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AMERICAN GEAR MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

Load Classification and Service


Factors for Flexible Couplings

AGMA INFORMATION SHEET


(This Information Sheet is NOT an AGMA Standard)

Load Classification and Service Factors for Flexible Couplings


American
AGMA 922-A96
Gear
Manufacturers CAUTION NOTICE: AGMA technical publications are subject to constant improvement,
Association
revision, or withdrawal as dictated by experience. Any person who refers to any AGMA
technical publication should be sure that the publication is the latest available from the Association on the subject matter.
[fables or other self-supporting sections may be quoted or extracted in their entirety.
Credit lines should read: extracted from AGMA 922-A96, Load Classification and Service
Factors for Flexible Couplings, with the permission of the publisher, the American Gear
Manufacturers Association, 1500 King Street, Suite 201, Alexandria, Virginia 22314.]
Approved September 18, 1996

ABSTRACT
This information sheet provides suggested load classifications and related service factors that are most frequently used for various flexible coupling applications. Typical applications using smooth prime movers are
listed. Special considerations which may involve unusual or severe loading are also discussed.
Published by

American Gear Manufacturers Association


1500 King Street, Suite 201, Alexandria, Virginia 22314
Copyright 1996 by American Gear Manufacturers Association
All rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, in an electronic
retrieval system or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher.

Printed in the United States of America


ISBN: 1-55589-680-4

ii

AGMA 922-A96

Contents
Page
Foreword

Scope

References

Responsibility

Load classification

Service factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6

Tables
1

Load classification and service factors

Load classifications and typical service factors for flexible coupling


applications

iii

AGMA922-A96

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iv

AGMA 922-A96

Foreword
[The foreword is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as a
part of AGMA 922-A96, Load Classification and Service Factors for Flexible Couplings.]
This document was developed originally as standard AGMA 514.01 by the Flexible
Coupling Product Group of AGMA to show some of the applications for flexible couplings
and to serve as a guide to the character of the loads found in these applications. It made no
attempt to include all possible applications for flexible couplings, but a sufficient number and
variety were covered to serve as a guide for proper application.
The load classification and service factors shown in this document vary for some types of
equipment from identical or similar equipment as shown in other AGMA Standards. Such
variations are not errors or discrepancies, but have been determined based on design,
construction and limitations of the flexible coupling.
The first draft of AGMA 514.01 was prepared by the Flexible Coupling Technical Committee
in January 1968. It was approved by Flexible Coupling Product Group 7 on October 20,
1968. AGMA514.01 became an official AGMAstandard on May 27,1969. AGMA514.02
was a revision of AGMA 514.01. The major change was the addition of Service Factors to
table 2. AGMA 514.02 was approved by the AGMA Membership on October 22, 1971.
The Flexible Couplings Committee voted to change the standard to an information sheet.
The only changes made were editorial, necessary to reflect an information sheet.
Suggestions for the improvement of this information sheet will be welcome. They should be
sent to the American Gear Manufacturers Association, 1500 King Street, Suite 201,
Alexandria, Virginia, 22314.

AGMA 922-A96

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vi

blank.

AGMA 922-A96

PERSONNEL of the AGMA Flexible Couplings Committee


Chairman: Donald B. Cutler
Vice Chairman: Glenn Pokrandt

Rexnord Corporation
The Falk Corporation

ACTIVE MEMBERS
T.G. Fromknecht
J.R. Mancuso
J.D. Tennies
R.G. Thompson

Zurn Industries, Inc.


