s Not Controlled by Microsoft”: 
http://www.wired.com/2014/09/tox/ 
23
“​
I (Stallman) had already experienced being on the receiving end of a nondisclosure agreement, when 
someone refused to give me and the MIT AI Lab the source code for the control program for our printer​
”, 
under the heading “A Stark Moral Choice” from an article on the GNU website: 
http://www.gnu.org/gnu/thegnuproject.en.html 

 

Privacy Protections Through Transparency 
Because of the Open Source nature of FOSS, it’s very difficult to hide anything that the 
software does from the community that uses it, as the code is constantly being reviewed by the 
community developers. This extreme transparency has a number of positive impacts on the 
privacy of the end user. Most directly, it prevents the maker of the software from gathering 
information from the users without the user’s knowledge. The transparent nature of the software 
also makes the software more secure, as the constant code review performed by the community 
results in security flaws being promptly discovered and, more importantly, fixed.  
While currently most software and services will disclose the information they collect on 
their users through the privacy policy, such policies can be lengthy, difficult to read, and placed 
in obscure locations 24. To make things worse, certain policies are ambiguous about the type of 
information they collect. The Chinese Baidu browser policy25  simply states that “Baidu may 
collect your personal information when you voluntarily opt to use our services, programs or 
provide us with your personal information”, failing to mention exactly what types of information is 
collected. A recent Citizen’s Lab study26 revealed the type of information collected, which 
includes everything from your search terms and browser history, to your MAC address and hard 
drive serial number. The latter two pieces of information aren’t directly necessary for the 
operation of a typical web browser, and could be cause for concern among privacy advocates. 
As an alternative to closed source, proprietary browsers like Baidu, Internet Explorer, and 

24

 Mcdonald, Aleecia M., Robert W. Reeder, Patrick Gage Kelley, and Lorrie Faith Cranor. "A Comparative 
Study of Online Privacy Policies and Formats." Privacy Enhancing Technologies Lecture Notes in Computer 
Science (2009): 37­55. Web. 
25
 Baidu Browser Privacy Policy: ​
http://en.browser.baidu.com/policy.html 
26
 CitizenLab: “​
Baidu’s and Don’ts: Privacy and Security Issues in Baidu Browser​
“: 
https://citizenlab.org/2016/02/privacy­security­issues­baidu­browser/ 

 

others, a user could opt for FOSS like Firefox or Chromium, both browsers that have been 
praised for their privacy features27 . 
Privacy and Security are intrinsically linked. Data breaches are fairly common on the 
internet, and often expose the personal information of thousands of users. Adobe’s 2013 breach 
of 153 million users, the February 2016 Mate1 breach of 23 million users, the October 2015 
hack of the Telephony company TalkTalk, the list goes on. These breaches exposed user 
E­Mail addresses, passwords, and sometimes even banking information, leaving those users 
susceptible to further breaches in their personal privacy. These countless examples serve to 
prove how important maintaining proper security is to protecting user privacy. Security holes 
aren’t exclusive to large online services, either. The cybersecurity firm Trend Micro revealed 
vulnerabilities in Apple’s proprietary QuickTime movie player, and since Apple is no longer 
providing security updates to that software, the vulnerabilities are likely to go unpatched28. Near 
the end of Windows XP’s support life cycle in early 2014, around 18% of computers in the world 
still used the software29. Despite this statistic, Microsoft refused to patch critical security 
vulnerabilities past April 8th, 201430. Both of these demonstrate two key points supporting 
FOSS. First of all, these bugs weren’t discovered internally. The QuickTime bugs were 
discovered by an external security firm, and the Windows XP IE bug was discovered by a 
Google employee. Despite the quality assurance teams that worked on both softwares, the bugs 
still managed to slip through, only to be caught by the community. Secondarily, both bugs 
continue to be unpatched. The first point demonstrates the online community’s propensity for 

27

 Lifehacker: “Which Browser is Best for Privacy?”: 
http://lifehacker.com/which­browser­is­better­for­privacy­1525895782 
28
 Apple Quicktime Vulnerabilities: 
http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/04/apple­stops­patching­quicktime­for­windows­despite­2­active­vulner
abilities/​
,   
29
 Windows XP Usage Statistics: ​
http://gs.statcounter.com/#desktop­os­ww­monthly­201402­201402­bar 
30
 Windows XP Internet Explorer Vulnerabilities: 
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2489407/malware­vulnerabilities/microsoft­sticks­to­vow­­leaves­xp­e
xposed­to­ongoing­attacks.html 

