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MAY 12, 2010

MAY 12, 2010 THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 1 Vol 37 No

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 1

Vol 37 No 19

NASCAR:

A HALL FIT FOR KINGS

PAGE 5

1 Vol 37 No 19 NASCAR: A HALL FIT FOR KINGS PAGE 5 Connect with us

Connect with us on facebook

A HALL FIT FOR KINGS PAGE 5 Connect with us on facebook THIS WEEK Live music
A HALL FIT FOR KINGS PAGE 5 Connect with us on facebook THIS WEEK Live music

THIS WEEK

FIT FOR KINGS PAGE 5 Connect with us on facebook THIS WEEK Live music Bryant Johnson

Live music

Bryant Johnson will perform classic rock music on Thursday from 6-8 p.m. at the Brantley County Library.

Fishing day

Lake Wares Annual Kids Fishing Day will be held on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Any child up to the age of 16 accompanied by an adult can participate. Hot dogs and drinks will be served at 11:30 p.m. For more information call Herbert Boyd at 912-283-3865 with any questions.

Prayer seminar

Awomen’s prayer union will

be held on Friday from 4-7 p.m. and Saturday from9 a.m. until

5 p.m. at College Place United

Methodist Church, 3890 Altama Ave., Brunswick. For more information call Mary Blanche Rice at 265-6888 or visit www. womensprayerunion.com.

Pirates

The Waycross Service League will hold Pirates, Princesses & Pals on Saturday from 8:30-10:30 a.m. at Kettle Creek Church, 2523 Carswell Ave., Waycross. Dress up in your favorite costume and come eat breakfast with your favorite “pals”. Prices are: 1 and under free, 2-11 $5, 12 and older $7. Tickets can be purchased at Osburn Studio, 912-338-0150.

UPCOMING

Board meeting

The Satilla Community Ser- vices Board will hold its next Board meeting on Thursday, May 20 at 6 p.m. in the Board Room located at 1007 Mary Street, Waycross. For more information, please contact La- Cretia Gassem at 912-449-7101.

Sing

The Whaley’s and SWAT (Sunday with a Twist) will perform at Hickox Praise and

Worship on Saturday, May 22 at

7 p.m. Refreshments will follow. Hickox Praise and Worship is

MORE ETC. ON PAGE 2

OPENWIDE! Donovan Thron opens wide as Dental Hygienist Susan Pittman cleans his teeth at the

OPENWIDE!

OPENWIDE! Donovan Thron opens wide as Dental Hygienist Susan Pittman cleans his teeth at the Teledenistry

Donovan Thron opens wide as Dental Hygienist Susan Pittman cleans his teeth at the Teledenistry Clinic housed at a Brantley County elementary school.

Special to the Enterprise

Brantley students open up to Teledental Program

Special to the Enterprise

Donovan Thron was a little hesitant at first as he climbed into the dentist chair. A soft-spoken dental hygienist comforted him, and he opened his mouth wide to show off his teeth. The Brantley County student was one of many elementary school children who recently received dental treatment at the county’s first-ever Teledentistry Clinic housed within the school. The Teledental Program, the first of its kind in Georgia, is a collaboration of the Southeast Health District, Waycross dentist Jon Drawdy and the Medical Col- lege of Georgia. The program is new to the Brantley County School System. It was piloted with much success in Ware County last year at Head Start. “It is exciting to have a teledenistry clinic in our school system to provide pre- ventative dental services to our students,” said Roxie Tumlin, Brantley County Schools Special Education Director. “Students with poor oral health who experience pain, decay, impactions and infections in their teeth and gums cannot fully engage in the learning process while at school. This innovative partnership with

Public Health will certainly help us take

care of

their teeth.” “When you bring the services to the school to provide services in a school setting it ensures 100 percent attendance, essentially eliminating the problem of failed appointments,” added Diane Watson, Telehealth Coordinator for the Southeast Health District, which consists of 16 coun- ties, including Brantley. Clinics are scheduled in cooperation with the school. There is a room at the el- ementary school that is set up much like a dentist exam room, said Watson. Children, whose parents have consented to the ser- vices, receive cleanings exams and x-rays. Referrals are made, if necessary. Drawdy provides the oversight for the dental hygienists who are onsite. Faculty and residents of the Medical College of Georgia Dental School are able to view the children’s x-rays and mouths via a closed- circuit connection. They can also talk to the hygienists and parents in real time. Watson noted that the Teledental Program was presented last year to the Georgia Dental Association Board of Trustees to raise awareness about the uses of teledentistry in rural settings.

one of their most basic needs —

Airport project still on rocky path

By Chris Buchanan

Getting airport renova- tions back on track may be off to a rockier start than expected, board of com- missioners chair Ron Ham announced at the Tuesday regular meeting. Members of the board, department of transporta- tion, airport authority and the bonding company in charge of finishing the proj- ect met last week to deter- mine how to move forward with the construction and settle disputes over runway

height and unit costs for the construction materials. The project fell into the hands of a bonding company in February after the initial

the hands of a bonding company in February after the initial I think the document they

I think the document they gave us gives them the gold mine and us the shaft — Mary Gibson

contractor, Folsom construc- tion, closed its doors. The project had since been man- aged by the bonding com- pany and its subcontractor Littlefield construction. During the meeting, all parties discussed the basic parameters of a three-way tendering agreement be- tween the county, Littlefield Construction, and the bond- ing agency. But when the actual

first draft of the agreement reached the county offices on Monday, Ham said that it placed a significant amount of the cost back on the county. “There are certain places where they’re trying to say that’s not our expense, that’s going to be your ex- pense,” Ham said. “Our situation is if Folsom had stayed on the job, we’d be through with the airport now and we would not have incurred these expenses.” Ham said that the county is making sure that the bond company will incur this cost.

See BOC, page 9

Principals bailing out?

Two more resign following rumors that a ‘connected’ teacher was out to get one

By Chris Buchanan

The Brantley County Board of Education accepted the resignation of two more principals Monday night, leaving three out of seven schools without a top admin- istrator. Nahunta Primary School principal Evon Grif- fin and Brantley County Mid- dle School principal Shelli Tyre turned in resignations, following in the footsteps of Waynesville Primary School principal Tonya Johnson, who resigned at last month’s meeting. “We’ve got two princi- pals leaving,” said Super- intendent Drew Sauls. “To both of you I’d like to say I appreciate what you’ve done and hope you have some fun where you’re going.” Sauls said that he hoped they’d have continued suc- cess. The board split on a move to renew the contract

suc- cess. The board split on a move to renew the contract BCMS pricipal Shelli Tyre

BCMS pricipal Shelli Tyre talks with supporters after this week’s meeting

Photo by Christpher Buchanan/Staff

of Sherri Herrin, an eighth grade science teacher and the wife of board vice chair- man Van Herrin, with Joey Shuman and Dot Hickox voting against the move and Linda Marion and chairman

See BOE, page 9

DA approves $78,000 budget

By Chris Buchanan

The Brantley County Development Authority approved

a request for just over $78,000 for the 2011 budget at a called meeting on Thursday. According to Development Authority Director Jeanie Bo-

land, the figure includes modest increases in customary office expenses and new office equipment. The proposed budget also provides for expenses for industrial park development. This development not only includes the Nahunta Park, but also the new green industrial park in Waynesville. Funds will also go toward marketing of the community to prospective business and industry. Boland said that the there is no increase in salary or increase in the authority’s spending on local programs that it sponsors. “We agree that we should focus any available funds primarily on development of our resources - industrial parks - and marketing,” she said. The board already has plans to form a marketing commit- tee to explore the most efficient and effective way to market Brantley County as a business and industrial location. Members also agreed that the director will research pro- jected cost to become a certified economic developer (ED). “The purpose for the ED program is for all ED directors - across the nation - to have the opportunity to be exposed to the same level of training and resources,” Boland said. Ultimately, Boland said the board is optimistic about the upcoming year. “This is another step in the right direction to promoting this community and growing jobs and tax base,” she said. “As

a group, we are committed to the 2011 Program of Work for

the Authority and excited about the opportunities ahead of us.”

Hoboken mail carrier gets award

Hoboken rural mail carrier Melissa Roberts has been presented an Expert Driving Award by the postmaster for

continuously striving to provide excellent service and deliver the mail in a timely and consistant manner. She was presented a safe

driver award for satisfactory driver observations and for safely delivering the mail for the past 15 years. According to Hoboken Postmaster Greta Dyal, without honest, reliable, hard working employees like Roberts, it would be impos- sible for the postal service to survive. Her dedicated and de- pendable service is appreci- ated by the postal service and her many customers, Dyal said.

by the postal service and her many customers, Dyal said. MELISSA ROBERTS www.brantleyenterprise.com * Jessica

MELISSA ROBERTS

service and her many customers, Dyal said. MELISSA ROBERTS www.brantleyenterprise.com * Jessica AnnCrabb, right, was

www.brantleyenterprise.com

*

Dyal said. MELISSA ROBERTS www.brantleyenterprise.com * Jessica AnnCrabb, right, was recognized as the Brantley
Jessica AnnCrabb, right, was recognized as the Brantley County school system STAR student and valedictorian

Jessica AnnCrabb, right, was recognized as the Brantley County school system STAR student and valedictorian and Jessica Delores Johns was named the salutatorian at this week’s school board meeting . More school board news elsewhere in today’s paper.

Photo by Chris Buchanan

news elsewhere in today’s paper. Photo by Chris Buchanan weekend weather Fri Partly Cloudy 88°/66° 20

weekend

weather

today’s paper. Photo by Chris Buchanan weekend weather Fri Partly Cloudy 88°/66° 20 % Sat Partly

Fri

Partly Cloudy

88°/66° 20 %

Sat

Partly Cloudy

88°/66° 20 %

Sun

Scattered T-Storms

82°/64° 40 %

20 % Sun Scattered T-Storms 82°/64° 40 % DO YOU THINK THOSE WHO HAVE SPOUSES WORKING

DO YOU THINK THOSE WHO HAVE SPOUSES WORKING IN THE SCHOOLS SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO SEEK ELECTION TO BOE SEATS?

Bulk rate postage paid • Permit No. 24 •POB 454 • Nahunta, GA 31553 • Address service required • COPYRIGHT 2010 THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE

PAGE 2 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010

Hortense is looking for teams (church and open). For more information contact Frances Sloan at 473-2302 or Rhonda Lee at 579-2340.

HES registration

at 473-2302 or Rhonda Lee at 579-2340. HES registration Box 1090 Nahunta, GA., 31553. There is

Box 1090 Nahunta, GA., 31553. There is no age limit and the deadline for photo submission is July 31. For additional infor- mation, contact the library @

912-462-5454.

Pool tournament

Cedar Lounge will hold a pool tournament every Saturday at 3:30 p.m. For more information call 462-5741.

Hispanic church

The Atkinson Church of God of Prophecy is starting an Hispanic Church. For more information call Javier Rosales at 912-269-0733, Rowdy Eunice at 912-223-0464, or the church at 778-3226. The church is located in Atkinson Community next to Atkinson Pawn.

Pre-k enrollment

Kidz Kountry Day Care and Learning Center is now accept- ing enrollment in its 2010-2011 Pre-K Program. If your child will be 4 years of age on or be- fore September 1, 2010, you may pick up an enrollment packet Monday through Friday from6 a.m. until 6 p.m. Kidz Kountry is located on Highway 82 in Waynesville. For more informa- tion come by or call 778-5434.

Pre-k

Precious Stages is accept- ing applications for Pre-k enrollment for the 2010-2011 school year. Your child must be four years old on or before September 1, 2010 in order to be eligible for Pre-k. For infor- mation call 462-7151.

Pre-k

The Brantley County Pre-Kin- dergarten Program is accept- ing applications for enrollment for the 2010-2011 school year. Your child must be four years old on or before September 1, 2010 in order to be eligible for Pre-k. Registration packets may be picked up at the school offices in Hoboken, Nahunta and Waynesville. Enrollment is limited.

BBQ cookoff

Lake Ware will hold a BBQ cookoff on Friday, October

15 and Saturday, October 16. Brunswick stewcompetition on Friday night and cookoff on Saturday. For more informa- tion, suggestions or questions call 912-283-3865. Vendor forms and fees are available upon

request.

Line dancing

Southeast Singles will hold line dancing classes every Monday at 6:30 p.m. at Norman’s Music room. For more information call Betty at 285-5024, Nancy at 281-6026, Faye at 458-2267, Marva at 281-0535 or Olive Grif- fin at 283-9607.

Donations

An account has been set-up at the Heritage Bank in Nahunta for Amy Schultze for dona- tions to help with her medical bills and expenses. Amy had a stroke on December 9 and is recovering at home.

Adult education

Brantley County Adult Educa- tion’s hours are Tuesday and Thursday, 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 – 9 p.m. As soon as a new full time instructor is selected, the center will return to a full time schedule. If you have any ques- tions, please call 912-462-7923 or Okefenokee Technical College

912-287-6580.

Chamber meeting

The Brantley County Chamber of Commerce will hold their meetings on the third Wednes- day at 12 p.m. of every month. For more information call Tim Sawyer at 462-6282 or visit bchamber@btconline.net.

Head start

Brantley County Head Start is currently accepting applica- tions for the current program year. This is a free comprehen- sive, federal preschool program for eligible children ages 3-4. For more information call (912) 462-6552 or visit the center at 470 Bryan Street, Suite A, Nahunta.

Writing workshops

The Brantley County Histori- cal &Preservation Society, Inc. will hold writing workshops at the Confederate Park Library each Wednesday from 10 a.m. -2 p.m., until further notice, to help those who are writing stories for the books, Story of Brantley County, Vol. 2 and the Confederate book. For more information contact Dorothy J. Thomas at Djt1927@aol.com.

Trivia

Southeast Singles will hold trivia Tuesdays at Applebees

at 9 p.m. For more information call Nancy at 281-6026, Beverly at 387-5142 or Marva at 281-0535.

Cookbooks

The hardback cookbooks published by the local chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy are nowavailable at the Brantley County library at a cost of $12. For more infor- mation, contact Karen Harrell at 462-8483.

Walking

Southeast singles will walk ev- ery Monday and Wednesday at the YMCA track in Waycross at 6:30 p.m. For more information call Nancy at 281-6026, Beverly at 387-5142 or Marva at 281-0535.

Mission

The Satilla Community Mis- sion in Hortense is open every Wednesday from 5-7 p.m., or in case of an emergency call any of the three names listed below, and they will meet you at the mission. The mission does take money, but we would prefer a check made out to Satilla Baptist Church, and on the memo put for Satilla Com- munity Mission. If you have any questions please feel free to call Pastor Daniel Harris at 912-237-1000, Bud Jones at 912- 462-6397 or John Terwilleger at

912-579-9926.

Mercy mission

Liberty’s Mercy Mission be open for service every other

Thursday, serving a different

variety of food at 12 p.m. The

clothes closet will open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the same day. Liberty Lighthouse Worship Center sponsors the mission located in the social hall of the church, located three miles south of Nahunta off US 301. For more information or dona- tions, please call 462-8488.

GeorgiaCares

GeorgiaCares, a local part- nership with the Division of Aging Services, is designed to educate and help seniors and disabled persons under age 65 sort through the complexities of Medicare and related health insurance concerns. Their counselors are non-biased and our services are free. For help, call 1-800-669-8387.

Child restraints

The Waynesville VFDhas been awarded Mini Grant and has available technical assistance and educational materials to reduce the number of fatalities on Georgia’s roads. Materi- als include child restraints to parents who meet financial eligibility. For more informa- tion about protecting your child frompreventable injuries, contact Tonya Whitworth at 912-322-2935 or tonyaCPST@ yahoo.com.

Donations

Brantley County Neighbors Helping Neighbors is currently accepting donations for sick children, cancer patients, and families in need. Some of the sick children have requested chihuahua puppies, talking birds, etc. Any donation will be greatly appreciated. Please contact Ronnie Jacobs at 462- 5214, Pat Tompkins at 462-7443, or Mert Dowling at 462-5455 for more information.

