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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

INDIA SMART CITY MISSION


MISSION TRANSFORM-NATION

THE SMART CITY CHALLENGE


STAGE 2
SMART CITY PROPOSAL

SMART CITY CODE:

MH_10_AUR

CONTENTS
A. CITY PROFILE
B. AREA-BAS ED P ROPOS AL
C. PAN-CITY PROP OSAL(S)
D. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
E. FINANCIAL PLAN
ANNEXURES (1-4)

QUESTION NO.
1-8
9-18
19-30
31-36
37-43

PAGE NO.
7-22
23-44
45-61
62-76
77-86

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

CHECKLIST
All fields in the SCP format document have to be filled. The chart below will assi st you in verifying
that all questions have been answered and all fields have been filled.
Q. No

TICK

PART A: CITY P ROFILE


1.

QUALITY OF LIFE

2.

ADMINIS TRATIVE EFFICIENCY

3.

SWOT

4.

STRATEGIC FOCUS AND BLUEPRINT

5.

CITY VIS ION A ND GOALS

6.

CITIZE N ENGA GEMENT

7.

SELF-ASSESSMENT: BASELINE

8.

SELF-ASSESSMENT: ASPIRATIONS & IMPERATIVES

PART B: AREA BASED PROPOSAL


9.

SUMMARY

10.

APPROACH & METHODOLOGY

11.

KEY COMPONE NTS

12.

SMART URBA N FORM

13.

CONVERGE NCE AGENDA

14.

CONVERGE NCE IMPLEME NTATION

15.

RISKS

16.

ESSENTIAL FEATURES ACHIEVEMENT PLAN

17.

SUCCESS FACTORS

18.

MEASURABLE IMPACT

Table 1

Table 2

PART C: PAN-CITY PROP OSAL(S)


19.

SUMMARY

20.

COMPONE NTS

21.

APPROACH & METHODOLOGY

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

22.

DEMAND ASSESSMENT

23.

INCLUS ION

24.

RISK MITIGATION

25.

FRUGAL INNOVATION

26.

CONVERGE NCE AGENDA

27.

CONVERGE NCE IMPLEME NTATION

28.

SUCCESS FACTORS

29.

BENEFITS DELIVERE D

30.

MEASURABLE IMPACT

Table 3

Table 4

Table 5

PART D: IMPLEMENTATION PLAN


31.

IMPLEME NTATION PLAN

32.

SCENA RIOS

33.

SPV

Table 6

34.

CONVERGE NCE

Table 7

35.

PPP

Table 8

36.

STAKEHOLDER ROLES

7 DOCUME NTS

PART E: FI NANCI AL PLAN


37.

ITEMISED COS TS

38.

RESOURCES PLAN

39.

COS TS

40.

REVENUE AND PAY-BACK

41.

RECOVERY OF O&M

42.

FINA NCIAL TIMELINE

43.

FALL-BACK PLAN

ANNEXURE 1

Smart City features

ANNEXURE 2

A-3 sheets (self-assessment )

ANNEXURE 3

max 20 sheets (A-4 and A -3)

ANNEXURE 4

Documents for Question 33

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

INSTRUCTIONS
1.

This document must be read along with the Smart City Mission Guidelines. An electronic version of
the SCPformat is also available on the website <smartcities.gov.in>
Follow: Downloads > Memos.

2.

The respons es must be within the word limits given. The font size must be 12 Arial, with 1.5 spacing,
left aligned paragraphs with one inch margins. All additional information must be given in 20 nos. A-4
size pages in Annexure 3.

3.

For the A rea-Based Proposal, only one Area should be selected. The A rea selected can be a
combination of one or more types of area-bas ed developments. This can be retrofitting or
redevelopment or greenfield alone or a combination of these, but the area delineated should be
contiguous and not at separate locations in the city.

4.

The Area-bas ed Development must contain all the Essential Features as per para 6.2 of the Mission
Guidelines. Please fill out the following checklist.
S.
No

Essential Feature

Confirm
if
included
()

Para. No.
in SCP

1.

Assured electricity supply with at least 10% of the Smart Citys


energy requirement coming from solar

Point 1 under Q 16

2.

Adequate water supply including waste wat er recycling and storm


water reuse

Point 2 under Q 16

3.

Sanitation including solid waste management

Point 3 under Q 16

4.

Rain water harvesting

Point 4 under Q 16

5.

Smart metering

Point 5 under Q 16

6.

Robust IT connectivity and digitalization

Point 6 under Q 16

7.

Pedestrian friendly pathways

Point 7 under Q 16

8.

Encouragement to non-motorised transport (e.g. walking and


cycling)

Point 8 under Q 16

9.

Intelligent traffic management

Point 9 under Q 16

10.

Non-vehicle streets/zones

Point 10 under
Q16

11.

Smart parking

Point 11 under
Q16

12.

Energy efficient street lighting

Point 12 under
Q16

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

13.

Innovative use of open spaces

Point 13 under
Q16

14.

Visible improvement in the A rea

Point 14 under
Q16

15.

Safety of citizens especially children, women and elderly

Point 15 under
Q16

16.

At least 80% buildings (in redevelopment and green-field) should


be energy efficient and green buildings

Point 16 under
Q16

17.

In green-field development, if housing is provided, at least 15%


should be in affordable housing category.

Point 17 under
Q16

18.

Additional smart applications, if any

Point 18-26 under


Q16

5. The pan-city Smart Solution should be IT enabled and improve governance or public services. Cities may
propose one or two such Smart Solution(s). If more than one solution is presented kindly use
supplementary template 'P an-City Proposal No 2'.
6. In order to make the proposal credible, all claims must be supported with government order, council
resolutions, legal changes, etc and such supporting documents must be attached as Annexure 4.
7. The Questions can be answered directly in this editable PDF file and can be saved on local computer,
before printing. Your submission in electronic form should contain:
1. The SCP in whole (92) pages
2. The Self Assessment Sheet (Annexure 2)
3. Additional 20 Sheets (Annexure 3)
4. Additional list of Documents (Annexure 4)
Electronic submission to be sent on DV D along wit h printed copies. 5 printed copies of the SCP
document (complet e in all respect) should be sent to MoUD along with the DVD containing the complete
electronic copy. The printed copies should be spiral bound as separate volumes.
It is advised to use latest version of Acrobat Reader (Acrobat XI or higher) to fill the form.
Acrobat Reader XI c an be downloaded from:
https://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/thankyou.jsp?ftpID= 5507&fileID=5519

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

SCORING DIVISION
TOTAL 100 POINTS
CITY-LEVEL:
AREA-BASED DEVELOPMENT:
PAN-CITY SOLUTION:

S.No.
1.
2.
3.
4.

