Design Of A 95% Glass Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy.

Tania Valencia Juarez Ortiz 4250680 Delft, The Netherlands
For obtaining the Degree of Master in Architecture, Urbanism and Building Sciences Building Technology Track
Delft University of Technology
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Design Of A 95% Glass Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy.
Tania Valencia Juarez Ortiz 4250680 Delft, The Netherlands
For obtaining the Degree of Master in Architecture, Urbanism and Building Sciences Building Technology Track
Delft University of Technology

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Fig. 1.1
Eye level View of the Canopy n Context.
3dmax Render
Morphing Glass Canopy

Preface and Acknowledgements
There are many people to thank for. First of all I’d like to thank my family, specially my mother, without whom
this would not be possible, for their support and for making me feel close even though we’re so far away.
I would like to thank my tutors for their patience and support, and for all the knowledge they so kindly gave me
which is the most important thing I’m taking with me.
I would like to mention specially Professor Fred Veer who was the teacher of the first lecture I attended to in
TU Delft , from whom I have learned a lot, not only about glass but also about material science, and about the
art of glass breaking. For research, of course. I want to mention also Professor Andrew Borgart who also was
my teacher since the first year of the Masters, and helped me see that Structural Mechanics and modelling in
IDiana is not such a hard theme. And last but not least, Professor Tillmann Klein who made this team of tutors
so complete with his accurate advise.
It’s not easy to be in a foreign country, but it’s an incredible experience, and what makes the experience so
amazing is the people you meet. I was lucky enough to make very good friends, which I will never forget, and
without them I could never have finished this. And of course, my friends in Mexico with whom I have kept in
touch.
I would also like to mention Arq. José Moyao, Arq. Miguel García Etchegaray, Ing. Antonio Ojeda, Arq. Jaime
Ruiz Alvarez, Ing Antonio Vieyra and Arq. Heliodoro Monterrubio and Lic. Leticia Malvaez who helped me
during this process.

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Contents Purpose and Organization 7 Introduction Objective Scope of the study Limitations and delimitations Organization of the document Research design Summary Review of the Related Material 14 Introduction Why? History Case Studies Unresolved Issues Summary Results of the Investigation 18 Introduction Structural Glass Deployable Structures Summary Project Design 32 Introduction Site Design Evolution Modeling Model for FEM/Diana Final Model Construction Purpose and Results of the Experiment Summary Conclusions and Implications 60 Introduction Conclusions Reflection References Appendix A 66 5 .

Building’s Energy Demand. problem production Design Of A 95% Glass Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy. idea Energy Saving Interior Comfort. benefits Glass Deployable Structures market 6 . Material and Mechanical Technology.

or reused for new necessities. Glass exists in big amounts in the earth. therefore a very good cladding material. recycled. I started searching for a better material to glass. But glass can be very sustainable if it is designed correctly. and reusing it. and I wanted to do something about it. And it behaves better than concrete. thinking that it will be preserved through history. which led me to research about building with plastics and ETFE. Designing a building should no longer be about creating an emblem. 7 . It can be considered as the transparent concrete of the future. A building should be designed as a living entity that provides shelter and comfort. The green house effect can be transformed into energy used to heat or cool buildings.shipaglass.writeanadgetpaid. I followed the next courses of Building technology.biz www. I was aware of the big problems in which our planet is. It is waterproof and transparent. and is 100% recyclable. A building should be able to adapt and be relocated. where I learned that the way we use and reuse energy is what makes a difference. and to find new materials that applied to facades could solve buildings’ energy demand. I wanted to learn how to design buildings that could create the energy they used. At the end of this great adventure. through receiving energy from the earth. Glass is often considered as not sustainable because it is related to the greenhouse effect. The love and admiration I had for this material is even bigger.com London Eye Own picture Purpose and Organization Introduction I came to The Netherlands to try to make a difference. I can see glass very differently. I found out that ETFE and polycarbonate have many limitations if compared to glass.Cover: Eye level View of the Canopy closing 3dmax Render Morphing Glass Canopy Detailed mages on previous page from: TU Delft Corporate Presentation Example www.

Design Of A 95% Glass Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy. Research Connection Design Final product 8 . Deployable Structures Structural and Mechanical Technology. idea Glass Engineering Technology.

Motion Structures 9 .Deployable Structures How do they work? How are they designed? Structural Research How are they Calculated? Eye level Render of the clossed Canopy 3dmax Render mages on previous page from: ETFE facade Hamburg FRP Zaha Hadid’s Stand Paris Glass Munich Olympic Stadium Glass Temperature Experiment TU Delft www.hobberman.com Jeremy Kasdin Zhong You.com TED.Objective The objective of this research is to find the answer to the following Research Question: Is it possible to design a dismountable morphing Canopy with 95% Glass? To be able to answer the research question I will have to answer the following Sub-questions: In terms of Material Technology .Glass Eye level Render of the openned Canopy 3dmax Render What is the correct Glass Engineering Technology Design Approach? When designing with glass which are the Basic Design Rules? What are the characteristics of structural glass? What kind of glass should I use? What kind of Glass Connections shall I use? In terms of Mechanics .2012.

This research will not focus on Climate since it is part of an open canopy. and using glass as a structural and cladding element. the design of connections and the use of glue instead of holes in glass connections.Scope of the study The two main subjects on this research will be: Deployable Structures Glass Engineering Technology The project will be developed along the research through the following steps: Modeling Sketching total project 3d modeling Model for FEM/Diana Glass Model Experiment’s proposal HDF Model 1:05 Structural Calculations Model for FEM/Diana Calculations report Final Report Limitations and delimitations The results of this research will give information about the possibility of creating structural glass deployable structures. 10 . The door for further research on this kind of structures will be open to creating bigger structures using this mechanism.

Organization of the document This document starts with an introductory overview of the purpose. and the results of modeling for i-Diana. It will show the structural assumptions. significance and limitations of this research. reporting the final glass model construction and the results of the experiment. the structural calculations. Deployable Structures Research and Glass Engineering Technology Research. Chapter 4. will start with an introduction to the site. Chapter 5. followed by the evolution of the project. Chapter 3. Project Design. I will finish with a proposal for the Design. I will show the benefits of this structures and mention previous investigations on this topic. Result of the Investigation. Chapter 2 The Review of Related Material will show an overview of this research and explain the historical evolution of glass and deployable structures. I will report the experiment’s proposal and evolution. Conclusions and Implications. will be dedicated to the results of the investigation. 11 . It is divided in the two main fields of this research. will show the conclusions and recommendations of this report.