OREMC programs

OREMC offers safety and en- ergy efficiency programs and demonstrations to schools and community and civic organiza- tions in our service area. Their energy efficiency experts can offer tips that will help you save electricity and stretch your budget. If you are inter- ested scheduling a program for your group, please contact our office at 912 462-5131 or 800- 262-5131 and talk with Craig Muchison (ext. 1147), David Smith (ext. 3319) or Linda Har- ris (ext. 1151).

Closet

Neighbors Helping Neighbors

has a clothes closet available at

135 Florida Avenue, Nahunta.

Please call Rev. Jimmy and Barbara Bryant at 462-6340 for an appointment.

Support groups

SEGA MAMa’s meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6 -8:30 p.m. All coping skills and life skills classes are on an 8 week rotation the topics change but they are all faith based. The charge for the classes are $5 per topic. The Monday night classes “Over- comers, ADaily Choice” will meets from7 - 8:30 p.m. and the cost is $16.

Clothes closet

Waynesville Baptist is in need of clothes and shoes of all sizes for their clothes closet. The closet is open every Tuesday from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

American indian

The American Cherokee Confederacy of Georgia is ac- cepting members with 1/16 or more of Indian heritage. You don’t have to be just Cherokee, as long as you don’t belong to another tribe or organization. For more information contact the American Cherokee Con- federacy Tribal Office 619 Pine Cone Road, Albany, Georgia 31705 or call 229-787-5722.

Donations

Neighbors Helping Neighbors is accepting donations for a “Fire Fund” to help families when their homes are burned and destroyed by fire. Dona-

tions may be sent to Neighbors Helping Neighbors, c/o Fire Fund, P.O. Box 271 Nahunta,

31553.

Donate blood

The Red Cross needs approxi- mately 1,200 people to donate blood each weekday to meet the needs of approxi- mately 140 hospitals and healthcare

facilities. Most people age 17 or older who weigh at least

110 pounds can give blood. For

more information call 1-800

GIVELIFE(448-3543).

blood. For more information call 1-800 GIVELIFE(448-3543). located 2.5 miles down Buffalo Creek Road in Hickox
blood. For more information call 1-800 GIVELIFE(448-3543). located 2.5 miles down Buffalo Creek Road in Hickox

located 2.5 miles down Buffalo Creek Road in Hickox com- munity.

Reunion

The Families of Hamon Barber and James Everett “Rube” Bar- ber, sons of Everett Obadiah “Chubb” Barber, will hold a

reunion on Saturday, May 22 at

12 p.m. at Odadiah’s Okefenok

on Swamp Road in Waycross. Lunch will be held in the pavilion, bring your favorite dishes, tea or coke, and serving utensils for your dishes. Paper products will be furnished. For more information call Herbert Barber at 912-449-6432 or Sonny Barber at 912-778-4683.

Gospel sing

Bachlott Church of God will hold a gospel sing on Saturday, May 22 at 7 p.m. with the New Taylor singers.

Reunion

The Brantley County Class of

1980 will hold their 30th year

Class Reunion on Saturday,

May 22 at 5 p.m. at Twin Oaks Park in Schlatterville. For more information please call Tina Clem Walker at 912-462-

7125 or 912-286-1613 or leave

a message for Alisa Altman Peeples at 912-462-5955.

Sing

Harvest Community Church will hold a sing on Sunday, May 23 at 10:30 a.m. featuring regional southern gospel group Kindred Spirit. For more infor- mation call 912-465-5591.

Revival

Hickox Praise and Worship will hold revival services

beginning on Sunday, May 23 at 6 p.mthrough Wednesday, May

26 at 7 p.m. nightly. Speakers

will be Jason Marden and Brother Ray Gillis. Hickox Praise and Worship is located 2.5 miles down Buffalo Creek Road in Hickox community.

Gospel drama

The Atkinson Church of God of Prophecy will hold a gospel drama on Wednesday, May 26 at 7 p.m.

Concert

Jay Sweat and Travis Thirft will perform oldies music on Thursday, May 27 from 6-8 p.m. at the Brantley County Library.

Reunion

The descendants of Emory Arlington and Serena Eliza-

beth Lee Johns will hold their annual family reunion at Hoboken Elementary School on Saturday, May 29 beginning at 10 a.m. Family members are asked to bring “the usual good

eats.”

please contact Rev. Emory Ion

Johns at 912-282-1499 or Doro- thy Johns Thomas at 912-265-

7599 or visit djt1927@aol.com

For further information,

Coed league

The Summer Coed League in

Hoboken Elemetary is holding Kindergarten registration. If you have a child who will be five (5) years old on or before September 1 of this year he/ she will need to be registered for Kindergarten, unless cur- rently enrolled in their Pre-k.

Paperwork is needed in order to be registered. Please call the school office at 458-2135 for more information.

Nominations

The Chamber of Commerce

is accepting nominations for

Citizen of the Year, Business of the Year and Farmer of the Year. For forms or more information call TimSawyer at 462-5166, Ruby Ann Sawyer at 462-6957 or Linda Harris at 462-5131 ext. 1151.

Baseball camp

The 30th annual Robert Sapp baseball camp is accepting applications for its summer sessions to be held at Mallory Park on St. Simons and at North Glynn Park in Bruns- wick on Monday, June 7 - Fri- day, June 11, from9 a.m. - 3 p.m. for boys ages 7-14. For more information or brochures call Jimmy Brown at 912-267-6724 or Robert Sapp at 770-287-3309 or email rsbbcamp@charter.net or visit www.robertsappbase- ballcamp.com.

Youth camp

The Brantley County Touch- down Club is hosting their 3rd Annual Youth Fundamental Camp on Monday, June 14, Tuesday, June 15, and Wednes- day, June 16 from 9 a.m to 12 p.m. for children entering 1st grade through 8th grade 2010-2011 school year. Lunch

will be provided and each

participant will receive a spirt pack. Early registration fee

is $50 deadline is Sunday, May

23, late registraion fee is $65 from Monday, May 24 through Saturday, May 29. The deadline for registration is Saturday, May 29. Registration forms can be picked up at KT Bugs, BC Designs and Movie Time.

Pageant

The Mr. and Mrs. Brantley Firecracker pageant will be held on Saturday, June 19 beginning at 1:30 p.m. with the pageant to start at 2 p.m. at the Brantley County High School Cafeteria. Entry fee is $50. For more information contact Kathy at kathy.hendrix@coast- albb.com.

Birthday calendars

The Friends of the Library will be selling birthday calendars again this year. We’ll be looking for 12 photographs of Brantley County that will

be featured each month.

a part of this fundraiser by

submitting your photos of our beautiful area. Landscape shots only, no people. Photos must be submitted in a 4x6 format and can be dropped off at the library or mailed to P.O.

Be

Seven Day Forecast

off at the library or mailed to P.O. Be Seven Day Forecast How to contact us:

How to contact us:

DEPARTMENTS

Editor

editor@brantleyenterprise.com

News

newsdesk@brantleyenterprise.com

Sports

sports@brantleyenterprise.com

AdS

ads@brantleyenterprise.com

Etc.

etc@brantleyenterprise.com

You can also call us at 912-462-6776 or send mail to Post Office Box 454, Nahunta GA 31553.

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 3

Auxiliaries tryouts held

Recently, tryouts were held for the 2010 BCHS Auxiliaries. Results are as follows:

BCHS Band Dance Team: Captain Kittie Carreker, Co-Captain Shelby Johnston, Destiny Smith, Mary Turner, Stephanie Wilson, Hannah Pafford, Katie Anderson, Emily Rowell, Natalee Brown, Serena Smith, Nichole Herrin, Des- tiny Burchfield, and Chelsea Whalen. BCHS Band Color Guard: Captain Brittany Green, Co- Captain Brittany Carver, Lauren Nichols, Redessa Carreker, Shabree Nichols, Elizabeth Dean, Heather Russell, Shannon Joyner, Rebecca Barrett, Allisa Gohil, Ashley Gibson, Alexis McLean, and Charity Knowles. BCHS Band Solo Twirlers: Emily McDermott and Kay- lyn Dunsmore. The Drum Major is Samantha Hurley and the Assistant Drum Major is Lydia Scott. Daniel Byrd, Brantley County Schools Music Supervisor, was pleased with progress on all fronts and foresees an excit- ing football season ahead.

Reunions

Flowers

The descendants of Washington (Wash) Flowers and Lillian (Taylor) Flowers will hold their annual reunion on Saturday, May 22 at 1 p.m. at Aunt Ola O’Berry’s old home place. Paper products and ice will be furnished, please bring a covered dish and dessert if you like. Bring lawn chairs. For more information call 462-8908.

Johns

The descendants of Emory Arlington and Serena Elizabeth Lee Johns will hold their annual family reunion at Hoboken Elementary School on Saturday, May 29 beginning at 10 a.m. Family members are asked to bring “the usual good eats.” For further information, please contact Rev. Emory Ion Johns at 912-282-1499 or Dorothy Johns Thomas at 912-265-7599 or visit djt1927@aol.com

Obituaries

Dollie Embery

Dollie Dora Embery, 68, of Waverly, passed away late Sunday evening at Hospice of the Golden Isles. Survivors include her husband, Robert Embery of Waverly 2 daughters, Mary Jane Em- bery and husband Kevin Rollins of Hortense, Martha Embery of Brunswick brother, John B. ‘Junior’ Taylor of Brunswick 6 grand- children, Jessica Rollins, LCpl. Thomas Hall, Jr. and wife Devin, James Ellis, Clifford Burd, Haley Burd, Michael Burd. Several nieces and nephews, and many friends, residents, and staff mem- bers, whom she had met during her lengthy stay at Jolley House of Hospice of the Golden Isles. Dollie had been a resident of Waverly since 1960, and was a member of Norwich Baptist Church, and a home maker. Memorial Services will be held Sunday, May 16, 2010, 2 p.m. at Chapman Funeral Chapel with Rev. Diane Lovin officiating. The family will be receiving friends immediately following the memorial service. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested donations to Hospice of the Golden Isles. Chapman Funeral Chapel & Crematory is in charge of the arrangements.

Sidney Willis

Sidney Walker Willis, 75 of St. Simons Island, died Tuesday (May 4, 2010) at Hospice of the Golden Isles, Brunswick. Born in New Smyrna Beach, his parents were William B. Willis and Sarah Purdom Willis. He was also preceded in death by a brother Ralph Willis. He served in the U.S. Army in the Korean Conflict and was a Traffic Manager with LaRoache Industries. He had just celebrated 26 years of sobriety. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Marilyn Brooks Willis of St. Simons Island, 2 sons and daughters-in-law, Brad and Nazy Willis of Atlanta and Sandy and Paula Willis of Jacksonville, 4 grandchildren and 1 great grand daughter; 3 brothers, Gerald Willis of O Fallon, Il, Ronald Willis of Williamson, S.C. and Gary Willis of Nahunta; and a sister, Janice Grimes of St. Simons Beach; several nieces, nephews and other relatives. In Lieu of Flowers donations can be sent to Hos- pice of the Golden Isles, Inc., 1692 Glynco Pkwy Brunswick, GA 31525. A memorial services was held Friday morning at 11 a.m. at Frye Funeral Home Chapel , Nahunta with Rev. Jane Brooks offici- ating. Sympathy may be expressed by signing the online registry at www.fryefh.com.

expressed by signing the online registry at www.fryefh.com. Proudly Serving Families Since 1908 • Marbles •
expressed by signing the online registry at www.fryefh.com. Proudly Serving Families Since 1908 • Marbles •

Proudly Serving Families Since 1908

• Marbles

• Granites

• Bronze

• Cemetery Lettering

• 2125 Minnesota Avenue

• Valdosta Highway • US 84

• Waycross GA 31553

tbatten@baileymonumentco.com

912-283-8454 or 912-614-4008

tbatten@baileymonumentco.com 912-283-8454 or 912-614-4008 Tony M. Batten Territory Manager PETA offers to feed
tbatten@baileymonumentco.com 912-283-8454 or 912-614-4008 Tony M. Batten Territory Manager PETA offers to feed

Tony M. Batten

Territory Manager

or 912-614-4008 Tony M. Batten Territory Manager PETA offers to feed Brantley kids People for the

PETA offers to feed Brantley kids

People for the ethical treatment of animals (PETA) has offered to feed Brantley

fare well here. The organization sent a letter to Dr. Drew Sauls, su-

district has hired a collection agency to recoup the losses and will charge parents a 40 percent interest rate on their children’s lunch debt. The group is asking the superintendent to es- tablish a Meat-Free Mon- day policy for school lunches countywide in exchange for a deli- cious, protein-packed veggie burger or veggie dog for each student. “Our proposal is a win-win solution for Brantley County schools, students, and parents,” says PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “Students would get a healthy and deli- cious meal, and schools and parents would get some help to ease financial problems-

-free of charge and free of animal suffering.

problems- -free of charge and free of animal suffering. County students if the school system will

County students if the school system will adopt a no-meat Monday program. But Nutrition Service director Cindy Ham said the idea of veggie burgers and franks probably wouldn’t

perintendent of the Brantley County School System, offer-

ing to help the district offset

a debt that has accumulated

from unpaid student lunches. The offer came follow- ing reports that the school

Legal challenges filed against coal plants

Public interest groups today filed legal challenges to three state water and air per- mits for the proposed 850 mega-watt Plant Washington coal power plant in Sandersville, GA.

According to documents filed in the Office of State Administrative Hearings, Georgia Environmental Protection Division permits for the proposed Plant Washington would illegally de- grade water resources for users and down- stream communities along the Oconee River, and allow high levels of harmful pollutants into the air residents breathe. The legal chal- lenges claim: The state air permit fails to set safe limits on harmful air pollutants that would be emitted by Plant Washington, including sulfuric acid mist and particulate matter. Particulate mat- ter is linked to respiratory illnesses, heart disease and even premature death. The state water withdrawal permit fails to set necessary limits on the amount of wa- ter the plant can take from the Oconee River for use at a proposed plant located in the Ogeechee River watershed. Without adequate limits, communities such as Dublin, GA, area farms and other downstream users along the Oconee River would be left without sufficient

water resources. The state water discharge permit fails to limit the temperature of heated wastewater discharged by the proposed plant into the Oconee River, changing the riverπs ecology, depleting available oxygen in its waters, and harming fish and other wildlife that depend on the river system. Georgia already has 10 coal-fired power plants, one of which, just north of Macon, is Plant Scherer, often cited as the most polluting coal-fired plant in the nation. Plant Washington is a project of Pow- er4Georgians, a com- pany organized by Cobb Electrical Membership Corporation (EMC) and four other EMCs. The EPD has seven days to send the cases to the Office of State Administrative Hearings, where they will be assigned to administrative law judges. Court dates are expected later this summer. Attached are quotes from attorneys and groups represented in the legal challenges - Altamaha Riverkeeper, GreenLaw, Southern Environmental Law Center, Fall-line Alliance for a Clean Environment, Ogeechee River- keeper, Sierra Clubπs Georgia Chapter, and Southern Alliance for Clean Energy - and information on the individual groups.

for Clean Energy - and information on the individual groups. Chambers — two of them —

Chambers — two of them — pinned

Christopher Daniel Chambers was pinned Friday night, May 7, in recognition of completion of the Associ- ate of Nursing degree. The ceremony, held at Coastal Georgia Community College in Brunswick, honored some 60 graduates of the college’s nursing program in a time honored pinning tradition dating back to the time of its founder, Florence Nightin- gale.

In a moving ceremony, the graduates recited the Nightingale pledge to do no harm and to comfort where they could, listened to a speech by one of their own, Sonja Woods, and enjoyed a reception following the ceremonies. Christopher is the son of Cherry and Danny Cham- bers of Waynesville, and the grandson of the late Sam and Ivene Langley of Old Post Road Hortense.

