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TIME TO BEEF UP YOUR BURGERS FOOD PAGE 21 POVERTY PROGRAM RYAN PUSHES OVERHAUL,QUESTIONED ON

TIME TO BEEF UP YOUR BURGERS

FOOD PAGE 21

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RYAN PUSHES OVERHAUL,QUESTIONED ON TRUMP

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RYAN PUSHES OVERHAUL,QUESTIONED ON TRUMP NATION PAGE 8 WARRIORS TAKE AIM AT GAME 3 SPORTS PAGE

WARRIORS TAKE AIM AT GAME 3

SPORTS PAGE 13

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Wednesday June 8, 2016 XVI, Edition 254

www.smdailyjournal.com

Clinton claims historic victory

California overwhelming picks Hillary as presidential nominee

By Julie Pace and Lisa Lerer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Claiming her place in history, Hillary Clinton declared victory Tuesday night in her bruising battle for the Democratic presidential nomina- tion, becoming the first woman to lead a major American political party and casting herself as the beneficiary of generations who fought for equality. “This campaign is about making sure there are no ceilings, no lim- its on any of us,” Clinton said dur- ing an emotional rally in Brooklyn, eight years to the day after she ended her first failed White House run. As she took the stage to raucous cheers, she paused to relish the moment, flinging her arms wide and beaming broadly. Clinton had already secured the delegates needed for the nomina- tion, according to an Associated

needed for the nomina- tion, accord ing to an Associated Bernie Sanders Press tally. She added

Bernie Sanders

Press tally. She added to her totals with vic- tories in New Jersey, New Mexico and South Dakota, three of the six states voting Tuesday.

Clinton faces a two-front challenge in the com- ing days. She must appeal to the enthusiastic supporters of her rival Bernie Sanders — who vowed to stay in the race despite having

no realistic path to the nomina- tion — and sharpen her contrasts with presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. She sought to make progress on both, using her own loss in 2008 to connect with Sanders’ backers. “It never feels good to put our

See CLINTON, Page 12

“It never feels good to put our See CLINTON , Page 12 REUTERS Hillary Clinton arrives

REUTERS

Hillary Clinton arrives to speak during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York.

Canepa and Guingona to face off

borough of New York. Canepa and Guingona to face off BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Daly City Vice

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Daly City Vice Mayor David Canepa, center, was the top vote getter in last night’s primary for a seat on the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors.

Daly City councilmen in race for North County supervisor seat

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Daly City Vice Mayor David Canepa was easily the top vote getter in Tuesday’s primary for a seat on the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors and will face off against fellow Councilman Mike Guingona in November’s election. Canepa had 45.7 percent of the vote to Guingona’s 21.7 percent, according to semi-official final election results posted after mid- night. Brisbane Mayor Cliff Lentz finished third with 17.8 percent of

the vote and Francisco Supervisor Jane Kim among many others. Canepa quickly hugged his mother

the

vote

and

Francisco Supervisor Jane Kim among many others. Canepa quickly hugged his mother Dee when the first results came in just after 8 p.m. Canepa was surprised by Tuesday night’s margin of victory. “It’s been an extra competitive

Colma

Vice

Mayor

Helen

Fisicaro

fin-

ished

fourth

with

14.7 per-

cent.

Canepa held

a campaign

race and I’ve been quite impressed by the other candidates during the campaign. They have run clean races. I’m humbled by the experi- ence,” Canepa said. Later he thanked a long list of supporters for their help but said

Mike Guingona

at

Estrada’s

party

restaurant

in

Colma surrounded by family and supporters including Undersheriff Carlos Bolanos, Coroner Robert Foucrault, Daly City Councilman Ray Buenaventura and San

See SUPERVISOR, Page 23

Palo Alto councilman leads in District 24 race

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Palo Alto Councilman Marc Berman knows he’ll advance to the general election; but a second runner-up in the eight-candidate race to represent the 24th District in the Assembly was almost too close to call Tuesday night.

in the Assembly was almost too close to call Tuesday night. M a r c B

Marc Berman

Palo

Alto

attorney Vicki Veenker and Menlo Park Councilman Peter Ohtaki were neck in neck for second place through- out the primary

neck in neck for second place through- out the primary Vicki Veenker We Smog ALL CARS

Vicki Veenker

We Smog ALL CARS
We Smog ALL CARS
through- out the primary Vicki Veenker We Smog ALL CARS evening during which the pool of

evening during which the pool of Peninsula candidates seek- ing terms in Congress and

state

Legislature were

whittled down.

the

Incumbents

and state Legislature were whittled down. the Incumbents Peter Ohtaki had strong leads as ballots were

Peter Ohtaki

had strong leads as ballots were cast and counted for two con- gressional seats, and two in the Assembly and one in the

state

pri-

Senate. As

open

an

mary, the top two candidates regardless of party will continue campaigning to the general elec- tion. The most contested position was sought by eight candidates vying to replace outgoing Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-

Menlo Park, who is termed out of

See ELECTION, Page 24

candidates vying to replace outgoing Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D- Menlo Park, who is termed out of
candidates vying to replace outgoing Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D- Menlo Park, who is termed out of

2 Wednesday June 8, 2016

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“Love hath no physic for a grief too deep.”

— Robert Nathan,American author and poet

This Day in History

1966

The strongest of a series of tornadoes struck the Topeka, Kansas, area, killing 17 people. A merger was

announced between the National and American Football Leagues, to take effect in 1970. In A. D. 632 , the prophet Muhammad died in Medina. In 1845 , Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1864 , Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president during the National Union (Republican) Party’s convention in Baltimore. In 1912 , the ballet “Daphnis et Chloe” was premiered by the Ballets Russes in Paris. In 1915 , U.S. Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned over what he viewed as President Woodrow Wilson’s overly bellicose attitude toward Germany follow- ing the sinking of the RMS Lusitania. In 1948 , the “Texaco Star Theater” made its debut on NBC- TV with Milton Berle guest-hosting the first program. (Berle was later named the show’s permanent host.) In 1953 , the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that restaurants in the District of Columbia could not refuse to serve blacks. Eight tornadoes struck Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, killing 126 people. In 1967, 34 U.S. servicemen were killed when Israel attacked the USS Liberty, a Navy intelligence-gathering ship in the Mediterranean. In 1972, during the Vietnam War, an Associated Press pho- tographer captured the haunting image of 9-year-old Phan Thi Kim Phuc as she ran naked and severely burned from the scene of a South Vietnamese napalm attack.

burned from the scene of a South Vietnamese napalm attack. Actor-comedian Jerry Stiller is 89. Birthdays

Actor-comedian Jerry Stiller is 89.

Birthdays

attack. Actor-comedian Jerry Stiller is 89. Birthdays Actor-director Keenen Ivory Wayans is 58. Rapper Kanye

Actor-director Keenen Ivory Wayans is 58.

is 89. Birthdays Actor-director Keenen Ivory Wayans is 58. Rapper Kanye West is 39. Former first

Rapper Kanye West is 39.

Former first lady Barbara Bush is 91. Actress Millicent Martin is 82. Actor James Darren is 80. Actor Bernie Casey is 77. Singer Nancy Sinatra is 76. Singer Chuck Negron is 74. Musician Boz Scaggs is 72. Author Sara Paretsky is 69. Actress Sonia Braga is 66. Actress Kathy Baker is 66. Country musician Tony Rice is 65. Rock singer Bonnie Tyler is 65. Actor Griffin Dunne is 61. “Dilbert” creator Scott Adams is 59. Singer Mick Hucknall (Simply Red) is 56. Musician Nick Rhodes (Duran Duran) is 54. Rhythm-and-blues singer Doris Pearson (Five Star) is 50. Actress Julianna Margulies is 49.

Pearson (Five Star) is 50. Actress Julianna Margulies is 49. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ZALEG

 
 
 
 
 

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

USEIS

 
 
 
 

QIYETU

LLC All Rights Reserved. USEIS     QIYETU FARLVO Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
LLC All Rights Reserved. USEIS     QIYETU FARLVO Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
LLC All Rights Reserved. USEIS     QIYETU FARLVO Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE

FARLVO

All Rights Reserved. USEIS     QIYETU FARLVO Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
All Rights Reserved. USEIS     QIYETU FARLVO Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
All Rights Reserved. USEIS     QIYETU FARLVO Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans.

Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.
Ans.

here:

Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) PITCH VAGUE RADIUS INDUCT

Answer: When the baker made a wedding cake for his

Jumbles:

daughter, he was — “TIERING” UP

cake for his Jumbles: daughter, he was — “TIERING” UP REUTERS A zoo performer smiles as
cake for his Jumbles: daughter, he was — “TIERING” UP REUTERS A zoo performer smiles as

REUTERS

A zoo performer smiles as he puts his head between the jaws of a crocodile during a performance for tourists at the Sriracha Tiger Zoo, in Chonburi province, east of Bangkok,Thailand.

Southern California highway covered in onions after wreck

YUCAIPA — A multivehicle crash left a Southern California highway covered in onions. The Riverside Press-Enterprise reports a truckload of onions spilled at midmorning Tuesday on the westbound side of Interstate 10 in Yucaipa, about 70 miles east of Los Angeles. Two other vehicles were also involved. The California Highway Patrol says the truck driver was taken to a local hos- pital for treatment of minor injuries. All lanes reopened shortly before 3 p.m.

Suspect steals S.F.ambulance, crashes on Treasure Island

SAN FRANCISCO — Authorities say a San Francisco Fire Department ambu- lance was stolen during a medical emer- gency Tuesday morning and crashed on Treasure Island. KNTV reports that San Francisco police spokeswoman Grace Gatpandan says officers got a call about 8 a.m. that the ambulance was stolen from Mason Street, and the suspect was speeding toward the Oakland-San Francisco Bay Bridge. GPS was used to track the ambu- lance, which crashed into a guardrail or median on a freeway exit.

No

injuries were reported. It was not immediately clear how the

A small

fire then

broke out.

In other news

suspect, who was later arrested by the California Highway Patrol, was able to take over the ambulance. The suspect’s name and age were not released. The case remains under investigation.

Voiceover recording of man with gun scares office workers

NEWBURGH, N.Y. — An upstate New York production company’s recording of a man threatening people with a gun has sent people scurrying for cover at its office building. Police say office workers in the City of Newburgh reported hearing the voice in their building on Monday afternoon. Police SWAT teams quickly converged on the scene. The surrounding buildings were evacuated. Traffic was blocked. Police searched the building and dis- covered one of the office suites housed a production company that was doing voiceovers by playing recordings of a man threatening people with a gun. Police say the production company staff had left the building just before police arrived.

Romania:Vasile Cepoi wins, loses and loses in mayor’s race

BUCHAREST, Romania — In a Romanian town, Vasile Cepoi defeated Vasile Cepoi and Vasile Cepoi in a may- oral election. The middle name made all the differ- ence.

The victor told the Associated Press:

“I added my middle name, and ran as Vasile Lica Cepoi. Anyhow, residents knew about the confusion before the vote.”

who

He was

also

the incumbent,

secured his fourth term as mayor of Draguseni. He said Tuesday that the coincidence of three candidates having the same name was an attempt by political parties to confuse residents in the northeastern town of 2,500 people.

Both names are common in Romania; Cepoi means “big onions.” The mayor won 1,200 votes, Vasile Cepoi won 100 votes and Vasile Cepoi trailed with 10. The three are not related. Two other candidates scored even less.

Ukraine border guards discover bootleg alcohol pipeline

MOSCOW — Authorities in Ukraine say they have foiled plans to ship boot- leg alcohol from Moldova to Ukraine via a pipeline. The SBU security service said on Tuesday that border guards in the coun- try’s west stopped works to lay pipes on the bed of the Dniester river at a point where it crosses the border. The would-be bootleggers rented a house on the riverbank on the Ukrainian side and started to lay the pipe across the river, authorities said. The SBU released footage of the pipeline being dug up.

Lotto

June 4 Powerball Fantasy Five 16 20 22 43 64 17 1 4 5 20
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1
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25 48
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Daily three midday
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11 27 35 45 3 Daily three evening Mega number 3 9 6 The Daily Derby

The Daily Derby race winners are California Classic,No.5,in first place;Gorgeous George,No. 8, in second place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:40.30.

Local Weather Forecast

Wednes day : Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog and

drizzle in the morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10

mph

afternoon. Wednes day ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph. Thurs day : Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest winds around 10

west 10 to 20 mph in the

60s. Northwest winds around 10 west 10 to 20 mph in the Becoming mph. Thurs day

Becoming

mph. Thurs day ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.

cloudy. Highs in the 60s.

Friday through monday Lows in the lower 50s.

Mostly

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Wednesday June 8, 2016

3

San Bruno budget shows continued growth

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The economy in San Bruno is expected to continue improving for the fourth consecu- tive year, according to a budget report show- ing sustained growth in property, hotel and vehicle tax revenue collections. The City Council is expected to study the proposed budget during a session scheduled Wednesday, June 8, before looking to grant approval for the document later this month. The proposed budget for the 2016-17 fiscal year illustrates the city’s total revenue jumped to $41.9 million, up from roughly $40 million the prior two years and $38 mil- lion in 2013-14, according to the report. Mayor Jim Ruane lauded the state of the city’s budget, praising the economic conser- vatism officials have shown over recent lean years, which he claimed is now paying divi- dends. “I feel very comfortable with the state of the city’s finances,” he said. “I think we are in good shape.” The primary revenue stream driving the growth is increased property tax collections, according to the report, showing the city should take in $8.9 million this year, up from $8.4 million in the last fiscal year. Transient occupancy tax, or revenue gener- ated when a visitor stays overnight in a city hotel or motel, should generate $3.5 million in the upcoming fiscal year, a hike from the $3.3 million brought in during the year prior. Ruane added the city stands to bring in more transient occupancy tax revenue through the development of the Crossing Hotel, which was recently approved to be built on a slice of land near the intersection of El Camino Real and Interstate 380. OTO Developments, a builder based in South Carolina, has been selected by the council to acquire from the city a plot of land adjacent to Jack’s Restaurant and build the hotel, but a group opposing the deal has

and build the hotel, but a group opposing the deal has Comment on or share this

Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

attempted to stop the process due to the developer’s reluctance to hire union labor. The deal is now mired in the courtroom, as opponents have sued to push forward an ini-

tiative attempting to grant voters the chance

to repeal the council’s previous approval of

selling the land targeted for the hotel to the developer. For his part, Ruane said he believes the deal is in the best interest of the city, as the hotel is expected to generate roughly $1 mil- lion in hotel tax revenue annually for the city. Vehicle license fees are also expected to be

a valuable source of income for the city, according to the report, generating $4.2 mil- lion for the city, about $200,000 more than the amount collected last year. The only projected dip in primary revenue sources from last year is sales tax, which is proposed to drop down incrementally to $7.4 million in the upcoming fiscal year from the $7.5 million collected last year. Sales tax collections in general have been dropping in San Bruno since the 2013-14 fiscal year, when the city drew $7.6 million. With increased revenue comes increased budgeted spending, according to the report, which shows the city expects to spend about $40 million in the upcoming fiscal year. Expenditures have outpaced revenue col-

lections since the 2013-14 fiscal year, according to the report, as spending is expected to jump by about $6.6 million while income has only grown by about $4 million in the same period of time, according

to the report.

Hikes in costs associated with public safe- ty, administration and community services personnel are the largest sources of increased proposed spending, according the report showing the city expects to spend $37.8

million combined across the three areas, an increase of $5.6 million since the 2013-14 fiscal year. The largest source of spending is on public safety, according to the report, attributing for $25.9 million of the expected expendi- ture budget. Under a policy approved by the council in 2013, 25 percent of the budgeted general fund expenditures should be set aside in reserves, which has allowed officials to stash an expected $11.4 million in a separate fund. An additional $6.2 million is proposed to be held in the city’s capital improvement reserve fund as well, plus about $3 million in an emergency disaster reserve fund created in the wake of the Crestmoor gas pipeline explosion. Along with the budget growth experienced recently, the city’s laundry list of capital improvement projects has increased as well, according to the report. The city carried over roughly $38 million worth of projects from the year prior, and added an additional approximately $17 mil- lion, boosting the entire budget for the upcoming year to $55 million. Water and wastewater underground infra- structure improvements totaling in the neighborhood of $5.5 million are among the primary big ticket items the city hopes to address in the coming year, according to the capital improvements spending plan. Officials have also made an ongoing com- mitment to fixing city streets, spending nearly $6 million to date to address the proj- ects over the past decade, with an expecta- tion of adding another $2 million worth of work to the budget this year, according to the report. In all, Ruane said he believes officials should be content with the state of the city’s finances. “I’m very confident the council is pleased with the budget overall,” he said. The San Bruno City Council meets 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 8, in room 115 at San Bruno City Hall, 567 El Camino Real.