S.No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

30
55
15

CITY LEVEL CRITERIA: 30%

Criteria
Vision and goals
Strategic plan
Citizen engagement
Baseline, KPIs, self-assessment and potential for
improvement

AREA-BASED DEVELOPMENT (ABD): 55%


Criteria
Smartness of proposal
Citizen engagement
Results orientation
Process followed
Implementation framework, including feasibility
and cost-effectiveness

%
5
10
10
5

%
7
5
15
3
25

PAN-CITY SOLUTION: 15%


(If more than one solution is proposed, each proposed solution
will be graded separately and the average of the two aggregate scores
will be awarded to the city toward the 15% overall weightage)
S.No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Criteria
Smartness of solution
Citizen engagement
Results orientation
Process followed
Implementation framework, including feasibility
and cost-effectiveness

%
3
1
5
1
5

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

A. CITY PROFILE
1. QUALITY OF LIFE
In the last three years, what efforts have been made by the city to improve livability, sustainability and
economic development? Give specific examples along with improvement with KPIs that are in t he
public domain and/ or can be validated. Your answer should cover, but not be restricted to (Describe in
max. 50 words each, mentioning the source of the data):
a. Transportation condition in the city

Public transportation in Aurangabad comprises 39 buses operated by MSRTC along 13


routes, and over 25,000 auto-rickshaws. MSRTC engaged 10 more buses in August
2015 to increase the existing daily ridership of approximately 12,500. 41 km of roads
have been re-laid, including construction of a flyover to ease traffic congestion.
(Source: MSTRC, MSRDC, AMC, RTO, Auto Rickshaw Union)

b. Water availability in the city and reduction in water wastage/ NRW

The 792.2-crore, 24x7 water supply project, being implemented under PPP, would be
completed by August 2017. The water supply per capita, water connection coverage and
NRW are 75 LPCD, 46% and 49%, respectively, which, on project completion (including
extended areas), would be 135 LPCD, 100% and 15%, respectively.
(Source: Prepared by AMC)

c. Solid waste management programs in the city

To improve collection and disposal efficiency, AMC has initiated action to collect and
segregate recyclable waste at the source by engaging 2,800 rag-pickers for segregation
before disposal and treatment. Presently, about 10% of the citys waste is composted
after the segregation of recyclable waste by engaging NGOs and rag-pickers.
(Source: Mechanical Department, Aurangabad Municipal Corporation; October 2015)

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d. Safety/ security conditions in the city

The safe city project, comprising video surveillance, tracking of police vans and
ambulances, central command centre, etc., is under implementation. Phase 1 (Rs 2 Cr) is
60% complete; Phase 2 (Rs 15.5 Cr) will be completed by 2016. A 100% LED street
lighting project is in the advanced preparation stage.
(Source: Aurangabad Municipal Corporation, October 2015)

e. Energy availability and reduction of outages in the city

The Aurangabad division (average load: 352 MW), with 269,955 users, receives
electricity from the grid. Distribution loss reduced from 41.85% in 2006-07 to 21.54% in
2014-15; while collection efficiency improved from 68.2% in 2006-07 to 98.5% in
2014-15, limiting AT&C losses to 21.87% in 2014-15. There are no scheduled outages.
(Source: Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Company Limited; October 2015)

f. Housing situation in the city, specifically role of municipality in expediting building plan approvals,
enhancing property tax collection, etc

Aurangabad has 250,000 residential properties and 53 slums, with a population of 2.20
Lakh. About 5,000 units have been built in the last three years. Building approvals would
be expedited from 60 days to less through e-governance. There are plans to reach 100%
coverage and 80% tax recovery by 2016-17.
(Source: Town Planning & BOT Department, AMC; October 2015)

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

2. ADMINISTRATIVE EFFICIENCY
In the last three years, what have been the changes in Administrative Efficiency due to the use of
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) (Describe in max. 50 words each, mentioning the
source of the data):
a. Overall attendance of functionaries

A biometric attendance system has been implemented in the Administrative Head Office
of AMC. The implementation of biometric systems in ward and divisional offices is in the
planning stage.
(Source: General Administration Division, AMC; October 2015)

b. Two-way communic ation between citizens and administration

AMC interacts with citizens through Janta Darbars and regular ward office meetings. A
monthly e-bulletin disseminates information about important schemes and development
projects. All major projects, such as the 24x7 water supply project and the underground
sewerage system, are undertaken after several rounds of public/stakeholder consultation.
(Source: IT Department, AMC; October 2015)

c. Use of e-Gov to enable hassle free access to statutory documents

As part of e-governance, online access to resources is facilitated for the payment of


property tax, audit reports, annual budgets, birth and death registrations, status of various
applications, project reports, citizen grievances, DC rules, RTI, etc. All procurements are
done by following the e-tendering process.
(Source: IT Department, AMC; October 2015)

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d. Dashboards that integrat e analytics and vis ualization of data

AMC currently doesnt employ analytics or dashboard preparation for regular activities as
penetration of prevalent IT systems is limited. With wider acceptance of technology
envisaged across the organization at headquarter and ward level offices going forward,
data centralization and visualization would be possible and used to support
decision-making.

e. Availability of basic information relevant to citizens

The AMC website and interaction forums provide easy access to information sought by
citizens. Periodic general body meetings provide timely insights into functions and
activities to elected public representatives. Project-wise financial budgets have been
published for FY2013-14 and FY2014-15.
(Source: IT & General Administration Division, AMC; October 2015)