In an ear- lier ceremony

Thursday after- noon at Arm- strong College in Savannah, Brandy O’Brien Chambers was pinned by her mother, Anese Harden, in

a ceremony

recognizing

nearly eighty- five graduates receiving the Bachelor of Sci- ence in Nursing degree. This pro- gram included the traditional candle-lighting by students as they passed the flame reminding each nurse of the responsibility to bring the light of compassion and car- ing into darkness. Brandy is the daughter of Walter O’Brien, Jr. of

darkness. Brandy is the daughter of Walter O’Brien, Jr. of Brunswick, and Anese Harden of Browntown,

Brunswick,

and Anese

Harden of

Browntown,

and the

granddaugh-

ter of Agnes O’Brien and

the late Wal- ter O’Brien, Sr. of Bruns- wick.

Con-

gratulations to Brandy and Christo- pher Cham- bers. You have shown the value of dedication and sacrificing in order to achieve your goals and are to be commended on your steadfast determination to succeed. Congratulations to all the students as well, and good luck to each.

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idealswhichareimportanttoourwayoflifeincoastalGeorgia.
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Tech

schools

spring

enrollment

grows

Spring quarter enroll- ment in Georgia’s 28 techni- cal colleges is up by 19% over the same time last year. Initial numbers posted by the technical colleges indicate that the current spring enrollment of 107,269 students is 17,381 more than in the previous spring quarter of 2009, when 89,888 students attended classes on the TCSG campuses. It also marks the third consecutive quarter of six-digit enrollment in the Technical College System of Georgia, which is a first for the system. The TCSG colleges are on pace for close to a 20% overall enrollment increase in the current fiscal year ending on June 30. The sys- tem projects that the annual enrollment in FY 2010 will be in excess of 185,000 students, or about 30,000 more students than in the previous year. Affordable tuition and world-class training that leads to an in-demand job in two years or less is increas- ingly attractive to both the younger, more traditional college students as well as older men and women seeking to learn new skills because they’re either under- employed or out of work entirely. In fact, this spring quarter’s largest percentage increase was in the 40 and over age group, which rose by a third from 14,263 stu- dents in the spring of 2009 to the current 19,015 students. The 25 and under age group, which accounts for about half of all TCSG stu- dents, grew by 11%. TCSG Commissioner Ron Jackson notes that the huge growth in enrollment continues to be fueled in large part by the effects of the recession, although the attraction of a technical col- lege education is expected to remain strong even when the economy recovers. “Georgia’s technical colleges offer low tuition and exceptional training in skills that are highly marketable and integral to the work- force needs of business and industry. We believe that the lasting value of a TCSG edu- cation will continue to draw more and more students to our campuses,” said Jackson. TCSG tuition is cur- rently $40 per credit hour but will be raised to $45 dollars beginning with the sum- mer 2010 quarter. Since the majority of TCSG students use either the Georgia HOPE grant or the federal Pell grant (or both, depending on their need), most should see no additional out of pocket cost since the tuition increase will be covered by the grants. “For those students who have exhausted their HOPE funds or do not qualify for the federal Pell grant, finan- cial assistance is available through technical college foundations,” stated Cindy Tanner, executive director of the Okefenokee Technical College Foundation. “The OTC Foundation awarded over $65,000 in scholarship money to qualified students in 2009. For most students the greatest financial burden is the cost of books and pro- gram supplies.”

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PAGE 4 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010

TALKING POINTS

SEND ITEMS FOR THIS SECTION TO EDITOR, PO BOX 454, NAHUNTA GA 31553 OR EDITOR@BRANTLEYENTERPRISE.COM

Sen. Isakson challenges union change

U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., has introduced a “disapproval resolution” seek- ing to stop the National Mediation Board from overturning 75 years of precedent to make it easier for airline and railway employ- ees to unionize. “The National Mediation Board simply does not have the legal authority to make such a radical change without Congressional authorization. With this rule change, a union could be permanently recognized without a majority of employees having ever supported representation,” Isakson said. “I will not stand by and let this administration compro-

mise fairness to grant favors to labor unions.

I will do everything in my power to stop

this backdoor attempt to shift the balance between labor and management.” Upon introduction, a disapproval resolu- tion is referred to the committee of jurisdic- tion, which in this case will be the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. If the committee does not favorably report the resolution, it may be discharged upon petition by 30 Senators. Once a disap- proval resolution is placed on the Senate calendar, it is then subject to expedited consideration on the Senate floor, and not subject to filibuster. If passed by the Senate, the resolution still must clear the U.S. House and be signed by the President before it could go into effect. Isakson immediately picked up 25 co- sponsors for the disapproval resolution. The National Mediation Board’s final rule change, which was issued on May 10, would affect companies under the jurisdic- tion of the Railway Labor Act by allowing union elections to be decided by only a major- ity of workers who cast ballots, reducing the number of votes it takes for a union to win. Since the creation of the National Mediation Board in 1934, the rule had been that employ- ees who did not vote on whether to create a union had been counted as “no” votes. Under this previous “majority rule” procedure, a union could only be approved if a full major- ity of all employees voted to do so. Isakson believes the National Mediation Board does not have the authority to change this election procedure without Congres- sional authorization. The Supreme Court has upheld the “majority rule” twice, and the National Mediation Board previously re- jected requests to change it four times under both Democratic and Republican adminis- trations. The AFL-CIO requested the rule change in a Sept. 2, 2009, letter to the National Mediation Board. Isakson, along with seven of his Senate colleagues, filed official com- ments on the rule change with the National Mediation Board on Jan. 4, 2010, urging the board to reject the changes

Georgia invents government spending website

Trying to get a handle on the billions of

dollars paid for thousands of items that state governments buy every year is a worthy goal. In Georgia, such purchases consume almost

a third of the state budget, but identifying

where the dollars actually go has been be- yond existing accounting technology. So Georgia invented a better mousetrap. In partnership with the Pew Center on the States, the Department of Administrative Services (DOAS) – State Purchasing Division is creating a “Spend Management Analytics” tool. The revolutionary aspect of the system will be its ability to collect and analyze pur- chasing information from every agency and university from every angle — buyer, supplier, category and cost. The data will allow State Purchasing to go to the sellers’ market better positioned to find purchasing economies and new statewide contract opportunities. Georgia’s joint effort with Pew will for the first time seamlessly refresh and generate histories of data across different systems, so that purchasing analysis stays current. The tool can combine data from the three different financial systems that currently individually track purchases by Georgia’s 86 state agencies and 35 academic institutions — all of which means the State of Georgia will have an estimated $3.5 billion in spend under management. Next steps of the project involve passing along the innovations of this project to state governments nationwide. Spend Management Analytics is the latest chapter in Georgia’s efforts to overhaul purchasing practices and technology in the state, and in today’s tough economic times, there is a national need for this kind of efficiency as well. Governor Sonny Perdue spoke positively of the project, saying, “I anticipate Georgia’s spend cube will eventually help lower costs and provide more value for our taxpayers. I appreciate Pew for their partnership as we continue to employ sound business manage- ment practices to improve the state’s finan- cial health.”

Our mission:

• To promote honest and open government in Brantley

County and its municipalities that is responsive to the desires and needs of its residents.

• To promote the orderly and planned growth of Brantley County in order to accommodate the rapid increase in

population while preserving the rights of existing property owners and residents.

• To promote the continued growth and development of the

Brantley County Industrial Park and other industry in the

county while providing incentive for the growth of existing industry and businesses.

• To promote the improvement and further development of

the Brantley County airport as an important tool for use in the effort to bring in more industry.

School Choice passes first important Georgia court test

By Mike Klein

School choice advocates in Georgia have prevailed in an important Superior Court ruling that upholds the constitutionality of state-created charter schools with partial funding from state taxpayer dollars. Attor- neys on both sides predict this case will be appealed to the Georgia Supreme Court with a final decision sometime next year. One immediate impact is some 300 seventh- and eighth-grade girls will continue to navigate the hallways of Ivy Preparatory Academy in Norcross, just outside Atlanta. Ivy’s Prep’s enrollment will jump to 450 students this fall when it adds sixth grad- ers. Funding is also assured next year for the Charter Conservatory for Liberal Arts & Technology in downstate Statesboro. This is a David-vs.-Goliath financial showdown that pits a tiny number of state charter schools against an entrenched educa- tion bureaucracy. Charter schools are public schools that are allowed greater flexibility

and innovation – including less central office control – in exchange for greater accountabil- ity. More than 1.65 million Georgia students attend traditional public schools; 65,000 attend charter schools. Just 430 attend state charter schools. Ivy Prep and Charter Conservatory will be joined by six new schools this fall and the state’s ninth char- ter school will open in 2011. All were made possible by a 2008 state law that created the Georgia Charter School Commission. Tony Roberts, executive direc- tor at the Georgia Charter Schools Association, said Friday’s ruling is “a victory for all of us” over “established

educa-

tional

powers

that

were

feel-

ing threatened.” Similar cases can be found nationwide. The constitutionality of state-created charter schools was upheld in California, Ohio and Michigan cases, but charter schools lost in a Florida case. Nina Gilbert is the head at 2-year-old Ivy Prep. She knows there is a likely Georgia Su- preme Court battle down the road. “We’re not done [in court] if the districts decide to go further. It is my hope they do not but I would not be surprised if they [appeal].” The question before Fulton County Superior Court Judge Wendy L. Shoob was whether the Georgia Charter Schools Commission can approve and fund charter schools after a local school board has already denied a charter. Three of the state’s largest school systems were joined by four others in an effort to have the funding model declared unconstitutional. Shoob heard three hours of arguments Friday, and then issued a speedy ruling: “The General Assembly has provided sufficient guidelines. Commission charter schools are not required to be under the control or man- aged by an elected board of education. The funding is constitutional.”

So, what’s all the fuss about? In a nutshell, follow the money. State education dollars assigned to charter schools would otherwise be allocated to traditional public school systems. Ivy Prep received $1.2 mil-

lion in state funds this year, $850,000 of it to fund the Gwinnett students whose parents enrolled them in the charter school rather than in the public school system. Attorney Tom Cox represented the At- lanta and DeKalb County school systems. Cox said the public school districts believe the Georgia Charter Schools Commission usurps constitutional authority that local school boards have over public education. Cox also said the plaintiffs contend the charter schools do not meet sufficient criteria to be described as special schools, such as those founded to teach blind or deaf students. Gwinnett County (158,000 students), DeKalb County (98,000 students) the Atlanta Public Schools System (48,000 students) and four smaller systems also argue that using state funds to assist state-created charter

schools is

unconstitutional because

they were Ivy state de-
they were
Ivy
state
de-

not created by local boards. Prep was created under charter when Gwinnett nied its local charter application. Attorney Josh Moore represents

Gwin-

nett. “We would have preferred to win but I think the expectation since the be- ginning was this would ultimately be decided by the Supreme Court.” Attorney Bruce Brown represented the charter schools. “The law is what it is. One judge has said quite emphatically that it is constitutional.” Attorneys are uncertain about when they will see Judge Shoob’s final orders, but it is likely within several days to a couple of weeks. No district has announced whether it will appeal but attorneys expect to see each other again this fall or early next year at the Georgia Supreme Court. Meantime, Ivy Prep’s Nina Gilbert ex- pects to keep her focus on classrooms, not the courtroom. “We have to remember charter schools started because of the demand for school choice,” Gilbert said. “As long as par- ents demand choice, and as long as teachers are looking for more creative and innova- tive environments to teach, I think charter schools will thrive.” Mike Klein is an editor with the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, an independent think tank that proposes practical, market- oriented approaches to public policy to improve the lives of Georgians. Nothing written here is to be construed as necessar- ily reflecting the views of the Foundation or as an attempt to aid or hinder the passage of any bill before the U.S. Congress or the Georgia Legislature.

UGA vet school sets open house

By Kat Gilmore

The University of Geor- gia College of Veterinary Medicine’s sixth annual “Vet School for a Day” will be held Sept. 29. This program brings high school students from throughout Georgia to the university’s Athens campus to learn more about careers in veterinary medi- cine.

The program is held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and in- cludes a tour of the teaching hospital, a panel discussion by faculty veterinarians in a variety of specialties, and the opportunity for the high school students to meet veterinary student leaders. Students also will learn about the high standards for admission to the college, and what they need to study to be prepared for veterinary school. “Through this program, we hope to encourage stu- dents interested in science to pursue one of the variety of careers available in veteri- nary medicine, especially in underserved areas such as food animal medicine,” said Paige Carmichael, associate dean for academic affairs.

said Paige Carmichael, associate dean for academic affairs. Registration, which is required for the event, will

Registration, which is required for the event, will open on August 11. All stu- dents must be accompanied by an adult chaperone (par- ent, counselor or teacher). Students attend for free, but to help offset the cost for food there is a $15 per person fee for each chaperone; the fee is payable on the day of the event. “Vet School for a Day” is sponsored by the David Fore- hand Foundation, created in memory of alumnus Dr. David Forehand (DVM, class of 1976). More information about the event can be found at http://www.vet.uga.edu/

academic/events/vs4ad.php.

The UGA College of Vet- erinary Medicine, founded in

1946, is dedicated to training future veterinarians, to con- ducting research related to animal diseases, and to pro- viding veterinary services for animals and their owners. Research efforts are aimed at enhancing the quality of life for animals and people, improving the productiv- ity of poultry and livestock, and preserving a healthy interface between wildlife and people in the environ- ment they share. The college enrolls 102 students each fall out of more than 550 who

For more information,

see www.vet.uga.edu.

apply.

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The governing elite vs. the rest of us

By Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson

The truly revolutionary American idea of government as the servant of the people may be fading away. Many of today’s so-called “civil servants” are a protected, privileged class. While Middle America struggles

through a difficult recession, a lot of govern- ment employees have lived on the gravy train. Here are some facts to buttress that as-

sertion:

Since the recession began in 2008, a period during which approximately eight mil-

lion private-sector workers lost their jobs and millions more saw their income decline, the number of federal employees is increasing at

a 7 percent per-year rate and their income is

holding up quite nicely. According to the Cato Institute, the average federal worker’s pay and benefits now approximates $120,000 per year, or roughly double the compensation of the average private-sector employee. Factor out the lavish government fringe benefits and look at salary only, and the civil servant is still far ahead: $71,197 vs. $49,935. During this recession, the percentage of federal employees earning annual base salaries above $100,000 increased from 14 to 19 percent. The number of Defense Department employees being paid more than $150,000 per year increased from 1,868 to 10,100. Before, the Department of Transportation had one employee with a salary above $170,000, but now has 1,690. As a gesture toward fiscal responsibility, President Obama reduced what was supposed to be a 2.4 percent raise in federal salaries this year to 2.0 percent. That still compares quite favorably to the zero-percent cost-of-

living increase that Social Security recipients’ have received. Also on tap are handsome pay raises for the employees of the Federal Housing Admin- istration. The FHA has distinguished itself recently by incurring a loss of $54 billion in

a mismanaged home-loan business. And of

course we can’t neglect to mention the CEOs of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, who have been cleared to receive as much as $6 million in salary this year while being subsidized to the tune of over $100 billion in monetary transfusions from the Treasury and the Fed. Other federal agencies may not be losing money by the tens and hundreds of billions of dollars in such an obvious way, but money appropriated for them by Congress still seems to vanish into a black hole. For ex- ample, statistics from 2006 showed that if all the federal dollars spent by antipoverty pro- grams had been given directly to Americans below the poverty line, a poor family of four would have received $67,000. The actual aid received by poor Americans is less than half that amount. What explains such glaring inef- ficiency? Most of those funds are consumed by the cushy pay packages of the army of bureaucrats who administer those programs. And let’s not even get into the Department of Agriculture, which has one bureaucrat for every nine or ten full-time farmers. The preferential treatment received by government employees was also reflected in how last year’s stimulus money has been spent. According to ProPublica, the District of Columbia received more than four times as much money per capita as the average of the 15 states that received the most money. (Oh, did I mention that members of the Pelosi/Reid Congress voted themselves a 6 percent increase in funds for their staffs and other support?) It isn’t just the federal government work- ers who have an unusually lucrative setup. Gov. Christie of New Jersey recently an- nounced his intention to reform the pension plan for the Garden State’s public employees. Consider an incredible fact: According to Christie, a 49-year-old state employee who had contributed $124,000 toward his retire- ment is eligible to receive $3.3 million in pension payments and another half-million dollars in heath care benefits over the rest of his life; and a retired teacher who had put $62,000 toward her pension and not a penny for health care is scheduled to receive $1.4 million in pensions and $215,000 in health care benefits. Taxpayers pay for this. This story is repeated over and over in a number of states that now teeter on the brink of bankruptcy due to billions of dollars of ob- ligations to state employees. It’s hard to refer to these people—many of whom, of course, are wonderful, decent human beings—as civil

“servants” when their salaries and/or benefits are so much higher than those of the taxpay- ers who pay for the generous compensation packages of their government “servants.” Abraham Lincoln’s ideal of government “of the people, by the people, for the people” seems to have become government of the gov- erning elite, by the governing elite, and for the governing elite. The current imbalance can’t continue. Something’s got to give. (Hendrickson is an adjunct faculty member, economist, and contributing scholar with The Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College.)