Deployable Structures and Glass Engineering Technology that will help me create and solve the design. Both subjects will be studied together and at the same time as the design evolves. The study of deployable structures will focus on the following themes: Kinematic Chains Scissor Hinges Tensegrity Mouri Foldable Hobberman Calatrava Stadiums The study of Glass Engineering Technology will focus on the following themes: Characteristics (Tests) Improvements Float glass and heat strengthened glass Laminated PVB and Sentry Glass Glass sizes Water jet cutting Steel reinforced glass Glass inserts used for connections Glass gluing The design will be done at the same time as the research and will be reported through the following phases: Project Development Modeling Structural analysis Final Model Construction Conclusions 12 . which will follow a path established by the set of sub-questions in two main subjects.Research design The research’s objective is to answer the research question.

gluing several layers so if one breaks the other will still carry the loads. Above Picture: A perfect transparent morphing structure in Nature Jellyfish As Inspiration Own Picture Currently there is the need for a new code for building with glass and it is very necessary to continue the investigation through tests to get a better understanding of this material. we can order 12m long glass from China. we can now use float glass that increases the tensile stress of 20N/ mm2 for normal glass to 145N/mm2 and breaks into hundreds of small fragments. Next Page Pictures: Santiago Calatrava’s Liege Train Station Peter Rice’s connections TGV Station at L’aeroport Charles de Gaulle Glass Sunshading at L’aeroport Charles de Gaulle Theo Jansen’s Bestes ETFE Double Facade in Hamburg Own picures. and we can use water-jet cutting to make holes in glass. We can improve the structural safety of glass by laminating it. avoiding through this the failure and strength lost by fracture when cutting glass. 13 . Through innovations in glass technology.Summary This thesis is the result of my search for new ways of building with a deep concern in the environment using technology and material science.

Chapter II Review of Related Material 14 .

perfectly elastic behavior up to very high stresses. it is mixed with Na2O to make soda glass. and is 100% recycled. 2003) Glass is made of sand.”(Nijsse. The correct Glass Engineering Technology design approach depends on the knowledge of the material’s properties and of the elements that we can use to overcome its restrictions and take advantage of its qualities. Rob. soda and chalk.” (Nijsse. glass has been improved through many technological advances that have made it possible for us to use it as a load bearing material. 2003) “The basic molecule of glass: SIO4. and with B2O5 to make borosilicate glasses. Notice the negative outside of the pyramid. Rob. It is for this reason that the structure itself is called glassy. The main technological advances that have led us to be able to use glass structurally are: Innovations in Glass Engineering Technology Tempered glass and heat strengthened glass Laminated PVB and Sentry Glass Glass sizes Water jet cutting Steel reinforced glass Glass inserts used for connections Glass gluing 15 .” * (Smith Anthony 2005. In the past few years. It is responsible for the little gaps in the material allowing light (photons) to pass but also responsible for the quick cracking of glass. It behaves better than concrete at compression and can be reinforced as concrete.”(Ashby et al. It is responsible for the little gaps in the material allowing light (photons) to pass but also responsible for the quick cracking of glass. A small crack or imperfection within it can make the material collapse. Materials that exist in big amounts in Earth. Glass is a brittle material.Glass Engineering Technology Material Properties Composition and Chemical Properties “Amorphous silica is the basis of almost all glasses. a term interchangeable with amorphous. 2007) “The basic molecule of glass: SIO4. Notice the negative outside of the pyramid. but in reality its usable strength is governed by fracture mechanics and is determined by the presence of microscopic cracks in the glass surface. In theory “glass is an homogeneous and isotropic solid material displaying ideal. The analysis design and testing of an asymmetric bolted glass roof panel). but it is the silica that gives the structure.

There are basic elements or “kinematic joints” that connected to rigid members. or “joints” form a mechanism. 16 . The deployment can be achieved through the combination of basic forms that can fold. Study Models Scissor hinges can be modified to vary the movement into any kind of movement by just adjusting the length of the links. They can form strong structures that have two stable positions. and each can move in different basic ways. have a single degree of mobility.Deployable Structures and Classification Deployable structures are structures that can move for several reasons. could be a way to construct and improve buildings. therefore my first approach to this theme is the way any mechanism performs. Tensegrity structures can also be deployed. (Allegra) Tensegrity Tensegrity structures are structures formed of rigid posts and tensors. or need a different structure to hold the cladding. When we connect these basic elements into a closed linkage we create a mechanism. Mechanisms Deployable structures preform through a mechanism. one when closed and another when opened. These foldable structures follow the patterns of folded paper.Origami Other forms of creating a foldable cladding with a rigid element is by using the rigid foldable origami or Miura-ouri. or constructed in space. The minimum mechanism that can be created is the Bennett linkage that consists of four revolute joints that combined together. The design of the hinges is basic to be able to create doubly curved structures. These structures are mainly combined with membranes for cladding. Cladding with pantographs or scissor hinges have been done by Hoberman in his arch and basically is done by transforming the scissor hinge into the cladding element. for flexibility of performance as it is in stadiums and in the future. Santiago Calatrava made a study of the basic deployments of these structures. Foldable Origami Or Miura-Ouri. This particular study is to create a climate adaptive structure but movement can be used for many other functions as for structures that need to be deployed in space. The movement can also be modified and controlled by changing the length of the pieces. But there are studies and they can be simplified into one kind of hinge for every function. They have been exploited by Hoberman into the creation of spheres that move magically from a very small position to a very big one. They are structures made of two layers and their stability relies on the tension of the elements. Scissor hinges Scissor hinges are a very simple mechanism that can deploy long distances. They are formed from basic geometric elements that can be combined into al possibilities.

as well as technical support. I have studied three main projects: The DZ Bank in Berlin’s Glass canopies The Lincoln Center Canopies Cantilevered Bolted roof of The “Gallerie Beyeler” in Basel. It explains why the research is based on this particular subjects. Hoberman’s patents and projects have been an important source to this research. An interesting improvement could be using doubly curved glass panels. It opens a new research theme by combining two different existing mechanisms and providing the opportunity to use circular overlapping plates. Summary This chapter introduces the focus of this research and the basic topics that will be explained more deeply in the next chapter. and with further study can also be improved.Case Studies Apple Stores The Apple Stores have been a big improvement to the use of glass as a structural element for several reasons: The use of bigger glass plates Sentry Glass The invention of titanium insert connections In this research I will use them as an important case study. Unresolved Issues There are many possibilities to continue this research. 17 . As a variation of the mechanism used I could propose a folding round stair. I made an analysis of the way these structures work and many study models. The mechanism of the structure I propose can be continued into a much bigger structure. and how they affect the project. Glass Canopies As a reference on the way Glass Engineering Technology has been used in canopies. The hinges design proposed could be studied further for improvement. Switzerland Hoberman As inspiration.

jpg 18 .com/cn/retail/store/galleries/pudong/images/pudong_gallery_image5.apple.Chapter III Glass Engineering Technology http://images.