Kop-Flex, Inc.
Renold, Inc.
Deck Manufacturing Corporation

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
S. Chen
P. Dixon
T. Hewitt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.W. Hindman
V. Ivers
E.C. Kus
D. Lindsay
J.W. Mahan
J.D. Mays
R.E. Munyon
J. Paluh
S.L. Pearson
A. E. Phillips
W. Pizzichil
R. Post
D. Reynolds
E.I. Rivin
T.M. Schatzka
J.F. Slusarick
R. Whitney

Kop-Flex, Inc.
Metal Improvement Company
Rexnord Corporation
Rexnord Corporation
Xtek, Inc.
Deck Manufacturing Corporation
Emerson Power Transmission
Lovejoy, Inc.
Rexnord Corporation
Kop-Flex, Inc.
Zurn Industries, Inc.
Mobil Oil Corporation
Dodge/Rockwell Automation
Philadelphia Gear Corporation
Renold, Inc.
Dodge/Rockwell Automation
Wayne State University
Lovejoy, Inc.
Huffman Corporation
Emerson Power Transmission

vii

AGMA 922-A96

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viii

AMERICAN GEAR MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

American Gear Manufacturers


Association -

Load Classification and


Service Factors for
Flexible Couplings

AGMA 922-A96

3 Responsibility
3.1 Applications
The manufacturer's published warranty applies to
the flexible couplings described in this publication.
The following conditions are typical and are beyond
the manufacturer's responsibility.
The flexible coupling is protected as prescribed by the manufacturer,' in either inside or
outside storage, between the interval of its receipt
by the buyer and actual installation;

1 Scope

The flexible coupling is properly installed


and maintained in accordance with the
manufacturer's instructions;

The purpose of this information sheet is to list and


classify the character of the load, and the suggested
service factor for various applications, so that proper
flexible coupling selection can be made for a given
service.

The system of connected rotating parts is


compatible, free from critical speed, torsional and
other type vibration within the specified operating
speed range, no matter how induced;

1.1 Applicability
This information sheet is applicable to standard
couplings as defined in AGMA 510.03.

1.2 Exceptions
It is recognized that there are couplings for which the
service factor values shown in this information sheet
are not necessarily applicable. For specific application information, refer to the manufacturer's catalog
or recommendations. AGMA acknowledges the
right of any manufacturer to use different selection
methods, or service factors, or both for their specific
product.

2 References
The following documents contain provisions which,
through reference in this text, constitute provisions of
the information sheet. At the time of publication, the
editions were valid. All publications are subject to
revision, and the users of this information sheet are
encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying
the most recent editions of the publications listed.
AGMA 510.03, Nomenclature for Flexible Cou-

plings (1984).

The imposed torsional load, speed and


misalignment are within the capacity limits for
which the units were sold, or as specified in the
purchase contract.

3.2 Systems analysis


Responsibility for system analysis in compliance
with these requirements rests with the purchaser of
the flexible coupling.

3.3 Exceptions
Exceptions to any of the foregoing provisions are a
matter of specific contractual agreements.
NOTE: Service factors and load classifications for any
equipment used to move or convey people is beyond
the intent of this information sheet. Consult the
manufacturer for recommendations.

4 Load classification
The broad categories of load classification are
shown in table 1. They are classified in the three
commonly recognized load classes: Uniform (U),
Moderate Shock (M), and Heavy Shock (H). These
load classifications are based on normal operation of
the drive system. Load classification for various
applications are given in table 2.

AGMA922-A96

Table 1 - Load classification and service factors


Load classification

Normal service factor range 1 )

Uniform (U)

1.0 - 1.5

Moderate Shock (M)

1.5 - 2.5

Heavy Shock (H)

2.5 and over

NOTE:
1) The range of values signifies increasing reliability, longer life or more severe duty requirements. See 5.1.