 

bug finding. The FOSS community leverages this to eliminate bugs in their software. Services 
like Bountysource even allow users to post monetary “bounties” on bugs they’d like fixed or 
features they’d like added, allowing community contributors to receive monetary compensation 
for their valuable effort. As for the second point, according to a survey referenced by CIO, the 
average proprietary software bug takes about 7 days to be resolved. To contrast this, the same 
article states that about 40% of bugs in FOSS are patched in about 8 hours31. The promptness 
and vigilance with which the FOSS community fixes bugs not only makes the software better to 
use, it makes it more privacy friendly because of the decreased number of security flaws. 

FOSS: Accessible for everyone. 
Finally, FOSS is the best option for protecting user’s privacy simply based upon how 
accessible it is. A large number of FOSS projects are released under licenses that guarantee 
users the right to freely modify and redistribute the software, instead of the software being 
owned by some corporate entity. This style of licensing has a number of benefits. First of all, it 
reduces financial barriers of entry for using the software. Users don’t have to purchase licenses 
or subscriptions to use FOSS, allowing them to use privacy friendly software with minimal 
financial investment. Secondarily, if there ever comes to pass a legal environment that isn’t 
privacy friendly, the potential for decentralized distribution of FOSS means that privacy tools will 
still be available to those who need them, regardless of the efforts of the state.  
A common tool that many users use to protect their privacy is something called a VPN 
(Virtual Private Network). A VPN takes all of your computer’s network traffic, encrypts it, making 
it unreadable for anyone intercepting the traffic, and sends it to another location, where it’s 
decrypted and made readable again. They’re often used to access work networks from outside 

31

 Proprietary Software Bugfix time vs FOSS fix time: 
http://www.cio.com/article/2374313/developer/enterprise­developers­programming­speed­­check­­time­to­fix
­bugs­­not­so­fast­.html 

 

the office, but they are also used to protect the user’s internet traffic from being intercepted by 
other people on the user’s network. As such, they are a valuable privacy tool for users who 
often use public networks, like coffee shops or bus WiFi. Unfortunately, operating a VPN 
requires software running on the location where network traffic is decrypted and forwarded to 
the internet. There are online VPN providers, but this is often a subscription service, requiring 
the user to pay some amount of money per month to maintain their VPN access. While there 
are free services, the savvy consumer has to wonder exactly how those services make the 
money to maintain their servers. Luckily, there is a Free, Open Source Software alternative: 
OpenVPN. OpenVPN can run on any number of things, from your router32, to an old desktop PC
33

, to even a $35 mini­computer34. By maintaining their own OpenVPN server, a user can avoid 

monthly fees. This means that users that may not have been able to afford the services of a 
VPN can still protect their privacy. 
Encryption, a process used throughout the entire technology world to protect bank 
transactions, medical information, and other personal information from being disclosed to 
unauthorized parties, has become a hot policy topic in recent years. Prominent news sources 
are associating encryption35  with terrorism36  and world leaders are looking to ban or weaken it37, 
prominent technology companies warn against the danger of weakening encryption 38. In early 

32

 OpenVPN on your router. Warning: Requires custom firmware: 
http://www.howtogeek.com/64433/how­to­install­and­configure­openvpn­on­your­dd­wrt­router/ 
33
 Installing OpenVPN on a Windows PC (Client and Server): 
https://community.openvpn.net/openvpn/wiki/Easy_Windows_Guide 
34
 Raspberry Pi OpenVPN Install: 
http://readwrite.com/2014/04/10/raspberry­pi­vpn­tutorial­server­secure­web­browsing/ 
35
 WSJ: “FBI Stymied by Islamic State’s Use of Encryption, Director Says“: 
http://www.wsj.com/articles/fbi­stymied­by­islamic­states­use­of­encryption­director­says­1447866592 
36
 CNN: “Paris attackers likely used encrypted apps, officials say”: 
http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/17/politics/paris­attacks­terrorists­encryption/ 
37
 Wired: “No U­turn: David Cameron still wants to break encryption“: 
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2015­07/15/cameron­ban­encryption­u­turn 
38
 The Guardian: “Apple, Google and Microsoft: weakening encryption lets the bad guys in“: 
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/nov/23/apple­google­microsoft­weakening­encryption­back­d
oors 