Results of the Investigation
Introduction

Glass Engineering Technology

Characteristics (Tests)
“Glass can be very strong, much stronger than structural steel. However, because glass has a relatively low
fracture toughness, such strengths can only be achieved when it’s virtually out of defects, as a freshly drawn a
glass fiber can be.” (RICE, PETER 1995. Glass Engineering Technology)

Glass Production

Above Pictures.
New materials as fiber reinforced polymers are
using glass fiber, which provides a translucid,
semi-transparent strong polymer. An example of
this material comined in a facade with curved glass
laminate can be seen in the Elbphilharmonie Hamburg. Horseshoe shaped cut out glass balconies
made of glass fiber reinforced polymer GRP for
the doubly curved laminated triple glazing at
the Elbphilharmonie Hammburg.
Klaus Lother. Glass tuning forks and curved
glass panes, Intelligent Glass Solutions Magazine.

Glass is normally produced by the float process. The product obtained is annealed or float glass. This can be
toughened to two different kinds of glass, fully toughened, or heat strengthened.
“Glass is toughened by heating it to about 700 degrees centigrade, then carefully cooling it using air blowers
to cool the surfaces rapidly while the center is still viscous. The surfaces are then put into compression as the
center cools and contracts. The high surface compressive stresses are equilibrated by smaller tensile stresses
acting over a greater proportion of the cross sectional area.”(Rice, Peter. 1995)
Depending on speed at which glass is cooled down the resulting stresses within the glass will vary from heat
strenghtened (cooled slowly) to fully tempered (cooled fast).
It is because of the technical advances that we can use glass structurally. But it is important to know how to
use them. In my search for the correct Glass Engineering Technology design approach a new sub-question appeared: When shall I use float glass and when to use heat strengthened glass?

Fully Tempered Glass
“During the thermal tempering process, float glass is heated to approximately 620−675 _C (approximately
100_C above the transformation temperature) in a furnace and then quenched (cooled rapidly) by jets of
cold air.” (Haldimann, M., 2006) “The typical residual compressive surface stress varies between 80MPa and
150MPa for fully tempered soda lime silica glass.”
Float glass’ high tensile strength and it’s characteristic of failing into millions of small pieces made it the safest option when constructing anything above people’s heads. But “If the glass panels fail at too high a failure
stress, so many cracks form simultaneously that the stress cannot go from one layer to another layer.”(Veer,
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F.A. 2005) Therefore; Laminated Heat Strengthened Glass can provide the safest option in my particular case,
but this depends on the needs and the characteristics of the design.

Heat strengthened glass
“Heat strengthened glass is produced using the same process as for fully tempered glass, but with a lower cooling rate. The residual stress and therefore the tensile strength is lower. The fracture pattern of heat strengthened glass is similar to annealed glass, with much bigger fragments than for fully tempered glass. Used in
laminated glass elements, this large fracture pattern results in a significant post-breakage structural capacity.
As the stress gradient depends on the glass thickness and the glass must be cooled down slowly, thick glasses
(> 12mm) cannot be heat strengthened using the normal tempering process.” (Haldimann, M., 2006) “Heat
strengthened glass has a bending strength of around 80 Mpa.” (Veer, F.A. 2013, AR105 TU Delft)

Laminated PVB and Sentry Glass
A laminate is made of 2 or more glass planes (annealed, heat strengthened or floated) welded together with a
sheet of PVB or Sentry Glass or a resin. Sentry Glass is resistant to higher temperatures than PVB. If the glass
will be where the temperatures are higher than 30 degrees Celsius Sentry Glass is recommended. The combination for thicknesses can be any kind, according to the design and availability.
There is the possibility to apply IR or temperature coatings between the laminates to provide with less solar
absorption or fire resistance.

Lamination process

Architectural Record Magazine June 2014

“Laminated glass is of major interest in structural applications. Even though tempering reduces the time dependence of the strength and improves the structural capacity of glass, it is still a brittle material. Lamination
of a transparent plastic film between two or more flat glass panes enables a significant improvement of the
post breakage behavior: after breakage, the glass fragments adhere to the film so that a certain remaining
structural capacity is obtained as the glass fragments ‘arch’ or lock in place. This capacity depends on the
fragmentation of the glass and increases with increasing fragment size (Figure 2.12). Therefore, laminated
glass elements achieve a particularly high remaining structural capacity when made from annealed or heat
strengthened glass that breaks into large fragments. The post-breakage behavior furthermore depends on the
interlayer material.” (Haldimann, M., 2006)
In practice better results can be obtained when combining heat strengthened layers with tempered layers.

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shrinks
compression
tension
compression

tension
compression
Cracks cannot open
due to the stresses

Glass
Advantages
Excellent Compression
Greenhouse Effect (misconception)
Abundant on Earth
Recyclable Transparent Concrete

Technology

temp 250 ºC

temp 250 ºC

PVB

Toughening of Glass
Laminated Glass
Reinforced Glass

PVB
polyvinylbutilate
polyvinylbutilate

press
press
mechanical evenly distributed

mechanical evenly distributed

Design

resin

resin

Disadvantages

hardens after application

hardens after application

Brittle
Breaks

Bending forces
in the glass

Pilkington Planar System

Bending forces
in the support

Articulated Bolt

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http://www.apple.com/retail/fifthavenue/

Glass sizes

3.21m. x 6.00m
3.30m x 8-10-17m
bigger spans relying in the strength provided by using no joints.