Table 2 - Load classifications and typical service factors for flexible coupling applications

Application
Agitators
Pure liquids
Liquids and solids
Liquids - variable density
Blowers
Centrifugal
Lobe
Vane
Brewing and distilling
Bottling machinery
Lauter tub

Load classification
(see 5.1 and table 1)

Typical service factor


(see 5.2)

U
U
U

1.00
1.25
1.25

U
U
U

1.00
1.50
1.25

U
U

1.00
1.25

Briquetter machines
Can filling machines

2.00

1.00

Cane knives
Car dumpers

2.00

2.50

Car pullers - intermittent duty


Clay working machinery

1.50

1.75

U
U
M

1.25
1.50
2.00

U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U

1.25
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.50
1.25

M
U
U
U
U
U
U

1.50
1.25
1.25
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50

Compressors
Centrifugal
Lobe
Reciprocating - multi-cylinder
Conveyors - uniformly loaded or fed
Apron
Assembly
Belt
Bucket
Chain
Flight
Oven
Screw
Conveyors - heavy duty not uniformly fed
Apron
Assembly
Belt
Bucket
Chain
Flight
Oven

(continued)

AGMA 922-A96

Table 2 (continued)
Application

Load classification
(see 5.1 and table 1)

Typical service factor


(see 5.2)

Conveyors - heavy duty (continued)


Reciprocating
Screw
Shaker

M
M
H

2.50
1.50
2.50

M
M
M
M
M
M

2.00
2.00
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.50

H
H

2.75
2.75

M
U
M
M
M
M
M
M
M

1.75
1.50
2.25
2.25
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.50

M
M
M
U

1.75
1.50
2.00
1.50

U
M
U
M

1.00
2.00
1.50
2.00

U
U
U
H
U

1.25
1.25
1.25
2.50
1.25

M
U
M
M
U

1.75
1.25
1.75
1.75
1.00

Cranes and hoists


Main hoists
Reversing
Skip hoists
Trolley drive
Bridge drive
Slope

Crushers
Ore
Stone

Dredges
Cable reels
Conveyors
Cutter head drives
Jig drives
Maneuvering winches
Pumps
Screen drive
Stackers
Utility winches

Elevators
Bucket
Centrifugal discharge
Freight
Gravity discharge

Fans
Centrifugal
Cooling towers
Forced draft
Induced draft without damper control

Feeders
Apron
Belt
Disc
Reciprocating
Screw

Food industry
Beet slicer
Cereal cooker
Dough mixer
Meat grinders
Bottling, can filling machine

Generators (not welding)


Hammer mills
Laundry washers
Reversing

Laundry tumblers

1.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

(continued)

AGMA922-A96

Table 2 (continued)

Application
Lumber industry
Barkers - drum type
Edger feed
Live rolls
Log haul - incline
Log haul - well type
Off bearing rolls
Planer feed chains
Planer floor chains
Planer tilting hoist
Slab conveyor
Sorting table
Trimmer feed
Machine tools
Bending roll
Plate planer
Punch press - gear driven
Tapping machines
Other machine tools
Main drives
Auxiliary drives
Metal mills
Draw bench - carriage
Draw bench - main drive
Forming machines
Slitters
Table conveyors
Non-reversing
Reversing
Wire drawing & flattening machine
Wire winding machine
Mills, rotary type
Ball
Cement kilns
Dryers & coolers
Kilns
Pebble
Rod
Tumbling barrels
Mixers
Concrete mixers
Drum type
Oil industry
Chillers
Oil well pumping
Paraffin filter press
Rotary kilns
Paper mills
Barker auxiliaries, hydraulic
Barker, mechanical
Barking drum (spur gear only)
Beater & pulper

Load classification
(see 5.1 and table 1)
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M

Typical service factor


(see 5.2)

2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.50
1.50
1.75

M
M
M
M

2.00
1.50
2.00
2.50

1.50
1.25

U
M
M
M

2.00
2.00
2.00
1.50

M
H
M
M

2.25
2.50
2.00
1.75

M
M
M
M
M
M
M

2.25
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00

M
M

1.75
1.50

U
M
M
M

1.25
2.00
1.75
2.00

M
M
M
M

2.00
2.00
2.25
1.75

(continued)

AGMA 922-A96

Table 2 (continued)

Application

Load classification
(see 5.1 and table 1)

Typical service factor


(see 5.2)

Paper mills (continued)