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3. SWOT
Based on the detailed city profiling, what are the strengths and developmental areas of the city?
Conduct a detailed SWOT analysis of the city with all relevant metrics and data. (max 1000 words):

Aurangabad city, known as the capital of the Marathwada region, is one of the most
important urban centres in Maharashtra, with strong economic drivers in industry and
tourism.
STRENGTHS:
1. Strong Industrial Base:
Aurangabad has over 6,000 MSME and 170 large industries, including Bajaj Auto,
Skoda Auto, Audi India, Varroc, NRB Bearings, Wockhardt, Lupin, Videocon,
Siemens, Goodyear and Colgate-Palmolive.
One of the three auto clusters in Maharashtra was created in Aurangabad to enhance
quality and industrial output, making enterprises globally competitive.
Close proximity to DMIC clusters (Shendra and Bidkin) that are under development.
Easy availability of an industrial workforce from adjoining regions.
2. Tourism Capital of Maharashtra:
Two ASI- protected monuments are located in the city: Bibi- Ka- Maqbara and
Aurangabad caves, which drew 1,928,703 domestic and 21,199 foreign tourists
cumulatively in 2014-15. There are over two dozen heritage monuments,
complemented by arts and handicrafts, including Paithani and Himroo handwoven
silks, which can bolster city tourism.
Two UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Ajanta Caves and Ellora Caves, which attracted
1,682,472 domestic and 50,421 foreign tourists cumulatively in 2014-15 to
Aurangabad District, creating huge tourist footfalls in the city.
Availability of quality lodging and boarding facilities catering to all tourist segments.
3. Education
At 87.4, Aurangabads literacy rate is higher than the state/national literacy rates.
Educational hub with numerous institutions delivering quality education, from primary
school to graduate and postgraduate courses.
4. Location and Connectivity
Capital of Marathwada and divisional administrative headquarters.
Good connectivity via the national/state highway, railways and air supports the
growth of the industry, trade and tourism economy.

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WEAKNESSES
1. Inadequate core urban infrastructure to sustain and promote development
Urban mobility is constrained due to inadequate growth in the road network
compared to the city growth, and inadequate maintenance of the existing roads and
footpaths.
Limited coverage of utility infrastructure, such as water supply and sewerage, to only
46% and 60% of the citys households, respectively. The high cost of water is due to
high energy costs, as water is pumped from a dam 60 km away.
Inadequate solid waste management, with only about 50% of the 570 MT/day of
municipal solid waste being collected and disposed.
2. The large percentage of unauthorised housing (Gunthewari) and a large slum
population (2.2 lakhs in 53 clusters) due to the lack of affordable housing adversely
impacts the quality of services and financial efficiency.
3. Lack of supplementary tourism infrastructure, such as shopping arcades, museums,
amusement parks, etc. to complement heritage tourism.
4. Limited access to public transport, thus promoting auto-rickshaws as intermediate
transport and the ownership of private vehicles (CAGR of 12.47% for two-wheelers
and 10.23% for four-wheelers in 2010-15), leading to incremental traffic density,
congestion and pollution, exacerbated by an inadequate traffic management system
and the unavailability of parking solutions.
5. E-governance measures adopted in a piecemeal manner, limiting effectiveness.

OPPORTUNITIES
1. Aurangabad has the potential to emerge as the most preferred economic/industrial
destination, thereby attracting investments from national/international companies,
specifically in the automotive, engineering and pharmaceutical sectors.
2. Well poised to accelerate industrial growth by using the Make in India mission as
leverage to promote entrepreneurship in the region.
3. Potential to attract IT/ITeS industries, thus adding to the availability of a competitive,
literate workforce and learning from the success of the Vodafone and Idea
ITeS/BPOs.
4. The unutilised capacity at the existing airport has the potential to enhance regional
connectivity to boost tourism and meet the growing industry requirements.
5. The NagpurAurangabadMumbai super communication corridor project has been
approved and project preparation initiated, which will bolster regional connectivity and
economic development. A dry port, 40 km from Aurangabad, has been proposed by
the Union Government, reducing transportation costs and supporting import/export
through JNPT, thereby boosting industrial development.

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THREATS
1. Sluggish growth is observed in the development and upgrade of infrastructure, thereby
increasing the probability of the migration of skills to developed urban centres.
2. Relatively low infrastructure growth in the region reduces investment attractiveness,
adversely impacting the creation of opportunities for citizens and the immigrant
population.
3. Sustained measures are needed to improve the social and environmental
infrastructure to enhance the quality of life and city attractiveness.
4. Being part of a water-scarce region affected by frequent droughts, the depleting

Upgrading core infrastructure services to increase the water supply network coverage,
improve the effectiveness of the waste water management system and reduce waste
generation by implementing an efficient municipal solid waste management system are
required. Deriving the maximum benefit from development requires the implementation of
smart solutions across utility corridors to ensure centralised control and effective
monitoring.
Adopting intelligent traffic management systems and increasing the capacity of the
existing public transport to improve urban mobility, in addition to promoting walking and
cycling by providing the requisite supportive infrastructure.
Addressing concerns on transparency and ensuring effective implementation; adopting
e-governance across functions with intercommunication systems to be integrated at the
institutional level.
Implementing efficient energy management practices to reduce the ecological footprint,
complemented by financial efficiency by using solar energy for public utilities and
deploying LED street lighting systems with central control to increase efficiency.
An incremental supply of housing units is required to limit the proliferation of slums and
unauthorised housing structures by undertaking the development of affordable housing.
Stimulating economic growth by developing the central business district is required to
provide the requisite infrastructure to support the development of the service industry and
entrepreneurship.