Police reports

That’s wild

A small coyote was seen near Serra Drive and San Felipe Avenue in South San Francisco before 5:28 a.m. Friday, May 27.

HALF MOON BAY

Theft. A backpack containing school work and cash was stolen on the 400 block of

Spruce Street before 11:30 p.m. Friday, June

3.

Burg l ary . The door of a business was removed and $80 was taken from a cash reg- ister on the first block of Highway 1 before 11 a.m. Friday, June 3. Citation. A 40-year-old Half Moon Bay man was cited and released after he was seen trying to use a counterfeit bill and found to have two warrants on the 500 block of Kelly Avenue before 9:15 a.m. Friday, June 3. Burg l ary . The window of a business was broken and a safe containing approximately $4,000 was stolen on the 100 block of Main Street before 5:43 a.m. Friday, June 3.

Co ntro l l ed s ubs tance. A man was found

in possession of methamphetamine on the 5700 block of Highway 1 before 2 a.m. Thursday, June 2.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO

Reckl es s dri v i ng . Several vehicles were seen burning out in a parking lot on West Orange Avenue before 7:22 p.m. Saturday, May 28. Burg l ary. A laundry room was broken into and money was taken from the machines on Alida Way before 9:15 a.m. Saturday, May

28.

Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . Someone

with a gun was seen trying to break into a house on Arleen Way before 4:48 a.m. Saturday, May 28.

Di s turbance. A group of people in vehi-

cles were heard yelling, breaking glass and playing loud music on Callan Boulevard before 4:44 a.m. Saturday, May 28.

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LOCAL/STATE

Wednesday June 8, 2016

5

Lim trailing in race for judge

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

San Mateo Deputy Mayor David Lim was trailing in his bid to become a judge in Alameda County by about 3 percent of the vote in Tuesday’s primary. Former Alameda Councilwoman Barbara Thomas was the top vote getter with more than 47.09 per- cent of the vote after results were updated after midnight. Thomas will face off against either law professor Scott Jackson who had 28.19 percent of the vote or Lim, an Alameda County prosecutor, who had 24.2 percent of the vote, according to election results. Judges do not have to live in

according to election results. Judges do not have to live in David Lim the same coun-

David Lim

the same coun- ty they serve. Thomas had more than 78,000 votes, Jackson had just about 46,800 votes and Lim had just more than

40,000 votes after midnight with 779, or 69.68 percent, of 1,118 of the precincts reporting, according to Alameda County election results. “I’ll take the results with a grain of salt. We’re close to sec- ond and I hope to get to second to force a runoff in November,” Lim said.

Lim has spent the past 15 years working as an assistant district attorney for the East Bay county and is serving his second term as a San Mateo councilman having first been elected in 2009 and re- elected in 2013. Lim decided to run for the seat after two longtime Alameda County Superior Court judges decided not to seek re-election. Having graduated law school in

1999,

Lim

spent

the

last

10

years

focusing

on

prosecuting

real

estate and mortgage fraud

cases. He served as mayor of San Mateo in 2013 and is slated to take the same role in 2017 if he does not win the judge’s seat.

Voters sign off on lawmakers cutting peers’ pay

By Alison Noon

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — California voters on Tuesday gave state law- makers the ability to suspend their colleagues’ pay along with their voting power when legisla- tors are accused of wrongdoing while in office. It was the lone, statewide ballot measure in the primary and was proposed by lawmakers who asked voters to give them greater lati- tude. Voters agreed, with 77 percent

favoring Proposition 50. Lawmakers sought the change after suspending former Democratic senators Leland Yee, Ron Calderon and Rod Wright as they faced felony accusations in 2014, when all three faced criminal charges but had not yet been convicted. A state law prohibiting lawmakers’ pay from being reduced meant the three Democrats continued receiving paychecks while on suspension. “We think the voters understood that the Legislature needed and wanted some more tools in the event they ever again needed to deal with the kind of problems

they had in 2014,” said Jim Mayer, chief executive of California Forward, a nonpartisan think-tank that supported Proposition 50. “This was a very simple choice: If the Legislature was ever going to suspend a legis- lator again, should they be able to suspend them without pay? The voters said ‘yes.’” The proposal will permit harsh- er punishment, but also makes it more difficult to pull off. The 40-person Senate or 80-per- son Assembly currently can sus- pend a member with pay with a simple majority of votes.

Measure F fails

Half Moon Bay won’t need supermajority vote of City Council for certain bonds

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The Half Moon Bay City Council won’t have to worry about needing a steeper-than-average threshold to approve certain types of financing after a citizen-initiat- ed ballot measure failed Tuesday. Measure F, which would have required a super majority of the council vote to approve lease rev- enue bonds, failed after receiving just 952 votes or 45.9 percent, according to semi-official results from the San Mateo County Elections Office. Known as the Taxpayer

Protection Act, it was proposed by a group of residents who also ral- lied two years ago to pass a differ- ent ballot measure restricting the council from demolishing the Main Street Bridge. Tuesday’s attempt was also initiated by another major infrastructure proj- ect — the creation of a new $22 million public library the city is splitting with the county. The City Council has never actu- ally taken out any lease revenue bonds, although it voted to do so to fund a portion of the library that will soon be under construction.

See MEASURE F, Page 23

Coding problem briefly affects electronic voting machines

A coding problem affected about 140 electronic voting machines throughout San Mateo County Tuesday morning, but the issue was resolved in about 90 minutes, according to a county election official. The problem was identified at about 7 a.m. — an hour before polls opened for Election Day — on some Hart InterCivic “eSlate” machines used by the county, assistant chief elections officer Jim Irizarry said.

Local brief

The issue was with passcodes that connected individual machines to the central process- ing unit at election headquarters in San Mateo, Irizarry said. The issue was resolved by 8:30 a.m. and during the time the elec- tronic machines were down, peo- ple were still able to vote via paper ballots, he said. There were a few minor hardware issues later in the day but Irizarry said shortly before polls closed at 8 p.m. that overall “the rest of the day has gone relatively smooth- ly.”

“the rest of the day has gone relatively smooth- ly.” rescriptions & Home Medical Supplies Delivered
“the rest of the day has gone relatively smooth- ly.” rescriptions & Home Medical Supplies Delivered
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rescriptions & Home Medical Supplies Delivered (650) 349-1373 29 West 25TH Ave. (Near El Camino)
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(Near El Camino)
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ly.” rescriptions & Home Medical Supplies Delivered (650) 349-1373 29 West 25TH Ave. (Near El Camino)
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6 Wednesday June 8, 2016

LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Court suspends California water district’s land buy

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FRESNO — Southern California’s largest water supplier was temporari- ly blocked from buying sprawling farmland that could be used to help build twin tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a court ruled Tuesday. The state’s 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento granted a tem- porary restraining order the day before escrow was set to close on Metropolitan Water District’s $175 million deal for 20,000 acres. The ruling delays the district’s pur- chase by no more than a few weeks,

Metropolitan

Stites said. “We don’t believe it’s a substan- tive decision,” she said, adding that the court probably needs more time to review hundreds of pages of docu- ments filed in the case. Metropolitan will ultimately be cleared to buy the land at the hub of California’s water system east of San Francisco and more than 300 miles north of Los Angeles, Stites said.

Catherine

attorney

San Joaquin and Contra Costa counties filed suit against Metropolitan, a major backer of Gov. Jerry Brown’s plan to build the tunnels to send water south.

David Ernest Cereghino

died

peacefully in Redwood City on May 30, 2016, surrounded by his wife and daughters. He was a native of San Francisco born on Nov. 9, 1937, to Dina and Emilio Cereghino. Dave attended Corpus Christi grammar school and graduated from Riordan High School in 1955. After high school he served in the Air Force Reserves for eight years. He worked at United Airlines for 43 years until he retired in 2000. He was a devout Catholic and belonged to Mount Carmel Church in Redwood City and was a member of the Mount Carmel Men’s Club. He will be dearly missed by his wife of 50 years, Patricia; daugh- ters Deborah Cereghino of San Jose, Teri (David) Rosa of Newark.

David Ernest

Cereghino

Obituaries

A funeral mass will be celebrated at 10:30 am, Thursday, June 16, at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, 300 Fulton St., Redwood City, California. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Anthony Correa

Anthony Correa,

of Millbrae,

born Oct. 10, 1920, in Mexico, died June 3, 2016. He was 95. “May we all work for peace and may Anthony with his wife Yole enjoy eternal peace together.” His devoted wife of 57 years, Yole, predeceased him Sept. 11, 2012. Their friends and families in Durango, Mexico, and Faenza, Italy, hold their loved ones in their minds and hearts.

Genentech, other drug firm agree to $67M settlement

The U.S. Department of Justice announced that South San Francisco-based Genentech Inc. and another drug company have agreed to pay $67 million to settle a federal lawsuit that alleged the two companies made misleading statements about a cancer drug. The settlement in federal court in San Francisco concerns the drug Tarceva, used to treat a type of lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. It resolves a so-called “whistle- blower” lawsuit filed under the U.S. False Claims Act in 2011 by Brian Shields, a former senior product manager for the drug. Tarceva was marketed jointly by Genentech and OSI Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Farmingdale, New York, the sec- ond defendant in the case. The Justice Department said while the case was settled, there was no finding that either compa- ny was legally liable for the claims. The lawsuit alleged the two com- panies made misleading state- ments to doctors between 2006 and 2011 about the effectiveness of Tarceva in treating patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. It alleged that there was little evidence to show that Tarceva was effective with those patients unless they had never smoked or had a mutation in a protein known as the epidermal growth factor receptor. The department said the federal government will receive $62.6 million and state Medicaid pro- grams will receive $4.4 million of the settlement. Shields will receive about $10 million of the government’s proceeds.

Local briefs

Genentech was acquired in 2009

by

Basel, Switzerland.

Hoffmann-La

Roche AG of

San Bruno police ask public’s help to ID suspicious trio

Police are asking for the pub- lic’s help to identify three people who they believe intended to bur- glarize a San Bruno home last week. On May 25, around 3:30 p.m. a resident arrived at his house in the 2400 block of Oakmont Drive and found three males standing outside the residence, according to police. The trio told the homeowner they were waiting to be picked up. A fourth person in a white Honda Civic then arrived and picked up the three, police said. Surveillance video in the area showed the three being dropped off by the white Honda just moments before the homeowner arrived. Based on the trio’s actions, investigators believe they were planning on commit- ting a residential burglary, accord- ing to police. Most residential burglaries occur when burglars believe a home is empty, police said. To ensure this, burglars will often knock on the door. If some- one answers the door, the burglars will come up with an excuse for knocking. If they get no answer, they will then proceed with the burglary, according to police. Police advise that homeowners

accord ing to police. Police advise that homeowners and residents should not confront a burglary suspect.
accord ing to police. Police advise that homeowners and residents should not confront a burglary suspect.
accord ing to police. Police advise that homeowners and residents should not confront a burglary suspect.

and residents should not confront a burglary suspect. Instead, police recommend calling 911 immedi- ately if they find a suspicious per- son at or near their residence. Anyone with information about the identity of the trio is asked to contact San Bruno police at (650) 616-7100. Anonymous tips can be emailed to sbpdtipline@san- bruno.ca.gov.

is asked to contact San Bruno police at (650) 616-7100. Anonymous tips can be emailed to

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Wednesday June 8, 2016

7

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Wednesday • June 8, 2016 7 REUTERS Transportation Security Administration Administrator Peter

REUTERS

Transportation Security Administration Administrator Peter Neffenger testifies before a Senate Homeland Security Subcommittee hearing.

TSA chief: Progress being made on shortening lines

By Joan Lowy

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Significant progress has been made on shortening screening lines since earlier this spring, when airlines reported thousands of frustrated passengers were missing flights, the head of the Transportation Security Administration said Tuesday. Over the busy Memorial Day weekend, 99 percent of passengers at U.S. airports waited less than 30 minutes and 93 percent waited less than 15 minutes in regular security lines, Peter Neffenger told a hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. In TSA Precheck lines for travelers who have received priority

security vetting, 93 percent of passengers waited less than 5 minutes, he said. The agency said it is reducing lines partly by adding more lanes and increasing staffing at peak periods, especially at seven of the nation’s busiest airports: John F. Kennedy in New York, Newark in New Jersey, O’Hare in Chicago, Miami, Atlanta, Dallas-Fort Worth and Los Angeles. “When you get stories of long wait times it has primarily been those airports,” Neffenger said. “If you can prevent problems from happening there, you don’t have prob- lems that cascade throughout the system.” TSA also is exploring the possibility of adding automated screening technology at more than a dozen airports that can speed up lines by as much as 30 percent, he said.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Swimmer started at Stanford amid assault prevention efforts

By Lisa Leff and Pual Elias

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Brock Turner began his short-lived career as a swimmer at Stanford University two years ago amid renewed efforts by the prestigious California school and other U.S. colleges to prevent campus sexual assaults. Stanford required new students to com- plete online training over the summer that covered topics such as acquiring affirmative consent for sex and the need for bystanders to intervene. A video featuring student-ath- letes talking about the issue was screened for freshmen attending campus orientation sessions, where students also heard the provost pledge that perpetrators would be held accountable and received brochures

would be held accountable and received brochures Brock Turner informing them or their rights and

Brock Turner

informing them or their rights and responsibili- ties as members of the Cardinal community. Four months later, Stanford police arrested Turner for assaulting a woman he’d encountered at a fraternity party. Two graduate students con-

fronted the freshman as he attacked the unconscious victim by a garbage bin, then chased him down and held him until officers arrived. Turner agreed to withdraw from Stanford rather than go through expulsion proceed- ings. From Stanford’s perspective, the system worked as well as it could have.

Defendant in church shootings faces November federal trial

CHARLESTON, S.C. — The federal death penalty trial of a white man charged with shooting and killing nine black parish- ioners during a Bible study at their Charleston church will be held in November, a judge announced Tuesday. Chief U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel set Nov. 7 to begin selecting jurors for the federal trial of Dylann Roof, 22, who faces numerous counts, including hate crimes, in the June 17 shootings at Emanuel AME Church. That’s about two months before Roof’s state death-penalty trial. Roof faces nine counts of murder in state court in a trial set to begin in January.

Around the nation

Congress sends Obama bill to regulation toxic chemicals

WASHINGTON — Congress has approved a bipartisan bill that would for the first time regulate tens of thousands of toxic chemi- cals in everyday products, from household cleaners to clothing and furniture. Supporters say the bill would clear up a hodgepodge of state rules and update and improve a toxic-chemicals law that has remained unchanged for 40 years. A voice vote in the Senate on Tuesday fol- lows approval in the House last month and sends the measure to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign it.

fol- lows approval in the House last month and sends the measure to President Barack Obama,
fol- lows approval in the House last month and sends the measure to President Barack Obama,

8 Wednesday June 8, 2016

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

For the first time, more than 4 in 10 U.S. women are obese

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The nation’s obesity epi- demic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. For the first time, more than 4 in 10 U.S. women are obese, according to new government health statis- tics. Obesity rates for men and women in the U.S. had been roughly the same for about a decade. But in recent years, women have surged ahead and now just over 40 percent of women are obese, compared to 35 percent of men. The percentages were reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in two articles published online Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association. The numbers are based on small government survey that is considered the best measure of the nation’s obesity problem. Though it is not altogether surprising to

health researchers because the nation has long been growing more obese, it is “scary” that the statistic has reached 40 percent for women, said Dana Hunnes, a dietitian who sees obese patients at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. “It’s a really alarming figure, and it’s alarming that it’s continuing to go up despite government calls to action on weight loss and healthy eating,” she said. Why the problem is getting worse for women faster than for men remains some- what of a mystery to health researchers. “I don’t know if anyone truly knows for sure,” Hunnes said. Experts say there are a range of possible explanations, including that many women are satisfied with a larger body size. The rate of obesity in women is also high- er than in men across the world, although far lower overall than in the U.S. According to the World Health Organization, 15 percent of women worldwide and 11 percent of men are obese.