 

april, Senators Dianne Feinstein (D­CA) and Richard Burr (R­NC) introduced a discussion draft 
of a bill called The Compliance With Court Orders Act of 201639. It states that “​
all providers of 
communications services and products (including software) should protect the privacy of United 
States persons through implementation of appropriate data security and still respect the rule of 
law and comply with all legal requirements and court orders”​
. It goes on to require that “​

covered entity that receives a court order from a government for information or data shall (A) 
provide such information or data to such government in an intelligible format; or (B) provide 
such technical assistance as is necessary to obtain such information or data in an intelligible 
format or to achieve the purpose of the court order​
”. In short, this essentially requires 
companies that make communications software or devices to build backdoor access into all of 
their products, so that the government can access them with the proper warrant. The bill has 
been highly criticized by privacy advocates40, and isn’t likely to pass due to a lack of white house 
support41, but it isn’t entirely inconceivable that similar legislation may pass in the future42. In the 
case that it does, users of FOSS are likely to be significantly better protected than those using 
corporate controlled, proprietary software. There already exist FOSS encryption solutions like 
GnuPG43 for encrypting E­mails, or LUKS44 for encrypting hard drives. Since FOSS is 
encouraged to be modified and distributed by the community, it’s not likely that the United 
States Government has any practical way to enforce their encryption regulations. The typical 
strategy of fines and legal action would be ineffective against a large, geographically disparate, 

39

 Full Text of the Bill: ​
https://cryptome.org/2016/04/burr­decrypt­draft.pdf 
 Wired: “The Senate’s Draft Encryption Bill Is ‘Ludicrous, Dangerous, Technically Illiterate’” 
https://www.wired.com/2016/04/senates­draft­encryption­bill­privacy­nightmare/ 
41
 Reuters: “White House declines to support encryption legislation“: 
 ​
http://www.reuters.com/article/us­apple­encryption­legislation­idUSKCN0X32M4 
42
 Wired: “White House Silence on an Anti­Encryption Bill Means Nothing”: 
http://www.wired.com/2016/04/dont­read­white­house­silence­encryption­bill/ 
43
 GnuPG Website: ​
https://www.gnupg.org/ 
44
 LUKS Website:​
 https://guardianproject.info/code/luks/ 
40

 

and often pseudonymous development community, especially since there would be a good 
chance that some of the developers would be outside the US entirely. 

 

 Some Concerns with FOSS 
Despite all these benefits, FOSS isn’t perfect. However, not every concern expressed 
about FOSS is legitimate, and a good deal of them can be mitigated if the proper measures are 
taken. Some such concerns are: Whether FOSS can even be secure when the source code of 
the software is freely available, the idea that FOSS is more difficult to use than proprietary 
alternatives, and concerns about stagnation in development due to a lack of profit motive.  
The first of these concerns, that software can’t be secure if it’s Open Source, assumes 
that all secure software operates on the concept of “Security Through Obscurity”. Security 
through obscurity attempts to make software secure by relying on the fact that outsiders don’t 
know how the software works45 . For example, before encryption, militaries often communicated 
in code through things called classical ciphers46 . Ciphers function by replacing letters in a 
message with other letters or numbers. The problem with using this kind of security is that, as 
soon as the inner workings of a cipher are made public (for example, which letters correspond 
to which numbers), the cipher becomes useless. A similar thing can be said for software. If 
software relies entirely on security through obscurity, as soon as the inner workings of the 
software are revealed, the software is insecure. Modern software development instead relies on 
strong encryption methods like PGP, RSA, AES, and more. Every single one of these 
algorithms is extensively publicised, any person can go in the internet and read exactly how 
they work. Instead of relying on security through obscurity, these methods use mathematics to 

45

 “What is security through obscurity?”: ​
http://users.softlab.ntua.gr/~taver/security/secur3.html 
 Practical Cryptography: What’s a simple cypher? 
http://practicalcryptography.com/ciphers/classical­era/simple­substitution/ 
46