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4. STRATEGIC FOCUS AND BLUEPRINT


Based on the SWOT analysis, what should be the strat egic focus of t he city and the strategic blueprint
for its development over next 5-10 years to make it more livable and sustainable? (max 500 words):

The citys strategic focus is to position itself as one of the most vibrant economic hubs,
using its strong presence in the industrial and tourism sectors as leverage, while
addressing some of the inadequacies in the availability of basic infrastructure, affordable
housing, water distribution, waste management and sanitation services, citizen
engagement, and operational and financial efficiency.
The strategic blueprints for development works over the next 10 years are:
Development of Core Infrastructure:
Water and sewerage infrastructure
In the next five years, the city plans to achieve100% coverage of water and sewer
connections by completing the execution of projects under implementation, viz. the
24/7 water supply scheme and the sewerage system, including a 216-MLD sewerage
treatment plant under the Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small and
Medium Towns (UIDSSMT). AMC has also sought funds under the Atal Mission for
Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) for water supply and sewerage
projects to connect the newly-merged villages in the city as well as unauthorised
(Guntewari) colonies.
Urban mobility
Development and improvement of the mobility network, including achieving 100%
connectivity of roads and good pedestrian walkways, provision of parking spaces,
including multi-storeyed parking zones at strategic locations, establishing a public
transport system using clean fuel whereby feasibility to introduce rail based transit
system such as mono-rail/ metro-rail may be explored, and an intelligent traffic
management system. The strategy would be to enhance the commuting experience
for citizens and tourists.
Establishment of affordable housing and slum redevelopment
As the city has a large population living in the slum areas, the strategic priority is to
undertake slum redevelopment to create about 45,000 dwellings with appropriate
services and social infrastructure.

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Environment infrastructure & services


One of the most important strategic initiatives
is to achieve a zero-garbage status in next 10 years by implementing a municipal
solid waste management system, including collection and segregation at source,
processing, and recycling (including waste-to-energy mechanisms), to become the
most clean city as well as achieve self-sufficiency in energy management. Recycling
and the reuse of sewage water for non-potable and industrial use would be one of the
priority development works.
E- Governance
Development of strong e-governance and an IT platform, including a citizen services
portal, virtual digital experience centre (V-DEC), Aurangabad city mobile application,
GIS-enabled project works management, integrated file movement system,
document management system, e-vault for citizens, AMC intranet portal for
cross-domain collaboration, a city operations dashboard covering vital city domains,
IT infrastructure management for AMC data centres, and web- and mobile-enabled
services and applications to enhance citizen engagement and services.
Institutional Framework
Establishment of an institutional framework and infrastructure services to enhance
tourist attractions, including a virtual digital experience centre (V-DEC); hop-on,
hop-off services; promotion and branding; heritage walks; signage and policies, to
attract investment in this segment.

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5. CITY VISION AND GOALS


What should be the vision of the city based on the strategic blueprint? How does the Vision Statement
relate specifically to the citys profile and the unique challenges and opport unities present in your city?
Define overall as pirations and goals for the city along with how you see key metrics of livability and
sustainability improving over the next 5-10 years? (max 1000 words):

VISION FOR AURANGABAD


A healthy city that is environment-friendly, citizen-centric and convenient, and to advance
the citys status as a tourism and cultural centre by providing world-class infrastructure
and services

Guiding principles of the vision


Converting challenges and shortcomings into opportunities
Efficient management of natural resources through conservation, recycling and
reuse, as well as to be environmentally conscious
Transparent and responsible governance through strong commitment and citizen
engagement, and delivering quality services through the use of the latest technology
tools
Fiscal responsibility management and efficient use of financial resources so as to
economise city management costs and provide value additions to citizens
Striving for continuous improvement through capacity and skill building of city staff, to
deliver high quality services
Focus on competitiveness by building existing strengths and responding to
opportunities
Preserve and promote cultural diversity
Focus on sustainable economic growth
The vision for the city of Aurangabad has been formulated through extensive citizen
consultation and an understanding of their aspirations, and appreciating the city profile,
challenges and opportunities, to implement transformative measures to achieve the
status of being the most attractive and liveable city.
CITY PROFILE:
Aurangabad city, the largest urban centre of the Marathwada region, with a population of
1.2 million and an area of 170 sq km, holds significant strategic relevance to the
development and growth of the region as well as the State of Maharashtra. The citys
strong cultural heritage and diversity (over two dozen monuments, art and handicrafts),
high literacy level (87.4%), important education and health centres (300+), strong
industrial workforce and culture (300,000+), and strong industrial presence (6000+) are
its core attributes that have not been adequately harnessed or leveraged. The citys
growth is deterred by its inadequacies in civic infrastructure, including roads and public
transportation, water and sanitation, environment degradation, housing, governance and
fiscal status
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Besides being one of the important industrial centres in the state, with five industrial
estates and many large Indian and multinational corporations, Aurangabad is also well
connected by national highways, railways and airport. It holds strategic advantage due to
its proximity to large industrial cities, such as Nashik and Pune, as many small and
medium enterprises have an established presence in Aurangabad to cater to OEM player
in the Pune and Nashik markets, apart from other national and international markets.
CHALLENGES:
Slow pace of infrastructure development due to the lack of adequate fiscal resources
Significant population increase in the last decade and a half, due to the incorporation
of fringe areas that are not adequately supported by infrastructure growth
Rainfall deficient region; lack of water management measures; environmental
degradation due to discharge of waste water into rivers and nullahs; air pollution due
to high traffic growth and congestion
The large slum population and unauthorised housing colonies add to the fiscal and
physical strain on the city
Slow in adopting technological tools and platforms to improve governance and
administrative efficiency
OPPORTUNITIES:
Aurangabad has inherent potential to transform itself into a Tier 1 urban centre, as it
is considered to be strategically positioned to contribute to the nation's economic
growth.
The proposed DMIC ShendraBidkin MIP will showcase Maharastras manufacturing
industries. It will be a vital large scale industrial cluster, supporting industrial power in
western Maharashtra, and is likely to generate over half a million jobs in the district
over next three decades.
Aurangabad is strategically located to emerge as the next sought-after trade city, a
venue for manufacturing-related research and design, as well as a hi-tech hub.
Well-developed tourism infrastructure and amenities can transform the city into a
global tourist destination, creating large employment and economic opportunities.
The development of national highways, the NagpurMumbai Super Expressway and
the dry port at Jalna will add impetus to the opportunities in the region.
ASPIRATIONS OF THE CITIZENS:
The citizen engagement and consultation process has helped define the overall
aspirations for the city, which is expressed as follows:
"Aurangabad is to become the most convenient, clean, safe, pollution- and slum-free,
tourist-friendly city, with good quality infrastructure and services at affordable prices. It
must offer good employment opportunities, while retaining its unique identity as a
heritage and cultural centre. There should be transparency and effective governance
through the use of digital platforms to make civic services easily accessible."

