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SYLLABICATION RULES

Every syllable has one vowel sound.


The number of vowel sounds in a word equals the number
of syllables.
A one syllable word is never divided.
Consonant blends and digraphs are never separated. (bl,
br, ch, ck, cl, cr, dr, fl, fr, gh, gl, gr, ng, ph, pl, pr, qu, sc, sh,
sk, sl, sm, sn, sp, st, sw, th, tr, tw, wh, wr)
When a word has a ck or an x in it, the word is usually
divided after the ck or x.
A compound word is divided between the two words that
make the compound word.
When two or more consonants come between two vowels
in a word, it is usually divided between the first two
consonants.
When a single consonant comes between two vowels in a
word, it is usually divided after the consonant if the vowel
is short.
When a single consonant comes between two vowels in a
word, it is usually divided before the consonant if the
vowel is long.
When two vowels come together in a word, and are
sounded separately, divide the word between the two
vowels.
When a vowel is sounded alone in a word, it forms a
syllable itself.
A word that has a prefix is divided between the root word
and the prefix.
When be, de, ex and re are at the beginning of a word,
they make a syllable of their own.
A word that has a suffix is divided between the root word
and the suffix.
When a word ends in le, preceded by a consonant, the
word is divided before that consonant.
When ed comes at the end of a word, it forms a syllable
only when preceded by d or t.
When a word or syllable ends in al or el, these letters
usually form the last syllable.
The suffixes able and ible form their own syllable.
When ture and tion are at the end of a word, they make
their own syllable

Syllabication Rules

home = 1 sub-ject = 2 pub-lishing = 3


stop feet bell
rest-ing bush-el reach-ing

nick-el tax-ation
in-side foot-ball tooth-brush
sis-ter but-ter hun-gry

lev-er cab-in hab-it

ba-sin fe-ver ma-jor

ra-di-o di-et i-de-a

grad-u-ate a-pron u-nit


dis-count mis-fit un-tie
be-came de-fend ex-hale remain
kind-ness thank-ful stuff-ing
pur-ple fum-ble mid-dle
start-ed fund-ed
lev-el us-u-al
print-able con-vert-ible
lo-tion pos-ture

Rules

1. Every syllable has one vowel sound.


2. The number of vowel sounds equals the number of
syllables.
3. When you hyphenate a word hyphenate between
syllables.
4. Never hyphenate a one syllable word such as
"go, jump, in, the, and lake."
5. Consonant digraphs and blends are never separated.
blend-ing not blen-ding.
clash-ing not clas-hing,
march-ing not marc-hing
fast-ing not fas-ting
Hyphenate compound words between the words as in:
book-store book-case
Hyphenate words between the prefix and the root word or
the root word and the suffix as in: mis-understanding or
misunderstand-ing or misunder-standing

When two or more consonant come together,


hyphenate between the first two consonants as in blister,

Divide a word so that the syllable either at the end of a


line or at the beginning of the next has at least three
letters.
The following words should not be divided: divided,
about, above, below, around, nickel, taxi, major, minor,
cabin,

The Problem with the Rule


A diphthong has two vowels. The
"OW" sound as in the word out has
two vowel sounds "ah" and "oo"
that come together.
See above.
See Rule 5.

See Rule 3. In speech the word


blending is properly pronounced as
two syllables: blen-ding.
but notice the word notice is not
not-ice nor is Sheraton, she-rat-on.

The Rules about compound words,


consonant blends, prefixes, and
suffixes supercede:
Home-schoolers not Homeschoolers (Compound)
streng-then not stren-gthen, (ng is
consonant blend)
trans-atlantic not tran-satlantic
friend-ship.not frien-dship
In other words, words of five or
fewer letters should never be
hyphenated because you must have
at least three letters at the end of
the line and at least three at the
beginning, and three and three is six,
and five is less than six.