Obama meets Indian PM, seeks implementation of climate pact

WASHINGTON — India will try to join a climate change deal within this year, the Obama administration said Tuesday, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi met President Barack Obama at the White House and the two leaders played up their efforts to cooperate on issues of global concern. Stressing their “strong bonds,” Obama said the world’s two largest democracies had “joined forces” to bring about the landmark climate agreement that was reached in Paris last December. “We discussed how we can as quickly as possible bring the Paris agreement into place, how we can make sure that climate financing that’s necessary for India to be able to embark on its bold vision for solar

Around the nation

energy and clean energy that Prime Minister Modi has laid out can be accomplished,” Obama said, alongside Modi after their meeting in the Oval Office.

Colin heads out sea after drenching Florida with rain

Colin headed out to sea Tuesday after dumping as much as 9 inches of rain on parts of Florida, forcing at least one city to pump partially treated sewage into the Gulf of Mexico ocean because the system was overloaded with rainwater. Colin flooded roads and caused thousands of power outages in Florida and a team investigated a possible tornado related to the storm that damaged homes and toppled trees in Jacksonville.

storm that damaged homes and toppled trees in Jacksonville. REUTERS Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
storm that damaged homes and toppled trees in Jacksonville. REUTERS Speaker of the House Paul Ryan

REUTERS

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan talks to reporters during an event to discuss the Republican Party’s anti-poverty plan at House of Help City of Hope in the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington,D.C.

Ryan pushes poverty program overhaul,questioned on Trump

By Mary Clare Jalonick

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — House Speaker Paul Ryan on Tuesday proposed an overhaul of the nation’s poverty programs, the first of several policy plans intended to unite the fractured Republican Party, but his agenda was immediately overshadowed by ques- tions about Donald Trump. The proposal, unveiled at the House of Help City of Hope, an alcohol and drug treatment program in the Anacostia neigh- borhood of Washington, would make changes to welfare, food and housing aid, among other programs, to increase work requirements, make the aid more efficient and allow states to make more decisions about how it is distributed. As Ryan announced the plan with partici- pants in the program by his side, he faced repeated questions about the presumptive Republican nominee’s latest controversial comments. In response, Ryan said Trump made the “textbook definition of a racist comment” in saying an American-born judge isn’t qualified to preside over a case because of his Mexican heritage. Ryan stood by his endorsement of Trump, saying he would be a better president to enact his agenda than Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Trump has said U.S. District Court Judge Gonzalo Curiel can’t be impartial in law- suits against Trump University because his parents were born in Mexico and Trump wants to build a wall along the border. Trump’s legal team has not sought a recusal of the jurist. Ryan endorsed Trump last week after a lengthy delay, making clear that his support is largely due to the fact that a Republican president could help him enact his longtime policy goals. Overhauling the nation’s welfare and nutrition programs has long been a priority for Ryan, who also plans to release a national security plan on Thursday. Policy plans on regulations, the Constitution, health care and taxes will roll out in the coming weeks. The Wisconsin Republican said he has discussed his agenda with Trump, who has similarly argued that Democrats have failed the poor. Trump has given few specifics on how he would deal with poverty issues, though, beyond creating new jobs and leav- ing Social Security intact. Along with several House committee chairmen, Ryan met with House of Help City of Hope’s founder, Shirley Holloway, and later praised her for working with addict- ed individuals and helping lift them out of poverty.

HELP WANTED

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SALES

EVENT MARKETING SALES

TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES

Join the Daily Journal Event marketing team as a Sales and Business Development Specialist. Duties include sales and customer service of event sponsorships, partners, exhibitors and more. Interface and interact with local businesses to enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s ever expanding inventory of community events such as the Senior Showcase, Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and more. You will also be part of the project management process. But first and foremost, we will rely on you for sales and business development. This is one of the fastest areas of the Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow the team. Must have a successful track record of sales and business development.

We are looking for a telemarketing whiz, who can cold call without hesitation and close sales over the phone. Experience preferred. Must have superior verbal, phone and written communication skills. Computer proficiency is also required. Self-management and strong business intelligence also a must.

To apply for either position, please send info to

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Wednesday June 8, 2016

9

What is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day?

By Tippy Irwin

W orld Elder Abuse Awareness

Day was launched June 15,

2006, by the International

Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations. The purpose of WEAAD is to pro- vide an opportunity for communities around the world to promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect of older persons by raising awareness. While there is an acute awareness of child abuse in this country, in com- parison elder abuse is little known, little understood and lags in the leg- islative process both at the state and the federal level. In addition, WEAAD is in support of the United Nations International Plan of Action acknowl- edging the significance of elder abuse as a public health and human rights issue. WEAAD serves as a call to action for individuals, organizations and communities to raise awareness about elder abuse, neglect and exploitation. I applaud our state and our county for participating in this year’s WEAAD to bring this to the forefront of the common citizens. Not until we engage the entire citizenry in keeping our eyes open and reporting issues that we suspect are elder abuse, will we make any headway in combatting this devastating problem.

In addition to local law enforce- ment, there are pri- marily two organi- zations in our coun- ty that are commis- sioned to investi- gate reports alleg- ing abuse: Adult

Protective Services handles all reports of abuse involving individuals who live independently in their own homes; Ombudsman Services deals with complaints made by the elders and dependent adults who live in the long-term care facili- ties in our county. As resident advo- cates we receive complaints made by or on behalf of these residents, we investigate and we work to bring res- olution to those complaints, working closely with local law enforcement and the licensing bodies of the facili- ties to find lasting solutions to the issue at hand. Complaints run the gamut from things as simple as cold coffee all the way through egregious abuse. If you are interested in becom- ing a state-certified long-term care ombudsman, please contact Sherine Elamad at (650) 780-5705. Approximately 70 percent of all our clients suffer from some form of dementia and are faced with some form of disability. According to the nation- al statistics on elder abuse, that makes this group of people three

on elder abuse, that makes this group of people three Guest perspective times more liable to

Guest

perspective

times more liable to become victims of interpersonal violence. In fact, for every reported case it is estimated that another 24 cases go unreported. This is a problem of endemic proportions. For the past three years, Ombudsman Services of San Mateo County has joined with the Veterans Memorial Senior Center in Redwood City to hold an educational event at Courthouse Square in Redwood City on or about World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, to educate the public about elder abuse and simply to awak- en people to the facts that this is an issue that needs to be recognized and dealt with. This year we are again holding the event which will take place at Courthouse Square in Redwood City 10 a.m. to noon Friday, June 10. We will be serving coffee and bagels on the Square at 10

a.m

cussion which will be led by Redwood

City police Lt. Sean Hart. We look forward to a good crowd.

Come and join the public dis-

Tippy Irwin is the executive director of Ombudsman Services of San Mateo County.

Letters to the editor

Thank you

Editor, I try to read the San Mateo Daily Journal six days a week, but it is not easy to find copies in my area (Avalon Park) of South San Francisco. You are the editor of a fine newspaper. I get more (and better quality) news from the San Mateo Daily Journal than on any national or local news show — they just play videos of America. Many thanks to your entire staff and you for the articles you choose from the Associated Press and the original reporting you publish. I appreciate you all. I especially like the Boggle puzzle; it is just plain fun. Good luck with your new online format and keep the daily print news- paper as fine as it is.

John Dillis South San Francisco

Protecting our border

Editor, Mike Brown in his letter has nailed it (“Ending illegal immigration” in

the June 3 edition of the Daily Journal). How can any American support illegal immigrants burning our flag and waving Mexican flags at the same time? It is an insult to all of us who are legally here in America. These people chose their own path. We have a right as a coun- try to protect our border and remove anyone who is not here legally. If you are protesting against this, then you must not be American. They may be humans but they have a country and that is where they belong. They should receive no privileges, no driver’s licenses, no insurance, no nothing. Trying to pass laws to secure votes by the Democrats is a pure sham and should not be allowed. So I urge everyone to vote for Donald Trump and protect our border, our children’s future and America’s future.

Robert Fava

Redwood City

Rethinking support for ‘The Donald’

Editor, As an independent voter who thinks Donald Trump is an idiot, I would like to commend the protesters in Albuquerque and San Jose for rough- ing up the Trump supporters. You sure showed them. I’ll bet that elderly cou- ple being harassed at the San Jose rally will rethink their misbegotten support. Folks should understand that “The Donald” evokes deep passions and people that have political beliefs so far from our sainted wisdom deserve to be assaulted, frankly. To better identify them, I suggest mak- ing each and every one wear a yellow “T” emblazoned on their clothing. To be fair, supporters of both camps have exhibited similar reactions to the opposition, and thus share enough traits to make both very uncomfortable, were they intelligent enough to recognize it.

John Dillon

San Bruno

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek,

Jerry Lee, Publisher

Jon Mays, Editor in Chief

Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor

Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer

Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager

Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events

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Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha Weigel

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Andrea Sanchez-Lopez

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It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula. By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to provide our readers with the highest quality information resource in San Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we choose to reflect the diverse character of this dynamic and ever-changing community.

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Class of 2016?

“Y oung minds are dampened and diminished every

day in numbers too great to bear thinking

about, forced through a system that stunts the

capacity for a lifetime of growth. In contrast to insects, someone said, human beings start out as butterflies and end up in cocoons.” — Marilyn Ferguson, “The Aquarian Conspiracy,” 1980. High school seniors who have been graduating during the past few weeks will have commemorated four years of school where most of the emphasis has been on reading, math test scores and preparation for college. Those who played by the rules have been granted diplomas and some of those will be qualified for college. Many will be launched into the world of employment woefully unprepared with vocational skills that can help them get a job to support them adequately. Whether headed for college or the workplace, there are many things that all young people need to learn besides what our education establishment considers basics before they go out in especially today’s world where adequate employment is not all that easy to find. We all need to remember that there is a whole person involved — one who, no matter what their abilities or lack thereof, deserves respect for their unique qualities. Whatever the next step for the graduates, shouldn’t we be asking: What have they learned about life? Have they learned to appreciate some very important aspects of living that are much harder to measure but are just as essen- tial for their success — in college or the workplace — as those skills that have so carefully been tested? I would hope that the graduates have at least made inroads into understanding the following:

1). Know themselves better and to develop healthy self- confidence; 2). Self-respect and respect for others; 3). The importance of responsibly challenging and ques- tioning the status quo on the way to developing their own values; 4). Appreciation of their own uniqueness and developing their own talents and gifts; 5). Skills for immediate employment (or college entrance) and practical aspects of personal financial management; 6). The basics of good nutrition and personal health, including the importance of sexual responsibility and an appreciation for the miracle of life; 7). How to take charge of a task and see it through; 8). Appreciation and the practice of honesty, decency, responsibility and compassion; 9). The rewards of curiosity, creative thinking and knowl- edge; 10). Basic understanding of history, geography and various aspects of science and the arts; 11). That neither wealth nor material accumulation is the measure of success; and 12). That every decision we make has either a positive or negative contribution to our future. Young people today, though operating in school under more pressure to succeed, are less likely to understand English well, more likely to come from a broken home or never to have lived with two nurturing parents, more likely to have to deal with addicted parents, more anxious about the world and their personal safety, more likely to have spent their pre- school years mostly in the care of someone besides their par- ents, more likely to come home to an empty house, more likely to be pressured to be accepted to a prestigious universi- ty or college, often likely to have to deal with stressed out parents who are plagued by many pressures themselves, more likely to be homeless and/or hungry and much more likely to have been bombarded with gratuitous sexual activity and vio- lence (thanks to a plethora of electronic gadgets) and the con- sumer ethic and obsession with appearance from the media. They are less likely to be well-nourished physically, emo- tionally and spiritually than children of a few decades ago. Skill in a few basics is not enough to develop the kind of citizens we need for a more productive and humane society. Parents and educators must work together to develop a pro- gram of education that helps a child become a well-function- ing human being — not a human doing — and help develop a desire for justice, a penchant for community and a love of humanity. Now, in 2016, Steve Hilton who (among his many other credentials), teaches at Stanford University, published his book, “More Human — Designing a world where people come first.” He ended his chapter on schools with: “Yes, the basics of literacy, numeracy, history and science — subjects taught in factory schools — are important, but we also need to focus on the skills that will enable our children to succeed in a globalized, knowledge-based, rapidly changing world. Success is no longer just learning facts; it’s about more human skills like empathy, self-regulation, conscientious- ness, teamwork, resilience, problem solving, innovation and critical thinking — skills that will give children a platform to build a successful, happy life.” There is still much to learn!

Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 850 columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is gramsd@aceweb.com.

Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 850 columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is

10 Wednesday June 8, 2016

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Late sell-off leaves stocks barely higher; oil rises

By Marley Jay

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Stock indexes inched upward Tuesday, led by gains in energy companies as the price of oil closed above $50 a barrel for the first time in almost a year. The market had been on track for its highest close since last July, but an afternoon stumble erased most of the early rally, leaving broad indicators with meager gains for the day. Slumping bond yields increased the appeal of high-dividend stocks, sending prices for phone companies higher. Health care stocks sank as a series of poor results from clinical trials knocked drugmakers lower. The Dow Jones industrial aver- age held onto a gain of 17.95 points, or 0.1 percent, to 17,938.28. The Dow was up as much as 82 points earlier.

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS High : 18,003.23 Low : 17,936.22 Close : 17,938.28 Change : +17.95

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

High:

18,003.23

Low:

17,936.22

Close:

17,938.28

Change:

+17.95

OTHER INDEXES

S&P 500:

2112.13

+2.72

NYSE Index:

10,599.22 +44.40

Nasdaq:

4961.75

-6.96

NYSE MKT:

2367.70

+24.38

Russell 2000:

1179.97

+3.10

Wilshire 5000:

21900.74

+34.86

10-Yr Bond:

1.71

-0.01

Oil (per barrel):

50.43

+0.74

Gold :

1,247.10

-0.30

The S&P 500 rose 2.72 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,112.13. The Nasdaq composite, which is heav- ily weighted with biotech compa- nies, lost 6.96 points, or 0.1 per- cent, to 4,961.75. Benchmark U.S. crude oil added

67 cents, or 1.3 percent, to $50.36 a barrel in New York. Oil hasn’t closed at $50 a barrel or higher since July 21. Brent crude, which is used to price internation-

al oils, added 89 cents, or 1.8 per- cent, to $51.44 a barrel in London. Among

ener-

gy

companies,

Chevron

rose

$2.15,

or

2.1

percent,

to

$103.32

while

Newfield

Exploration added $1.87, or 4.7 percent, to $41.81. Helmerich & Payne gained $2.61, or 4 percent, to $67.35. The dollar plunged following Friday’s jobs report as investors concluded that the Fed won’t raise interest rates any time soon. That has helped energy companies by putting upward pressure on the price of crude oil. Industrial com- panies have also had a good run. “When you get a Fed that is now perceived to be lower for longer (on interest rates), with a dollar

that is less likely to rally, and an economy that may be slowing but is not in recession, that has tend- ed to be a positive for those stocks in 2016,” said Julian Emanuel, U.S. equities and deriva- tives strategist for UBS. Bond prices rose, sending the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury note down to 1.72 percent from 1.74 percent. That made bonds less appealing, and sent income- seeking investors into phone company stocks. Verizon added $1.04, or 2.1 percent, to $51.75. Two biotech drugmakers tum- bled after important drugs failed in clinical testing. Biogen, which makes several treatments for mul- tiple sclerosis, said a potential drug called opicinumab failed in a mid-stage clinical trial. Its stock dropped $36.98, or 12.8 percent, to $252.86. Alexion Pharmaceuticals said a study of its drug Soliris failed, and its stock lost $16.86, or 10.9 per- cent, to $138.13. The company gets almost all of its revenue from Soliris, which is approved to treat two rare blood disorders, and an additional approval could have strengthened its sales. Both Biogen and Alexion have plunged by about one-third since July.

