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FAKULTI PENDIDIKAN DAN BAHASA

OUMH 2203
ENGLISH FOR WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION

Nama : Zainun bt Daud


Nombor Matrik : 770102036882001
No. Kad Pengenalan : 770102-03-6882
Nombor Telefon : 019-5050033
Alamat e-mel : zdnun@yahoo.com
Nama e-Tutor : En Mohd Haniff bin Zainudin
Pusat Pembelajaran : Perak Learning Centre

Januari 2016

Table of Content
Page

1.0

2.0

1.0

Introduction

1.1

My Opinion

1.2

Important of Language

Contributing Factors

2.1

Language Exposure

2.2

Mother Tongue Language

2.3

Skill Gap

2.4

Malaysian English

2.5

Communication Skill

3.

Recommendation

Reference

INTRODUCTION

The history of the English language really started with the arrival of three Germanic tribes who
invaded Britain during the 5th century AD. This tribe, the Angles, the Saxons and the Jutes,
crossed the North Sea from what today is Denmark and northern Germany. At that time the
inhabitants of Britain spoke Celtic language. The Angles came from Englaland and their
language was called Englisc (Old English) which the words England and English are derived.
The English language has spread too many parts of the world. The increase in the number of
those learning it and using it has been the most striking example of language expansion in this
century. It has become the most important international language and is the most commonly
taught in second or foreign language in the world. Recent facts from the Internet and other
source show that there are about 780 million users of English of whom about 380 million are
native speakers, about 300 million are second language speakers, and about 100 million are
foreign language speakers, Jantmary Thirusanku and Melor Md. Yunus (2012).
Basically, before the advent of the Internet and Information and Communication Technology
(ICT), the business community is communicated by letter. It took some time, so those who were
not proficient in the language could ask someone who was more fluent to write their letters and
notes. We also heard some of our local employers complain that when our graduates attend an
interview, a meetings or conferences, they cannot expressed their ideas, so they are made to look
less smart when actually, knowledge-wise, they are comparable to any graduate from the rest of
the world, by Ambigapathy & Aniswal (2005); Ngui (2005). It is anticipated that with the trend
of globalization, this country will face more stiff competition from other foreign countries. Thus,
Malaysians should be well equipped with a solid education foundation and in training to remain
competitive; including the ability to communicate in English.

1.1

My Opinion:

I totally agreed with the statement given, many Malaysian have difficulty in communicating in
English and who could not communicate in English were unable to negotiate the best deals in
business transactions or investments. English is the language of international communication and
it is widely used in Malaysia. As a second most important language in Malaysia, English is
extensively used in education system from the primary up to tertiary level. It is also widely used
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in various professions such as the medical, engineering, legal and business. Even in government
sector, especially in my school some of my fellow teacher is not able to communicate in English
fluently. Maybe the environment of the school and the need of communicating in English were
not highlighted or take seriously among my fellow colleague.
I think the best solution for these matters; teachers at school have to play major roles for
improving the students English skills. According to Wendy Hiew (2012), the teaching of English
in schools needs to be improved. At the same time, universities need to offer free English classes
to their students. She also stated in her journal by having a dynamic setting on campus that
encourages critical thinking and a university management that is open to discussing current
issues intellectually will do wonders in improving students' marketability. In order to produced
quality and good workers or students, all the organization (government or private sectors) should
take part and play their roles especially our education facility such as school, preschool or
universities.

1.2

Important of Language

According to the views of Ahmad Tajuddin and Azza Jauhar (2015), as a result of the growing
importance of English and the governments open support for the language, universities have to
reorient their practices on the use of English on campus. An extensive use of English must be
emphasized across the entire university community in order for the learners to achieve mastery
of the language, by providing them with more opportunities to use the language formally or
informally. Therefore, it is very crucial for Malaysian students to be proficient in English so that
they can use the language efficiently for academic purposes and later in professional setting. In
the era of globalisation had changed the nature of jobs, making communication skills,
specifically in English, a valuable asset for today's worker. The standard of English also affects
the quality of the public sector as civil servants have to interact with international citizens and
the business world as well as articulate Malaysia's stand on issues to the international
community. These include negotiations on important agreements such as trade agreements.
2.0