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

CITY GOALS:
To achieve 100% adequacy in the provision of core infrastructure and basic services
in the next 10 years.
Citizen-centric city: To be an inclusive city by creating an environment for citizen
engagement at all levels by adopting fair and transparent practices while delivering
high quality services, including a quick response mechanism.
Environment-friendly city: To be the most eco-friendly city by introducing an
institutional framework to encourage conservation and the reuse of natural resources;
use of renewable energy, including solar and waste-to-energy sources; water
harvesting; and the development and restoration of green spaces.
Fiscal self-sufficiency and sustainability: To adopt best practices and technologies to
achieve financial sustainability through the recovery of user fees and taxes.
Slum-free city: To be a slum-free city in the next 15 years by creating adequate
affordable housing through slum redevelopment and other measures.

Over next 10 years, the following improvements are envisaged in Aurangabads liveability
and sustainability metrics:
Housing: The development of affordable housing, including slum redevelopment, along
with provisions for basic services and amenities, would significantly improve living
conditions in the city.
Health: 100% coverage of water supply, sanitation and waste management would
improve the quality of health in the city due to better environmental conditions.
Economy: Higher income due to increased job opportunities as well as savings due to
better availability of public services, such as transportation, water management, etc.
Better quality of infrastructure to attract higher investments, such as tourists visiting the
city, leading to a higher GDP.
Sustainability: Initiatives in water management, waste water recycling, recycling of
waste, energy management, development of gardens and green areas as well as and
e-governance are expected to create long-term fiscal and physical benefits for the city.

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6. CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT
How has city leveraged citizen engagement as a tool to define its vision and goals? Specifically
describe (max 150 words each):
a. Extent of citizens involved in shaping vision and goals

Citizen input highlighted areas that are constrained or lacking, and are essential for
sustained economic growth and to improve living standards. The initial input received
was collated and a draft city vision compiled, which was again shared with citizens in
subsequent interactions. The draft vision encompassed the key areas on which the
majority of the responses were focused, and, during public engagements, the latent need
to channelize efforts towards achieving the city vision was observed. The draft city vision
was refined to align with the aspirations expressed, and comprehensively embody the
citizens vision for the city. The city vision aims to incite a sense of ownership among
citizens to make Aurangabad a Smart City and provide a guiding framework for future
projects to be undertaken for the elevation of service levels, leading to sustainable
development and an improvement in the quality of life.

b. Engagement strategy to get best results from citizens

An ideal mix of above-the-line and below-the-line advertising of the Smart City Mission
was undertaken to spread awareness. The strategy to spread awareness and educate
citizens about the mission was considered essential to receive constructive feedback on
key problem areas and prioritise areas where remedial action is desired. As relatively few
citizens have access to the Internet, field surveys were undertaken to collect opinions
across demographics to ensure a comprehensive compilation of citizen views. On project
initiation, a digital channel was established as a primary source to spread awareness
before undertaking zone-level meetings, focus group discussions, student engagement
and stakeholder consultation. Citizen engagement was sustained through newspaper
articles, radio jingles, hoardings/banners, drop boxes and social media. Once the
targeted citizen acceptance of the mission was achieved, our approach of reaching out to
citizens in phases enabled us to acquire valuable insights to enrich our proposed
solutions and the envisaged development.

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c. Different means of citizen engagement adopted

Meetings in the six zones were conducted and 40 drop boxes placed across the city to
understand the issues faced by citizens. Two workshops were conducted for corporation
employees and elected officials to augment their understanding and share probable
development options. Road shows at eight colleges addressed over 2,500 students. Input
from representatives of numerous sectoral associations and experts were received during
three round table conferences.
Intensive coverage via regional newspapers and an online presence via Facebook,
Twitter, MyGov.in and aurangabadsmartcity.co.in reached out to the masses. Over
135,000 responses were received through field surveys and input from institutions sought
via Google forms. WhatsApp messaging, 399,500 SMSes and 25,000 emails
complemented public interaction and the awareness campaign. The mission was
introduced through 3,080 FM radio playbacks, and information on mission-focussed
competitions (essay writing, photography) disseminated through newspaper
advertisements. Smart City vans campaigned for a month, informing the public about the
project.

d. Extent of coverage of citizen engagement in different media and channels

Various activities undertaken as part of the Smart City Mission, such as zone-level
meetings, general body meetings, round table conferences, college road shows and
progress on area development conceptualisation and pan-city solutions, were covered
extensively by more than eight regional daily newspapers. Interaction with newspaper
editors and reporters was conducted to elucidate the background of the project to solicit
support for public consultation.

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e. Incorporation of citizen inputs in overall vision

The city vision has been derived to capture key areas where efforts need to be
channelised post intensive public consultation. Advancement in the quality and
availability of basic civic services, such as water supply, urban mobility, waste
management, safety and security, thus enhancing the tourism and industrial potential,
highlighted by citizens, is the basis for the formulation of the city vision. Due to growing
awareness about sustainability and environmental issues, citizens aspire to adopt
environment-friendly service offerings, such as waste and water recycling, and solar
power. With increasing access to Internet, improved governance using technology as
leverage is envisaged by citizens, which would increase convenience and ensure that
citizen-centric initiatives are undertaken by authorities in a well-planned manner.