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Worker productivity slumped again in Q1

By Martin Crutsinger

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — American workers were less productive again in the January-March quarter, although the decline wasn’t as severe as first thought. Meanwhile, labor costs climbed at a faster pace than initially estimated. The Labor Department said Tuesday that productivity declined at an annual rate of 0.6 percent in the first quarter after a 1.7 percent drop in the fourth quarter. The government first estimated that productivity fell at a 1 percent rate. Labor costs for employers rose at a 4.5 percent rate in the first quarter, even faster than the 4.1 percent gain first report- ed. Productivity has been weak for the past five years, a troubling development since productivity growth is the key factor that pushes up living standards. The rise in labor costs indicates that worker pay is finally

climbing after an extended period of weak wage growth. Blerina Uruci, an economist with Barclays Research, said she forecasts only modest productivity growth in the coming years, with “limited scope for an imminent return” to the stronger productivity gains that were occurring before the 2007-2009 recession. Fed Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Monday that lackluster productivity gains represented a key uncertainty facing the economy. Productivity growth has been unusually weak over the past five years, averaging just 0.5 percent per year, just one-third of the annual gains seen from 1970 to 1990, she said. While some economists are pessimistic about the prospects for productivity in the coming years, Yellen remains “cautiously optimistic” as the adverse effects of the Great Recession on investment spending and research begin to fade.

GM CEO sticks to strategy despite falling sales and shares

DETROIT — Despite tumbling U.S. sales and a falling stock price, General Motors

CEO Mary Barra says she’ll stay the course with a strategy of cutting low-profit sales to rental car companies and keep- ing resale prices strong. Speaking to reporters before the company’s annual shareholders meet- ing Tuesday, Barra said

GM’s share of profitable retail sales to individual buyers is rising and trade-in values for cars and trucks remain strong. GM’s sales fell 18 percent last month compared with a year ago. Its 15.7 percent market share was the lowest since at least 1980, according to Ward’s Automotive. The company’s stock price is down more than 10 percent for the year and is nearly $3 below its initial public offering price from 2010. But the company’s first-quarter profit dou- bled, to $1.95 billion, and it posted record earnings last year of $9.7 billion. It also reduced sales to rental car companies by

almost 50 percent last month.

to rental car companies by almost 50 percent last month. Mary Barra Business briefs Delta’s new

Mary Barra

Business briefs

Delta’s new CEO: Consider service and reliability over price

ATLANTA — Delta Air Lines is posting record profits and is generally envied by the rest of the industry, due largely to its success in catering to high-paying business passengers. While other carriers try to copy that model, Delta’s new CEO, Ed Bastian, has turned his attention to the rest of the plane.

Bastian wants to con- vince leisure travelers to choose Delta not based on price, but on the experience. That could be a hard sell in a cul- ture where most fliers look for the cheapest flight that fits their schedule. “The company has invested over the last five years heavily in the business cabin and business customer,” Bastian says. “We’ve got to make certain that we turn a higher focus than we’ve had on the main cabin.” Bastian proudly notes that a decade ago, Delta was getting 90 cents for every dollar charged by its competitors.

proudly notes that a d ecade ago, Delta was getting 90 cents for every dollar charged

Ed Bastian

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Wednesday June 8, 2016

11

THE DAILY JOURNAL WORLD Wednesday • June 8, 2016 11 REUTERS Forensic experts and firefighters stand

REUTERS

Forensic experts and firefighters stand beside a Turkish police bus which was targeted in a bomb attack in a central Istanbul district,Turkey.

Car bomb attack targeting police kills 11 in Istanbul

By Dominique Soguel and Suzan Fraser

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ISTANBUL — A car bomb hit a police vehicle in Istanbul during the morning rush hour on Tuesday, killing 11 people and wounding 36, the fourth bombing to hit the city this year. There was no immediate claim of respon- sibility, but Turkey has seen a recent increase in violence linked to Kurdish rebels or to the Islamic State group which has found recruits and established cells in the country. Speaking at the scene of the blast in Beyazit district, Istanbul Gov. Vasip Sahin said a bomb placed inside a car detonated as a police vehicle passed by. The dead were seven police officers and four civilians. At least three of the wounded were in serious condition. Sahin declined to comment on who may be behind the attack and authorities imposed a news blackout preventing media from reporting details of the probe in Turkey, citing concerns over security and police and forensic efforts to investigate the attack. Such bans primarily affect the diffusion of graphic images on local television channels. Turkish citizens can access

information from other sources via the internet or satellite dishes. “We urge the government to hold off the news bans which are actually not effective at all,” said Ozgur Ogret, the Turkey repre- sentative for the Committee to Protect Journalists, calling the bans a violation of press freedom and people’s right to be informed. News bans became commonplace after a 2013 bombing attack in Reyhanli, near the border with Syria, which killed 52 people. Since then, Turkey has witnessed a resur- gence of conflict with Kurdish rebels and growing spillover from the war in Syria. In a sign of escalating conflict both on the Kurdish and IS front, the pace of vio- lence has accelerated and shifted away from border areas to major cities, including Ankara, the capital. Istanbul alone has endured two bombings targeting security forces and two hitting tourism sites in

2016.

These attacks have contributed to a dip in tourism and taken a toll on the economy. Tuesday’s bomb went off in a bustling Istanbul neighborhood just north of the iconic Golden Horn, where the Bosporus Strait meets the Sea of Marmara. The area is home to the offices of provincial authori- ties, three universities and ancient sites including Roman-era aqueducts.

and ancient sites including Roman-era aqueducts. Israel says con men stole millions from companies By Daniel

Israel says con men stole millions from companies

By Daniel Estrin and Erika Kinetz

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RISHON LEZION, Israel — The scam had all the trappings of a major con. Working from a dingy office building just a short drive from the glittering Mediterranean Sea, eight immigrants from Europe formed an unlikely team that allegedly conspired to dupe major multinational companies out of millions of dollars. Most of them spoke French, the others Italian. Using their language skills and familiarity with European business prac- tices, they telephoned employees at some of Europe’s biggest companies, identified themselves as top executives and tricked workers into transferring large sums of money to bank accounts in their control, police said. Among the companies targeted, according to police and suspects’ lawyers:

Kia Motors, Hugo Boss and Chanel. It was a classic “fake CEO” or “fake presi- dent” scam, a scheme used by various crimi- nals worldwide that has robbed companies of some $1.8 billion in just over two years, according to the FBI. Most of the eight sus- pects in the latest case are either jailed or under house arrest.

But not the man who boasts of pioneering the scam years ago, inspiring copycats like these around the globe: French-Israeli con artist Gilbert Chikli. He mysteriously remains a free man, living in luxury in his villa in a seaside Israeli city as French authorities try to bring him to justice over a massive con for which he was previously convicted. “If they have a problem, they can come see me. They know my address. I am not fleeing,” Chikli told the Associated Press by telephone. “Send them my regards.” The case illustrates how financial crime has globalized faster and more efficiently than the law enforcement that is trying to fight it. Israel extradited Chikli to France to stand trial in 2008 for defrauding HSBC, Thomson, Accenture and other companies out of 6.1 million euros, and attempting to extract over 70 million euros from at least 33 others. But in 2009, Chikli says he char- tered a private plane and flew back to Israel. A French court in May 2015 sentenced him in absentia to seven years in prison. Instead, he’s been sipping coffee at a port- side cafi in Israel and hanging out at his pri- vate swimming pool.

Nail-biter race for Peru’s presidency remains tight

LIMA, Peru — The nail-biter race for Peru’s presidency remained tight Tuesday as the daughter of imprisoned ex-president Alberto Fujimori gained ground on her rival thanks to votes trickling in from remote rural areas and embassies abroad. Former World Bank economist Pedro Pablo Kuczysnki’s razor-thin lead over Keiko Fujimori shrank to fewer than 47,000 votes early Tuesday morning before widen- ing slightly later in the day to over 57,000. With tallies from more than 97 percent of polling stations counted, Kuczynski had 50.2 percent of the votes compared with Fujimori’s 49.8 percent. While two quick counts showed Kuczynski prevailing in a tight contest, still being counted are the ballots cast by 885,000 Peruvians eligible to vote abroad, the last of which are expected to arrive in

Around the world

Peru on Wednesday. Peruvians living abroad, the majority in the United States, turned out massively for Fujimori in the 2011 election but are expected to be more split in the support this time around. About 1,200 handwritten tallies repre- senting up to 360,000 votes were being dis- puted and were sent to a special electoral board for review, Mariano Cucho, the head of Peru’s electoral authority, told RPP Radio on Tuesday Both candidates have remained largely silent while awaiting final results of what is Peru’s tightest presidential race since 1962, which ended in a military coup. “Tranquility and serenity,” Kuczynski urged on Tuesday as he was mobbed by reporters leaving a restaurant. “We have to wait for the final verdict. We’re almost there.”

as he was mobbed by reporters leaving a restaurant. “We have to wait for the final

12 Wednesday June 8, 2016

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

A confident Assad vows to ‘liberate’ every inch of Syria

By Albert Aji and Bassem Mroue

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAMASCUS, Syria — President Bashar Assad vowed Tuesday his troops would “lib- erate” every inch of Syria, just like they recaptured the ancient town of Palmyra from the Islamic State group, in a speech that reflected his renewed confidence as the mil- itary pressed on toward Raqqa, the extrem- ists’ self-styled capital. His remarks in parliament came as his opponents, backed by Turkey and Saudi Arabia, are struggling for survival and his troops have almost encircled rebel-held neighborhoods of Aleppo, Syria’s largest city. Saying the military situation was much better than it was months ago, Assad told the lawmakers that Aleppo will be “the graveyard where the hopes and dreams of the butcher Erdogan will be buried.” The reference was to Turkish President

Recep Ta yyip Erdogan, one of the staunchest supporters of the rebels fighting to topple Assad. Erdogan has allowed safe passage from his country for fighters and weapons over the border into Syria. Assad also described Erdogan as a “thug” and a “fascist” in the speech, which was fre- quently interrupted by applause. When Assad walked into the chamber to speak, the legislators had stood and chant- ed, “Our soul, our blood we sacrifice for you, Bashar!” The civil war, now in its sixth year, has turned in Assad’s favor ever since Russia began a bombing campaign in September, helping Syrian troops recapture wide areas from insurgents. The biggest victory came in March, when government forces evicted the Islamic State group from Palmyra, a desert town in central Syria world famous for its majestic Roman- era ruins.

Syria world famous for its majestic Roman- era ruins. REUTERS Syria’s president Bashar Assad gestures while

REUTERS

Syria’s president Bashar Assad gestures while parliament members clap in Damascus.

CLINTON

Continued from page 1

heart into a cause or a candidate you believe in and come up short,” she said. “I know that feeling well. But as we look ahead to the battle that awaits, let’s remember all that unites us.” Sanders, speaking at a rally in Santa Monica, California, said he’d spoken to Clinton late Tuesday. He notably stripped his speech of all criticism of her, but still pledged to compete in next week’s final pri- mary in the District of Columbia and take his fight for “social, economic, racial and environmental justice” to the Democratic convention. “Our fight is to transform this country and to understand that we are in this togeth- er, to understand that all of what we believe is what the majority of the American people believe and to understand that the struggle continues,” he declared. Clinton had an edge over Sanders in California, but votes were still being counted early Wednesday. Sanders has hoped a win in California would give him ammunition to convince superdelegates to

abandon Clinton before the Democratic convention in July. Clinton is eager to avoid a convention fight and to set her sights fully on Trump. She was biting and sarcastic as she took on the billionaire businessman, accusing him of wanting to win “by stoking fear and rub- bing salt in wounds — and reminding us daily just how great he is.” Even as the Democratic race was ending, new turmoil broke out among the Republicans. GOP leaders recoiled at Trump’s comments about a Hispanic judge, with one senator even pulling his endorse- ment. Trump capped his difficult day with victo- ries in California, New Jersey, New Mexico, South Dakota and Montana. But he was muted his victory rally, saying he understands “the responsibility” of leading the Republican Party. He also made a direct appeal to dejected Sanders supporters and other Democrats. “This election isn’t about Republican or Democrat, it’s about who runs this country:

the special interests or the people,” he said. Trump promised a major speech next week on Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton. Clinton’s new wins came a day after she secured the 2,383 delegates she needed to

become the presumptive Democratic nomi- nee, according to an Associated Press tally. Her total includes pledged delegates won in primaries and caucuses, as well as superdel- egates — the party officials and officehold- ers who can back a candidate of their choos- ing. President Barack Obama called both Clinton and Sanders late Tuesday. The White House said Obama congratulated Clinton for “securing the delegates neces- sary to clinch the Democratic nomination for president” and praised her “historic campaign,” though he did not formally endorse her. The White House said Obama and Sanders will meet at the White House on Thursday, at the Vermont senator’s request Sanders picked up wins in North Dakota and Montana, where a small number of del- egates were up for grabs. Republicans had appeared unified after Trump vanquished his last opponents about a month ago. But the real estate mogul has continued to make controversial state- ments, frustrating party leaders. The latest cause for GOP concern was his insistence that a judge handling a legal case involving the businessman was being unfair in his rulings. Trump has said U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel can’t be

impartial because the jurist’s parents were born in Mexico and Trump wants to build a wall along the border. Illinois Sen. Mark Kirk, who is locked in a close re-election fight, became the first lawmaker to pull his endorsement of Trump. House Speaker Paul Ryan said the businessman’s assertion was the “textbook definition of a racist comment” but he would continue to support Trump. Trump released a statement saying he does “not feel one’s heritage makes them incapable of being impartial.” But he still questioned whether he was receiving fair treatment in the case involving the now- defunct Trump University. Sanders’ achievements have been remark- able for a candidate who was unknown to most Americans before the campaign. He has drawn massive crowds to rallies around the country and built a fundraising jugger- naut based largely on small donations online. The Vermont senator has been par- ticularly popular with young voters, an important piece of the Democratic coali- tion. Still, Clinton’s victory has been broadly decisive. She leads Sanders by more than 3 million cast votes. She has 2,469 delegates to Sanders’ 1,637. That count includes both pledged delegates and superdelegates.

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U.S. SOCCER IN THE ZONE: AMERICANS EXPLODE FOR THREE FIRST-HALF GOALS IN 4-0 WIN OVER
U.S. SOCCER IN THE ZONE: AMERICANS EXPLODE FOR THREE FIRST-HALF GOALS IN 4-0 WIN OVER COSTA RICA >> PAGE 14
<<< Page 18, Thompson, aware of Zika
virus, still wants to play in Olympics
Wednesday • June 8, 2016

Kap is slowly getting back on the field

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — Colin Kaepernick was cleared for individual work and took on-field

reps Tuesday for the first time since undergo- ing multiple offseason surgeries. The 28-year-old quarterback joined the rest of his 49ers teammates for a two-hour prac- tice and took part in almost every session except for team scrimmages. He did some light throwing early during position drills then later engineered two drives during a 7- on-7 session.

Kaepernick showed some rust early in the workout, which was expected after he was lim- ited the entire offseason following surgeries on his left shoulder, knee and right thumb. “He’s practicing,” coach Chip Kelly said. “You’re not going to go

from not practicing to full practice. I don’t think anybody ever does that, so you’re going to bring him along gradually. He’ll start to do more indi- vidual drills and start throwing to receivers, tight ends and the running backs. It’s just a natural progression that he’s doing.” The 49ers have taken a cautious approach with Kaepernick’s rehabilitation this offsea- son but plan to ramp things up slightly now that he’s been given partial clearance to practice. Just where Kaepernick fits in remains uncertain following an offseason during which he asked for and was granted permis- sion to seek a trade. At one point it appeared he might be headed to Denver but the much- hyped pre-draft deal with the Broncos never materialized. It’s possible that Kaepernick could still be traded before training camp opens next month. For now, his biggest hurdle is trying

camp opens next month. For now, his biggest hurdle is trying Colin Kaepernick See KAP ,

Colin

Kaepernick

See KAP, Page 16

Mavs still in search of ‘W’

Millbrae Joe DiMaggio sees glimpses of talent in 4th straight loss

Joe DiMaggio sees glimpses of talent in 4th straight loss TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL Millbrae Mavericks No.3

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Millbrae Mavericks No.3 hitter Robert Thorgerson laces a fourth-inning double that leads to the team’s only run in a 7-1 loss to the San Francisco Barbarians Tuesday at Marchbank Park.

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Bryce Burns is one of those guys who makes summer-league baseball worth the price of admission. The recent Serra graduate arrived straight from work for his 2016 Joe DiMaggio League pitching debut with the Millbrae Mavericks, taking the mound in relief with fresh paint caked on his pitching hand after

a day spent whitewashing a staircase at a home in San Mateo. While the game didn’t go Millbrae’s way — the Mavericks fell 7-1 to the San Francisco Barbarians Tuesday at Marchbank Park — Burns was most certainly a bright spot.