CONTRIBUTING FACTORS

According to Shamsudin and Nesi (2006) revealed that people are often declined to
use English because they are embarrassed about their lack of fluency. They are unsure of
meaning o f c e r t a i n w o r d s w h i c h m a d e t h e m v e r y r e l u c t a n t t o r e s p o n d o r
r e p l y t o t h e s p e a k e r s . T h i s i s because they always feel worry and shy to make
grammatical mistakes and feel embarrass of their lack of proficiency. They are afraid of the
negative physical response, such as smirk that they received from other more proficient speakers
when the speak incorrectly, therefore they w i l l t r y t o a v o i d c o m m u n i c a t i n g i n
E n g l i s h i n f r o n t o f o t h e r s a n d n o t f u l l y i n v o l v e d i n conversation.

2.1

Language Exposure

In Malaysia, people who came from small towns or rural areas are usually grown up in
environment where English is not a crucial language in their daily life. They are not exposed to
the language and have limited opportunity to use English outside their classrooms. Consequently,
those people a l w a y s e x p r e s s u n w i l l i n g n e s s a n d h i g h a n x i e t y t o u s e t h i s
l a n g u a g e t o c o m m u n i c a t e d e s p i t e acknowledging that English is important for
their future. Mindset and attitude towards English language also pose a great factor to the
problem. Lack o f

confidence

and

negative

mindset

among

the

working

M a l a y s i a n s t o c o m m u n i c a t e i n E nglish is becoming a dominant situation. Some can be


said well in written English but when it comes to oral communication, they are lacking
tremendously.

2.2

Mother Tongue Language

Family background has a major influence on their English language as everyday life
communication. Martin (2005) in his research says interference of mother tongue language
system in some ways contributes to wrong use of English grammatical rules, morphology and
syntax. Speakers tend to refer to their first language system when writing in English, use direct
translation and constantly referred to English and bilingual dictionaries meanings to comprehend
English text (Nambiar, 2007). Research conducted by Thiyagarajah (2003) found that students in
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rural schools did not use English outside the classrooms and adopted very limited learning
strategies may be due to the unawareness of the learners different styles of learning. Mother
tongue such as Bahasa Malaysia, Tamil or Chinese has a strong influence over the learning of
English. All preschool children should be taught, nurtured and encouraged along a path that will
enable them to succeed in school and in life, eventually with full command of the English
language. Full immersion in English with no attention to the home language has not been shown
to offer any advantages for preschool learning or later academic success (August & Shanahan,
2008).

2.3

Skill Gap

Research done by National Institute of Research in Higher Education (IPPTN) has discovered
that Malaysia is grappling with quality issues in higher education, which has had an impact on
employability figures standing at a 48% (IPPTN 2010). This occurred when higher education
institutions produced a new graduated (workforce) that could not coop or enter the labor market
because of the differences in what they perceived was needed in the market and what was
actually needed and produced. The current course book or syllabus are more toward the
examinations orientated, as opposed to preparing graduates or workforce for working in real life.

2.4

Malaysian English

Malaysian English is quite different from Standard English and many view it as more inferior. Its
popular use among the locals, however, has caused concern about declining standards of English.
According to Prof Dato Dr Asmah Haji Omar (2004), despite being traditionally based on
British English, Malaysian English has, in recent decades, been strongly influenced by American
English. This can be commonly seen in web based media and documents produced within
organizations. According to R.K. Singh (2010), as we know in Malaysia, Standard English is less
used compare to Malaysian English. Standard English is most commonly used in formal situation
meanwhile Malaysian English popular among locals, however, has caused concern about the
declining standards of English.
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2.5