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THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 5

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 5 All times Eastern All times Eastern
All times Eastern All times Eastern
All times Eastern
All times Eastern

Sprint Cup

Autism Speaks 400 Presented by Hershey’s Milk & Milkshakes,

1 p.m., Sunday

Nationwide Series

Heluva Good! 200 Auto Parts, 2 p.m., Saturday

Truck Series

Dover 200,

8 p.m., Friday

2 p.m., Saturday Truck Series Dover 200, 8 p.m., Friday Losing a lap, in this day

Losing a lap, in this day

and age, is like winning the lottery in reverse.

When did they put magnets

in the Darlington Raceway SAFER barriers?

Prior to the current streak

— six straight finishes outside the top 15 — Tony Stewart had never gone more than four

races without such a finish … in his career.

Six weeks ago, it was said

that a freak basketball injury would wreck Denny Hamlin’s chance for a championship. One word: Hah!

It is widely believed that a

second date at Kansas Speed- way is going to come from

struggling Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, Calif.

The NASCAR Hall of Fame

induction ceremony is sched- uled for Sunday, May 23. What happens if the Sprint All-Star Race is rained out the previ- ous night? Answer: A sticky problem.

Darlington should be called

The Track Only the Tough Tame.

Hamlin became the first

driver to win Cup and Nation- wide races at Darlington on the same weekend since Mark Martin in 1993.

Dover International Speed-

way is the most underrated track on the Cup schedule. Plus, it has Miles the Monster.

2010 STANDINGS

Sprint Cup

1. Kevin Harvick

1,622

2. Jimmie Johnson

- 110

3. Kyle Busch

- 113

4.

Jeff Gordon

- 147

5. Matt Kenseth

- 150

6. Denny Hamlin

- 164

7.

Greg Biffle

- 191

8. Kurt Busch

- 202

9. Jeff Burton

- 228

10. Mark Martin

- 265

11.

Carl Edwards

- 277

12.

Dale Earnhardt Jr.

- 304

Nationwide Series

 

1. Brad Keselowski

1,615

2. Kyle Busch

- 55

3. Kevin Harvick

- 63

4. Carl Edwards

- 199

5. Justin Allgaier

- 209

6. Paul Menard

- 290

7. Joey Logano

- 387

8. Greg Biffle

- 518

9. Jason Leffler

- 566

 

Tony Raines

- 566

Camping World Truck Series

 

1.

Timothy Peters

760

2.

Todd Bodine

- 22

3.

Aric Almirola

- 30

4.

Ron Hornaday

- 97

5.

Johnny Sauter

- 117

6.

Matt Crafton

- 134

7.

Jason White

- 153

8.

Ricky Carmichael

- 155

 

Austin Dillon

- 155

10.

Mike Skinner

- 168

� Who’s hot: Denny Hamlin has won three of the past six Cup races. …Kevin
� Who’s hot:
Denny Hamlin has
won three of the
past six Cup races.
…Kevin Harvick
stretched his points
lead to 110.

Hamlin

…Kevin Harvick stretched his points lead to 110. Hamlin Stewart � Who’s not: For the first

Stewart

Who’s not: For

the first time in his career, Tony Stewart has gone six races without a top-15 fin- ish. …Clint Bowyer fell three slots, 12th to 15th, in the points standings.

Vote for your favorite

The Sprint Fan Vote allows NASCAR fans to choose which eligible driver gets a berth in the Sprint All-Star Race on May 22 at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Voting runs until an hour before the start of the race. Joey Logano earned the automatic berth in 2009. Sprint customers may vote using the NASCAR Sprint Cup Mobile application on Sprint or Nextel devices. To download the ap- plication, free with any “standard plan,” Sprint customers should text “NASCAR” to 7777. Anyone may also cast a ballot by logging on to www.nascar.com.

If you have a question or comment, write: NASCAR This Week, c/o The Gaston Gazette, P.O. Box 1538, Gastonia, NC 28053 or send an e-mail to mdutton@gastongazette.com

T U R N SPRINT CUP NATIONWIDE CAMPING WORLD TRUCK DOVERDOVER DATADATA 4 Race: Autism
T
U
R
N
SPRINT CUP
NATIONWIDE
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
DOVERDOVER DATADATA
4
Race: Autism Speaks 400
Presented by Hershey’s Milk &
Milkshakes
Where: Dover (Del.)
Race: Heluva Good! 200
Where: Dover (Del.)
International Speedway (1.0 mi.),
200 laps/miles.
When: Saturday, May 15.
Last year’s winner: Brad
Keselowski, Chevrolet.
Qualifying record: David
Green, Chevrolet, 157.916 mph,
June 6, 2004.
Race record: Dale Earnhardt
Jr., Chevrolet, 130.152 mph, May
30, 1998.
Last week: Denny Hamlin swept
both Darlington races on Mother’s
Day weekend. He outdistanced
Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle
Busch, whose Toyota bore an almost
identical paint scheme. Hamlin drove
No. 20, Busch No. 18.
Race: Dover 200
May 16
Sept. 26
2
Where: Dover (Del.) International
Speedway (1.0 mi.), 200 laps/
miles.
When: Friday, May 14.
Last year’s winner: Brian Scott,
Toyota.
Qualifying record: David Starr,
Chevrolet, 157.577 mph, June 2,
FINISH
START
N
International Speedway (1.0 mi.),
400 laps/miles.
When: Sunday, May 16.
Last year’s winner: Jimmie
Johnson, Chevrolet.
Qualifying record: Jeremy
PIT ROAD
2005.
R
Mayfield, Dodge, 161.522 mph,
June 4, 2004.
Race record: Mark Martin,
Ford, 132.719 mph, Sept. 21,
U
1997.
Distance:
mile oval
Last week: Denny Hamlin
drove a Toyota to victory in the
Showtime Southern 500 at
Race record: Mark Martin, Ford,
120.200 mph, June 2, 2006.
Last race: Johnny Sauter
outdueled Ron Hornaday Jr. to win
at Kansas Speedway. The Chevrolet
drivers tangled, spun and regained
control of their trucks with 13 laps
to go, and Sauter pulled away
afterward.
1
Length of
1,076
ft.
24º
Length of
1,076
ft.
Banking in
Banking in
Miles/Laps:
400
mi. = 400 laps
Darlington, giving Hamlin three
victories in the past six races.
straights
turns 1-4
T
V
E
NASCAR HALL OF FAME
R
S
U
S
Allmendinger
Johnson
ALLMENDINGER VS. JOHNSON
Jimmie Johnson never knew what hit him.
It was A.J. Allmendinger, whose Ford had
skidded, out of control, through the apron
and back onto the Darlington Raceway
banking during the Showtime Southern
500. Allmendinger apologized profusely,
saying he’d had brake problems for several
races in a row. “I had no brakes,” he said.
“I couldn’t do anything about it.”
NASCAR This Week’s Monte
Dutton gives his take: “Different cars,
different brakes … they fail repeatedly.
Think maybe the driver might be wearing
’em out?”
Bones to pick
This Week welcomes letters to the editor,
but please be aware that we have room
for only a few each week. We’ll do our best
to select the best, but individual replies
John Clark/NASCAR This Week
Though NASCAR’s been around since 1948, the sport’s new Hall of Fame in Charlotte will induct five each year, starting with William H.G.
France, William C. France, Richard Petty, Dale Earnhardt and Junior Johnson on May 23. Fans will get to read more about each class and
learn more about the sport through state-of-the-art videos in the new oval-shaped building that resembles a short track.
are impossible due to the bulk of mail
received. Please do not send stamped and
self-addressed envelopes with your letters,
which should be addressed to: NASCAR
This Week, The Gaston Gazette, P.O. Box
1538, Gastonia, N.C. 28053.
Dear NASCAR This Week,
I have voiced my opinion to NASCAR, but
A Hall Fit For Kings
apparently they do not care what people
think because I never get a reply.
I have been an avid fan of NASCAR for
more years than I wish to reveal. That is,
until recently, when they put the stupid
(“lucky-dog lap back” rule) into effect. How
can they justify this when a driver can win
The newest Hall of Fame on the block has it all for NASCAR
a race while racing one or even more laps
less than other drivers? …
Also, I disagree with letting Sprint Cup
1
By Monte Dutton
NASCAR This Week
The NASCAR Hall of Fame oc-
cupies a prominent share of the
downtown skyline. It bears some
resemblance to the Country Mu-
sic Hall of Fame and Museum in
Nashville, Tenn. Above its massive
walls, the Hall takes an oval shape,
and there’s a practical reason. In-
side, that oval shape translates into
something of a simulated short
track — and also a banked ramp
earned enduring fame as driver,
mechanic and owner.
NASCAR has been around since
1948, but only five men get in each
year. Inductions in succeeding
years will be eagerly anticipated
with legendary drivers like David
Pearson, Bobby Allison, Cale Yar-
borough, Darrell Waltrip, Lee Petty
and Curtis Turner still waiting in the
wings, so to speak.
Among the Hall’s features:
drivers drive in the Nationwide race when it
is at the same track on the same weekend.
I no longer sit myself in front of the TV
CHARLOTTE — NASCAR
opened its Hall of Fame on May
11, giving stock-car racing a shrine
to rival baseball’s in Cooperstown,
N.Y., football’s in Canton, Ohio, and
basketball’s in Springfield, Mass.
As former Charlotte Motor
Speedway president H.A. “Humpy”
every weekend to watch this stupid racing,
and I have friends who feel the same way.
Clayton Long
Sebring, Fla.
Technically, every driver completes the
number of laps listed because those who
take advantage of the free passes are waved
around the pace car to complete the laps
prescribed. That doesn’t mean you don’t
make some valid points. NASCAR supposedly
made these changes “for the fans,” and it’s
Wheeler, noted, “This is where the
to the second floor — with still, full-
N
clear many fans don’t like them.
peach basket was put up in 1949,
sizedracecarsplacedaroundit,fro-
� A theater screen 65 feet wide
T
right out on Little Rock Road near
the airport.”
Wheeler was referring to the site
and 15 feet high, along with a video
wall containing 64 plasma-screen
televisions.
Fans can take a trip
of NASCAR’s first major race, run
zen in fanciful race mode. The main
floor is 10,000 square feet. Exhibit
space exceeds 40,000 square feet.
The May 23 induction ceremony
� Visitors will wear either video
through time with book
on June 19, 1949, on a ¾-mile dirt
track that existed through 1956.
That track was located near the
present site of Charlotte Douglas
will officially enshrine NASCAR
founder William H.G. (Big Bill)
France; his successor and son,
William C. (Bill Jr.) France; Richard
cards or wristbands with computer
chips enabling holders to activate
interactive parts of the museum like
racing simulations and trivia.
Want to read a wholesome, sportsmanlike,
friendly account of racing in the old days? Check
out I’ll Never Be Last Again (Coastal 181), by
Bill Wimble as told to Lew Boyd. In the foreword,
R
International Airport.
Petty,stock-carracing’smostprolif-
� Each Hall of Fame inductee
was $154.5 million. The exhibit
budget alone was $31 million.
ic winner; Dale Earnhardt, the only
other driver to win seven champi-
will have a “spire” with a video, em-
blematic photo and quote about
him.
Boyd refers to Wimble as “a soft-spoken
gladiator,” and the description fits. The Modified
legend tells stories of steamy summer nights at
Oswego, Fonda, Langhorne and Devil’s Bowl.
Wimble’s humility shines through it all. You can
buy the book at www.coastal181.com.
U
The overall NASCAR hall budget
onships; and Junior Johnson, who
U
R
T
N
3

Matt Kenseth: Ford’s problem is not enough speed

By Monte Dutton NASCAR This Week

DARLINGTON, S.C. — Matt Kens- eth, a master of the deadpan, made use of the self-evident when asked why no Ford driver had won a race entering Saturday night’s Showtime Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway. Then, however, Kenseth elaborated. “I think the reason that Ford probably doesn’t have any wins is we haven’t gotten our cars to run fast enough, obviously, but all of your eggs are sort of in one basket, too,” he said. “RPM (Richard Petty Motorsports) and Roush (Fenway) are side-by-side. We use the same engineering department, the same chassis, the same bodies — all that stuff — so, really, all of your eggs are in one basket. “If we, as an organization, are off and we’re not hitting it right, it’s going to be

hard for Ford to win, so we’ve got to fig- ure out how to get a little bit better to get up there with those guys.”

Down, boys — Two Hendrick Motor- sports crew chiefs, Chad Knaus and Alan Gustafson, recently signed long- term contracts. Jeff Gordon’s crew

recently signed long- term contracts. Jeff Gordon’s crew chief, Steve Letarte, hasn’t … yet. And what

chief, Steve Letarte, hasn’t … yet. And what of Steve Letarte, Gor- don’s crew chief? Gordon basically said enough, already. “Oh, would you guys settle down?

It was a week ago that Chad (Knaus)

and Alan (Gustafson) signed, and no- body was asking any questions about Stevie (Letarte),” said Gordon, good- naturedly as usual. “And now, all of

a sudden it’s, like, they are signed so

why isn’t Steve signed? “He’s going to be signed. Every- thing is going really well. He and I are getting along, and doing better than we ever have, and his commitment to

this team is showing every weekend just how good he is, and that’s not go- ing to change.”

He was kidding, all right? — Undoubt- edly, in the weeks to come, the obvi- ously flip, intended-to-be humorous, remark of Dale Earnhardt Jr., after crashing two cars in practice at Dar-

lington, will be used against him. “I don’t know, man. This place will probably be the catalyst to my retire- ment one day. I will probably come here when I am 45, run a race and say

I will probably come here when I am 45, run a race and say Gant was
I will probably come here when I am 45, run a race and say Gant was

Gant was a late bloomer?

Matt Kenseth is among several Ford drivers that have not won a Sprint Cup race this season.

John Clark/

NASCAR This

Week

Harry Gant was the ultimate late bloomer. Gant, of Taylorsville, N.C., never had a full- time ride in NASCAR’s top level until he was 39 years old. That’s not the only reason Gant was a late bloomer. Gant finished second 10 times before he ever won. The long-awaited victory occurred at Martinsville (Va.) Speedway on April 25, 1982. Eventually Gant won 18 races, including the final two at the age of 52.

the hell with it.” Earth to public: He isn’t contem- plating retirement. And, besides, he won’t be 45 for another decade.

Why, that’s Darlington! Crashes are so common at Darlington that they’re not a big deal, according to Jeff Burton.

“You hit the wall here, and you wreck and you just say, ‘Well, that’s Darlington.’ It’s a little of the built- in excuse factor,” he said. “There’s no question that this race track, if

you mess up, you’re going to hit something. “At Michigan, if you mess up, you’re not necessarily going to hit something. That’s the big difference.”