The right-hander inherit- ed a bases-loaded jam with two outs in the fourth inning; and not only did he escape the jam, he went on to face the minimum seven batters through 2 1/3 innings of work. “This was his tryout,” Mavericks interim manager Mike Alaraj said. “He did amazing. He passed all the tests. You’ll be seeing him more.” Alaraj was helming the team Tuesday with regular manager Bryan Hidalgo unable to attend the game. The skim coaching staff seemed fitting for a man-without-a-nation Millbrae team that lost its fourth straight to start the season. The Mavericks are without a home field this season, as their usual home digs at Mills High School are being refur- bished. So, Millbrae will be utilizing Trojan Diamond at Skyline College for a majority of its home games this summer. The Mavericks’ road show is taking its toll. The team has been outscored 33-8 through four games, including two shutouts at the hands of South San Francisco. Tuesday’s matchup saw the Barbarians notch their first win of the summer in four tries. While Millbrae technically committed one error in Tuesday’s loss — an errant throw with the bases loaded in the second

loss — an errant throw with the bases loaded in the second Bryce Burns See JOE

Bryce Burns

See JOE D, Page 16

Dubs and Cavs both know series can turn

By Tim Reynolds

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — Golden State has won the first two games of the NBA Finals, both of those wins coming by double figures and with a few dominant stretches of basketball in there. Strange as this sounds, that has the Warriors feeling a bit uneasy. The champions know exactly how fast a series can change, having just pulled off a mathematically improbable comeback from 3-1 down against Oklahoma City in the Western Conference finals. And even with the odds now stacked high against Cleveland in these NBAFinals, the Warriors say they cannot fall into the trap of think- ing this series that resumes with Game 3 on Wednesday night is already over. “That’s a great analogy, one that we’ve already used,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said Tuesday. “It doesn’t matter what the scores are, doesn’t matter if you win by 25 or lose by 25, it’s one game in the series. And we got blown out twice in a row in OKC, down 3-1, and we were able to come

back. We know we’re playing against a great team. They’re coming home. They can change the momentum around with just one win.” Cleveland hopes he’s right. The Cavs might be without concussed Kevin

Love for Game 3, but they are 7-0 at home in these playoffs — winning by an average of 20.9 points. “It’s a do-or-die game for us,” Cavaliers forward LeBron James said. “We can’t afford to go down 3-0 to any team, especially a team that’s 73-9 in the regular season and playing the type of basketball they’re play- ing.” When the Warriors were on the brink of elimination against the Thunder, history suggested that they had a 3.9 percent chance to win the series — 232 previous NBA teams were down 3-1 in a best-of-seven, and only nine won.

teams were down 3-1 in a best-of-seven, and only nine won. Steve Kerr See NBA ,

Steve Kerr

See NBA, Page 18

Daunting task for Sharks trailing 3-1 in Cup series

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JOSE — The task facing the San Jose Sharks is daunting: No team in nearly three quarters of a century has rallied from a 3-1 deficit to win the Stanley Cup Final. Before the Sharks can start figuring out how to accomplish that ultimate goal, they will need to take much smaller steps, starting with just getting a lead at any point in a game. Through four games, the Sharks have yet to play with the lead. They allowed the first goal all four times and got their only win in Game 3 in an overtime game they never led until Joonas Donskoi’s game-winner. “We’ve got to find a way to stick one of those in early and put them in the spot where they’re chasing the game a little bit, which we haven’t done yet,” coach Peter DeBoer said Tuesday. Doing that would be a good start to what would be an improbable comeback if the Sharks could pull it off. Of the 32 team that have fallen behind 3-1 in the Stanley Cup

Final since it became a best-of-seven series in 1939, 31 have ultimately lost the series. The only winner in that span came in 1942, when Toronto actually rallied from 3-0 down to beat Detroit. DeBoer has been in a tough spot in the final

before. In 2012 with New Jersey, his team lost the first three games to Los Angeles before rallying for two wins and ultimately losing in six games. “Everyone was writing us off,” he said. “We took the approach of, ‘Why not us?’ I don’t care what the record book says, that only one or two teams have come back from this situation, whatever those numbers are. Why can’t we be the first team to do it? It starts with one game. I think that’s the approach we’re going to take.” The formula that got San Jose to its first Cup final has been missing. The Sharks

The formula that got San Jose to its first Cup final has been missing. The Sharks

Peter DeBoer

See SHARKS, Page 16

14 Wednesday June 8, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

U.S. erupts for three first-half goals in win

By Jay Cohen

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Clint Dempsey had a goal and two assists, and the United States rebounded from its opening loss in Copa America with a convincing 4-0 victory over Costa Rica on Tuesday night. Jermaine Jones, Bobby Wood and Graham Zusi also scored as the U.S. moved into prime position to grab one of two spots in the knockout round coming out of Group A in South America’s cham- pionship. The Americans take on Paraguay in Philadelphia on Saturday night. It was quite a response to days of questions after the U.S. allowed a goal off a corner kick and commit- ted a costly hand ball in a 2-0 loss to Colombia on Friday night. Costa Rica, which played a scoreless tie against Paraguay in its Copa opener on Saturday in Florida, looked sluggish for long stretches of the first half and was unable to recover. It played with- out key defender Kendall Waston after he got a red card in the previ-

ous game. The loss to Colombia ramped up criticism of U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann, who said last month the Copa goal for the Americans was the semifinals. U.S. Soccer Federation President Sunil Gulati told a group of reporters before the match that recent results for the men’s team “haven’t been what we would have hoped for, especially in the offi- cial competitions.” But Klinsmann and his players insisted they felt pretty good in the team’s performance on Friday night in Northern California, and the coach doubled down on the positive vibe by sending out the same starters against defensive- minded Costa Rica. And it worked — in a big way. Moments after DeAndre Yedlin’s poor clearing attempt almost set up an early goal for Costa Rica’s Joel Campbell, the Americans started to find their way. Wood was pushed in the back by Cristian Gamboa when he attempt- ed to go after a cross into the box, drawing a penalty kick despite a series of protests in front of refer-

penalty kick despite a series of protests in front of refer- USA TODAY SPORTS Clint Dempsey

USA TODAY SPORTS

Clint Dempsey scores on a penalty kick in the first half of the Americans’ win over Costa Rica in the second game of pool play in the 2016 Copa America Centenario.

ee Roddy Zambrano. Dempsey then drove it past Patrick Pemberton on the goaltender’s left side for a 1-0 lead in the ninth minute. It was Dempsey’s 50th interna- tional goal. He also scored his first at the home of the NFL’s Chicago Bears on May 28, 2005, against England.

The United States seemed to get stronger as the first half went along, and another flourish in the final minutes before halftime helped put it away. Jones stole the ball at midfield and passed to Dempsey, who car- ried it deep into the Costa Rica side. The forward then nudged it back over to Jones, who shot it on

the

Pemberton in the 37th minute. With Costa Rica looking a little ragged, the U.S. kept up the attack. Dempsey passed to Wood in the middle, and he turned away from defender Oscar Duarte before beating Pemberton on the ground for a 3-0 lead in the 42nd minute — delighting the crowd of 39,642 on a cool, cloudy night in Chicago. U.S. goaltender Brad Guzan, playing near his hometown of Homer Glen, Illinois, clapped as he headed off the field after the halftime whistle, and Costa Rica barely challenged in the second half. Midfielder Bryan Ruiz sent a header off the left post in the 67th minute on the Ticos’ best opportu- nity of the night. Dempsey was saluted with a standing ovation when he was replaced by Chris Wondolowski in the 78th minute, and he applauded the crowd as he headed off the field. Zusi, who replaced Wood in the second half, completed the scoring with a drive and a shot in the 87th minute.

ground

past

a

diving

replaced Wood in the second half, completed the scoring with a drive and a shot in

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Wednesday June 8, 2016

15

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Wednesday • June 8, 2016 15 JOHN HEFTI/USA TODAY SPORTS Giants left

JOHN HEFTI/USA TODAY SPORTS

Giants left fielder Gregor Blanco watches a foul ball that is caught by Boston Red Sox catcher Sandy Leon to end the ninth inning at AT&T Park in San Francisco’s 5-3 loss in interleague play.

BoSox batter Giants bullpen

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Xander Bogaerts hit a go-ahead, two-run single in the top of the 10th inning, and the Boston Red Sox snapped the Giants’ five-game home winning streak with a 5-3 victory Tuesday night. The Red Sox loaded the bases against Santiago Casilla (1-1), who struck out two in a perfect ninth before running into trouble. Bogaerts also had a third-inning RBI single in Boston’s first visit to San Francisco in nearly three years. Dustin Pedroia extended his majors-best hitting streak to 14 games with an eighth- inning single, while David Ortiz’s streak ended at 13 after his tying groundout as a pinch-hitter in the seventh. Pedroia also has hit in 11 straight road games. Junichi Tazawa (1-1) pitched the ninth for the win and Craig Kimbrel closed it out for his 14th save. Ortiz’s high chopper over the pitcher’s mound was controlled by shortstop Brandon Crawford, but Chris Young slid under the tag about 15 feet shy of second base as Crawford threw to first trying to double up Big Papi. Jackie Bradley Jr. scored from third. Right-hander Albert Suarez pitched into the seventh in his second major league start, lift- ed for George Kontos after a one-out walk of Bradley, who stole second. Young had an RBI double and has hit safely in each of his last 13 starts for Boston. Two left-handed aces will face off Wednesday night in the conclusion of this quick two-game set: David Price against

Red Sox 5, Giants 3

Madison Bumgarner. “I don’t think I’ve faced an opposing pitch- er who’s had home runs,” Price said of Bumgarner, who has two. Boston starter Rick Porcello retired the first six batters in order Tuesday before Jarrett Parker’s leadoff homer run in the third. San Francisco fell to 17-7 at home in inter- league play since the start of the 2014 season.

Big Papi honored

The Giants honored retiring Red Sox star Ortiz in a pregame ceremony and presented him with a commemorative cable car bell. Hall of Famer Willie McCovey and two for- mer Ortiz teammates, Jake Peavy and Javier Lopez, gave him the gift. The 40-year-old Ortiz was relegated to pinch-hit duties for these two games in the NL ballpark as manager John Farrell looks to rest the hitter’s legs and feet as much as he has been on the basepaths. “I don’t want to risk losing him,” Farrell said. “We’ve got to be mindful of the wear and tear he’s going through as a 40-year-old.”

Mad-Bum derby?

If asked, Bumgarner would like to compete in the All-Star Home Run Derby next month at San Diego’s Petco Park. “I’ll do it for sure,” he said. “If they ask me to do it, I’ll do it.” Manager Bruce Bochy expressed concern because “that’s a lot of swings” and the potential for injury to his top pitcher.

swings” and the potential for injury to his top pitcher. A’s late rally falls short By

A’s late rally falls short

By Genaro C. Armas

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE — Zach Davies took a no-hit-

ter into the seventh before allowing a two-out home run to Oakland’s Billy Butler, and the Milwaukee Brewers withstood a shaky ninth inning to hold on for a 5-4 win over the Athletics on Tuesday night. Davies (4-3) allowed two hits and three walks over seven innings while striking out five. Butler turned on an 0-1 fastball from Davies to end the shutout. The A’s mounted their best rally in the ninth against closer Jeremy Jeffress after getting run-

ners on second and third

while trailing by three. One run scored on a groundout before anoth- er came home on a throwing error by short- stop Jonathan Villar. With runners on the corners, Jeffress got Marcus Semien swinging on a pitch out of the zone before ending the game by getting Chris Coghlan to fly out to the warning track in left. Jeffress held on for his 16th save, narrow- ly preserving Davies’ strong outing. The right-handed starter outdueled Oakland rook- ie Sean Manaea (2-4), who turned in seven solid innings but allowed two home runs to

turned in seven solid innings but allowed two home runs to Billy Butler Brewers 5, A’s

Billy Butler

Brewers 5, A’s 4

Chris Carter. The cleanup hitter slugged a two-run shot in the second and a three-run shot four innings later, with both homers going to center. It was plenty of support for Davies, a 23- year-old rookie coming off a career-best, eight-inning outing in a 3-1 win over St. Louis on June 1, when he allowed three hits. Davies got a hearty ovation as he returned to the dugout after finishing his outing against Oakland. Reliever Tyler Thornburg tossed a perfect eighth and extended a franchise record for a reliever with 26 straight batters retired before Jeffress provided nerve-wracking moments in the ninth for manager Craig Counsell. For the Brewers, outfielder Ryan Braun got his 1,500th career hit with an infield single in the sixth.

Trainer’s room

Third baseman Danny Valencia was scratched from the starting lineup with a stomach bug, replaced by Yonder OF Khris Davis returned to Miller Park for the first time since being traded by Milwaukee to Oakland for two minor leaguers in February. Davis was not in the starting lineup because of numbness and tingling in his hands and fingers after getting hit in the elbow with a pitch on Saturday against Houston.

New Jersey high school lefty Groome could be No. 1 in draft

DEPTFORD, N.J. — One of the quickest ways to get to the major leagues is to be a big left- handed pitcher with some pop on your fastball. Jason Groome has that and more. The 17-year-old from Barnegat High School along the New Jersey Shore is 6- foot-5, 225 pounds, throws in the 90s and has a deuce that falls off the table. It’s everything baseball scouts want to

MLB draft

see, and it’s one of the reasons he’s consid- ered an early pick in baseball’s draft on Thursday night. Groome threw a no-hitter with 19 strike- outs early in the year and appeared on his way to a great season. It came to a screeching halt when the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association suspended him for 30 days for violating its transfer rule. Barnegat also had to forfeit the game.

Athletic Association suspended him for 30 days for violating its transfer rule. Barnegat also had to
Athletic Association suspended him for 30 days for violating its transfer rule. Barnegat also had to

16 Wednesday June 8, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

JOE D

Continued from page 13

that fueled a four-run inning for the Barbarians — the infield defense committed a pair of miscues on the sequence that should have resulted in a tailor-made double play. Walks were also problematic. Mavericks starting pitcher Jordan Ganim issued nine walks through 3 2/3 innings, including walking in three runs. “We shouldn’t be seeing this bad play,” Alaraj said. “When they make plays, they make plays. They just need to get a little more repetition.” Burns came to the rescue in the fourth though. He had already produced a big swing of the bat in the top of the frame. After a one- out double by Robert Thorgerson, Burns flared a two-out RBI single to right field to give the Mavericks their only run. Then he emerged from the bullpen and stranded the bases loaded thanks to his own nice defensive play, fielding a slow chopper to the third-base side of the mound and gun- ning down Barbarians leadoff hitter Francisco Puyol to retire the side. Burns allowed one hit, a leadoff single in the fifth by Leo Kikuchi. But Burns didn’t let

the ball out of the infield again and coaxed a grounder out of the following batter, with Mavericks third baseman Daniel Walsh start- ing an around-the-horn double play. “I felt great,” Burns said. “When I was throwing, everything felt good.” Summer ball is likely the last hoorah for Burns on the baseball diamond. In his sec- ond year with Millbrae Joe D., he has one year of eligibility next season, which will be his last year of organized ball, he said. While at Serra, he never played baseball. He tried out for the freshman team four years ago and didn’t make the cut, and never gave it another go. “I didn’t think I was good enough, so I just didn’t try out,” Burns said. Burns didn’t play any high school sports until his senior year when he turned to track and field. He was a modest pole vaulter, but competed alongside Serra’s Central Coast Section pole vault champion Talon Galvez- Bennett. “It was actually really cool because he was really good compared to a lot of us,” Burns said. Now, the right-hander is looking to ener- gize a beleaguered Millbrae team that has been in a funk since the spring season. The Mills varsity team finished in the cellar of the Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division this year. And now the Mavericks

are scraping for offense, totaling just three hits Tuesday against a pair of Wallenberg-SF right-handed pitchers in starter Nikko Kinnard (three innings) and reliever Curtis Tam (four innings). But Burns may just have the demeanor to make a difference. At 6-3, 190 pounds, he brings something of a Jeff Samardzija pres- ence to the hill. And that’s a welcome pres- ence to the Mavericks coaching staff. “I’ll take a ‘Shark’ any day,” Alaraj said.

Post 82 back on the ball

The American Legion Post 82 Shockers seem to playing with the proverbial chip on their shoulder. After their controversial dismissal from the American Legion state championship tournament last season — being disquali- fied, after a semifinal victory, due to a wrin- kle in time as to the filing of insurance paperwork after the preseason deadline — the Shockers opened the 2016 season with a red-hot run through a weekend tourney host- ed by the San Leandro Ports. Post 82 posted a 4-1 record in the double- elimination tourney, making a run through the loser’s bracket after a 7-4 loss to Watsonville Saturday. The Shockers went on to win three straight, outscoring three opponents 29-12 to qualify for Sunday’s championship game.