Communication Skill

Communication is the receiving and sending of verbal and nonverbal messages within the
organizational context. Written communication involves any type of interaction that makes use of
the written word. Communicating through writing is essential in the modern world and is
becoming ever more so as we participate in what is now commonly called the information age.
In fact, written communication is the most common form of business communication. It is
essential for all small business owners and managers to develop an effective written
communication skill and to encourage the same in all employees.
Another way in which oral and written forms of communication are similar is that they can be
divided into verbal and nonverbal categories. Verbal communication involves the words you say,
and nonverbal communication involves how you say them; youre tone of voice, your facial
expression, body language, and so forth. Written communication also involves verbal and
nonverbal dimensions. The words you choose are the verbal dimension. How you display or
portray them is the nonverbal dimension, which includes the medium (e-mail or a printed
document), the typeface or font, or the appearance of your signature on a letter. In this sense, oral
and written communication is similar in their approach even as they are quite different in their
application.
Every graduated must have the ability to write and speak in professional manner because the
graduates have to involved in various aspects of business and interact with clients. The language
is very important because if you cannot speak your English present yourself well, it hard to help
a company drive business.

3.0

RECOMMENDATION

In conclusion, I hope all the Malaysian students are a proficient in English so that they can use
this language efficiently for academic purposes and later in professional setting and this will
changed the nature of jobs, making communication skills, specifically in English, a valuable
asset for today's worker. It is recommended that the government through the Ministry of
Education and Ministry of Higher Education put greater emphasis on the importance
of English language particularly communication skills for the students to master.
The government has an important role in transformation of higher education and restructuring of
the educational system in term of its effectiveness in producing employable graduates to meet the
demand of the job market and to compete in the international environment (Uda Nagu 2006). As
a result, Malaysian institutions of higher learning are not only need to intensity their efforts to
enhance students English competency, but also to ensure graduates English competency are
compatible with the need of the industry by developing plans to improve their programmes and
services.
This is to ensure they will be ready when they join their working environment. More
exploration and evaluation of pedagogical strategies that aim at preparing our Malaysians and
student to be future high quality employee must be carried out. Such exploration will need to
focus more attention on applying the English as the second language at schools. One practical
suggestion in this reports is that the English components should not only be taught in one unit of
school syllabus or certain but should be dispersed in different subjects, including subject content
courses in the other education programs for example preschool or even higher education such as
universities. This ensures that all the components are taught in meaningful contexts.

4.0

REFERENCE
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Ahmad Tajuddin, Azza Jauhar (2015) A Malaysian professional communication skills in English
Framework for English for occupational purposes courses. University of Nottingham,
Malaysia.
Ambigapathy, P. and Aniswal, A.G (2005) University Curriculum: An Evaluation on Preparing
Graduates For Employment, University Sains Malaysia: National Higher Education
Research Institute.
IPPTN, N.H.E.R.I. (2010). University Curriculum and Employability Needs (p.8)
doi:378.0720595
Jantmary Thirusanku and Melor Md. Yunus (2012) The Many Faces of Malaysian English.
Faculty of Education, National University of Malaysia, Selangor Darul Ehsan.
Karen Nemeth (2009). Many Languages, One Classroom: Teaching Dual and English Language
Learners. Gryphon House. Inc. USA
Ngui, C. (2005), Getting to the root of graduate unemployment. Malaysian Business, Business
Network.
Radha M. K. Nambiar. (2007) Enchancing academic literacy among tertiary learners: A
Malaysian Experience. 3L The Southeast Asian Jurnal of English Language Studies.
Uda Nagu, S. (2006, August 10) Final touches. (New Straits Times), p.2 Retrieved 20 February
2016 www.nst.com
Wendy Hiew (2012). English Language Teaching And Learning Issues in Malaysia: Learners
Perceptions Via Facebook Dialogue Journal. Centre for the Promotion of Knowledge and
Language Learning, University Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia.
JOURNAL:
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Journal of Arts, Science & Commerce. International Refereed Research Journal (Vol. III, Issue
1,Jan. 2012

WEB:
http://catalog.flatworldknowledge.com/bookhub/15?e=mclean-ch04_s01
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2012/138928/
http://www.inc.com/encyclopedia/cross-cultural-international-communication.html
http://www.researchersworld.com

https://www.scribd.com/doc/305199622/English-and-Workplace
http://www.wikihow.com/Communicate-with-a-Non-Native-English-Speaker
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English

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