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There are two new inventions for drilling glass. If glass holes are cut by drilling. This gives the opportunity to design bigger spans relying in the strength provided by using no joints. Peter. The best option is water jet cutting. and provides a sanded finish at the same time. cut by drilling simultaneously from both sides laser cutting laser heats the glass. Steel reinforced glas At Tu Delft several tests have been performed incorporating a steel reinforcement at the top and bottom of laminated glass beams. The best option is water jet cutting.12m. After it has been tempered of heat strengthened it can’t be cut. If the glass is toughened in a vertical oven the holes will be inaccurate. Until the creation of the Apple Stores this was the biggest size for glass. Nowadays you can order special glass sizes up to 3. “If the drill bits are not perfectly coaxial the hole will have a shoulder. with a 20 mm square hollow stainless steel profile at the edges in between. since there were no factories with a bigger size of autoclave.Glass sizes After its production annealed glass is cut to a typical size of 3. Glass has to be cut before processing it. 23 .”(Rice. 1995) The diagrams show a typical drilling sequence and how this problem can be eliminated. therefore the glass must be toughened in a horizontal oven. Through this invention glass can be cut without creating too much damage to the glass surface.30m x 8-10m. but this is not a very good option since laser heats the glass.00m. x 6. Water jet cutting Water jet cutting for glass consists on a machine that cuts glass through applying at the same time an abrasive element as sand with a very high pressure of water. Glass cutting Glass cutting Glass has to be cut before processing it. it has to be drilled simultaneously from both sides. one is laser cutting. The latest test was done with an eight meter long beam consisting of two panels of 2*12 mm heat strengthened pvb laminated glass.

This technology will be used in the design. 24 .Pictures in this page: Heat strengthened glass 8m Steel reinforced Beam TU Delft Before the test at 220 KN 11 days after breaking This particular beam was tested under load and presented the first cracks at 220 kN and finally broke at 430 KN. This particular way of reinforcing glass increases the safety of the beam through a very slender reinforcement. The beams proposed in my design will be steel reinforced. and will also form the slidding hinge connections and the cantilever rotating hinge. and the steel will take the tension forces of the cantilever. A week afterwards it was still standing carrying its own weight.

This apparently magical solution has been designed for the Apple stores. Glass Glueing Above Picture: Insert connectors Apple Store Amsterdam. and the site’s characteristics. Due to the brittle characteristic fo glass.Glass Inserts used for Connections Glass connections are the fundamental design part because they must gently transmitt the forces to the glass. Special care must be taken in the selection of the glue. The kind and strenght of the bonding that glue can provide is a much better solution. Recent development of titanium inserts embebbed in the laminated glass have proved to be a better soluton to making holes in the glass since in case of failure only one of the interlayers will break. The design of the connection is also of great importance. Comparative Charts of the most commonly used transparent glues in the market. according to the design requirements. 25 . making holes in the glass for the connections is not the best solution.

jpg 26 .mnginteractive.com/live/media/site122/2013/0604/20130604__hoberman%20arch%20go. http://extras.Deployable Structures Hoberman’s Arch.

Southampton.J. There are two categories of deployable structures. They can adapt their shape. WIT Press). and a spherical mechanism is that where all links or rigid elements are constrained to rotate along the same fixed point in space. This research will focus on the rigid deployable structures. a planar over-constrained linkage. Therefore we can say there are two basic kinds of mechanisms. There are several methods to study the kinematical linkages but this research will only focus on the particular linkage of the project. and an infinite number of higher pairs. In general they all are three dimensional. A planar mechanism is that where all trajectories are parallel to a plane. inflatable and rigid. TED. It is called over-constrained because it has mobility due to special geometry conditions. and are able to carry loads. In the particular case of the variation used in this project the links are not parallel but radial.Deployable Structures “Deployable structures are characterized by their rapid erection and easy disassembly for reuse” (GANTES. therefore a different kind of hinge is needed. 27 . The premise for this kind of linkages to have mobility is that their elements are parallelograms. but they can be simplified in order to study them. planar and spherical. See figure a four bar linkage and a planar over-constrained linkage. 2000. Boston. There are only 6 fundamental kinds of kinematic joints called lower pairs. C. UK. mechanical and physical properties for a specific use at any time. The kinematic joints perform a movement and are categorized by the degrees of freedom of the movement they perform. Mechanisms A mechanism consists of an assembly of rigid members joined by kinematic joints. These were studied and published by Reuleaux (1875) A kinematic chain of elements connected only by lower pair joints is called a linkage. The rigid deployable structures’ movement depends on a mechanism. Deployable structures are structures that have a transformation from a closed compact configuration to an open expanded configuration. Deployable Structures: Analysis And Design.com Jeremy Kasdin Flower Petal Star Shade CIT 2014 Mechanisms are categorized according to the degrees of freedom that they have.

com Scissor Hinges Study Model This variation allows using the structure also as a cladding element.googlepatents.hobberman. Hobberman’s Arch Patent www. this leads to a more economical cleaner design. The trick is to rotate the scissor hinges and to adjust the width of the elements to the desired final shape. Deployable Explanade Project www.com 28 .Example of the violation of Kutzbach’s criterion Constricted Double Link on which the second stage desing is based.

Southampton. There is a special variation of the scissor hinges also invented by Hoberman and exemplified in Hoberman’s Arch. René MOTRO. This research focused on a doubly-curved tensegrity system proposed where the main element is a cube formed by four rigid elements and twelve tensors. Scissor hinges can be modified to vary the movement into any kind of movement by just adjusting the length of the links. Deployable Structures: Analysis And Design. Deployable Structures: Analysis And Design. This particular sphere has four basic different kinds of hinges. Foldable / Unfoldable Curved Tensegrity Systems By Finite Mechanism Activation. Tensegrity “The concept of tensegrity was first realized by the sculptor Kenneth Snelson. Zhong You. 29 . They can generate curved or straight double-layered structures. (GANTES. Tensegrity Basic module study for doubly curved deployable structures. UK. WIT Press). actually such a deployable structure in his modem sense. WIT Press). forming 8 basic triangles. J. C. this leads to a more economical cleaner design.J. 2000.” (GANTES. resulting into a more transparent light weigh structure. Ali SMAILI1. The trick is to rotate the scissor hinges and to adjust the width of the elements to the desired final shape. who proposed that the method could be apphed to large architectural domes. This toy is made of several scissor hinges or pantograph assembled together to obtain only one degree of freedom. The term “tensegrity” was coined from the phrase “tensional integrity” by Fuher. Southampton.2006. Their folding process has no limitations since the tension of the cables can be adjusted. and the sphere is made by a combination of three main planar double chains connected by three secondary planar double chains. Boston. who began constructing structures in 1948 and showed them to Bucloninster Fuller. using the principle of the pantograph. This variation allows using the structure also as a cladding element. and can expand several times its package size. Boston.2012. in 1961. or scissor hinges. They can be used to provide any shape desired. Scissor hinges assembled to form a circle make a planar double chain. 2000. C. Iass Tensegrity structures separate the tensile and compressive forces into its two basic elements.Motion Structures Spanish architect Emilio Perez Pinero was the first to build. The most known scissor hinges are the toys invented by Hoberman. called The Hoberman’s Sphere. which are not distorted by the transformation because the top and bottom of the cube are not triangulated. and they can be assembled in several combinations providing the ability to transform.J. UK. or scissor hinge. The minimum combination of 4 cubes will have stability.Scissor Hinges Panthographs.