Like last year’s state tourney, however, Post 82 did not play for the championship — but this time did so on its own terms; the Shockers declined to play the title game citing lack of pitching depth as the primary reason. “We only had 10 players Sunday due to [graduation parties] and we had no pitching left,” Shockers coach Rick Lavezzo said via email. “There is no reason to overuse play- ers in the first week of summer.” Two recent grads, Angelo Bortolin (Serra) and Ramon Enriquez (Capuchino) paced the Shockers at the plate through the tourney with six RBIs. Skyline catcher Felix Aberouette added a home run and five RBIs. It was Carlmont’s Brandenburg brothers who carried Post 82 through the loser’s bracket though. Jordan Brandenburg — who captured the Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division triple crown this year as a sopho- more for the Scots — starred on the mound for the Shockers, earning the win in a 4-3 victory over host San Leandro. Meanwhile, his older brother Tyler Brandenburg was near perfect at the plate through three elim- ination-game wins, going 7 for 8 with two home runs. In Post 82’s 10-4 win over Alameda in the semifinals, right-hander Kyle Burns earned the victory. It was Burns’ one-hitter in last year’s Area 2 tournament championship game pro- pelled the Shockers into the state tourney.

KAP

Continued from page 13

to catch up to the rest of the offense while learning Kelly’s high-speed system. Kaepernick did not talk to reporters Tuesday but is expect- ed to address the media later this week. Blaine Gabbert, who started the final eight games in 2015 after Kaepernick was injured, continues to take all the reps with the 49ers’ first team offense. “I think he (Kaepernick) did fine,” Gabbert said. “He threw the ball well. We’re just all focused on getting better every day and he’s doing the same thing.” Kaepernick stayed busy before getting cleared. During OTA workouts, Kaepernick stood behind the offense and would mimic the play being run while working on his dropbacks and reads. He continued to do that on the first day of the 49ers’ mandatory minicamp when he wasn’t taking part in drills. “I’m sure he’ll say that he’s rusty and he wants to continue to work but it’s just cool to see him out there, helmet on, and getting at it,” wide receiver Torrey Smith said. “He complet- ed some passes. He made a few tough throws in some tight windows. I wouldn’t say it was a bad first day at all.”

650-489-9523

SHARKS

Continued from page 13

jumped on teams early for most of the first three rounds and then wore them down with their forechecking and cycle game. The power play was potent, providing timely goals throughout and the Sharks managed to knock off Los Angeles, Nashville and St. Louis on the way to the final. But little has worked against the Penguins, who have used their decided edge in speed to control play for most of the four games, often keeping the Sharks hemmed in their own zone. Pittsburgh has shut down San Jose’s top guns. Joe Pavelski, who leads the NHL with 13 playoff goals, has no points through four games. Brent Burns had two assists in Game 1 and hasn’t

recorded a point since. Logan Couture, who leads the NHL with 26 points this postseason, has just two against the Penguins.

points this postseason, has just two against the Penguins. Joe Pavelski “I thought every game we’ve

Joe Pavelski

postseason, has just two against the Penguins. Joe Pavelski “I thought every game we’ve created a

“I thought every game we’ve created a little bit more chances to score,” DeBoer said. “I think our big guys have gotten more shots off and more looks as the series has gone on. We’re doing some good stuff. But you can’t change the fact that we’ve played behind the entire series. That’s some- thing that we have to get fixed.” San Jose has trailed for 121:44 of the series, about 25 minutes less than they trailed over 18 games in the first round when the Sharks scored first in 13 games and forced the opponent to chase the game. The Penguins haven’t played from behind in what seems like ages. They have gone 435:46 of game time without playing with a deficit since losing Game 4 to Tampa Bay in the Eastern Conference final. Pittsburgh’s only two losses since came in overtime games where they didn’t trail until the final goal. “We’re doing our best to score first and get a lead. It has- n’t happened yet,” Couture said. “I don’t know how it would change their game. I imagine they would keep playing the same way. When we have the lead, we play good defense and keep it simple.” NOTES: F Tomas Hertl remains day to day with a lower-

body

lines for a spark to start Game 5 on Thursday.

DeBoer said he did not plan to shake up his

day to day with a lower- body lines for a spark to start Game 5 on
day to day with a lower- body lines for a spark to start Game 5 on

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Wednesday June 8, 2016

17

Sports briefs

Luke Donald survives playoff for U.S. Open spot

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Luke Donald went two extra holes to join four other players earning a spot in the U.S. Open after a play- off Tuesday morning. Donald, a former world No. 1 who has been eligible for every U.S. Open since 2005, made two pars in the six- man playoff in the Ohio quali- fier that featured the strongest field. The oth- ers advancing were Patrick

Rodgers, Jason Allred, Richard Schembechler II and Texas Longhorns sophomore Scottie Scheffler. Daniel Summerhays was elimi- nated when he missed a 5-foot putt on the second playoff hole. One other qualifier remains to be completed Tuesday. The Florida section was halted because of thun- derstorms

NFL, law enforcement looking into hacked tweet about Roger Goodell

NEW YORK — The NFL has “engaged law enforcement” to

look into how its Twitter account was hacked with a post purporting that Commissioner Roger Goodell had died. “We have engaged law enforce- ment to look

into the mat-

NFL

have engaged law enforce- ment to look into the mat- NFL Luke Donald Roger Goodell ter,”

Luke Donald

law enforce- ment to look into the mat- NFL Luke Donald Roger Goodell ter,” spokesman Brian

Roger Goodell

ter,”

spokesman

Brian

McCarthy said

Tuesday. “We

are reviewing

and strengthen-

ing our cyber- security meas-

ures.” Around midday Tuesday, a post went up on the league’s official account that read: “We regret to inform our fans that our commis- sioner, Roger Goodell, has passed away. He was 57,” followed by a hashtag and “RIP.” That tweet was soon deleted, as

were follow-up tweets that said:

“Oi, I said Roger Goodell has died.

Don’t delete that tweet,” and, as other Twitter users surmised it was

a hack: “OK, OK, you amateur

detectives win. Good job.” Goodell later jokingly tweeted, “Man, you leave the office for 1 day of golf” with former Bills quar- terback Jim Kelly and “your own network kills you off,” followed by a hashtag and “harsh.”

USA Softball preparing for Olympic vote on inclusion in 2020

OKLAHOMA CITY — As the Women’s College World Series draws to a close, USASoftball offi-

cials believe a bigger stage for the sport is on the horizon. The International Olympic Committee will vote before the Rio Games in August on whether

to include baseball and softball on

the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. Softball has not been played at the Games since 2008 and won’t be in Rio. But U.S. officials, including coach Ken Eriksen, are optimistic that the sport will be included in 2020. The IOC recom- mended the inclusion of baseball- softball last week. A positive vote would result in USOC funding and reintroduce softball as an Olympic sport, a critical selling point in drawing sponsorships.

Liberty’s Swin Cash will retire at end of season

NEW YORK — Swin Cash has

announced she will retire at the end

of the season.

The New York Liberty forward wrote a piece for the Players’ Tribune that was released Tuesday morning. The 15-year WNBA veteran was the second pick in the 2002 draft and has won three championships in the league with Detroit (2003 and 2006) and Seattle (2010).

She’s currently 14th in career scor- ing with just under 5,000 points. She also is 10th in rebounds. Cash re-signed with the Liberty on May 24 after being cut by the team right before the season began for salary cap reasons. She’s aver- aging 5.8 points and 3.3 rebounds

in four games.

PAL/WBAL ALL-LEAGUE TENNIS TEAMS

PAL BAY DIVISION First team

Casey Morris (Jr., MA); Reed Fratt (Sr., MA);Thomas Reznik (So., Cmont); Landers Ngrichemat (Sr., Ara); Hal Tuttle (Sr.,Wood); Cale Goodman (So.,Bgame); Lucas Rosenberg (So.,Hills);Drew Davison (Jr.,HMB); Phalgun Krishna (Sr.,SM)

Second team Jeffery Jorgensen (So.,MA);Timmy Berthier (Fr.,MA); Jack Jensen (Sr.,MA);Axel,Brenner (Sr.,MA);Nishant Relan (Sr., MA); Eric Laderman (Sr., MA); Noah Mil- man (Sr.,MA);Camillo Sauerssig (Jr.,MA);Theo Novak (So.,MA);Chris Iyer (Fr.,MA);Zach Osterow (Fr.,MA); Jake Andrew (Fr.,MA);AlexYang (Sr.,Cmont);Daniel Li (Fr., Ara); Jonathan Liu (Sr., Ara); Tony Wang (sr., Ara);Langston Swiecki (Sr.,Ara);Payton Newcomb (sr.,Wood);LeviVigdorchik (So.,Wood);Bishal Ghosh (Sr.,SM);Nicholas Chu (Fr.,SM);Michael Reznick (Sr., Bgame); Kevin Hutchaleelaha (Sr., Cmont); Bobby Goldie (Sr., Cmont); Josh Pogue (Sr., Cmont); Ben- jamin Liao (So.,Hills); Miguel Isidro (So.,HMB)

OCEAN DIVISION First team Kevin Reyes (Sr.,Mills);VincentYang (Jr.,Mills);Oscar Villatoro (Jr., Cap); Shawn Shukman (So., Cap); Matthew Freshwaters (Sr., Seq); Eduard Myasyan- ski (Fr.,Wmoor); Anthony Barron (Sr.,SSF)

Second team Terrence Ho (Sr., Mills); Gordon Ly (Jr., Mills); Rajid Kumar (So., Cap); Hirofumi Koichihar (Jr., Wmoor); Darien Sturtevant (So., SSF); Austin Hartman (Jr., Seq); Chris Beatty (Jr.,Seq)

WBAL MVP: Connor Soohoo,Crystal Springs First team Siddarth Chari (Menlo); Alex Neumann (Menlo); Clark Safran (Menlo); Nathan Safran (Menlo); An- dreiVolgin (Menlo);Josh Lin (SHP);Vincent Xie (SHP); Ronak Baldua (Harker);James Bell (TKA);Matt Peery (Pwood); David Wen (Harker)

Second team Ben Boggs (SHP); John Desler (SHP); Will Ritchey (SHP); Jack Pica (SHP); Kevin Lin (Crystal); William Loh (Crystal); Dylan Pace (Menlo); Gabriel Morgan (Menlo);Christopher Sahoo (TKA);EdwardTischler (Harker); Gary Tsai (Harker)

Honorable mention Michael Quezada (Menlo); Kylee Santos (Menlo); Michael Fitzgerald (Priory); John Gregory (Priory); Quincy Linder (Pwood); Randy Zhao (Harker)

(Priory); Quincy Linder (Pwood); Randy Zhao (Harker) AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST DIVISION   W L Pct GB

AMERICAN LEAGUE

EAST DIVISION

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Baltimore

34

23

.596

Boston

34

24

.586

1/2

Toronto

31

29

.517

4 1/2

New York

28

30

.483

6 1/2

Tampa Bay

26

31

.456

8

CENTRAL DIVISION

 

Cleveland

32

25

.561

Kansas City

30

28

.517

2 1/2

Detroit

30

28

.517

2 1/2

Chicago

29

29

.500

3 1/2

Minnesota

17

40

.298

15

WEST DIVISION

Texas

36

22

.621

Seattle

32

26

.552

4

Houston

28

32

.467

9

Angels

26

32

.448

10

A’s

25

33

.431

11

Tuesday’s Games Baltimore 9, Kansas City 1 N.Y.Yankees 6, L.A. Angels 3 Detroit 3,Toronto 2, 10 innings Texas 4, Houston 3 Washington 10,Chicago White Sox 5 Milwaukee 5, Oakland 4 Minnesota 6, Miami 4, 11 innings Arizona 5,Tampa Bay 0 Seattle 7, Cleveland 1 Boston 5, San Francisco 3, 10 innings Wednesday’s Games Jays (Dickey 3-6) atTigers (Zimmermn 8-2),10:10 a.m. Rays (Odorizzi 2-3) at D’backs (Bradley 2-1),12:40 p.m. KC (Volquez 5-5) at O’s (Tillman 7-1), 4:05 p.m. Angels (Weaver 5-4) at Yanks (Eovaldi 6-2),4:05 p.m. Houston (Fister 5-3) at Texas (Darvish 2-0),5:05 p.m. Miami (Chen 3-2) at Twins (Hughes 1-7), 5:10 p.m. A’s (Hahn 2-3) at Brewers (Anderson 3-6), 5:10 p.m. Nats (Scherzer 6-4) at CWS (Shields 2-7), 5:10 p.m. Indians (Carrasco 2-0) at M’s (Walker 2-6), 7:10 p.m. Boston (Price 7-2) at Giants (Bumgarner 7-2),7:15 p.m. Thursday’s Games Houston at Texas,11:05 a.m. Angels at N.Y.Yankees,4:05 p.m. Baltimore at Toronto,4:07 p.m. Miami at Minnesota,5:10 p.m. Washington at Chicago White Sox,5:10 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle,7:10 p.m.

NBA FINALS

Warriors 2, Cleveland 0 Thursday, June 2: Warriors 104, Cavaliers 89 Sunday, June 5: Warriors 110, Cavaliers 77 Wednesday, June 8:Warriors at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Friday, June 10:Warriors at Cleveland, 6 p.m. x-Monday, June 13: Cleveland at Warriors, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, June 16:Warriors at Cleveland, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 19: Cleveland at Warriors, 5 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

EAST DIVISION

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Washington

35

23

.603

New York

31

26

.544

3 1/2

Miami

30

28

.517

5

Philadelphia

29

30

.492

6 1/2

Atlanta

16

42

.276

19

CENTRAL DIVISION

 

Chicago

40

17

.702

Pittsburgh

32

26

.552

8 1/2

St. Louis

30

28

.517

10 1/2

Milwaukee

27

31

.466

13 1/2

Cincinnati

22

36

.379

18 1/2

WEST DIVISION

Giants

35

25

.583

Los Angeles

32

28

.533

3

Colorado

26

32

.448

8

Arizona

26

35

.426

9 1/2

San Diego

25

35

.417

10

Tuesday’s Games Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Mets 1, 1st game Philadelphia 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Cincinnati 7, St. Louis 6 Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Mets 1, 2nd game Washington 10,Chicago White Sox 5 Milwaukee 5, Oakland 4 Minnesota 6, Miami 4, 11 innings Arizona 5,Tampa Bay 0 L.A. Dodgers 4, Colorado 3 San Diego 4, Atlanta 3 Boston 5, San Francisco 3, 10 innings Wednesday’s Games Cubs (Lackey 6-2) at Phils (Velasquez 5-2),1:05 p.m. Braves (Tehern 1-6) at Pads (Pomrnz 5-5),12:40 p.m. Rays (Odorizzi 2-3) at D’backs (Bradley 2-1),12:40 p.m. Mets (Syndergaard 6-2) at Pitt (Taillon 0-0),4:05 p.m. Cards (Garcia 4-5) at Reds (Simon 2-5), 4:10 p.m. Miami (Chen 3-2) at Twins (Hughes 1-7), 5:10 p.m. A’s (Hahn 2-3) at Brewers (Anderson 3-6),5:10 p.m. Nats (Scherzer 6-4) at CWS (Shields 2-7), 5:10 p.m. Rox (Rusin 1-4) at Dodgers (Maeda 5-3), 7:10 p.m. Boston (Price 7-2) at Giants (Bumgarner 7-2),7:15 p.m. Thursday’s Games Pittsburgh at Colorado,2:10 p.m. St.Louis at Cincinnati,4:10 p.m. Miami at Minnesota,5:10 p.m. N.Y.Mets at Milwaukee,5:10 p.m. Washington at Chicago White Sox,5:10 p.m.

STANLEY CUP FINALS

Pittsburgh 3, Sharks 1 Monday, May 30: Pittsburgh 3, Sharks 2 Wednesday, June 1: Pittsburgh 2, Sharks 1, OT Saturday, June 4: Sharks 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Monday, June 6: Pittsburgh 3, Sharks 1 Thursday, June 9: Sharks at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5 p.m.

at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5
at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5
at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5
at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5
at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5
at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5
at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Sharks, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday,June 15:Sharks at Pittsburgh,5

18 Wednesday June 8, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Klay Thompson wants to play in Rio

By Tim Reynolds

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — Not even Zika worries will deter Klay Thompson from playing in the Olympics if asked.