“At Michigan, if you mess up, you’re not necessarily going to hit something. That’s the big
“At Michigan, if you mess up, you’re not necessarily going to hit something. That’s the big

PAGE 6 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SEND ITEMS FOR THIS SECTION TO SPORTS, PO BOX 454, NAHUNTA GA 31553 OR SPORTS@BRANTLEYENTERPRISE.COM

BOX 454, NAHUNTA GA 31553 OR SPORTS@BRANTLEYENTERPRISE.COM Photos, collage by Kathy Hendrix Brantley gives Toombs all

Photos, collage by Kathy Hendrix

Brantley gives Toombs all it can handle in playoffs

By Kathy Hendrix Sports Writer

The Heron baseball team’s season come to an end over the weekend, but not before they gave the state’s #2 ranked Toombs Co. Bulldogs all they could handle. After losing the first game Friday 6-5, Brantley won game two 7-6 to force the series into Saturday. The first two games were played in grueling heat starting at

4pm.

Game one had the Herons fac- ing a player touted to be one of the best pitchers in the state in Javec King. Brantley wasted no time in

jumping on top 2-0 in the 2nd on singles by Tanner Clark and Chase Nettles followed by and RBI single from Cameron Martin and and RBI groundout by Cole Dykes. Toombs tied it in the second with a 2 run homer and took a 4-2 lead in the 3rd. The Herons tied it with 2 in the 4th on a walk to Chase Nettles, a single by Gage Nettles, followed by 4 consecutive walks to Martin, Dykes, Walker Carter, and Justen White. Toombs went back ahead in the 5th on another home run making the score 5-4 but Brantley scored in the top of the 7th to tie after a double by White, a walk to Lawton Boyd, and an RBI single by Seth Hendrix.

Toombs won in the bottom of the 7th on a wild pitch for a final of 6-5. Game two didn’t start so well for the Herons as they found them- selves down 5-2 after 4 innings. That all changed in the 5th after Toombs went up 6-2 in the top half the Herons scored 5 in the bottom half to go up 7-6. Boyd singled, Hendrix reached on an error, Clark singled, Chase Nettles walked, Gage Nettles had an RBI on a fielders choice and Martin walked to drive in a run. Senior Travis Manning got the Bull- dogs out 6 up and 6 down in the last two innings to register a complete game win on the mound. Brantley’s defense was outstanding, not mak-

ing an error in either game. Game 3 had Brantley as the home team after winning the coin toss on Friday night. After getting the first two outs, senior pitcher Seth Hendrix allowed a walk fol- lowed by two singles to put Toombs ahead 2-0. Brantley answered with one in their half of the inning on a walk by Lawton Boyd, a single by Tanner Clark, and an RBI walk from Gage Nettles. After the second, aided by 3 more walks, the Bulldogs led 4-1 and the Herons looked tired. Brantley wouldn’t quit, and in the third got a much needed boost. Hen- drix and Clark singled, C. Nettles reached on a fielders choice and G.

Nettles reached on an error scoring Hendrix. Then the big hit came from Cameron Martin as he laced a double into right center field to tie the game 4-4. That would be the end of the scoring for the Herons as they could only manage one hit and a walk in the final 4 innings. Toombs would score 4 in the 4th and 2 in the 7th to put the game away. Brantley finished the season with a record of 15-14 making consecutive playoff appearances for the first time since a six year run from 2001-2006.

Hearing in Brunswick to determine land use

Special to the Enterprise

The public will get the chance to voice its opinion on possible changes regarding Department of Natural Resource lands at multiple hearings around the state — including one at Laura S. Walker State Park. The DNR’s Wildlife Resources Division is considering

changes relating to the marketing of recreational opportuni- ties on lands owned and managed by the department which may include charging fees at DNR-managed properties and facilities, classification of DNR-managed properties, and diversifying recreational opportunities on DNR-managed properties. The Department has scheduled four public meetings across the state to provide the public an opportunity to offer input on these changes for consideration. Public meetings have been scheduled on the following dates at the specified times and loca- tions:

the following dates at the specified times and loca- tions: Drive, Profes- • 7 p.m. on

Drive, Profes-

• 7 p.m. on May 17 at the

Pickens County Chamber of

Commerce, 500 Stegall Drive, Jasper

• 7 p.m. on May 18 at Macon

State College, 100 College Station sional Sciences Building, Room 211

A-B, Macon

• 7 p.m. on May 19 at Laura S. Walker State Park, 5653 Laura Walker Road in Shelter #1, Waycross

• 7 p.m. on May 20 at Gwinnett County Parks and Recre-

ation, Shortly Howell Park, 2750 Pleasant Hill Road Duluth Any participant at a meeting may present data, make a statement or comment, or offer a viewpoint or argument, either orally or in writing. Statements should be concise to permit everyone an opportunity to speak. Participants must

register upon arrival and notify the registering official of their intent to give a statement. Those unable to attend a meeting may submit comments electronically to john.bow- ers@dnr.state.ga.us or in writing by May 28. Written state- ments should be mailed to:

Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division, Game Management Section, Attn: John W. Bowers, 2070 U.S. Highway 278, SE, Social Circle, Georgia

30025.

These meeting sites are accessible to people with physi- cal disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to John W. Bowers at (770) 918-6404 no later than May 7. For more information on the scheduled public meetings, visit the Parks, Recreation and Historic Sites Division Web site at www.gastateparks.org [3], Wildlife Resources Division website at www.georgiawildlife.com, or contact Eric VanDe- Genachte at (404) 323-7333.

Coyotes becoming part of our wildlife scene

The distinctive call of the coyote or “song dog” echoes across our state, from the more welcoming rural areas of wooded forests and open fields, to the less inviting backyards of metro Atlanta neighborhoods. Rapid human population growth across the state coupled with the coyote’s unique abil- ity to adapt and thrive, contributes to today’s increased observation of coyotes in urban settings. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division encourages residents to edu- cate themselves and take the proper precautions essential to co-existing with coyotes. “Historically, coyotes were most commonly found on the Great Plains of North America. However, their range has expanded greatly. They are one of the most adaptable spe- cies on the planet. In fact, coyotes

have adapted quite well to living in

suburbs and cities like Los Angeles, New York and Atlanta,” says John W. Bowers, Wildlife Resources Division

assistant chief of Game Manage-

ment. “Preventive actions are the best solutions for residents to reduce the potential for human-coyote conflicts,” explains Bowers. Though the coyote’s principal diet typically consists of small rodents and fruit, they are character- ized as opportunistic and will prey on small, domestic animals if given the opportunity. Because of this, small

house pets (such as cats), young or small livestock and poultry are

vulnerable and susceptible prey. The Division advises landowners and homeowners to heed the following precautions to ensure the safety of their animals:

• Take pets indoors during the

night, as this is the coyote’s primary

hunting time. (In addition to coyotes, small pets may fall prey to free-roam- ing dogs and great horned owls.)

• If the pet must be kept outside,

install fencing and motion-activated

flood lights to discourage predators.

• Small livestock or poultry

should be kept in an enclosed or sheltered area. Coyotes rarely bother larger livestock although they are often blamed for such nuisance in-

stances. (It should be noted that free- roaming dogs, rather than coyotes, are notorious for harassing, injuring or killing livestock.) The Division encourages residents to also heed the additional following tips in an effort to minimize coyote habituation to humans and ensure public health and safety:

• NEVER, under any circum-

stances, feed a coyote.

• Keep items, such as grills, pet

food or bird feeders off-limits. Clean and store grills when not in use, keep pet food indoors or feed pets indoors and refill bird feeders infrequently and in small amounts.

• Make trash cans inaccessible.

Keep lids securely fastened or store trash cans in a secured location until trash pick-up. Additional solutions for manag- ing coyotes and the problems they may cause include trapping and/or hunting. Coyotes are not native to

Georgia and may be hunted/trapped year-round. The Division does NOT provide trapping services, but maintains a list of licensed trappers permitted to provide this service

across the state. To access this listing, visit www.georgiawildlife.com (Select “Permits and Other Services” and

then select “Nuisance Wildlife Trap- per List”). “The Division receives numerous calls each year. Most callers report the sighting of a coyote or request coyote relocation,” says Bowers. “Relocation is not a solution. Relocat- ing coyotes only moves the problem into someone else’s backyard. It also may result in a slower death from the stress of being released into unfamil- iar territory. Trapping and killing habituated or problem coyotes is the only reasonable way to keep them out

of backyards.” While coyotes closely resemble a

small dog in appearance, the distinc- tive characteristics that set the spe- cies apart are upright, pointed ears, a pointed snout, low forehead, a mottled color fur pattern ranging from black to reddish-blonde and a bushy tail

that is generally carried straight out.

Georgia offers plenty when it comes to bass fishing

Special to the Enterprise

Georgia is the only state in the nation where anglers can target six of the seven species of black bass. The most sought after, the largemouth bass, is just one among the state’s black bass population, includ- ing smallmouth, spotted, shoal, redeye (or Coosa) and Suwannee.“Fishing for bass is an all-time favorite passion of many anglers in Georgia and is the most popular type

of freshwater fishing in the nation,” says John Biagi, Fisheries Management chief for the Georgia Depart- ment of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division. “Bass are appealing because they are relatively abun- dant in most water bodies throughout Georgia, they grow to a quality size, are ag- gressive fighters and provide a fun challenge to catch.” The most widely distrib- uted and popular member of the black bass species,

largemouth bass are easily distinguished from other black bass species by their elongated lower jaw that extends past the eye and a wide stripe running down their sides. They commonly are found in the sluggish waters of rivers, lakes and ponds and are more tolerant of tur- bidity and salinity than other black bass. Consequently, they are found in most areas of the state. Largemouth bass

anglers can choose from a variety of methods, includ- ing plastic worms and jigs, topwater plugs, spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Fishing with live shiners is popular for those seeking trophy- sized bass. Success typically increases when fishing near some type of cover, such as submerged trees, plants or rocks. Check www.gofishgeor- gia.comfor most up-to-date information on largemouth bass fishing across the state.

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 7

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 7 Blackshear Family Practice Winner of the

Blackshear Family Practice Winner of the James Douberly Award

Family Practice Winner of the James Douberly Award Dr. Auylo’s Office Owns Best Decorated Campsite Title

Dr. Auylo’s Office Owns Best Decorated Campsite Title

Dr. Auylo’s Office Owns Best Decorated Campsite Title Branching Out In Brantley County Wins Most Money

Branching Out In Brantley County Wins Most Money Raised - Over $24,000

Out In Brantley County Wins Most Money Raised - Over $24,000 Cancer Survivors Lead The Way

Cancer Survivors Lead The Way

Money Raised - Over $24,000 Cancer Survivors Lead The Way Blackshear’Woman’s Club Team Grace Espicopal Church

Blackshear’Woman’s Club Team

Survivors Lead The Way Blackshear’Woman’s Club Team Grace Espicopal Church Team Jackson Hobbs Takes Alot For

Grace Espicopal Church Team

Blackshear’Woman’s Club Team Grace Espicopal Church Team Jackson Hobbs Takes Alot For The Team Little Memorial

Jackson Hobbs Takes Alot For The Team

Espicopal Church Team Jackson Hobbs Takes Alot For The Team Little Memorial Baptist Church Supports The

Little Memorial Baptist Church Supports The SECU

The Team Little Memorial Baptist Church Supports The SECU Ruskin Elementary Team Terry Steedley, The DJ,

Ruskin Elementary Team

Baptist Church Supports The SECU Ruskin Elementary Team Terry Steedley, The DJ, Keeps The Music And

Terry Steedley, The DJ, Keeps The Music And Fun Rolling

Team Terry Steedley, The DJ, Keeps The Music And Fun Rolling United First Federal Credit Uniton

United First Federal Credit Uniton Team

And Fun Rolling United First Federal Credit Uniton Team SoutheastCancerUnit says Thank You! Our April 30th

SoutheastCancerUnit

says

Thank You!

Our April 30th Cancer Walk Fund Raiser Was A Great Success Thanks To You We Raised

$ 126,000

James Douberly Award:

Blackshear Family Practice

Most Money Raised:

Branching Out In Brantley Co. - $25,344

Best Decorated Campsite:

Dr. Auylo’s office - Oncology/Hematology Care Center

TEAMS: Offerman, Branching Out in Brantley Co., Little Memorial Baptist Church: Hortense; Walkerville Baptist Church, Grace Episcopal Church, Wacona Elementary, Williams Heights Elementary, Soccer Sisters, Ware County Middle School, Blackshear Woman’s Club, J. Smith Lanier & Co., Ware Co. Employees, Dr. Auylo’s Office, Anytime Fitness, First Baptist Church: Blackshear, Blackshear Family Practice, United First Federal Credit Union, Pioneers, United Community Bank, Satilla Regional Cancer Treatment Center, South Georgia Oncology/Hematology Center, Baptist Village, Digestive Disease Consultants/South Georgia Endoscopy Center, Round-to- its, Mary Bennett Family, and Ruskin Elementary

THANKS TO: PrimeSouth Bank, Barbara & Vernon Fort, Barbara & Glenn Jones, Hansford Auction, Satilla Regional Medical Center, Terry Steedley, Peacock Septic Tank Co., Southland Waste Management, Waycross Shriners/Lake Ware, Inc.,Melinda Gillis, Ivey’s Laundry, Domino’s Pizza, Brenda Rolison: Waycross Dairy Queen, Lowe’s, Batten’s Prescription Shoppe, Brownings Medical Arts Pharmacy, Inc., Two Sisters Boutique, Jeanette Catering, Fred Tyre, Terry Hansford, Choo Choo Germano, Century 21, Pepsi Cola, Sapp’s Florist, Berry B’s, Sherwin Williams, Tea Time Gifts, Bill & Paula Day, Blackshear Rotary Club, WKUB, Wall’s IGA, Pierce County EMS, Blackshear Police Department, Pierce County Board of Education, Pierce County Rec Department, Scotty Graham, Director, Blackshear Flower Shop, Blackshear Elementary, Pearson-Dial Funeral Home, First Baptist Church: Blackshear, Gwen Cason, McDonalds, Hardee’s: Waycross

CORPORTATE SPONSORS: Barber’s Pharmacy, Blacksehar Drug Co./ Jones Medical, Oncology/Hematology Care Center, Digestive Disease Consultants/South Georgia Endoscopy Center, Blackshear Family Practice, Satilla Regional Cancer Treatment Center, Pleasant Hill Baptist Church:

Patterson, Satilla Regional Medical Center, Grace Episcopal Church, South Georgia Oncology/Hematology Center, Music Funeral Home, Anytime Fitness, Heritage Bank, Bennett Pharmacy: Nahunta, Southeast Georgia Gastronenterology, PrimeSouth Bank, Ware Weight Loss

Georgia Gastronenterology, PrimeSouth Bank, Ware Weight Loss Ware County Employees Team We Walk In Memory Of

Ware County Employees Team

PrimeSouth Bank, Ware Weight Loss Ware County Employees Team We Walk In Memory Of And Honor

We Walk In Memory Of And Honor Of Our Family Or Friends

Team We Walk In Memory Of And Honor Of Our Family Or Friends Dr. Auylo’s Office

Dr. Auylo’s Office - Christmas In April

Family Or Friends Dr. Auylo’s Office - Christmas In April Elaine Moody, Cancer Survivor, Walks The

Elaine Moody, Cancer Survivor, Walks The First Lap

In April Elaine Moody, Cancer Survivor, Walks The First Lap J. Smith Lanier & Co. Team

J. Smith Lanier & Co. Team

Survivor, Walks The First Lap J. Smith Lanier & Co. Team Joyce Sharpe, Cancer Survivor, Takes

Joyce Sharpe, Cancer Survivor, Takes The First Lap

Co. Team Joyce Sharpe, Cancer Survivor, Takes The First Lap Mary Bennett Family Team Team Offerman

Mary Bennett Family Team

Survivor, Takes The First Lap Mary Bennett Family Team Team Offerman Came In Second For Most

Team Offerman Came In Second For Most Money Raised

Team Team Offerman Came In Second For Most Money Raised This Little Fellow Lost His Mom

This Little Fellow Lost His Mom This Year To Cancer

In Second For Most Money Raised This Little Fellow Lost His Mom This Year To Cancer

Anytime Fitness Team

47b051210pp.lb

PAGE 8 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010

PAGE 8 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 Congressman Jack Kingston (R-GA) was named

Congressman Jack Kingston (R-GA) was named an “ACU Conservative” by the American Conservative Union, the nation’s largest grassroots conservative lobbying organization. Pictured here with the organi- zation’s president, David Keene, Kingston earned the mark as a result of his conservative voting record on economic and budget matters, cultural issues, national defense and foreign policy.