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7. SELF-ASSESSMENT: BASELINE
Define the baseline for your city based on self-assessment criteria given in Annexure 2 (column H).
Marks will be awarded based on how well you know y our city (Fill column I in the self assessment
sheet in Annexure 2 with as many KPIs and "hard metrics" as possible; max 50 words per cell)
Note: Attach Annexure 2

8. SELF-ASSESSMENT: ASPIRATIONS & IMPERATIVES


Emerging from the vision statement, assess the qualitative or quantifiable outcomes that need to be
achieved for each of t he Smart City Features described in Annexure 2 (c olumn J). In column K
describe the biggest single initiative/solution that would get each feature of the city to achieve
advanced characteristics (eg. increasing share of renewable energy generation in the city by X
percent). Note that a single initiative/solution may impact a number of features (eg. improved
management of public spaces may ease congestion on roads as well as improve public health).
(Fill in Annexure 2; max 50 words per cell)
Note: Attach Annexure 2

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B. AREA-BASED PROPOSAL
The area-based proposal is the key element of the proposal. An area-based proposal will identify an area of
the city that has been selected t hrough desk research, analysis, meetings with public representatives,
prominent citizens, and citizen engagement, as the appropriate site for either of three types of development:
retrofitting (approx. 500 acres), redevelopment (approx. 50 acres) or Greenfield development (approx. 250
acres).

This area will be developed into a smart area, which incorporates all the Essential

Features/Elements prescribed in the Mission Guidelines and any additional features that are deemed to be
necessary and appropriate.
Mapping of information and data is a key part of your Smart City Proposal. Create a suitable Base Map of
your city with all the relevant systems and networks as they exist today, showing its physical, administrative
and other characteristics, such as natural features, heritage areas, areas prone to flooding, slums, etc. The
base map should show the regional context in which your city is located and should contain the spatial and
physical layout/morphology of your city, the street network, the open and green spaces, the geographical
features and landmarks and the infrastructure, including for transportation, water supply, sewerage,
electricity distribution and generation, and so on.
Using the base map, represent, with the most effective method available, as much information and data
about the Area selected for area-based development. Only one Area should be selected and attached
in the form of a map containing the spatial and physi cal layout/morphology of the Area, the street
network, the open and green spaces, the geographical features and landmarks and the
infrastructure, including for transportation, water supply, sewerage, electricity distribution and
generation, and so on. The Essential Elements and additional features that are propos ed to be part of the
area-based development should be included. Describe, using mainly graphic means (maps, diagrams,
pictures, etc.) the propos ed area-based development, including the project boundaries, connectivity,
significant relationships, etc.
(max. 2 nos. of A -3 size sheets)

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9. SUMMARY
Summarize your idea for an area-based development. (max. 100 words )

Area-based development must aim to be a:


trendsetter, by creating the best standards of urban benchmarks by adopting smart
principles to positively affect the quality of life and socio-economic/environment status,
and create economic and employment opportunities. The use of ICT and a digital
platform, citizen-centric governance, financial and service efficiency must be key
attributes of city management.
key enabler in facilitating similar development across the city by triggering citizen
aspirations, and making it replicable and sustainable by understanding its profile,
challenges, capacity and socio-economic drivers.

10. APPROACH & METHODOLOGY


What is the approach and methodology followed in selecting/identifying the area-based development?
Describe the reasons for your choice based on the following (max. 1000 words):
a. The city profile
b. Citizen opinion and engagement
c. Opinion of the elected representatives
d. Discussion with urban planners and sector experts
e. Discussion with suppliers/ partners

APPROACH & METHODOLOGY:


Step I: Understanding the city profile to identify the interventions required through:
Extensive field visits;
Primary questionnaire surveys;
Secondary data collection;
Consultation with parastatal department/stakeholders/experts
Research.
Step II: Preliminary identification of 14 sites:
Redevelopment 9, Greenfield 4, Retrofitting 1
Selection criteria
Assessment of the city profile to identify prospective areas of intervention;
Site conditions
Multi-criteria analysis matrix with the following parameters (indicative list):
Connectivity; neighbourhood profile (socio-economic attributes); suitability of the
site for the respective type of area development project; availability of vacant,
contiguous land in the specified quantum; land ownership; etc.
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Step III: Stakeholder validation, two rounds of shortlisting and final selection through:
Citizen consultations;
Opinions of elected representatives and administrative officials;
Discussions with urban planners and sector experts;
Discussions with suppliers/partners.
Rationale for the selection of the proposed area based development on the basis of given
parameters:
RATIONALE 1: CITY PROFILE: IDENTIGFICATION OF AREAS FOR INTERVENTION
A. City Growth Pattern- Lack of Integrated mixed-use development with emphasis on
affordable housing
Indicators:
City area: 170 sq km; Population: 13.60 lakh;
Urban sprawl; Overall population density (pph): 41 (in 1991), 63 (in 2001), 82 (at
present), more than 1,800 pph (core areas);
Growth direction: extension of the south, east and south-east city boundaries
towards the ShendraBidkin corridor, Waluj area, etc.; Growth corridors: Beed
Bypass and Paithan Road;
Population growth rate: more than 70% in the last four decades;
Only 3035% of the city is under developed land use;
Substantial area in industrial locations in Waluj, Chitegaon; Upcoming industrial
area: ShendraBidkin DMIC corridor;
Number of enterprises: 8,730; Estimated workers:3.60 Lakh;
The slum population of 2.21 lakh and the large number of industrial labours call for
affordable housing;
No organised/model township development in the area;
Land availability in Chikalthana will bring in economies for large developments. This
will help make state-of-the-art infrastructure available to users at an affordable,
economic rate.
B. Tourism and hospitality
Indicators:
Proximity to UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Ajanta and Ellora caves;
Heritage predominance: Tourism Capital of Maharashtra;
Average annual tourist footfall: 13 lakh, with 95% leisure tourists; Foreign tourists:
~50,000;
Average tourist spending pattern: Rs 2,0004000 per day per person;
Average tourist duration of stay: 2 days.
C. Skill development
Indicator: Upcoming industrial areas
At present, an integrated Greenfield township project with affordable housing is the
best suited area development proposal for the town the first-of-its-kind smart model
mixed-use development and potentially replicable township project. The proposal will
tap the regions tourism potential and harness the development effects of the
upcoming BidkinShendra DMIC corridor for the town & region. It will act as a growth
catalyst for the area, local economy and improve the employability of local resources.
Chikalthana is connected via three major highways: the AurangabadJalna road,
Jalgaon Bypass Road and the upcoming MumbaiNagpur Expressway, and is ideal for
such development. Its proximity to Shendra and the availability of vacant land in the
area especially 125 acres of Government land further improves Chikalthanas merit for
such development.
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RATIONALE 2: CITIZEN OPINION AND ENGAGEMENT