The Golden State guard, while he and other potential Olympians in these NBA Finals acknowledged having

some concerns about the Zika virus, made clear Tuesday he would accept any invitation that comes his way to repre- sent USA Basketball at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. “It would be an honor to play for Team USA,” Thompson said. “I’d love

Klay Thompson

for Team USA,” Thompson said. “I’d love Klay Thompson to go to Brazil.” His insistence that

to go to Brazil.” His insistence that he wants to play came one day after his Warriors teammate Stephen Curry announced he won’t, citing needs to rest and heal as his primary reasons.

The Cleveland-Golden State finals matchup is loaded with Olympic prospects. Curry won’t be going, but as many as seven other players in the series may still repre- sent the U.S. this summer — and there’s likely international Olympians like Australian teammates Andrew Bogut and Matthew Dellavedova, plus Nigeria’s Festus Ezeli. Warriors forward Draymond Green was downright emphatic about his hope to be there. “Hell, yeah,” Green said when asked if he wants to play, dragging his words out for theatrics. Golden State’s Harrison Barnes also said he wants to go, and 2012 gold medalist Andre Iguodala also hopes to play — but indicated he isn’t sure to make the cut. “I’m on the list,” Iguodala said, “but I think I’m the No. 14 pick.” There are 12 slots on the U.S. roster. Cleveland star and three-time Olympian LeBron James hasn’t decided about playing in Rio yet, part of the reason why USA

Basketball is working on two different ros- ter scenarios in advance of the anticipated team announcement later this month. Kevin Love remains a possibility, and Kyrie Irving said he will decide after the finals. Irving said the Cavs are in a tough series with the Warriors, “so I haven’t really thought about it.” What many are thinking about, however, is Zika and its risks. Zika is a mosquito-borne virus and although there have been outbreaks across other countries, Brazil has been hit hard. Zika is known to cause severe birth defects, part of the reason NBC “Today” show anchor Savannah Guthrie — who is pregnant — said Tuesday she will not accompany the net- work’s team to Brazil for the Olympics. U.S. cyclist Tejay van Garderen has already cited Zika concerns as his reasons for dropping out from Olympic considera- tion, and the World Health Organization is putting together an emergency committee to study the virus and examine risks of the games behind held in Brazil.

NBA Finals

Cavs may be without Love in Game 3 of NBA Finals

CLEVELAND — Already underdogs, the Cavaliers may also be undermanned for Game 3 of the NBA Finals. They remain undaunted.

The Cavs practiced Tuesday without start- ing forward Kevin Love, who is following the league’s concussion

protocol after being struck in the back of the head by Golden State’s Harrison Barnes during Sunday night’s Game 2 blowout loss. Love stayed in the locker room while his teammates practiced on the floor at Quicken

Loans Arena, where they are 7-0 in this postseason and will have 20,000 screaming fans on their side for the next two games. Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said Love is feeling better, but his status for Game 3 — and the remainder of the series —

hinges on him passing several physical tests and getting cleared to play.

passing several physical tests and getting cleared to play. Kevin Love NBA Continued from page 13

Kevin Love

NBA

Continued from page 13

Compared to that, Cleveland’s chances look fabulous. “We’re not in that bad of shape as they were — 3-1 is worse than 2-0,” Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue said. “And they came back and took it one game at a time, like we have to do.” Teams that have fallen behind 2-0 in the NBA Finals have rallied to win 9.7 percent of the time, with three of them getting it done in 31 past opportunities. The 1969 Boston Celtics, 1977 Portland Trail Blazers and 2006 Miami Heat all lost the first two games of the finals on the road before win-

ning the title — the Celtics doing so in seven games, the Blazers and Heat getting it done in six. “History,” Lue said, “is something that’s made to be broken.” Despite their predica- ment, the Cavaliers cer-

tainly seemed confident and loose on Tuesday. During the open portion of practice, James was laughing with teammates and tossed up the occas ional underhanded 60- footer — reacting with mock disbelief when the low-percentage shot didn’t fall. Point guard Kyrie Irving played a long game of 1- on-1 with Cavs assistant coach James

a long game of 1- on-1 with Cavs assistant coach James Tyronn Lue Posey, who was

Tyronn Lue

game of 1- on-1 with Cavs assistant coach James Tyronn Lue Posey, who was on that

Posey, who was on that Heat team that ral- lied from 2-0 down in the finals against Dallas and hit a huge shot in the clinching game. Their thinking is simple: Take care of home court Wednesday and Friday, knot the series and see what happens in a best-of- three. “When they go on their runs, we have to be able to withstand those punches,” Irving said. “And Game 1 and Game 2, we’ve done it at times. We’ve shown that we’re capable of doing it, but we’re just constantly on our heels.” That’s what the Warriors do against every- one, not just the Cavs. Cleveland’s biggest lead in the series so far is six points. Golden State’s is 33. In four games this season, including the two

regular-season matchups, the Warriors have held the lead for a staggering 87 percent of the time. And in last year’s finals, Golden State won twice in Cleveland — more than proving that it can handle the Cavs’ raucous home crowd. “We know they’re going to make adjust- ments,” Warriors star and two-time NBA MVP Stephen Curry said. “We know they’re going to come out with a sense of urgency in the moment. But we need to have that same mentality, because for what’s at stake, if we’re able to go up 3-0, that is a great position to be in. That is the opportunity in front of us.” And no one has ever come back in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said. “No time to relax.”

in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said.
in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said.
in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said.
in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said.
in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said.
in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said.
in an NBA series from 3-0 down, either. “We can’t relax,” Warriors guard Klay Thompson said.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

FOOD

Wednesday June 8, 2016

19

Scallops take center stage in citrus-marinated kebabs

By Sara Moulton

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

I’ve always been a sucker for scallops. They’re sweet, meaty, cylindrical and bite-sized. This particular recipe puts scallops at the center of a skewer’s worth of very tasty kebabs. It requires no more than 15 minutes hands-on time and 40 minutes total from start to finish. And it’s how I spell dinner — and relief — at the end of a long day of work, when I have neither the time nor the patience to make anything more complicat- ed. First, buy the best scallops available. Sometimes, scallops are harvested, stored in water with preservatives, then kept at sea for days before the boat returns to shore. These are known as “wet” scallops, and I do not recommend them. Instead, look for “dry” scal- lops or “day boat” scallops, which are caught and brought to market right away. Of these, you want the biggest, plumpest specimens you can find. Those are the ones that will most easily pick up nice grill marks when you set them down across the grates. The bright, tangy citrus mari- nade here is a mixture of lemon juice, orange juice and the zest of both fruits, along with a little olive oil. It’s your choice of herb — sage or basil (the home team liked them both) — after which each scallop is wrapped in a strip

both) — after which each scallop is wrapped in a strip Once you’re rolling,don’t turn over

Once you’re rolling,don’t turn over the skewers until the scallops are easily loosened from the grill,which is how you know they’ve been properly seared.

of prosciutto. You want to be care- ful to fold the prosciutto and herbs around the scallops so they’re flush with the scallops’ edge. That will ensure the scallops cook evenly on the grill after they’ve been threaded onto skewers. How to ensure they don’t stick to the grill? Pat them dry, then brush them with a little oil right before grilling. The grill must be well heated before you start cooking. Once

you’re rolling, don’t turn over the skewers until the scallops are easi- ly loosened from the grill, which is how you know they’ve been properly seared. This will only take 2 to 3 minutes a side. Give each one a little poke in the belly to see if it’s almost done. You want to pull them off the grill when there’s still a little bit of give, indicating they’re slightly under- cooked. The carry-over cooking time will finish the job.

CITRUS-MARINATED SCALLOP AND PROSCIUTTO KEBABS

Start to finish: 40 minutes (15 minutes hands on) Servings: 4

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive

oil, plus extra for brushing the scallops 16 sea scallops (about 1 1/2

inches in diameter, 1 1/4 pounds), tough muscle discarded

8 thin slices prosciutto di Parma

(about 4 ounces) 16 large basil or sage leaves Preheat the grill to medium. In a medium bowl whisk together the lemon juice, lemon zest, orange juice and orange zest with a hefty pinch of salt until the salt has dissolved; whisk in the 2 table- spoons olive oil. Add the scallops and toss until they are well coated. Let them marinate for 8 minutes. Cut the prosciutto slices in half crosswise and fold them into strips about 1 1/2 inches wide (the same width as the scallops) and 5 inches long. Arrange the strips on a work surface and place a basil leaf in the center of each strip. Top the leaf with a scallop and wrap the pro- sciutto around the scallop to enclose it. Thread 4 prosciutto- wrapped scallops onto each of 4 metal skewers. (If us ing wooden skewers, soak them for 20 minutes in water before threading the scal- lops.) Pat the exposed scallop surfaces

1

tablespoon fresh lemon juice

dry and brush them lightly with

1

teaspoon freshly grated lemon

olive oil. Place the skewers on the

zest

grill and cook the scallops for 2 to

1

tablespoon fresh orange juice

3 minutes per side or until almost

1

teaspoon freshly grated orange

firm to the touch, transfer to plates

zest

and let rest for 5 minutes before

Kosher salt

serving.

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20 Wednesday June 8, 2016

FOOD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

An alphabet soup guide to confusing restaurant terms

By Leanne Italie

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Okonomiyaki, anyone? A survey released Tuesday for the restaurant reservation site OpenTable showed that style of savory Japanese pan- cake is the No. 1 most befuddling term among 2,035 diners, with one in five saying they won’t order something they don’t understand on a menu. Foodies, stand down. Many of the Top 10 most confusing terms you’re likely familiar with. For the rest of us, as chefs in America have expanded their horizons, we bring you gochujang, piri piri, yuzu and bibimbap, following okonomiyaki in that order. Nearly one in three diners in the Harris Poll conducted online for OpenTable said some menus are more confusing than they need to be. More than half surveyed in March felt ordering an unfamiliar item ruins their restaurant experi- ence. Okonomiyaki was a challenge for 69 percent of the diners ages 18 and over, about half of whom said they eat out at least once a month. But there’s rarely shame. The survey of diners around the country showed two-thirds aren’t embar- rassed by their cluelessness, saying they are usually fine asking a server for guidance, said Caroline Potter, OpenTable’s chief dining officer. The fact that some of the rubs, ingredients and completed dishes are a problem at all shows just how far many main- stream restaurants have come, she said. For instance, the 2014 edition of “The Foodspotting Field Guide,” featuring 75 dishes chosen by a gaggle of recreational foodies, posed

See TERMS, Page 22

gaggle of recreational foodies, posed See TERMS , Page 22 Farro is high in fiber and
gaggle of recreational foodies, posed See TERMS , Page 22 Farro is high in fiber and
gaggle of recreational foodies, posed See TERMS , Page 22 Farro is high in fiber and

Farro is high in fiber and a good source of iron and protein,which also makes it a great anchor for numerous vegetarian dishes.

Farro and asparagus make for a hearty summer salad

By Katie Workman

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Farro is a hearty whole grain that may well become a staple in your kitchen, in everything from soups and casseroles to sides and salads. Once a mainstay of the ancient Roman diet, farro is high in fiber and a good source of iron and protein, which also makes it a great anchor for numer- ous vegetarian dishes. Try using it in recipes that you might ordinarily reach for barley or brown rice. Fresh herbs and other leafy greens in whole grain salads balance out the heft of the grains and also provide a lovely pop of color and freshness. And I make these kinds of salads con- tinuously during the warmer months, since they keep well, and having a whole grain salad in the fridge means you never have to wonder what to make for lunch on those days when you’re feeling unimaginative. Don’t be shy with the salt and pepper — the

seasonings really lift the flavor. Finally, raw asparagus may seem sur- prising, but if the asparagus is very fresh it add a wonderful delicate aspara- gus flavor and a nice crunch. If the outer peel is thick, peel the bottom half of the stalks before thinly slicing them, or the texture will be too tough.

FARRO AND VEGETABLE SALAD

Start to finish: 45 minutes Servings: 6

4 cups chicken or vegetable broth

1 1/2 cups farro

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup minced shallots Juice of 1 lemon

1

cup roughly chopped flat-leaf pars-

ley

Coarse or kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

1 cup halved grape or cherry toma-

toes

2 cups roughly chopped watercress

2 cups thinly sliced raw asparagus, peeled if necessary

1 cup thinly sliced radishes

Combine the broth, farro, and salt in a saucepan over high heat and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer and cook uncov- ered for 30 minutes or until al dente. Drain the farro if there is excess broth remaining, rinse with cool water, and transfer to a large bowl.

Meanwhile, whisk together the oil,

vinegar, shallots, lemon juice, and parsley in a small bowl and season salt and pepper to taste. Add the tomatoes, watercress, asparagus and radishes to the farro. Pour the dressing over the salad, and toss to combine. Serve at room temperature or refrigerate and serve chilled.

Nutrition information per serving:

285 calories; 90 calories from fat; 10 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 214 mg sodium; 41 g car-

bohydrate; 8 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 9 g protein.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

FOOD

Wednesday June 8, 2016

21

Burger that may make even carnivores opt for veg

By Melissa d’Arabian

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

May shepherds in the season of the back- yard barbecue, and for us that means one thing: burgers. Let me back up and say that just about anything I make on the grill in warmer months, I also make regularly inside on the stovetop. And while I do love a flat- top-smooshed burger with its crusty, dangly edges, the backyard barbecue burger remains in a league of its own. Our family’s burger bonanzas are a little legendary in our social circle (OK, so maybe with just my kids, nieces and nephews). The herby-garlicky sauce I make, called “magic” sauce by those in the know, is particularly popular. So when three of my extended fam- ily members went vegetarian, my burger- grilling game suffered. I did what any well- intentioned-but-misguided carnivore would do: I bought some frozen veggie burgers from the grocery store and called it a day. Now, to be fair, some of those veggie burg- ers are downright tasty. But, homemade- with-love-magic-sauce-worthy? Not so much. So, I upped my veggie burger game. While I do love the black-bean, quinoa or legume-based versions I’ve created over the years, the simplest veggie burger of all remains a family favorite: the giant porto- bello mushroom cap. Bonus: This dish is low-calorie (leaving wiggle room for cheese, sauce and a bun), and it’s nearly fool-proof — no falling apart and disappear- ing into the flames between the grill grates. I used cilantro in this version because it pairs nicely with the baked corn tortilla

version because it pairs nicely with the baked corn tortilla The simplest veggie burger of all

The simplest veggie burger of all remains the giant portobello mushroom cap.

chips (just a few go a long way to add satis- fying crunch), but feel free to experiment with other herbs, such as basil, or mint. Even carnivores might be converted.

GRILLED PORTOBELLO BURGERS WITH CILANTRO GARLIC SAUCE AND TORTILLA CHIPS

Start to Finish: 25 minutes Servings: 4 For the sauce

1/3 cup low-fat Greek yogurt

3 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise

3 tablespoons roughly chopped fresh cilantro

1 scallion, roughly chopped

1 garlic clove, roughly chopped

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (or soy sauce, if vegetarian)

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 tablespoon water, if needed Black pepper For the burger:

4 large portobello mushroom caps, cleaned and gills removed

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar olive oil in a mister

Salt and pepper 4 slices gouda cheese (or other favorite melting cheese)

4 large slices of tomato, or 8 small slices

1 cup peppery greens, such as arugula or other peppery green mix

12 baked tortilla chips

4 whole grain hamburger buns (not over-

sized) To make the sauce, blend all the sauce ingredients in the blender until mixed, but with small flecks of green. Pour into a small bowl and chill, up to 3 days. Heat grill to medium high. Brush the mushroom caps with the balsamic vinegar, spray liberally with olive oil, and salt and pepper. Grill the mushroom caps for 3 min- utes on the smooth side and then flip. Top with cheese and grill, covered, another 3 minutes, until mushroom is tender (but not floppy) and cheese is melted. Meanwhile, toast the buns for 1-2 minutes on the cut side, or until barely golden. Place peppery greens on bottom of bun and then tomato. Remove the mushroom caps from the grill and place directly on the tomato. Top the still-hot mushroom with a couple of table- spoons of the sauce. Top with 3 chips on each burger and then the bun. Nutrition information per serving: 357 calories; 175 calories from fat; 15 g fat (5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 23 mg cholesterol; 626 mg sodium; 45 g carbohydrate; 8 g fiber; 9 g sugar; 15 g protein.