Kingston gets ACU Conservative award

Special to the Enterprise

Congressman Jack Kingston was honored in Washington this week for his conservative voting record. The American Conservative Union, the nation’s oldest and largest grassroots conservative lobby- ing organization, named Kingston an “ACU Conservative.” Having rated every member of Congress since 1971, the ratings are widely regarded as the definitive conservative assessment of the federal legislative branch. “This award is a reflection of Representa- tive Jack Kingston’s consistent support of conservative principles on a wide range of issues of concern to grass roots conserva- tives in 2009,” said David A Keene, Chairman of the American Conservative Union. “At a challenging time when the fundamental principles on which the American system of

government are being challenged, Represen- tative Jack Kingston stands with those who are trying to preserve those principles.” As the umbrella grassroots organization of the conservative movement, ACU tracks a wide range of issues before the Congress in three general categories: economic and bud- get matters, social and cultural issues and issues related to national defense and foreign policy. The objective is to provide a balanced, comprehensive picture of each member of congress’s ideological predisposition based upon recorded votes. “With the largest deficit in history and the federal government borrowing thirty- seven cents per dollar, we need more conser- vatism in Washington,” Kingston said. “Our challenges are enormous – from spending to job-killing regulations and the never-ending bailouts – I’m proud to be on the side of less government.”

Gas prices rise 2.3 cents

Average retail gasoline prices in Georgia have risen 2.3 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $2.82/g yesterday. This compares with the national average that has increased 2.1 cents per gallon in the last week to $2.93/g, according to gasoline price website GeorgiaGasPrices.com. Including the change in gas prices in Georgia during the past week, prices yester- day were 70.2 cents per gallon higher than the

same day one year ago and are 9.4 cents per gallon higher than a month ago. The national average has increased 6.8 cents per gallon during the last month and stands 72.1 cents per gallon higher than this day a year ago. “Last week we saw a correction in oil and wholesale gasoline prices,” said Patrick DeHaan, GasBuddy.com analyst. “With wholesale gasoline prices down as much as 30 cents per gallon since last Monday, I expect retail gasoline prices to fall as gaso- line stations continue to sell through their more expensive inventory.”

HealtH. Hope. Healing. ThAnks To you, we’ve mADe All Three A reAliTy. Delivering quality health
HealtH. Hope. Healing.
ThAnks To you, we’ve mADe All Three A reAliTy.
Delivering quality health care close to home takes an entire team of dedicated,
knowledgeable and accomplished professionals. It also takes a community
that’s passionate about supporting excellence in health care.
In celebration of National Hospital Week, May 9-15, we thank you for trusting
your health, and the health of your loved ones, to Southeast Georgia Health System.
For more than 120 years, your trust and support have encouraged us to constantly
improve and excel.
During this celebration, we also want to thank the more than 2,000 professionals
who make up Southeast Georgia Health System. Your devotion and expertise
have made us the region’s premier health care provider. It is because of you that
health, hope and healing are promises we can deliver on every day.
2415 Parkwood Drive • Brunswick, GA 31520
912-466-7000 • www.sghs.org
© 2010 SGHS
5/2010
31520 912-466-7000 • www.sghs.org © 2010 SGHS 5/2010 HELP WANTED • HELP WANTED • HELP WANTED

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North Bryan County Resident Black Creek Ellabell, GA

North Bryan County Resident – Black Creek Ellabell, GA Elvin Mosley Last seen: Thursday, May 6,
North Bryan County Resident – Black Creek Ellabell, GA Elvin Mosley Last seen: Thursday, May 6,

Elvin Mosley

Last seen: Thursday, May 6, 2010 at 4:00pm

-An 82 year old Bryan County resident with Alzheimer's -Driving a 2008 Light Blue Toyota Highlander SUV-- GA Tag Number: AYW7063 -White Male, 5'5, 165 lbs. -Mr. Mosely was wearing a light blue polo shirt with navy stripes, jeans, loafers, and glasses with no hat. -Any contact with this person, please notify Bryan County Sheriff's Department at 912.653-2899.

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 9

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 9 Special to the Enterprise CCG president,

Special to the Enterprise

CCG president, dignitaries scatter dirt at the student housing ground breaking

CCG breaks ground on student center, student housing

College of Coastal Geor- gia President Dr. Valerie A. Hepburn was joined by Uni- versity
College of Coastal Geor-
gia President Dr. Valerie A.
Hepburn was joined by Uni-
versity System of Georgia
Chancellor Erroll B. Davis
Jr.; Regent James A. Bishop;
College of Coastal Georgia
Foundation Chairman Wil-
liam F. Torrey, Jr. and a host
of community leaders to
break ground on the College
of Coastal Georgia’s Campus
Center and Student Housing
buildings on May 8.
The event comes just
nine months after breaking
ground on August 5, 2009
for the $15.8 million dollar
Health & Science Building
project.
As the newest sites for
construction, the Student
Housing project will provide
352 beds in July 2011 and
will be the introduction of
housing on the College of
Coastal Georgia campus. The
initial intent is to provide
approximately 140 units in
the two-single-bedroom semi-
suite layout, approximately
duction of on-campus hous-
ing, the Campus Center of
approximately 50,000 square
feet will also open in July of
2011. The project consists of
Bryan Thompson, Chairman
Howard Lynn, President
Valerie A. Hepburn, Founda-
tion Chairman William F.
Torrey, Jr., Trustee Pat Hod-
a 50,000 square foot campus
160 units in the four-single-
bedroom suite layout, and
approximately 52 units in
the two-single-bedroom suite
layout.
The College of Coastal
Georgia Strategic Master
Plan (completed May 2009)
established a 2010 baseline
enrollment goal of 3,000
center on the main campus
which will include dining
and food service, bookstore/
coffee shop, health center,
student gathering spaces and
nett Cooper, SGA President
Barbara Nakigudde, Master
Planning Committee, Chair
Duane Harris, Vice President
for Student Affairs Jerry
Kiel, Vice President for Busi-
a theater.
students. The 2009 fall semes-
ter enrollment has already
exceeded that number. To
meet the next enrollment
projection of 4,000 students
by 2015, the construction of
600 on-campus housing units
is required.
In addition to the intro-
On the heels of the one
year anniversary of the Col-
lege’s Strategic Master Plan,
these new sites for construc-
tion will continue the trans-
formation of the College of
Coastal Georgia.
Photo Attached: Regent
James A. Bishop, Chancellor
Erroll B. Davis, Jr., Represen-
tative Jerry Keen, Represen-
tative Roger Lane, Repre-
sentative Cecily Hill, Mayor
ness Affairs Tom Saunders,
Assistant Vice President for
Design and Construction
Greg Carver, Director of
Facilities Gary Strickland,
BrunswickãGolden Isles
Chamber President Woody
Woodside, Tom Morgan,
Carter, Scott Barber, Lott
Barber, Tom Wening, H.J.
Russell & Company, Sarah
Freidel, Perkins-Eastman,
Jay Smith, and Ajax Building
Corporation.
FROM THE FRONT
BOE
BOC
From page 1
From page 1

Kerry Mathie in favor of. Herrin abstained which left the count at 2-2 with no one

to cast a tie-breaking vote and the motion was defeated. But school superintendent Drew Sauls said after the meeting that

a tie vote leaves the decision to the superintendent, meaning he must decide whether Herrin stays by Friday, which — be-

cause of the split votes — means he has a delicate situation. The board also approved the employment of Martha Mathie, the wife of board chairman Kerrie Mathie as a pre-K instrucrtor at Nahunta Primary School. Sauls declined comment on a decision not to extend the contract of band director Simon Newman made in April, al- though the position has already been listed on TeachGeorgia,

a state education job posting website, since April 26.

The listing was due to expire Monday and Sauls said if he doesn’t get a nibble, he’ll relist the position. And while Sauls wouldn’t comment, the Enterprise has learned that Newman was told the school system had decided to move in another direction. Although the principal exodus began last month with Johnson and added Griffin this month, the entire issue seems to surround Tyre, longtime and popular principal at the mid- dle school. A crowd of supporters showed up at last month’s meeting to take turns singing her praises after word began to spread that a certain teacher at the middle school — one with strong ties to the school board —was going to “get her fired.” Onlookers at the meeting said Tyre had been heard saying she wanted to “get out of the rat race,” but added they thought she was just being nice. Tyre has a daughter set to graduate this year from Brantley County High School, and another who already has transferred to the Ware County school system.

In other news, the board:

• Recognized this year’s valedictorian and salutatorian.

Jessica Ann Crabb — also winner of the STAR student award

— will be the valedictorian and Jessica Deloris Johnson will be the salutatorian.

• Recognized STAR teacher Pamela Hammond.

• Recognized retirees Judy Crews, Glenda Willis, Marcia Kennison, and Debra Sumner.

• Approved the minutes for the previous work session and regular meeting and the monthly financial reports.

• Approved the first reading of a change to school

system’s electronics policies. The change calls for students who have electronic devices on their person not have them on or visible during class. This would be a change from the previous policy that has zero tolerance for electronic devices

regardless of their state of use. However, the policy also ap- plies to the school bus as well as instructional time.

• Approved the payment of just under $31,000 to RESA

Services for 2011.

• Approved the bid of just under $5,000 for bus repair

from a local repair shop.

• Approved the school hand books for the 2010-11 school

year as presented with corrections. Corrections include the addition of addresses.

• Approved the bid of $14,000 from Joe Dixon Construc-

tion for fire doors at the sixth hall at the high school. The doors are more expensive because of their ability to close during a fire to prevent the spreading of a fire.

• Approved the bid of over $7,000 from EducationCity.com

to purchase a site license for Hoboken Elementary, Nahunta Primary, Nahunta Elementary, Waynesville Primary, and At- kinson Elementary. The system got a 50 percent discount for consolidating the school licenses. The educational software was originally individually license to each school. Accord-

ing the board member Linda Marion, the software is used for language arts, math, and science.

• Listened to announcements from Superintendent

Drew Sauls. The ninth grade wing is currently scheduled

for completion by the end of May. The paving project should be finished by the end of the summer barring complica- tions with the area behind the field house. Paving of the senior parking lot began on Tuesday. Band camp numbers are expected to reach between 80 and 90 students. Atkinson Elementary School won a contest to save electricity — and money — through February, March and April. The school saved almost $2,000.

• Accepted the resignations of Special Education Teacher

Mary Lee, Hoboken Elementary School; Teacher Lester Her-

rin, Waynesville Primary School; Special Education Secretary Michelle Lee, board of education.

• Accepted a recommendations to hire Greg Davis and

Phillip Richards as physical education teachers at BCHS and Travis Hutcheson as temporary full-time bus mechanic.

• Accepted school personnel as presented.

• Accepted the recommendation to employee Martha Mathie as Pre-K at Nahunta Primary School.

• Accepted the recommendation to employee Angie Steed- ley as special education teacher at BCHS.

• Recommended the transfers of teacher Kelly Deweese

from Waynesville Primary School to Atkinson Elementary School and paraprofessional Angie Herrin from BCMS to Hoboken Elementary School.

Airport Authority head Mary Gibson said she wasn’t satisfied with the current draft and requested veto power if future drafts didn’t meet the airport authority’s criteria. “I think the document they gave us gives them the gold mine and us the shaft,” said Gibson. “And we will not agree to it.” Ham said that this was only the first step in a lengthy process and that the agreement would be scrutinized. In the next phase, Ham, Gibson and county attorney Tom Lee will look into changes to make to the agreement before sending it back to the company for revisions. “This is just the first volley,” Ham said. “They threw it across the bow, we’re red inking it and we’re going to throw it back across the bow.” However, Ham did say that the company was willing to work with the county to settle the dispute and also commend- ed Gibson for her management of this plan since its initial inception back in 2006. The board approved a three-way contract between the parties pending modifications by Lee. In a close vote, the board also voted down a proposal to add a waiver for alcohol licenses near homes and churches. Both Commissioners Charlie Summerlin and Linton Her- rin voted against the changes while commissioners Gregg O’Quinn, who proposed the idea, and Mike Edgy voted for the addition of a waiver. Ham broke the tie voting against the measure but said that he was not opposed to having one in the ordinance but rather didn’t agree with the wording. “In this day and age, I think we need to not have our hands tied quite so much,” Ham said. “But I think we need to approach from a different angle.” Ham said that he expects this issue to resurface in the future.

In other business, the board:

• Approved the passage of changes to section 801 of the

subdivision ordinance but postponed a decision on the mobile home ordinance because the board didn’t have the full docu- ment at the meeting to examine. The board did vote to give

a variance to Sean Johnson regarding the 15 year rule. The

board plans to remove the 15 year limitation entirely but

will not officially do so until the entire ordinance has been overhauled. The man explained that the postponed vote on the ordinance was costing him money while he awaits the commissioners’ vote. The commission will hold a called meet- ing regarding the ordinance approval.

• Listened to a presentation by Courtney Reich with the

Ecological Planning Group. Reich is acting as a consultant to

help with a coastal incentive grant that the county submitted.

• Voted to set up an intergovernmental agreement be-

tween city of Nahunta and Brantley County for fire protec-

tion services. The county and city attorneys will be working together on the language of the agreement.

• Approved the purchase of five metal buildings for use as

fire substations at $46,350 each. The new stations are planned for construction on Highway 110 North, Raven Rock Road, Post Road North, Palm Road, and High Bluff Rock Road. This doesn’t include electrical and the fire departments will be responsible for plumbing and water.

• Approved the designation of over $80,000 in the capital projects account to the new recreation park.

• Was introduced to the new Chief Tax Appraiser Carey Lamb Jr. by Billy Lee.

• Decided to table a vote on a new vehicle for the tax as- sessors to replace the current truck.

• Voted to give the tax assessor’s board the go-ahead to

create a new tax assessor position for a level two appraiser.

• Took no action on the closing of Lee Cemetery Road.

Commissioners had been looking into the road for months to

decide whether to gate the road, close the road or abandon it entirely.

• Tabled a vote to approve the rebidding of scrap metal

salvage and base it off of the current index price of the spe- cific bundle. Attorney Tom Lee and County Manager Parrish Barwick will be working on the language of a new contract.

• Decided against the closing of Memphis Way when resi- dents explained that the road is still widely used.

• Accepted right-of-way deeds from residents on Buster

Walker Road.

• Accepted a motion to get more specifications on water

pumps for irrigation of the new recreation department fields.

• Accepted the reappointment of Shane Courson and the

appointment of Terry Steely to the recreation advisement

committee. Steely will be replacing Mike Hendrix who turned down the recommendation for his re-appointment.

• Accepted the bid from D and D Decorators of just under

$10,000 for the painting and repairs to the outside of the courthouse.

• Approved and entered contracts with Satilla Commu- nity Services.

• Amended the county bereavement policy to define a day as eight hours.

• Approved the lease or purchase of an infield machine for the recreation department.