It relies on the stability gained by paper by folding. The following research done at the University of Applied Design in Munich Consists of the development of a Glass Folded Plate Structure. Development and Design of a Glass Folded Plate Structure.Origami Miura-Ouri Foldable. Mathias Krupna. 2006.Miura-Ouri Foldable. clamped and with an insert on the glass laminate. The characteristic of foldable structures is that 2D panels connected with a hinge along their common joint line form them. The analysis of a simple structure was done in FEM using a simple door hinge conection with two variants. Their design can be originated by folding paper. JIASS. 30 .Origami Stefan Trometer.

Wembley Stadium The two lateral structures of the cover slide to open and close. Load Wind Load Seismic effects Snow Load Dynamic effects Thermal effects Skew effect Water proofing Mechanism Driving Mechanism There must be a Disaster Prevention Plan. as well as a maintenance plan.Stadiums Stadiums are the most common used depliable structures and a very good design source but at a very big scale. Guidelines for Structural Design of Retractable Roof Structures. 31 . the most interesting feature about stadiums are the guidelines for performance. Safety in conversion Degree of openness Speed Flexibility of space Effect of wind on retracted roof Occupancy environment Fire safety Consideration of building type Economic efficiency Operability management Cost Structural Design Considerations. Applied to this particular research. which can be used with some adaptations to the design of any depliable structure. www.wembleystadium.com Architectural Considerations.

Chapter IV The Design Eye level Render of the clossed Canopy 3dmax Render 32 .

.sun and the Sea. 33 .Museum located outside the archaeological site’s walls.Surrounded by a 5m tall wall & Coral Reef .C. .The city of Tulum .Late Post-Classic Mayan Period 1200-1521 A.

com Topographc Map of the city of Tulúm. The city was abandoned after the Spanish invasion and covered by the jungle.Previous Page Images: Satelite Image of Quintana Roo. This project will be a part of the museum. Servicio Meteorológico del Estado de Quintana Roo. Nowadays it is an important turistic site. which doesn’t have a museum. It is rare. WWW. www. located outside the archeological site’s walls. and was probably still inhabited during the Spanish invasion.com Project Design Introduction The site chosen for this project was at the entrance of an archeological museum in the ancient ruins of Tulum. but possible to have hurricanes in Tulúm.googlemaps. but will be able to fold when it’s too hot. It is 1 hour drive away from Cancún along the coast of the Caribean Sea. It was surrounded by a 5m tall wall on three sides and by the second largest Coral Reef in the Caribbean Sea on the fourth side. The reason for choosing this particular site was to deal with the challenge of a sustainable glass structure in a very hot place. and not interfere with it’s beauty.com Aerial View of the Ancient Ruins of Tulum Concurso Internacional Arquine 2008. The main building called the Castle was built in a cliff and in line with the sun and the Sea. in Quintana Roo. Now it is an important archeological site. and to take advantage of the transparent property of glass to respect the ruins. 34 . Site The city of Tulum belongs to the Late Post-Classic Mayan Period (1200-1521 A. www.arquine. México. The canopy will protect form the rain and wind. Next Page Images: Temperature and rain annual reports for Quintana Roo. Concurso Internacional Arquine 2008. México.). México.C. Although The Caribean is a hurricane region this area is protected by Cozumel Island and Cancún Island.arquine.

Challenge: • A glass structure in a hot and humid place • Respect the ruins • Protect from the rain and wind 35 .

The cantilevered hinge had to be designed.First Stage Cantilevered Scissor hinge Lessons Learned The tensors had to be adjusted The scissor hinge woks better as a self supported structure. Third Stage 2 Main Rotating Beams Lessons Learned The cantilever was solved by clamping the rotating beams and using a ball bearing. Second Stage 2 Main Beams Lessons Learned The second beam had to supported. 36 .

Second Stage Sequence of the animation 37 . The main beam remains steady while the movement rotates around each of the principal hinges of this beam.Second Stage 3D Top Views The movement was induced by an actuator paralel to the main beam on the middle glass plate connector. The only flaw in this stage is that the whole structure remains cantilevered. There was no problem with the mechanism in this version.

The canopy would be supported by a main curved beam and a series of tensors connecting the second beam to the scissor hinge. and this generated several problems on the cantilevered structure. 38 . This option simplified the design because the scissor hinge was substituted by a series of sliding hinges in the second beam. The second approach was to use two secondary beams. and the two secondary beams provide the movement. to which the overlapping panels were connected. Therefore the second step was to simplify it. and the mechanism remains the same. But there was an important issue to solve. The first idea is respected. and were carried by a main beam. Therefore I tried to simplify it. As I studied the model for solving this idea with Glass Engineering Technology.Design Evolution The design first started as a combination of linear over-constrained link with a scissor hinge that provided the possibility to create a curved structure. the scissor hinge resulted to be a bad solution for this material. Modeling This research followed two types of modeling: Computer generated modeling. This solution was working but resulted too complicated for the material. and the tensors were no longer needed. the main beam had to rotate on its support to provide the movement. and hand made scale models that prove the proposed mechanisms would work. Sketching total project First Approach The first approach was to combine a series of hinges along a circular beam with a scissor hinge hanging from cables that would create the intended folding rotation of the panels. The final design is the solution to these problems by changing the position of the supports and balancing the cantilevered beams with a mirrored structure. but two columns replac e the main beam.

Simplification A series of study models were done to understand the intended movement and how to solve it. Sliding Cantilever Cantilevered Scissor hinge Simplification The cantilever was still not solved since the forces generated on the secondary beams were too strong for a moving structure. Two versions were made to have a simply sliding cantilevered glass plate. a sliding hinge along a second beam. Further study of the movement need on the scissor hinge led to a final solution. Models Modified Scissor hinge Three beams Needed to be restricted An external beam 39 .