Add veggies to keep lean burgers flavorful and moist

By Jim Romanoff

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Many people mistakenly assume turkey burgers are lean. But depending on the variety of ground turkey used, you can end up with more than 15 grams of fat in a 4-ounce portion. You can buy ground turkey that is 99 percent

lean, but you’ll end up with dry, flavorless burgers. A good compromise is 93 percent lean ground turkey, which has about 8 grams of fat per serving. It’s enough to keep the burgers moist and flavorful, but lean enough to include in a healthy diet. Of course, as with any meat, less fat means less flavor, so you’ll want a strategy

for compensating for these losses. Think meatloaf. By mixing in chopped vegetables — such as onions, mushrooms and celery — fresh or dried herbs and a wet component, say ketchup or mustard, you will not only boost the flavor, but also add back much-needed moisture. Consider adding breadcrumbs or quick

cooking oats, too. They not only stretch the meat (which cuts the total fat per serv- ing), but also help retain moisture. This robustly flavored stout and onion turkey burger uses caramelized sweet onions and a reduction of intense, dark beer com- bined with zesty mustard and dried thyme to

See BURGERS, Page 22

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22 Wednesday June 8, 2016

FOOD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

TERMS

Continued from page 20

this question: “Ever heard of Okonomiyaki?” Now, at least among those who don’t know classic Japanese cuisine, “It’s much more prevalent on American menus,” Potter said. “It’s interesting that there still remains this confusion on the diner side, whereas chefs and restaurateurs have latched onto it.” The menu issue doesn’t mean some com- ponents aren’t easily identifiable. “While you may recognize, you know, carrots, you might not recognize when it says on a menu they’re rubbed with haris- sa,” Potter said, noting that particular North African spice mixture of chili, cumin, gar- lic, coriander and olive oil occupies the No.

11 spot on the list of confusing menu terms. In addition to roaming the globe looking for inspiration or to expand their reper- toires, the farm-to-table movement has chefs reconsidering heritage techniques that might not be widely known by name. Ballotine, for example, is a piece of roasted, braised or poached meat, poultry or fish that has been boned, stuffed, rolled and either tied or stitched. Think turducken. It’s a classic French way of cooking a chicken thigh, intended to be reshaped to look like one, but the word was unknown to 61 per- cent of diners surveyed, capturing the 10th spot on the list. It’s clear, Potter said, that diners are try- ing to catch up with the ambitions of chefs. “Chefs are reaching back, they’re reach- ing to all corners of the globe. When you talk to chefs, the way they’re spending their downtime, they’re saying I’m going to Thailand for two weeks and I’m going to eat my way through street food and all these

restaurants and come back with inspira- tion,” Potter said.

Potter thinks yuzu, which 64 percent of those surveyed found confusing on menus,

is a good example of an ingredient enjoying

big love from chefs in the U.S. Dallas restaurant Victor Tangos, for exam- ple, has used the aromatic Asian citrus fruit known mostly as a flavoring in everything from tempura-fried Brussels sprouts to an infusion for a cocktail made of gin, shiso (No. 8), French wild cherry liqueur, lemon, honey and orange flower water. “Restaurants are doing everything from serving yuzu miso brown butter on their lobster to yuzu marmalade or yuzu vinai- grette,” Potter said. Recently, at a Manhattan restaurant, she ran across a yuzu pound cake and a yuzu jelly. “That, in particular, is really sweeping the nation, and I have to admit I was kind of, like, what is yuzu exactly?” she said.

There is, of course, a segment of diners in search of familiarity and comfort in restau- rant food, Potter said. “We do know that diners want to see more descriptors on menus, and they also like to see pictures. That plays to our food photo culture. Instagram is filled with food pic- tures. That desire is a by-product of how visual our food culture has become,” Potter said. So what is gochujang, the second most confusing term? It’s a savory, spicy, pun- gent fermented Korean condiment made from red chili, glutinous rice, fermented soybeans and salt. It was deemed confusing by 67 percent of diners surveyed. And No. 3 piri piri, which was misunder- stood by 64 percent? It’s a Portuguese term for hot chilies or a hot sauce made from them. No. 5 bibimbap is a Korean dish of rice topped with sauteed vegetables served with chili paste, beef or other meat, some- times with a raw or fried egg.

BURGERS

Continued from page 21

enhance ground turkey. Use this same flavor base to make excellent meatloaf or meat- balls. If you like, you can top the burger with some tangy, extra-sharp cheddar cheese, which makes a perfect foil for the assertive- ness of the stout. By using extra-sharp cheddar you can get away with using a full- fat cheese because just a little adds a lot of flavor. Serve these burgers with a side of sweet potato fries and a few crunchy pickle spears.

STOUT AND ONION TURKEY BURGER

Start to finish: 1 hour (35 minutes active) Servings: 4

1 teaspoon canola oil

1 cup chopped Vidalia onion

1 cup Guinness or other stout

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

pound 93 percent lean ground turkey cup panko (Japanese-style) bread- crumbs

1/3 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese (optional)

4 whole-wheat hamburger buns or other

1

1

small wheat bread In a medium saucepan over medium, heat the oil. Add the onions and saute until soft- ened and slightly golden, 7 to 10 minutes. Add the stout and increase heat to high. Boil the mixture until reduced by two-thirds and making syrupy bubbles, about 20 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a medium bowl to cool for 20 minutes. Heat a gas grill to medium-high or prepare

a charcoal fire. Add the mustard, thyme, salt and pepper to the onion mixture. Add the ground turkey and breadcrumbs. Gently but thoroughly combine. Shape into 4 patties, about 3/4- inch thick. To oil the grill grates, wet a folded paper

towel with oil, hold it with tongs and rub it over the grates.

Grill the burgers until well browned on the underside, 4 to 5 minutes. With a spatu- la, turn the burgers carefully. Grill 4 to 6 minutes more, or until the burger registers 165 F at the center. Top with cheese, if using, during the last minute of grilling. Meanwhile, toast the buns at the edge of the grill. Serve the burgers on the toasted buns.

Nutrition information per serving (values are rounded to the nearest whole number):

468 calories; 131 calories from fat; 15 g fat (5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 73 mg choles- terol; 49 g carbohydrate; 32 g protein; 5 g fiber; 966 mg sodium.

49 g carbohydrate; 32 g protein; 5 g fiber; 966 mg sodium. In these complex times,
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Wednesday June 8, 2016

23

Measure AA proponents claim victory

A first of its kind regional $12 per parcel ballot measure to generate $500 million for restoring San Francisco Bay wetlands was touted by proponents as passing with their tally of 69.08 percent of the vote in favor. Proponents said late Tuesday that with 965,543 votes counted so far, that the two- thirds threshold was passed. “All indications show that the voters overwhelmingly agreed that restoring the Bay Area’s most precious natural resource is

a top priority,” Save the Bay’s Executive

Director David Lewis said in a prepared statement Tuesday night. “Tonight’s vote is

a resounding victory for wildlife and people

Around the Bay

who want a healthy, beautiful Bay for future generations.” Voters in all nine Bay Area counties weighed in on the measure which sought the parcel tax to make improvements to the Bay through conservation and flood protection projects. Critics suggested it amounted to taxation without representation since the members of the San Francisco Bay Restoration Authority are not voted on by members of the public. The money would largely restore 15,100 acres of salt ponds purchased from Cargill Inc. in 2003 with an aim to eventually restore them to tidal wetlands.

SUPERVISOR

Continued from page 1

the campaign is now going to kick into high gear as he preps to face Guingona. Guingona, who has served on the Daly City Council for two decades, held a gather- ing at the Pilipino Bayanihan Resource Center surrounded by his supporters. “I’m cautiously optimistic,” he said about Tuesday’s results. He said the race now will center on gover- nance and not about who has run the best campaign so far. “Now voters will get to see the difference between me and my opponent,” Guingona said. Canepa has raised and spent the most money in the race since announcing his can- didacy in 2014 to replace termed-out Supervisor Adrienne Tissier, who endorsed Fisicaro. Fisicaro had also secured the endorse- ments of county supervisors Carole Groom and Warren Slocum as well as U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo. Lentz was endorsed by Supervisor Dave Pine. At Canepa’s campaign party, he thanked officials in the crowd for going “against the establishment” by supporting his cam- paign. “This has been a true grassroots cam- paign,” he said. Most of the 58,716 voters in the district, about 66 percent, reside in Daly City with the rest living in Brisbane, Colma, Broadmoor, parts of South San Francisco and parts of San Bruno. The big issues to solve regionally are the same for both Canepa and Guingona as the region is in the midst of a housing crisis and

traffic on area highways becomes increas- ingly clogged. Each, however, has their own ideas on how to solve them. Improved access to health care and educa- tion are also issues on which the two candi- dates are campaigning. When it comes to the county’s housing crisis, Canepa supports a bond measure to leverage with nonprofit partners to build more housing, particularly along the El Camino Real corridor close to transit cen- ters. Guingona, however, thinks “throwing money at the problem” won’t solve the cri- sis although he would like to see more Measure Asales tax revenue be earmarked for affordable housing. Daly City has done its part in building affordable housing but it’s a local control issue, said Guingona, a criminal defense attorney. Access to health care in the north county is a big issue for Canepa. With the recent sale of Seton Medical Center, there is concern services at that hos- pital might erode in the coming years, he said. But getting to the county-owned medical center in San Mateo can be burdensome for residents in the north county, he said. Both Canepa and Guingona have endorsed each other in their respective bids for Daly City Council in past years and both tout the accomplishments the city has made to approve affordable housing projects and improve public transportation in the coun- ty’s most populous county. For the first time in 2016, residents of north San Mateo County will have a chance to pick their own supervisor for the District 5 seat currently held by Tissier. Two other seats for supervisor are also open this year but neither Pine nor Slocum faced any competition in Tuesday’s primary and will retain their seats.

MEASURE F

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But Half Moon Bay officials ultimately per- suaded the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors to loan the city the remaining

funds it needed for the facility that will serve

a large portion of the entire coastside. Opponents were relieved the measure, which they argued was too broadly written and would have required an unusual four- fifths vote of the council for more than just lease-revenue bonds, did not pass. Opponents argued Measure F was an attempt by vocal critics of city officials to have a minority leading the council. They also heeded concerns by legal analysts who noted the measure’s language was so vague it could apply to a variety of different budg- etary decisions from simply leasing a city vehicle to passing the annual budget. “Although it took a lot of time and money for our group to get involved, we felt like we needed to take a stand and say hey, look, enough is enough. This is not good for our city,” said former councilman Allan Alifano. “Our committee was really trying to send a message to the community that you can’t let this personal group write bad legislation.” Despite losing, proponents of Measure F contend the new act was successful by

encouraging officials to seek less costly alternatives for the library than lease rev- enue bonds. “A, I’m glad people got to vote on this, B, the initiative saved the city $5.2 million. And that to me is a success by any measure. And if the people think it’s not a good idea, then that’s how it should be,” said the mea- sure’s main proponent David Eblovi. “I think people put this on the ballot because they were trying to express to the city, ‘before you put us deeply in debt, we would like to be consulted or have input.’” Eblovi noted Measure F opponents spent far more on their campaign then his group did, although Alifano pointed out Eblovi will likely be responsible for attorneys’ fees after initiating a legal battle over ballot language. Alifano noted the title of the measure, which insinuated it would protect taxpayers, likely sounded enticing to those asked to sign the original initiative that put it on the ballot. If it had been written to clearly only prohibit lease revenue bonds and not open the door for council critics to argue against other types of financing, Alifano said it may not have received so much opposition. “Everyone said it was just horribly writ- ten,” Alifano said. “If it had passed, the City Council today and in five and 10 years from now would have been stuck with this poorly written legislation.”

have been stuck with this poorly written legislation.” Two Democratic women to state Senate runoff By

Two Democratic women to state Senate runoff

By Michael R. Blood

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — In a historic first, California voters Tuesday sent two minority women, both Democrats, to a November runoff for the state’s open U.S. Senate seat. The matchup between state Attorney General Kamala Harris and 10-term Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez marks the first time since voters started electing sena- tors a century ago that Republicans will be absent from California’s general election ballot for the Senate. The two were among 34 candidates seek- ing the seat being vacated by retiring Sen. Barbara Boxer. Under California election rules, only two candidates — the top vote-getters — advance to the November election. Harris had a wide lead in early returns and was ahead in all but a handful of the state’s 58 counties. Sanchez, from Orange County, was holding steady in second place. “The stakes are high. The eyes of the country are on us, and I know we are pre- pared to do ourselves and our state and our fellow Californians proud,” Harris told cheering supporters at a celebration rally. She warned that voters in the upcoming campaign would “hear a lot of that rhetoric that tries to divide us, that is trying to tell us that somehow, we should start pointing fin- gers at who all among us is to blame, instead of understanding that instead, we should be embracing and wrapping our arms around each other, understanding we are all in this together.” With 3.4 million votes tallied, Harris had just over 1.4 million votes, or 40 percent. Sanchez was at 17 percent, with about 580,000 votes. Harris was performing

strongly in the San Francisco Bay Area, her stronghold, but was also leading in strongly Hispanic Los Angeles County and was about tied with Sanchez in the congresswoman’s home county, Orange. Republican candidates were lagging in single digits. Duf Sundheim, a Silicon Valley lawyer and a former chairman of the California Republican Party, was leading a clus- ter of Republicans trail- ing the two Democrats. In a year when millions of voters embraced out- sider candidates in the presidential contest,

California Senate voters appeared impressed with the two Democrats’ deep experience. Hoai Le, a 62-year-old mechanic from Santa Ana, said he was backing Sanchez because of her two decades in Congress. “She’s been there for a while. She knows how the system works,” said Le, an inde- pendent, after casting his ballot at a com- munity center. “She can do a lot better than the new guy.” Jeanette Wright of San Francisco, a 47- year-old executive assistant with the state, said she was impressed with Harris, a career prosecutor. “She’s a strong woman. She’s been around. She knows what’s going on with San Francisco. She knows what’s going on with the community,” Wright, a Democrat, said of the attorney general.

Wright, a Democrat, said of the attorney general. Kamala Harris Loretta Sanchez Tuesday, June 14 San

Kamala Harris

a Democrat, said of the attorney general. Kamala Harris Loretta Sanchez Tuesday, June 14 San Mateo

Loretta

Sanchez

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Rosie the Riveters at 11:15 a.m. and
1:00 p.m. Local women who worked
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answer your questions.
Senior Expo features:
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Goody bags for first 500 guests
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Blood pressure check
Senior Expo hours: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Expo Hall
Arrive before Noon for FREE parking
Sponsorships and Exhibitor Tables are available for Senior Day.
Please call 650-344-5200 for information

24 Wednesday June 8, 2016

DATEBOOK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

ELECTION

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office. Berman, who’s been endorsed by Gordon, clearly rose to the top in the primary. Veenker, who had a stronger lead in Santa Clara County, ended the night slightly ahead of Ohtaki, who has political roots in Menlo Park and earned more San Mateo County votes. Voters included residents in Menlo Park, Atherton, Woodside, East Palo Alto, North Fair Oaks, Palo Alto, Los Altos, Mountain View, Sunnyvale and the San Mateo County coastside from El Granada to the Santa Cruz County border. Berman, a Democrat, earned 28.6 percent or 16,557 votes, according to Secretary of State results posted after midnight. “It’s a good first start,” Berman said. “My top three issues continue to be education first and foremost; working on environmental issues that impact the district from all the cities on the Bay to all the way out to Half Moon Bay, Pescadero and the coast; and then infrastructure, whether it’s improving our roads and bridges to increasing access to high-speed internet.” Berman added he plans to continue to connect with constituents and further discuss other important topics such as housing and transportation as his cam- paign continues. As of 12:30 a.m., Veenker had 12,272 votes or 21.2 percent while Ohtaki trailed close by with 11,794 votes or 20.4 percent. Veenker’s assistant said they were not yet ready to make a statement late in the evening as the results were close. Ohtaki, who agreed he wasn’t yet sure if he’d be advancing, said he was proud to have stood out after spending far less than his opponents on the campaign. “It’s going to be neck and neck but I’m certainly pleased with the support I’ve gotten,” Ohtaki said, adding he’s a bipartisan problem solver who would focus on “issues like transportation, housing and education. … all of those require someone who’s analytical, and can reach across the aisle.”