Bleacher
Calenders
Converting machines, except cutlers, platers
Couch
Cutlers, platers
Cylinders
Dryers
Felt stretcher
Felt whipper
Jordans
Log haul
Presses
Reel
Stock chests
Suction roll
Washers and thickeners
Winders

Printing presses

U
M
U
M
M
M
M
U
M
M
M
M
U
U
M
U
M

1.00
2.00
1.50
1.75
2.00
1.75
1.75
1.25
2.00
1.75
2.00
2.00
1.50
1.50
1.75
1.50
1.50

1.50

2.00

1.00

2.00

M
M
U

2.25
1.75
1.50

M
M
M
M
M
U
M

2.50
2.00
2.25
2.00
2.50
1.00
2.00

U
M
U

1.00
1.50
1.25

U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U

1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25

Pullers
Barge haul

Pumps
Centrifugal
Reciprocating
Double acting
Single acting
1 or 2 cylinders
3 or more cylinders
Rotary - gear, lobe, vane

Rubber industry
Mixer - Banbury
Rubber calender
Rubber mill (2 or more)
Sheeter
Tire building machines
Tire & tube press openers
Tubers and strainers

Screens
Air washing
Rotary - stone or gravel
Travel water intake

Sewage disposal equipment


Bar screens
Chemical feeders
Collectors, circular or straight line
Dewatering screens
Grit collectors
Scum breakers
Slow or rapid mixers
Sludge collectors
Thickeners
Vacuum filters

(continued)

AGMA922-A96
Table 2 (concluded)
Application
Steering gear
Stokers
Textile industry
Batchers
Calenders
Card machines
Cloth finishing machines
(washers, pads, tenters)
(dryers, calenders, etc.)
Dry cans
Dryers
Dyeing machinery
Looms
Mangles
Nappers
Soapers
Spinners
Tenter frames
Winders (other than batchers)
Windlass

5 Service factors
Normal service factor range for each load
classification, table 1, is given as a range of values to
indicate the scope of the load classification
designation and in recognition that different types of
flexible couplings may be affected differently by
loading. It is recognized that precise definition of
load classification cannot be made for many
applications, as evidenced by the listing of the
service factor value 1.5 in both the Uniform and
Moderate Shock classifications, and the service
factor value 2.5 in both the Moderate Shock and
Heavy Shock classifications. Selection of a service
factor value within - or beyond - the range should be
based upon the degree of reliability desired or upon
how the specific system may differ from "normal" or
"average" conditions for the type of application.
5.1 Typical applications
The service factors listed in tables 1 and 2 are
intended as a general guide for applications with
smooth prime movers such as electric or hydraulic
motors and steam turbines.
Service factors listed in table 2 are the values most
frequently used for the various applications listed.
They are based on normal operation of the drive
system. Higher or lower values may be used

Load classification
(see 5.1 and table 1)
U
U

Typical service factor


(see 5.2)
1.00
1.00

U
M
M

1.25
1.75
1.50

U
M

1.50
1.75

M
U
M
U
U
U
M
U
M
M

1.50
1.25
1.50
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.75

depending upon the degree of reliability desired or


upon how the specific system may differ from
"normal" or "average" conditions for the type
application.
5.2 Special applications
Service factors listed in tables 1 and 2 represent the
normal relationship between flexible coupling design
power rating and prime mover continuous power
rating as listed on its nameplate. Applications
involving unusual or severe loading should be
carefully reviewed with the coupling manufacturer
before a service factor is applied.
5.2.1 Shock loading
Applications with high-torque motors and motors for
intermittent operations, and applications where
extreme repetitive shock occurs or where highenergy loads must be absorbed, as when stalling,
require special considerations and may not be
covered by the load classifications or service factors
given in tables 1 and 2.
5.2.2 Systems with brakes
When prime movers are equipped with brakes, and
the torque rating of the brakes exceeds the rating of
the prime mover, the rating of the brake dictates the
selection of the flexible coupling.

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PUBLISHED BY
AMERICAN GEAR MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
1500 KING STREET, ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA 22314