Open Final Proposal View of the Complex.Closed 40 .Final Solution Further study on the movement and the options to balance the cantilever led to a final solution. Final Proposal Final Proposal View of the Plaza View of one module Final Proposal View of the Complex.

Final Proposal View of the Complex Sequence of the animation 41 .

as would be in real life if this were cut by water-jet cutting.3d modeling The last part of the modeling will be to create a scale glass model therefore a scale MDF model was made. and need to be very precise that are the reason why they were made by lassercutting. 42 . Very precise drawing of each mold were drawn in autocad from the 3d model in real shape and magnitude. and sent to laser-cutting. This will serve as patterns to cut the real glass.

Environmental Considerations Heat and moisture 1.9mm 6mm 1 2 3 4 5 43 . 6mm . High Reflectance Coating 90% 4. Above 30 C Sentry Glass Interlayer 5. 2% slope 2.9mm 12mm .9mm 12mm . 3cm glass plate + Fourth layer added for redundancy. At higher temperature levels strength and stiffness of the interlayer decrease. Vindico Glass Coating 3.

if necessary. The predominant winds in Tulum are from the southeast. of the top and bottom layers.Model for FEM/Diana The model done for FEM calculations has to be a 3d simplified drawing of the 3d model itself. being non-porous.bk. 2005. and will be water jet cut with a pattern to lower the weight of the glass.A.tudelft.zappi. weak in tension and strong in compression. which in the case of the circular structure are considered negative in the z axis.” (Veer. leaving two equal layers of 8mm. 10 Years of ZAPPI Research Delft University of Technology. These were done following the codes for building in the Caribbean. www. 44 . really having properties like an extreme ultra high performance concrete. in case any of the other layers breaks. F. The design of the middle layer will be reinforced in the areas around the circular titanium insert connections and the edges. A volume is drawn as a surface. The result was a 3cm glass plate. From this thickness a third layer is added for redundancy. Model for FEM/Diana Diana Calculations The approach to the structural design with glass can be very similar to the design with concrete. layer in between.nl) Preliminary Structural Design Structural Assumptions The first approach to the analysis is to do some hand calculations to determine the approximate thickness required for the glass plates. Float glass. The middle layer is always the thicker. Generally in Mexico the codes for Miami are taken since they have the same conditions. with a 12mm. and a beam or column is drawn as a line. This way we can vary the sections of the beams or columns after the calculations. The main forces are the wind forces in case of a hurricane. “These materials are brittle. to continue with the design process.

FEM Input Mesh Creating A simplified version of the model is created for the analysis. The figure shows the mesh created with the materials applied. physical properties and forces. 45 . The beams are steel reinforced on the top and bottom layers for safety and to take in the mechanism. FEM Input Physical Properties The physical properties are specified for every different set of elements created. specifying materials.

middle.For the iDiana FEM calculations a 3cm glass thickness is considered. buttom sufaces) Distributed forces Shear forces Bending moment 46 . The dimensioning of the beams was with the rule of thumb as with dimensioning with concrete 1/10 of the length and the beam relation 1:2. middle. middle. Tension                   Compression       Forces             Moment FEM i Diana Results LC1 Gravity The analysis is made with three different load-cases: Load-case 1: dead weight Load-case 2: wind load Load-case 3: dead weight + wind load The Results are analyzed and obtained for the following forces: Nodal (Global) Element (Local) Displacements global Support reactions global Normal stresses (top. buttom sufaces) Shear stresses (top. and will hold the glass structure in case of failure. for the glass plates as well as for the reinforced circular glass beams. buttom sufaces) Principal stresses (top. LC2 Wind The glass beams will consist of a top and bottom u section steel reinforcement that will hold the mechanism of the sliding hinges.

92 MPa Bottom S1 max = 11.61 MPa Middle S1 max = 4.FEM Results Peaks S1 max = 104 MPa Tension Stress Principal Stress Annealed HS FT Tension Tension Compression + S1 20 40 80 + S2 6 40 80 S3 200 200 200 Top S1 max = 5.3 MPa 47 .

5 MPa 48 .Top S1 max = 37.5 MPa Middle S1 max = 6.72 MPa prstresses Case  1 top S1 principal  stresses  1* glass  plate  1 S2 principal  stresses  2 glass  plate  1 mid Case2 buttom top mid Case3 buttom top principal  stresses  3** glass  plate  1 buttom 16 2 7 104 52 66 104 52 66 min 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 max 38 7 41 min 0 0 0 max 7 0 0 7 3 11 14 3 11 min 0 0 -­‐7 -­‐14 -­‐4 -­‐7 -­‐14 -­‐4 -­‐14 14 1 2 max min S3 mid max -­‐2 0 -­‐14 max 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 min -­‐7 -­‐2 -­‐16 -­‐65 -­‐148 -­‐117 -­‐65 -­‐148 -­‐116 max 0 0 0 min -­‐39 -­‐6 -­‐37 Bottom S1 max = 40.

Tension Stress In this figure we can see that the behavior of the stresses is very low and within the parameters. The maximum stresses for Heat strengthened glass should be 40 MPa. 49 .

A special data is obtained for the critical glass plate 1 located on top of the columns. Nodal Displacements global displa Case 1 DTX displacements global x-direction DTY displacements global y-direction DTZ displacements global z-direction RESDTX resullting displacements max min max min max min max min top 0 0 0 0 0 -1 1 0 mid Case2 buttom top 0 -8 22 0 5 -49 53 0 mid Case3 buttom top 0 -8 22 0 4 -49 53 0 mid buttom 50 . and in the case of the stresses they are obtained for top.Maximum displacement: 53 mm The results are compared in a ghaph and reported in a chart for the three cases. For each idiana result please refer to Appendix A. middle and bottom layers on the surfaces.

Maximum support reaction: 13700 N Minimum support reaction: -13700 N Support reactions global supreac Case 1 FBX support reactions global x-direction FBY support reactions global y-direction FBZ support reactions global z-direction RESFBX resullting support reactions max min max min max min max min top 6 -6 0 0 -762 -2540 2540 762 mid Case2 buttom top 113 -113 643 -643 -10400 -11200 11200 10400 mid Case3 buttom top 108 -108 642 -642 -11100 -13700 13700 11200 mid buttom 51 .