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Beef prices escalate as demand increases

By April Reese Sorrow

In the past two years, consumers have witnessed record-high and rock-bottom food prices. Now, along with the economy, prices are picking up. Increases in demand are driv- ing consumer meat prices higher. Over the past year, the overall price of food has increased .2 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistic Consumer Price Index. In the past month, the CPI shows meat, poultry, fish and egg prices increased .2 percent. “We’ve seen all protein prices increase over the past several months, especially beef,” said Curt Lacy, a livestock economist with University of Georgia Cooperative Exten- sion. “Demand is picking up some as consumers appear to have more income or at least more they are willing to spend on meats.” Memorial Day kicks off the unofficial grilling season, which lasts through Labor Day. “This is the time of year we typically see an increase in demand for beef,” Lacy said. The average American eats 60 pounds of beef a year, he said. Half of it is eaten away from home. The hamburgers, steaks, meatballs and chili are consumed either in restau- rants or at ball parks and other food industry establishments. “In the economic downturn, we saw this demand decrease the most,” Lacy said. “The food service and restaurant sector really suffered, but all indicators show it is starting to turn the corner. The increase demand is coming from that sector.” According to the National Restaurant Association’s Res- taurant Performance Index, the industry is experiencing an increase. Fueled by restaurant operators’ outlook for sales growth, capital spending plans and staffing levels, the index rose to its highest level in 27 months in February. That increase in demand is increasing prices at the grocery store. Compared to March 2009, retail ground beef prices in March 2010 increased 45 cents per pound, while all steak prices increased only 1 cent per pound. Pork prices are a mixed bag. Sliced bacon is running 8 cents per pound ahead of a year ago, while pork chops are12 cents less than in March 2009. Retail chicken prices are the same as a year ago. Favorable retail prices have helped livestock producers. So far this year, hog carcasses are bringing about 15 cents more per pound. Cattle prices are up about 12 cents a pound compared to last year, Lacy said. Decreased farm supply and increased demand is also driving higher prices for the consumer. “We have really tight supplies in feed lots right now with fewer calves heading into feed lots,” Lacy said. “We will bring less beef to market this coming year.” Milk prices are picking up, too. “Milk prices at the retail and farm levels declined substantially last year,” said Tommie Shepherd, an agribusi- ness economist with the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the re- tail price of a gallon of milk in Georgia averaged $2.84 during the first quarter of 2010, a dime over the last quarter of 2009. In 2008, prices averaged $4.09 per gallon and climbed as high as $4.49 during the summer months. Producers are seeing an increase in their price, too. The federally mandated minimum price to farmers for 100 pounds of milk was $16.80 in March, or $1.44 per gallon. This amounts to a 35 percent increase over the March 2009 price of $12.47 per 100 pounds, or $1.07 per gallon. “We are seeing some expected recovery following a year of devastatingly low farm milk prices,” Shepherd said. “This increase is in line with average long-term trends, although producers are not seeing quite as strong of a recovery as was expected earlier this year.” Producer milk prices may peak at $18 later this year, Shepherd said, basing his estimate on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange milk futures prices. But, large cheese stocks and sluggish domestic consump- tion of dairy products should keep prices at the market rela- tively stable for the foreseeable future, Shepherd said. “Cheese prices are a major driver of farm milk prices,” he said. “If there is a lot of storable commodity out there, in the form of cheese and butter, then prices decline, which trans- lates back into lower farm milk prices and into lower grocery

back into lower farm milk prices and into lower grocery GETYOUR NEWSFIRST! EVENBEFORE ITHITSTHE STREETS!
GETYOUR NEWSFIRST! EVENBEFORE ITHITSTHE STREETS! CALL912-462-6776 FORMOREINFO.
GETYOUR
NEWSFIRST!
EVENBEFORE
ITHITSTHE
STREETS!
CALL912-462-6776
FORMOREINFO.

PAGE 10 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010

GOOD EATING

SEND ITEMS FOR THIS SECTION TO NEWS, PO BOX 454, NAHUNTA GA 31553 OR NEWS@BRANTLEYENTERPRISE.COM

FAMILY FEATURES I f you’re looking for tasty ways to improve your diet, you’re in
FAMILY FEATURES
I
f you’re looking for tasty ways to improve your diet, you’re in luck. You can
get big taste and big benefits from a little fruit — Wild Blueberries.
The Color Connection
A diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help maintain a healthy weight and reduce
the risk of chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease and some cancers. Eating
across the color spectrum is important so you get a variety of nutritional benefits.
Wild Blueberries get their color from naturally occurring phytochemicals,
which are primarily responsible for antioxidant activity. Wild Blueberries are
antioxidant rich, making them a great choice for their nutritional benefits and
disease fighting potential. In fact,
USDA studies rank Wild Blueberries highest in antioxidant capacity per
serving, compared with more than 20 other fruits including cranberries,
strawberries, apples and even cultivated blueberries.
Health magazine has named Wild Blueberries high on its list of “America’s
Healthiest Superfoods for Women,” singling out their variety of potential
health benefits, including preventing memory loss, improving motor skills,
lowering blood pressure, and fighting wrinkles.
Wild Blueberries are available year-round in supermarkets nationwide. Frozen
at the peak of ripeness, all the farm-fresh taste and nutritional benefits are locked-
in. Most studies show that frozen fruits and vegetables are higher in vitamins,
minerals and phytonutrients because they are frozen near the time of harvest.
Great taste, good nutrition and really convenient — no wonder so many people
are wild about blueberries. Learn more about this superfruit and get more great
recipes at www.wildblueberries.com.
Did You Know?
Wild Blueberries are a
different berry from
cultivated blueberries.
They grow naturally
in the fields and
barrens of Maine and
Canada. They are
smaller in size, have
a unique sweet-tart
taste, and are only
available frozen.
Chicken Breast with Sweet
and Sour Wild Blueberry Sauce
Prep Time: Approximately 20 minutes
Serves 1
1
6-ounce skinless, boneless chicken breast
Salt and pepper to taste
1
teaspoon oil
1
small red pepper
1
small green pepper
2
tablespoons fig jam (or apricot jam)
4
1/4
teaspoons balsamic vinegar
teaspoon sugar
2
2/3
tablespoons sweet and sour chili sauce
cup frozen Wild Blueberries, thawed
and drained
Season chicken breast with salt and pepper. Heat
oil in small, non-stick frying pan. Fry chicken
breast for 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat
and let cool.
Wash, seed and cut peppers into bite-sized
pieces. Cut cooked chicken breast into bite-sized
pieces; combine with peppers. Mix jam with
balsamic vinegar, sugar and chili sauce. Gently
stir in Wild Blueberries.
Wild Blueberry
Gingered Lemon Muffins
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Yield: approximately 36 muffins
Wild Blueberry
6
cups cake flour
Lemon Jam
Wild Blueberry
Ice Cream Pops
2
tablespoons baking powder
2
teaspoons baking soda
teaspoon salt
Prep Time: 25 to 30 minutes
Yield: about 8 half-pints
Prep Time: Approximately 15 minutes,
plus thaw and freezing time
1/2
Yield: 6 Pops
5
cups frozen Wild Blueberries
2
cups low-fat buttermilk
1
package dry pectin
1 cup frozen Wild Blueberries
1 cups (12 ounces) egg substitute
1/2
5
cups sugar
1 ounce milk chocolate chips
1 1/2
cups granulated sugar
cup canola oil
1
1/3
tablespoon lemon zest
cup lemon juice
2
1/2

4

cups frozen Wild Blueberries

1/3

cup (3 ounces) crystallized ginger,

1/3

chopped cup granulated sugar, for topping

2

tablespoons lemon zest

In bowl combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt; reserve. In another bowl beat together buttermilk, egg substitute, 1 1/2 cups sugar and oil; stir into flour mixture just to blend. Fold in Wild Blueberries, ginger and lemon zest. Scoop 1/4 cup batter into each greased 1/3-cup muffin tin. Sprinkle each muffin with sugar. Bake in 400°F conventional oven or 375°F convection oven 18 to 22 minutes or until firm to the touch. Serve warm.

Crush thawed Wild Blueberries one layer at a time, or chop frozen in food processor. Combine thawed, crushed Wild Blue- berries and pectin in a large saucepot. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Add sugar, stirring until dissolved. Stir in grated lemon zest and lemon juice. Return to a rolling boil. Boil hard 1 min- ute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim foam if necessary. Ladle hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Adjust two-piece caps. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water canner.

cups fat-free vanilla frozen yogurt, softened slightly Materials: small wooden or plastic sticks Thaw Wild Blueberries and purée. In a bowl, combine puréed Wild Blueber- ries, chocolate and frozen yogurt. Mix thoroughly. Rinse 6 standard muffin cups with cold water and spoon in Wild Blueberry mixture, dividing it evenly between the cups (silicone muffin cups need not be rinsed first). Place a stick in the center of each “muffin” and freeze until firm, at least 2 hours. Tip: Mixture can also be frozen with plas- tic sticks in small glasses or espresso cups.

Freezer Facts

Here are some of the reasons frozen produce is a perfect option for people looking to fill the pantry with healthy foods all year round.

Frozen offers great value when compared to in-season pricing.

No aging or spoiling means no waste, saving you money.

Frozen produce is ideal for smoothies, entrees, desserts, breakfast, and most recipes that call for blueberries.

Frozen Wild Blueberries are thoroughly washed and have no caloric syrups or additives.

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THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 11

THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 11 WANTADS Make some extra cash. Sell
THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 11 WANTADS Make some extra cash. Sell

WANTADS Make some extra cash.

• MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 11 WANTADS Make some extra cash. Sell your stuff. Call
• MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 11 WANTADS Make some extra cash. Sell your stuff. Call
• MAY 12 2010 • PAGE 11 WANTADS Make some extra cash. Sell your stuff. Call

Sell your stuff.

Call 912-462-6776!

Make some extra cash. Sell your stuff. Call 912-462-6776! Real Estate FORRENT: 2 bedroommobile home, central

Real Estate

FORRENT: 2 bedroommobile home, central heat & air. call 778-5247.

Two Rental Houses, 122 Main Sreet, suitable for doctors and 103 Reed Street, suitable for office space. Call Gene at 282-3363 or Lydia at 462-5377 or

282-2576.

FORRENT: Mobile Homes and Nice private mobile home lots with septic tank and well. Please call 912-266-7254.

VACATION RENTAL in The Smokey Mountains of Franklin, North Carolina. 3,4, or 7 days. Call for more information and a brochure. 912 473-2172.

Johns Realty Hwy 301 (912 462-6633). johnsrealty.comfor complete listings. *East Brantley, OneAcre beautifully wooded, $8,500. *JesseTrail/Waynesville - 15 acres, high oak ridge and wooded bottomland, $46,000. *Hortense 4.8 Acre just $16,400. *Waynesville/Whisper Ridge, 1456 SQF, 3 BD, 2 BA, mobile home with lot, just $37,500! * Heritage Plantation – Hwy. 110 West, Hortense, 1 acre lots, on paved road, $10,000 per acre, for site built homes. Seller holds a real estate license. *Fendig Place – Hwy. 110, Hortense,

3 BD, 2 BA, 1769 SQF, site built home, $129,900. Call Johns Realty at (912)

462-6633.

Mobile Homes For Rent in Atkinson.

$250 deposit, $275 & up rent. Call 617-

3552 or 778-6053.

FORSALE: Long Lake Subdivision. Lots available. $6,500-$8,500. Owner financing and improvements available.

912-270-4554.

FORSALE: 1.9 acre lot, Buster Walker Road, no restrictions, $7,500. Call 270-

7897.

FORSALE: 1.4 acre lot with well and septic tank, Long Lake Subdivision, $12,500. Owner financing available. Call

270-4554.

Mobile Home lots available. Buster walker Road, from$8,500. Call 912-

270-7897.

Mobile Homes For Sale or Rent to Own on your land. 2-3 bedroom mobile homes available. Call 912-264-4277.

House For Rent: 2 bedroom, $425 a month with $350 deposit. 106 James Street, Nahunta. Call 912-269-7171.

FORRENT: Mobile home, 3BDR/2BA double wide in Hortense. $500 a month, $250 deposit. Call 281-2221 or 473-2466.

FOR RENT: 3 BDR house, unfurnished with fridge, stove and air. ALSO: 2 BDR mobile home with newcarpet with fridge, stove and air. All convenient to downtown Nahunta. NO PETS. Call 462-5571.

FOR SALE: 80 acres on US 1 in Charlton County. 10 acres in Folkston with city water and sewer, with (3) 1,200 sq. ft. buildings. Call 912-816-8984.

FORSALE: 2004 Fleetwood Doubewide on 1.2 acres. 2040 SF. FHA Inspection approved. 4BDR/2BA, liv rm, den w/fp, master w/sit rm, garden tub, sep shower. Appliances incl wash/dry and dishwasher. Lg screen porch, shed and carport. Lot at end of cul-de-sac and backs up to woods for privacy. 2 mi. fromSatilla Grocery. Appraised $92,000, asking $75,000. Call

912-222-2775.

Transportation

FORSALE: 1993 Ford Mustang convertible. Fire engine red with black top. Perfect for beach: $3,000. Call

912-449-1148.

FORSALE: Motorcycles, cars, trucks,

trailers, and misc. parts. Call 912-462-

6047 between 8a.m. & 8p.m.

FORSALE: Tennant 255II Parking Lot Sweeper. Call 912 462-6047 between 8 a.m. & 8 p.m.

FORSALE: 1993 Toyota Four Runner. Call 912-424-2302.

WE BUY JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS. $75 and up. Call Dennis at 778-4746 or 670-0088 or Charlie at 778-3635 or

670-1853.

FORSALE: 2002 Saturn SL1, newclutch, newhead, and timing chain, $2,000 OBO. BYRDS GARAGE: NOWOffering Mobile oil change service, also car wash and auto detailing. Call 617-2973.

FORSALE: 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee. Maroon with 6 cylinder, 4wd, lowmiles. $7,000. Call 912-449-1148.

I BUYJUNK CARS: $125 and up. Call Wayne at 843-812-7879.

FORSALE: 1992 Geo Storm, 4 cyulinder,

Driver Trainees

Needed!

Werner is hiring. No CDL, No Problem! Training avail w/Roadmaster!

Call Now!

866-467-0060

runs good, no glass/dash. $250. Call

722-6321.

Recreational

FORSALE: 4-wheelers, 3-wheelers, go- carts, motorcycles and misc. parts. Call 912-462-6047 between 8a.m. & 8p.m.

FOR SALE: 1976 30 ft. Yellow Stone travel trailer, Park model. Needs work, $1,000. Call Donald at 912-288-0626.

Services

MULTITASK CLEANING SERVICE:

Commercial & Residential floor & clean- ing services. Specializing in cleaning carpets & tile floors. Free Estimates. Christian owned and operated. Call

778-4270.

Electric Motor Repair: Waterpumps, swimming pool pumps, air compressors, fans, power tools, etc. All work reason- able and guaranteed. Call 282-0520, leave message.

Housecleaning: Need extra help around the house? Honest, hardworking, dependable clean team. Very creditable references. Willing to travel if need be. Furnish own supples. Senior discounts. Available Mon.-Sat. 7a-3p. Call 462-6610.

Help Wanted

Concerted Services, Inc. is currently accepting applications for a Head Start Family Advocate in Brantley County. This is a full-time position 37.5 hrs per week 12 months per year. Salary is between $7.93-$13.69 per hour depending upon education and experience. Applicants must have a Bachelor’s or Associate degree in Sociology and/or experience in a social field is acceptable. A copy of all diplomas/GED, certificates and tran- scripts must be submitted with applica- tion. Applicant must have computer-data entry skills. Duties will include helping families become more self-sufficient and providing an environment where adults and children can develop to their fullest potential. Spanish-speaking bi-lingual applicants will be given favorable consideration. The selected applicant is required to have a valid Georgia Drivers License and will be subject to a criminal records check and drug screen. Apply in person at Brantley County Head Start, 470 Bryan Street, Suite A, Nahunta, GA or print an application from our web site at www.concertedservices.org and mail to Concerted Services, Inc., P.O. Box 1965, Waycross, GA 31502. Deadline for applications is 5/17/10 by 3:00 p.m.