 

transform data from a readable format, to something completely unreadable in transit, and back 
to a readable format again47. Because of these algorithms, it’s possible, and very advisable, to 
write software that remains secure despite its inner workings being completely public. 
Unlike the previous security by obscurity concern, FOSS being more difficult to use than 
proprietary software is a very valid concern. Unfortunately, due to the nature of the community, 
FOSS software tends to require more technical aptitude to use than proprietary alternatives. 
Take OwnCloud for example. If a user wants to use Google Docs, they simply navigate to 
Google’s site, click on the icons, and can use the software immediately. However, If a user 
want’s their own instance of OwnCloud, the software has to be installed on a properly 
configured server, a process in which there are a number of steps that would be difficult for a 
non­tech savvy user to perform. A similar situation is true for OpenVPN. The various 
distributions of the Linux operating system, despite their privacy and security strengths, can 
sometimes be daunting for a non­tech savvy user to set up. In the long term, if less tech savvy 
users start getting involved in using FOSS, and provide feedback to the developers, this 
problem may resolve itself. In the meantime, however, there are some things that can be done 
to mitigate this problem. Primarily, members of the FOSS community can put more resources 
into creating documentation readable for the layman. FOSS projects are generally very 
extensively documented, for example there are extensive manual pages for the majority of 
programs in linux48. However, these manual pages tend to be written in language that’s difficult 
for typical users to understand. By writing documentation in simpler language, FOSS developers 
could make the software more accessible for less tech savvy users. If the documentation still is 

47

 For more in depth information, read:  
ReadWrite: “Understanding Encryption: Here’s the Key”:  
http://readwrite.com/2013/09/19/keys­understanding­encryption/ 
48
 LinuxCommand.org: Reading Man Pages:  
http://www.linuxcommand.org/reading_man_pages.php 

 

too difficult to understand, and a user has exhausted their resources in asking the community 
for help, there exists an entire industry dedicated to providing user support for FOSS49. Red Hat 
and Canonical are both companies that facilitate the development of distributions of Linux (Red 
Hat Linux/Fedora Linux and Ubuntu, respectively), and both companies make their money by 
providing support to the users of the software. The distributions are still FOSS, but the users 
have the option to reach out to these companies if they require support, and the companies can 
help create free software, while still turning a profit.  
Finally, speaking of profit, there’s the assertion that FOSS is doomed because, without 
profit to motivate programmers, there will be a lack of good programmers to work on projects. 
Stallman actually addressed this concern in his original GNU manifesto. He states that: “​
Many 
people will program with absolutely no monetary incentive. Programming has an irresistible 
fascination for some people, usually the people who are best at it. There is no shortage of 
professional musicians who keep at it even though they have no hope of making a living that 
way​
“. Over 30 years after this manifesto was published, this statement rings truer than ever. 
FOSS projects continue to thrive. As mentioned earlier in the paper, Linux hosts 35% of all web 
servers. Projects like OwnCloud, OpenVPN, OpenOffice and more continue development, 
adding new features all the time. New projects like Tox appear, solving new problems. FOSS is 
alive and well. Furthermore, this problem is in fact partially resolved by the solution to our 
previous problem. Companies like Canonical and Red Hat make money off of supporting FOSS. 
If more people use FOSS, then these companies stand to profit more. A good way of having 
more people using FOSS, is to create FOSS that more people want to use. Therefore, it’s in 
these companies best fiscal interests to make their respective FOSS projects as good as they 
can possibly be, which often entails hiring developers to work on them. Finally, some 

49

 PC World: “How to get support for Open Source Software”: 
http://www.pcworld.com/article/207958/how_to_get_support_for_open_source_software.html 

 

corporations like Google support FOSS as a way of improving their own products. Google 
maintains several open source projects, like the Android operating system, albeit under the 
Apache version 2.0 license, that allows for closed source derivatives of open source projects50. 
By making Android open source, Google can market phones that run the operating system, and 
get the communities help developing it. 
All in all, while FOSS isn’t a perfect solution for protecting user privacy in our modern 
digital age, the inherent benefits that come from using FOSS add significant benefits to users 
that choose to use it. From the advantages of avoiding corporate and state influence, to the 
advantages of complete transparency, to the benefits of freely accessible software. FOSS 
proves itself to be the best option for a privacy savvy user in our current surveillance heavy 
society. Furthermore, as more and more privacy savvy users use FOSS, the community aspect 
starts to strengthen the privacy protections that FOSS imparts. Because of the blurred line 
between user and developer, the more privacy savvy users there are, the more privacy savvy 
developers there are likely to be. Users may start to take more proactive measures to protect 
their privacy, supporting and contributing to the software that protects it. FOSS is the best option 
for privacy conscious users, and if they continue to use it, it will likely remain this way for years 
to come. 
 

50

 

 Apache 2.0 License: ​
http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE­2.0