Maximum Normal Stress: 61 N Minimum Normal Stress: -113 N Normal and shear stresses (top. middle. buttom sufaces) Maximum Shear Stress: 23 N Minimum Shear Stress: -20 N stresses Case 1 SXX normal stresses x-plane glass plate 1 SYY normal stresses y-plane glass plate 1 SXY shear stresses x/y-plane glass plate 1 SXZ shear stresses x/z-plane glass plate 1 SYZ shear stresses y/z-plane glass plate 1 max min max min max min max min max min max min max min max min max min max min top 15 -6 mid Case2 1 -2 buttom 6 -15 top 93 -63 mid Case3 48 -145 buttom 61 -113 7 0 0 0 0 -7 31 -41 6 -20 25 -31 3 -3 0 0 3 -3 20 -22 13 -12 22 -20 1 -2 1 -2 1 -2 8 -34 4 -30 7 -26 1 -1 1 -1 1 -1 6 -6 6 -6 6 -6 top 93 -63 30 -16 31 -41 21 -15 20 -23 10 -23 8 -34 3 -4 6 -6 4 -6 mid 48 -145 1 0 6 -20 0 0 13 -12 0 0 4 -30 3 -4 6 -6 4 -6 buttom 52 61 -113 17 -29 25 -31 16 -21 23 -20 23 -10 7 -26 3 -4 6 -6 4 -6 .

Maximum Shear Force: 125 N Minimum Shear Force: -185 N Distributed and shear forces Maximum Distributed Force: 186 N Minimum Distributed Force: -611 N forces) Case 1 NXX distributed forces x-plane NYY distributed forces y-plane NXY distributed forces x/y-plane QXZ shear forces x-plane QYZ shear forces y-plane max min max min max min max min max min top 2 -2 7 -7 2 -2 32 -57 32 -33 mid Case2 buttom top 130 -129 182 -604 97 -203 125 -158 172 -183 mid Case3 buttom top 131 -130 186 -611 99 -203 125 -158 172 -185 mid buttom 53 .

Maximum Bending Moment: 4360 N Minimum Bending Moment: -5300 N Bending and torcional moments Maximum Torcional Moment: 4620 N Minimum Torcional Moment: -4460 N moments Case 1 MXX bending moment x-plane MYY bending moment x-plane MXY torsional moment x-plane max min max min max min top 2180 -904 446 -463 1100 -8 mid Case2 buttom top 3960 -5300 3030 -3330 4620 -4460 mid Case3 buttom top 4360 -5300 3030 -3430 4620 -4460 mid buttom 54 .

and this process also helped design the connections. Any glass plane must be held at least in four points. then the structure could ne done in glass. A 1:5 MDF model was made before trying to build a glass model. There are very few examples of this kind of cantilevered hinge. this guided the design of the insert. The joints and the design were made as they should be used in the real scale prototype. with three 55 . the hinged connections with the glass plates had to be glued. The Design of the Hinged Connections with the Glass Plates Hinged Connections with the Glass Plates Due to the characteristics of glass and to the resources available. where it is helpful to avoid moments. therefore all the MDF parts were lassercut. When working with a glass structure it is highly recommended to make a test model at the biggest scale possible for safety measures. This assumption is based in the characteristics of both materials. or in the case of a triangle. Many small-scale models were made to understand the movement and the mechanism itself. as should be any structure built with glass. If the MDF model proved to work. The Design of the Cantilevered Hinge Cantilevered Hinge One of the most troublesome parts of the design was the cantilevered hinge. Most cantilevers use a hinge in the z axis.Final Model Construction The Experiment. The model had to be very accurate. but the movement I was searching had to use a hinge in the x/y axis. The solution tried in the model was to counterbalance the cantilever with a mirrored beam and to clamp them together. and any mechanism. but there are some bridges that work with this system.

The glass plates could be leveled. but there was a slight deformation.The MDF beams didn’t fail. The beams were assembled with bigger aluminum angles glued together with double face tape. The glue and the angles used to assemble the beams were weak and the whole structure couldn’t take the force of it’s own weight. The small models proved to work better with only two support points. In real life the three points at least are necessary in case any of the other supports fail.points.The Glass Plates could be leveled with only two points just by tightening the bolts. This proved to be unstable and. therefore I decided to try how this would work. The triangular shape of the glass plates asked for three points. if it isn’t then the connection buckles.. And. it proved to be rigid enough to hold it’s own weight. if it is too tight.The tubular form of the beams proved to be correct. 1. therefore the need for a third point was proved. Once the complete structure was assembled. 56 . 2. The first attempt was made and the whole structure proved to be very heavy for the clamps. Results from the experiment The glass plates could be leveled.. it must be within a millimeter smaller.The relationship between the size of the hole and the hinge is very important. 3.. but it’s connections had to be very strong. The clamps supporting the beams were clamped to a desk. The glue and the connections failed 4.. the material proved to be stiff enough. the hinge will not rotate smoothly. and the size of the circular insert proved to be able to support the glass plates. but the mechanism only allowed a third point in the same line between the other two supports.

The cantilevered hinge had to include reinforcements between the sliding parts... but a smooth movement couldn’t be achieved. 4..Once the model was finished. 3. there were some external problems: The table to which it was clamped prevented one beam from cantilevering. The sliding hinges didn’t slide and the tension was transmitted to the beams. Conclusions The design of the cantilevered hinge needed several adjustments: 1.The connections of the parts of the beams had to be increased in number and redesigned. The structure is still standing..The beams had to be wider and the vertical elements had to be connected in between the horizontal elements providing more support and surface of adherence. Testing the Mechanism Vertical connections have to be improved. The beams could rotate but the glue failed immediately opening the beam at the connection with the hinge. 57 .. The bolts were not cut precisely to the required height. 5. 2. The sliding hinges didn’t slide.A pair of ball bearings were added at the top and bottom areas of contact between the clamp and the beam to avoid friction.The design of the mechanism and the sliding hinges must be checked. and this obstructed the movement of the beam.

Titanium connector inserted between laminates 4. 180mm diam.5mm soft aluminum ring 5. 2. 12mm HS Laminated Sentry Glass 3. White anodized aluminum 6/8” bolt 58 . Titanium 6/8” spacer 7. Titanium 6/8” nut 6.Glass Plates Hinge Detail 1. 6mm HS Laminated Sentry Glass 2.