No phone calls please. E.O.E.

HELPWANTED: Experienced HVAC service technicians and installers. Call

286-0041.

CNA’s WANTED: CNA- Part-time

position needed for a local home health care service in the Nahunta/St. Mary’s/ Brunswick areas. Fore more information, please call Pam Mimbs at 1-800-662-

4207.

PUBLICHEALTHSCHOOLNURSE (RN): Pierce County Elementary School, Blackshear, GA. Apply on-line at https:// www.careers.ga.gov/. Requisition Number 128-71122pq. Competitive Sal- ary. Great Benefit Package. Position is 8 hrs/day for 10 months. Monday – Friday, 8:00 – 5:00. No Weekends – No Nights – Holidays Off. For information and State of Georgia Application, visit our website at www.sehdph.org.

Agriculture

Pets & Animals

Baby chicks & Laying hens. Rhode Island Red chicks & sex link Pullets. Some chicks starting as low as 75 cents & up. NPIPCert. farm. Pullorum&Typhoid clean. Ga. bred & raised here in Brantley county. Call 912-282-1379

FOR SALE: 12 RR laying hens and 1 rooster. Started laying Feb. 15, 2010. $15 each or take all 13 for $12 each. Call 462-7821. Also have 15 pullets about ready to lay.

FORSALE: Baby chickens, young Peking ducks, and young turkeys. Call Larry Sessions at 778-6334.

FORSALE: 3American Eskimo Minia- ture puppies. Purebred, solid white, $200 each. Call 843-812-7879.

FORSALE: 3 cows, $300 each. Call Edward or Myrtle at 462-5579.

FORSALE: 2009 Colt, $150. call

462-6506.

Miscellaneous

CLOTHES, GIFTS & MORE CONSIGN- MENT invites you to come by and visit us. We are located in Hickox , 3 miles south of Nahunta on 301. Our hours are 9-5 Mon. - Fri. and 9-3 Saturday. The 1st Saturday of every month is our 1/2 off sale. 60% off winter items. We are now accepting Spring/Summer consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912-

consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A
consignments. Call nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A

SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY.

nowfor your appointment, 912- SMALL. BUSINESS. DIRECTORY. ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A WEEK.* CALL 462-6776 FOR

ADVERTISE HERE FOR $7.50 A WEEK.* CALL 462-6776 FOR DETAILS.

*SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY

     

Dirt for sale

 

912-223-3056

912-223-3056 Big Bubba’s Trucking & Land Clearing
Big Bubba’s Trucking & Land Clearing
Big Bubba’s Trucking
& Land Clearing

Pittman’s Backhoe & Fill Dirt

• Landscaping of all kinds and sizes • Bulldozer work• Septic tank • Bushhog • Tilling Days call (912) 458-2223 Home call (912) 458-2362 Cell (912) 282-6375

AZALEA PLACE APARTMENTS

School Circle

2 Bedroom, 1 Bath . $400, • 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath $450, 3 Bedroom, • 2 Bath $550.

1/2 off 1st months rent.

449-8393, 614-6909 or 614-5231.

449-8393, 614-6909 or 614-5231

614-6909 or 614-5231. 449-8393, 614-6909 or 614-5231 Wade Townsend Randy Nabb (912) 473-2379 WE SERVICE ALL

Wade Townsend Randy Nabb (912) 473-2379

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS HVACRefrigeration•CookingEquipment•MechanicalServices Satillacooling@yahoo.com

Satillacooling@yahoo.com Junk Cars and Trucks We pick up scrap metal Contact:

Junk Cars and Trucks

We pick up scrap metal

Junk Cars and Trucks We pick up scrap metal Contact: • Charlie Daniels Dannie Daniels 670-1853

Contact:

• Charlie Daniels Dannie Daniels

670-1853 or 778-3685

670-0088 or778-3885

Dannie Daniels 670-1853 or 778-3685 670-0088 or778-3885 462-7984. We also have available fresh shelled pecans, cane
Dannie Daniels 670-1853 or 778-3685 670-0088 or778-3885 462-7984. We also have available fresh shelled pecans, cane

462-7984. We also have available fresh shelled pecans, cane syrup and honey. We look forward to serving you, Mrs. Ann, Trish, and Stephanie.

FORSALE: Weber BBQgas grill and cover, $50. Calll 778-4270.

Need help with your mobility? We are Medical Mobility Solutions. An authorized Medicare, Medicaid, VA and insurance provider of medical equipment. We offer free consultation, will tell you up front about any co-pay requirements, and will file all necessary paperwork on your behalf. Call us in Waycross at 912-285- 8595 and let us help.

FORSALE: Used left finishing mower, $500. Areator for pond, has short in wir- ing that needs fixed, sold newfor $1,700, sell for $300. Call 912-778-4560.

Karen’s Creations jewelry nowavailable at Island Republic in the Pier Village on St. Simons Island! Lots of new ‘beachy’ designs, especially earrings. Reserva- tions nowbeing accepted for the next beading class on Tues. May 18th at Sweet P’s in Hoboken. Call them at 458- 2299 to reserve your spot. New jewelry delivered weekly to Finders Keepers in Nahunta and The English Lantern in Hoboken. Contact me at 462-8483 for a custom jewelry design or visit my website at: www.karens--creations.com.

Body by Vi, meal replacement. Lose weight. Make money. call Ken at 904- 707-3643 or Button at 904-699-1619.

NEW SHOP- This & That - We have a little of everything, couches, love seats, chairs, beds of all sizes, what knots, toys, purses, dressers, shoe tables, etc. Come check us out on Hughes Street. Located one paved road by BTC in block house. It’s like a yard sale everyday. Monday - Friday 10-6, Saturday 10-4. If we don’t have it we try to get it for you. Very low prices.

FORSALE: Electric Hospital bed. hardly used. Call 614-5133 or 462-5469.

FOR SALE: French doors; Awesome Au- ger yard tool- brand new; 2 ceiling fans; 30-40 gallon water tank; Grass trimmer. Call 458-3307.

Call Steve for your next Barber ap- pointment at Rowell’s Hair Care. Also, quality built cypress furniture and lumber.

912-462-6303.

FOR SALE: 2 old quilts, made by grand- mother, $75 each. Call 912-778-4160.

FORSALE: Small countertop lean mean fat grill machine, $10. 2 Hughes Direct TV boxes with card and remote, $25 each. 21 VCR tape movies, $0.50 a piece. CD’s - $0.50 a piece. Call 462- 6770 or 912-227-8806.

FOR SALE: 1998 Dodge Ram, 3500, 15 passenger van, 5.9 liter engine, $1,500. ALSO: Vincent Bach Stradivarius Trum- pet model #37 with case. $1,200 Firm. Call 282-3082.

FORSALE: 6 speed riding lawn mower, 13.5 hsp, engine - 2 yrs old, mower - 4 yrs old, $500 FIRM. Ab-lounger, bought for $300, sell for $50. Nice 11X10 area rug, $50. Call 912-202-2610.

Yard Sales

Weekly Yard/Field Sale at The Barn,

912-202-2610. Yard Sales Weekly Yard/Field Sale at The Barn, Friday’s and Saturday’s from8 a.m. -until. 749Auction

Friday’s and Saturday’s from8 a.m. -until. 749Auction Road. Call 912-282-6648.

BIGYARDSALE: Saturday, May 15, from 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Riverside Rock Road, 5 miles on the right.

Waynesville Volunteer Fire Dept. will be accepting donations year round for our semi-annual yard sales (no clothes please). We also help burnout victims throughout the year, and what we don’t

use, we sell. We are also accepting donations of Gaterade, Powerade, and water for the volunteers during incidents. Contact Lucy Cathcart at 912-778-4551 or Jack Cathcart 912-266-7172 to make arrangements to deliver or we will also pick up.

EARN MONEY FROMHOME!

No, really,

you can!

Local business seeks telephone sales associate to contact potential customers. Call from your home and make money.

But first, call this number for more information: 912-462-6776.

make money. But first, call this number for more information: 912-462-6776. Subscribe today and get the
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PAGE 12 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010

PAGE 12 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010

PAGE 12 • THE BRANTLEY ENTERPRISE • MAY 12 2010 Brian DePratter Robbie Batten Tim Hudson
Brian DePratter Robbie Batten Tim Hudson SeanFlanagan Mr. & Mrs. Donald Morrison
Brian DePratter
Robbie Batten
Tim Hudson
SeanFlanagan
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Morrison

Still cruisin’

Area car fanatics come together at Oak Bay

The first Satilla Classic Cruisers cruise- in was held recently at the new Oak Bay Mall in Nahunta. The owners of the 38 cars and the many on-lookers shared memories of days gone by. Many owner door prizes and five tro- phies were given out. The car owners’ ladies got some door prizes just for them. Sean Flanagan won “Cruiser of the Month” with his 1967 Camaro. Other trophy winners inclluded Robbie Batten for his 1985 Chevy truck, Tim Hudson for his 1970 Nova, Lamar Depratter for his 1967 Chevelle and Mr. and Mrs. Donald Morrison for their 1949 Ford truck. Organizers thank sponsors who helped make this happen including Michael’s Deli,

Movie Time, Jerry J’s, Satilla Heating & Cooling, Five Points Lawn Center, Bennett’s Hometown Pharmacy & Gifts, BC Sports, Dazzle Designs (Hair Loft), Brantley Auto Parts, Farmers & Builders, Piggly Wiggly, Marshland Credit Union and the Family Dol- lar Store employees. The next cruise-in will be held on May 22 at the Oak Bay Mall. There is no entry fee or admission fee, so come out and re-live some memories of the past and create some new memories. If you have a classic car or truck or a late model muscle car, come join us! Come in your best 1950 clothes and enter to win a trophy. For more information call Donnie at 270-7622 or Brian at 288-6542.

Mosquitoes swarm back to Georgia

Special to the Enterprise

Warmer weather and recent rains have led to an increase of mosquito activity. Local Public Health officials are strongly urging residents to reduce mosquito popula- tions around their home and to protect themselves against mosquito bites and the possi- ble spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, which have already been detected this season. The first Georgia West Nile Virus (WNV) case for 2010 was confirmed in a Clay- ton County man in mid-April by the Georgia Department of Community Health/ Division of Public Health Acute Disease Epidemiology Section. There have been no cases in Southeast Georgia at this time. However, Public Health officials encourage

residents to familiarize themselves with protective measures now. “The most effective ac- tions we can take to protect against mosquitoes are to reduce their breeding areas and to use mosquito repel- lant on ourselves,” says Dwain Butler, Southeast Health District Environmen- tal Health Director. He recommends pouring out stagnant water in bird- baths, pet dishes, old tires and any other receptacle in which mosquitoes might breed. This will greatly re- duce mosquito populations. Public Health officials also suggest making sure you and your children use mosquito repellant on exposed skin and clothing when outdoors during times mosquitoes are most active,

usually early morning or evening hours. A repellant containing DEET should be used according to package instructions. Repellants with DEET should not be used on infants, and children older than 2 should only use repel- lants that contain less than 10 percent DEET. Around 80 percent of those infected with WNV show no symptoms; while up to 20 percent have symptoms such as fever, headache, body aches, nausea, vomiting and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a rash. Those with compromised immune systems are at greater risk of more serious complications and illness. For more information about protective measures contact your local health department.

protective measures contact your local health department. Live music Bryant Johnson will perform classic rock —

Live music

Bryant Johnson will perform classic rock — including music by Bob Dylan, the Eagles, Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix and Billy Joel — Thursday from 6-8 p.m. at the Brantley County Library.

SKINTASTIC Saturday May 22, 2010 FREE SKIN CANCER SCREENINGS May is National Skin Cancer Awareness
SKINTASTIC Saturday
May 22, 2010
FREE
SKIN CANCER
SCREENINGS
May is National Skin Cancer
Awareness Month
SKINTASTIC Saturday,
May 22 from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
PARTICIPATING EXPERTS
American Cancer Society
Atlantic Shore Dermatology
- Ashley Cavalier, M.D.
Bailey’s Powerhouse Gym
Linda S. Pinson
Conference Center
Brunswick Dermatology
- Edward DiPreta, M.D.
Curves
In recognition of National Skin Cancer
Awareness month, Southeast Georgia
Health System is offering FREE skin cancer
screenings by expert dermatologists and
plastic surgeons. In addition to your
screening, you will be able to visit with
other health and beauty experts including
aestheticians, massage therapists, fitness
instructors, and more.
Golden Isles Center for Plastic Surgery
- Diane Bowen, M.D.
Renue Plastic Surgery
- Bill Mitchell, M.D. & Steven Barr, M.D.
Southeast Georgia Health System
• Breast Care Center
• Joint Replacement Center
• Outpatient Rehabilitation Care Center
• Wound Care Center
St. Simons Health and Fitness Club
Skin cancer is one of the most common
types of cancer and one of the most
preventable. You will benefit from a skin
cancer screening if you have any of the
following symptoms:
Summit Plastic Surgery
- Paula Legere, M.D.
REFRESHMENTS PARTNER
McDonald’s - Boozer Enterprises
•a small lump (spot or mole)
•a red lump (spot or mole) that is firm
•rough and scaly patches on the skin
•flat scaly areas of the skin that are red
or brown
•any new growth that is suspicious
Early detection may save your life. Take
advantage of the free screening and feel
SKINTASTIC! No appointment necessary.
For more information, call 1-800-537-5142,
ext. 5160 or visit www.sghs.org.
2415 Parkwood Drive • Brunswick, GA 31520
912-466-7000 • www.sghs.org
© 2010 SGHS
5/2010
31520 912-466-7000 • www.sghs.org © 2010 SGHS 5/2010 Census 2010 workers wear an officialidentificationbadge.
Census 2010 workers wear an officialidentificationbadge. For more information aboutthe2010Census visit www.2010census.gov .

Census 2010 workers wear an officialidentificationbadge.

For more information

aboutthe2010Census

visit

www.2010census.gov.

HowtoIdentify Census 2010 Workers By being counted in the 2010 Census you are standing up

HowtoIdentify Census 2010 Workers

By being counted in the 2010 Census you are standing up for what your community's needs are. That's why census takers are so important. Acensus taker is apersonfromyour community whois hired by the Census Bureau to make sure that your neighborhood gets represented as accurately as possible. The census taker's primary responsibility is tocollect census information from

residencesthathavenotsentbacktheir2010Censusform.

TheCensusBureauprovidesthecensustakerwithabinder containing all of the addresses that didn't send back a filled outcensusformfrom residencesthathavenotsentbacktheir2010Censusform. The census taker then visits all of those addresses and

The census taker then visits all of those addresses and records the answers to the questions on the formaddresses that didn't send back a filled outcensusform If no one answers at a particular residence,

If no one answers at a particular residence, a census taker will visit that home up to three times, each time leaving a doorhangerfeaturingaphonenumber;residentscancallthe number on the hanger to schedule the visitand records the answers to the questions on the form The census taker will ONLY ask

The census taker will ONLY ask the questions that appear on the census form. They will NEVER ask for your Social Security Number or personal banking information (such as account numbers or passwords).

Your privacyandconfidentiality is our priority!

The census taker who collects your information is sworn for life to protect your data under Federal Law Title 13. Those who violate the oath face criminal penalties: Under federal law, thepenaltyfor unlawful disclosureis a fine of up to $250,000 or imprisonment for up to 5 years, or both.

federal law, thepenaltyfor unlawful disclosureis a fine of up to $250,000 or imprisonment for up to
Census 2010 workers carry U.S.CensusBureaubags, makingthemeasier toidentify.
Census 2010 workers carry
U.S.CensusBureaubags,
makingthemeasier toidentify.

The Overdue Cookbook and the A Literary Feast Cookbook can be pur- chased at the Brantley County Public Library dur- ing regular business hours.

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