300mm & 304mm Duran Schott glass tube laminated column. 180mm Duran Schott glass tube 9. Steel u profile beam reinforcement 6. 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 8 9 3 4 11 12 13 59 . Soft aluminum ring glass column connector 12. 4. 3. Soft aluminum cross spacer column connector 13. Borosilicate Glass Cap White anodized aluminum 6” tube Stainless Steel clamp Stainless Steel Thrust 8”diam Ball Bearing 5. 6-12-12-6mm HS Laminated Sentry curved Glass 7. 200mm Duran Schott glass tube 8.Rotating Beam Hinge Detail 1. 2. 180mm Titanium connector inserted between glass tube laminates 10. Stainless Steel Thrust 8”diam Ball Bearing 11.

the glue would have been stronger. I would recomend using those tools to be certain about the trayectory of the members. Mathematica is an example of them. I would like to study other design possibilities. There are some softwares to analyze mechanisms. To the sub question. That was the most important reazon why the model failed. having a clear and analyzable load analysis of the design where 60 . as I changed the supports and direction of the movement. during the creation of the final amination I realized that the path of the sliding hinges was no longer a straight line as in the second stage model. If we had built the model in glass. it is possible to design a 95% glass climate adaptive curved canopy. As we modify the characteristics of members in a mechanism. At the end of the design process. but it would be possible to design the bottom with glass because they are taking the compression forces.Conclusions and Implications Introduction The model didn’t work properly but it showed all the important matters that have to be considered when building a real movable glass structure. Conclusions The answer to the research question is yes. The beams were designed using steel reinforcement at the top and at the bottom. The design of a cantilevered hinge as the one analysed has many problems that can be solved with the ballbearing and the clamps. when designing with glass which are the Basic Design Rules? The answer relies on teamwork between designers and industry. but there would have been important stresses due to the inaccuracy of the trayectories. also the paths changed. there is an infinite number of different movements that it can produce. but as it is a crucial part of the structure. The connections are the most important feature to design in this kind of structures and building a model is very helpful to see the way the perform. and the results of the idiana calculations prove this.

Safety Considerations Column Protection further study Trial on site construction further study Third Insert further study Maintenance Plan further study Mechanism further study 61 .

Some further safety considerations must be mentioned. A trial version of the canopy must be tested in site to create a maintenance plan for all the parts. 62 . The glass columns must have a protection against collition. As part of my conclusions I propose several safety considerations for this paticular project: Safety Considerations.the stressess in the glass can be predicted. A maintenance plan should be strictly followed during operation. A third support must be added to each glass pane. A study of the trayectory of the mechanism must be done with mechanica or a similar software. Some drawing have been done for this proposal. but require further study. using flexible and absorbing supports that can avoid any contact between the glass and glass or hard metals.

Relationship between the theme of studio and the case study chosen (location/object) The design will be situated in Tulum. My intention is to use glass structurally and not just hang it from the structure. But many of these mechanisms are already designed and have a patent. It will be able to adapt. Mexico. This solution was structurally too complicated to solve with glass elements therefore I analyzed other possibilities to simplify the design.Reflection Product process planning Diagrams and sketches There is a very close Relationship between the research and the design in both aspects the structural and the material choice. A very good example for this is the design of the connections and the beams. Transparency of glass will also play an important rail on the location. Glass research. The canopy can open and close depending on the climate conditions. The design also influenced my re search and enriched it with the solution to every challenge found along the way. Quintana Roo. Relationship between the methodological line of approach of the studio and the method chosen by the student Relationship between the project and the wider social context. therefore. It respects the existing architecture and camouflages within it. it was crucial to be informed of the latest advances achieved using this material. and be reused or recycled. The result was to create a planar linkage resting in two rotating beams. Referring to the main topic of my thesis. and analyze how different combination of parts give different mechanisms. Historic buildings already exist in the site and with its transparency it won’t interfere with the historical environment. It will protect from the weather but it will not interfere with the view of the jungle and the pyramid. The reason to chose this location was to address the climate conditions with an adaptable structure. 63 . because the design with Glass Engineering Technology has changed drastically the past 30 years. Through this I could understand how each part of the mechanism work. My intention in a social context is to provide a building that will only provide a service. In the first part of the research the design solution was to combine a linear link with a scissor hinge that allowed the curve of the design. My choice of approach to the design of a deployable structure was to do research models of the possible structures. it is very important to research what has already been done before designing.

References Glass Engineering Technology: www. Professor Fred Veer. WIT Press GANTES. 2009. Deployable Structures: Analysis And Design.tudelft.zappi. Southampton.iass. Boston. Fracture Strength of Structural Glass Elements – Analytical and numerical modeling. Southampton.com Veer. WIT Press 64 . www. F. Switzerland. Towards an Integrated Approach TU Delft. Haldimann.P. Boston. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL).J. Structural glass Peter Rice / by André Brown Author: Brown.Bos 2011. Safety Concepts in Structural Glass Engineering.nl Smith. AR105 Technoledge Lectures TU Delft Deployable Structures IASS www. C. Structural design of retractable roof structures.bk.. Rob 2003. PETER 1995. 2006. André Publish date: 2001 F.glassfiles. Thèse No 3671.A. Glass in Structures RICE.com INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR SHELL AND SPATIAL STRUCTURES 2000. Netherlands. The Analysis Design And Testing Of An Asymmetric Bolted Glass Roof Panel. M. UK.. 10 Years of ZAPPI Research Delft University of Technology. 2005. testing and design. Anthony 2005. 2000. Nijsse. UK.

Journal Of The International Association For Shell And Spatial Structures: J. René MOTRO. Zhong Publish date: 2012 Ali SMAILI1. Theo 2007.ZUK. Kinetic architecture Kinetic architectures and geotextile installations Author: Beesley. WILLIAM 1970. De Grote Fantast 65 . Philip Publish date: 2010 Motion structures : deployable structural assemblies of mechanisms Author: You. Foldable / Unfoldable Curved Tensegrity Systems By Finite Mechanism Activation. Iass Jansen.2006.

Apendix A FEM i Diana Results The analysis is made with three different load-cases: Load-case 1: dead weight Load-case 2: wind load Load-case 3: dead weight + wind load The Results are analyzed and obtained for the following forces: Nodal (Global) Element (Local) p. 001 018 030 075 102 117 125 141 .

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Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy
Appendix A FEM Results

135

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy
Appendix A FEM Results

136

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy
Appendix A FEM Results

137

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy
Appendix A FEM Results

138

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy
Appendix A FEM Results

139

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy
Appendix A FEM Results

140

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 141 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 142 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 143 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 144 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 145 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 146 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 147 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 148 .

Design of a Climate Adaptive Curved Canopy Appendix A FEM Results 149 .

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