Citizen sensitisation about the area-based development proposal through:
Ward-wise public consultation across six municipal zones;
Intensive coverage (300+ articles) in regional newspapers (8+ )
an outreach of 112,121 ON Face Book
Discussions posted on MyGov.in; 12000+ suggestions on WhatsApp
Youtube uploads, recording more than 167 views; 44 followers on Twitter
Radio publicity through jingles broadcast more than 3,000 times;
Bulk email of more than 25,000; Bulk SMS of approximately four Lakh;
Campaigning via smart city vans across 99 ward for a month;
Campaigning via banners and hoardings at more than 50 locations; and
Road shows at eight locations.
Essay Writing (99 Entries) & Photography Competition (69 Entries)
Public consultation for the selection of the desired area-based development:
Polling (offline and online) herein 5100 votes were case. Around 80% of the
participants chose Greenfield development. Offline surveys were conducted through
40 drop boxes across several locations in the town. There were 5450 offline
suggestions; 700+ feedback on www.aurangabadsmartcity.co.in
Door-to-door feedback survey: 135,000 forms were collected; around 94.8%
participants voted for Greenfield development.
Consultations with a majority of owners of the land parcels constituting the
Chikalthana site. Most of the landowners consented to the Greenfield development
and expressed their willingness to support the development.
RATIONALE 3: OPINION OF ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES
Two orientation workshops for corporation employees and elected officials;
Regular interaction and feedback sessions with administrative officials and elected
representatives;
Presentation of the 14 shortlisted options for which the Deputy Mayor, other elected
members, administrative officials and the media were present, and a further shortlisting
of four options was undertaken. The options are:
Redevelopment at GulmandiShahgunj & Mill Corner
Greenfield development at Chikalthana & Nakshatrawadi
Further shortlisting of the two Greenfield projects only
AMC General Body passed a resolution selecting Chikalthana Greenfield as the
area-based development project at their monthly meeting on 21 November 2015.
RATIONALE 4: DISCUSSION WITH URBAN PLANNER & SECTOR EXPERTS
Orientation in over 12 degree and engineering colleges & schools attended by more
than 5,000 students; workshops for industrial associations and other focus groups
Three Round Table Conferences attended by representatives of numerous engineer,
architect and builder associations, as well as sector experts from the urban planning,
The proposed development has received substantial support and valuable suggestions
from the Sector experts. They have opined that the logistics, site conditions and other
technical parameters of the Chikalthana site favourable for such development.
RATIONALE 5: DISCUSSION WITH SUPPLIERS/ PARTNERS
Groups like Shapoorji Pallonji, Samsung, Wipro, Oracle, etc., have expressed
willingness to partner the development, subject to appropriate terms and conditions.
Hence, an integrated mixed-use township development spread over 582.5 acres in
Chikalthana, with the core theme being tourism and hospitality, affordable housing and
skill development centres, has been selected as the Greenfield area-based development
proposal for Aurangabad, in consensus with the stakeholders.

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11. KEY COMPONENTS


List the key components of your area-based development proposal (eg. buildings, landscaping, on-site
infrastructure, water recycling, dual piping for water supply, etc.)? (max. 250 words )

Key components:
1. Mixed-use development (total area: 582.5 acres);
2. Tourism-based infrastructure and amenities;
3. Affordable housing: EWS, LIG, MIG
4. Skill development centres.
Land use distribution:
Residential (41%): EWS, LIG, MIG, HIG, villa/ twin villas, row houses; 20% Affordable
Housing
Commercial and tourism (9%): Tourism (40%), offices, shopping centres;
Social (15%): Hospitals, Educational Institutes, Skill Development Centre, Police
Station, Fire Station;
Open spaces (16%): Tourism amenities (75%), playgrounds, plazas, landscaping,
plantations
Transportation (19%): Roads, walkways, cycle tracks, parking.
Detail Master Plan provided in Annexure 3
Salient features
The integrated township would be strategically aligned to economic drivers in the
industry and tourism sectors.
Tourism and hospitality constitutes 18% of the overall land use, including open
spaces for Tourism use.
Target population density: 320 pph; Open space to built-form ratio: 70:30
Open spaces in various forms, such as central plazas, public squares, amphitheatres,
non-motorised promenades and street malls with local art and handicraft displays
Landscaping around utilities: trees along cycle tracks, water fountains (recycled
water); plantations at sit-outs, roundabouts, intersections, etc.
Design for differently-abled users: barrier-free designing
Walkability
Infrastructure
15-km mobility network: vehicular carriageways, cycle tracks, walkways,
designs, smart parking, intelligent traffic management system
Continuous water supply system: smart metering, dual pipeline network for potable
water supply and reuse of recycled waste water
Sewerage and intelligent solid waste management systems.
Energy-efficient street lighting
Electricity supply: underground cabling, solar energy
Dedicated service corridor for all utilities

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12. SMART URBAN FORM


Describe the smart characteristics of the proposed development that relate to urban form (eg.
uncluttered public places, mixed-use, open spaces, walkability) and how these will be incorporated.
(max. 250 words)

Smart Urban characteristics proposed in the development are as follows:


1. Planned and organised public places
Public-squares, assembly-plazas, neighbourhood central plaza, etc. interspersed with
built up forms
Innovative, smart, intermittent recreational areas with Wi-Fi zones, safety and
security surveillance, real-time-display-boards, etc.
2. Open spaces, gardens and landscaping
Proposed Built form to open space ratio: 30:70; green space centric development 70
acres of open land for the hospitality and tourism hub
Approximately 4 lakh plantations along the utility corridor, intersections, cul-de-sacs,
medians, etc.
Central parks, gardens, playgrounds etc. integrated in all clusters
3. Mixed-use development
Planned, efficient integration of retail, office, residential, hotel, recreation and other
functions following the principles of green urbanism
Street malls, dedicated hawker zones, convenient shopping proposed within
residential neighbourhoods, etc.
4. Easy pedestrian movement and non- motorised zones
Pedestrian-oriented development based on filtered permeability
15-km network of pedestrian sidewalks and 31 km cycle tracks on both sides of the
carriageway, each track measuring 3 m; automatic boom barriers
Designed promenade
5. Dedicated service corridor
Utility corridor (3 m) and storm water section (3 m) on both sides of roads
6. Organic grid iron pattern of roads with decentralised parking approach
7. Green buildings (90% of buildings)
8. Differently-abled design features
Barrier-free design, including ramps for all approaches, specific pavement design for
the visually-impaired, indicators for level changes, etc.
9. Signage and street amenities
Smart displays and interactive signage
Smart street amenities: light poles with sensors, garbage bins with RFID tags, etc.
10. Urban design norms
Well-designed urban design norms for built forms, common area, elevation features,
etc.

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13. CONVERGENCE AGENDA


In Table 1, list the Missions/Programmes/Schemes of the Government of India (eg. AMRUT, HRIDAY,
SBM, IPDS, Shelter for All, Digital India, Make in India, Skill India) and relevant external projects and
describehow your proposal will achieve convergence with these,in terms of human and financial
resources, common activities and goals. (max. 50 words per cell)
S.No

Missi on/Programme/
Scheme/Project

TABLE 1

How to achieve convergence

Atal Mission for Urban Rejuvenation and


Transformation (AMRUT)

Laying of Water supply Network: The


Aurangabad Municipal Corporation already
has a well-laid distribution network. The trunk
network can be extended to the project area.
Sewerage: Setting up of a sewerage
treatment plant for the project and extension
of the trunk sewer
Mobility: Laying of a 31-km cycle track and
pedestrian walkway within the project area.

Integrated Power Development Scheme/ Grid


Connected Rooftop Small Solar Plant

Solar-based street lights


Rooftop solar panels on all buildings, to
generate 20 MW daily for water heating and
lighting common areas, emergency lighting.
Extensive use of solar panels on the
southwest facade of commercial buildings.
Additional energy can be used for street
lights in the city.

Digital India

Central command area to monitor water


supply, sewerage, electricity, CCTV, piped
gas and broadband network.
Implementation of meters, e-governance and
mobile-based applications.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S.No

Missi on/Programme/
Scheme/Project

TABLE 1

How to achieve convergence

Swachh Bharat Mission

Solid waste management (estimated


generation- 10 MT/D)
Development of an integrated solid waste
management system with segregation at
source; door to door collection, recycling of
bio-degradable elements
Implementation of smart features like of
RFIDs tags/readers for transport vehicles and
collection bins.

Skill India

Seven hectares of land have been allocated for


lease to an industrial corporation/association to
set up a skill upgrade and training centre, with
a common facilitation centre with cubical units,
to set up production units for start-up SME
entrepreneurs.

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14. CONVERGENCE IMPLEMENTATION


Describe how the convergence will be implemented? For example, convergence with IP DS will be
credible if smart city elements (e.g. smart metering, underground cabling, shifting of transformers) are
included in the DP R being prepared for IPDS. If, a DP R has already been prepared, then the smart
elements should be included in the form of a supplementary DPR. Furthermore, according to the IPDS
Guidelines the DPR has to be approved by the State Government and sent to the Ministry of P ower,
Government of India. All these have to be complet ed before submitting the proposal. (max. 350 words )

The implementation plan for convergence is as follows:


Water supply and sewerage:
A supplementary DPR/ Service Level Improvement Plan (SLIP) will be prepared for the
proposed water supply and the sewerage treatment plant under AMRUT for the
area-based development, integrating it with the ongoing water supply (PPP) and
sewerage project for the city (under UIDSSMT).
Integration of ICT enabled features like smart metering and dual-pipe water supply into
the proposed project.
The supplementary DPR will be integrated in the State Annual Action Plan (SAAP) for
final State level approval.
Pedestrian network and cycle tracks:
A Service Level Improvement Plan (SLIP) will be prepared for the pedestrian network
and cycle tracks for the area-based development under AMRUT.
The SLIP will be integrated in the SAAP for final approval.
A DPR will be prepared based on the approval before implementation
Solid waste management:
A bankable, financially-viable DPR, with a viable financial model aligned with the
Governments goals outlined in the National Urban Sanitation Policy (NUSP) 2008,
SWM rules, advisories, Central Public Health and Environmental Engineering
Organisation (CPHEEO) manuals (including cost recovery mechanisms), O&M
practices and service-level benchmark advisories released by the MoUD will be
prepared.
The DPR duly apprised and approved by the State High Powered Committee will be
posed for Swachh Bharat Mission
Electricity and solar energy under IPDS/GCRTSS
A DPR prepared as per the relevant guidelines of the schemes will be submitted to
MSEDCL / State Level Distribution Reforms Committee(DRC) for approval and
recommendation for Central Financial Assistance

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Digital India
The following features of the area-based development can be covered under this scheme:
Information infrastructure, such as optical fibres, Cloud Enabled Data Centres, etc.
E-governance features, such as online applications, online data repositories, online
grievance redressal, etc.
GIS-based decision-making for project planning, conceptualisation, design and
development.
Mobile-based emergency services, etc.
Skill India
The development of the skill development centre and training modules can be linked to the
Skill India scheme under the Skill India mission. The training modules can be decided as
per current vocational traits, business trends, etc.

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15. RISKS
What are the three greatest risks that could prevent the success of the area-based proposal? In Table
2, describe each risk, its likelihood, the likely impact and the mitigation you propose. (max. 50 words
per cell)
TABLE 2
Ri sk

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation

Availability of land

Moderate

High
Project phasing, with
Land size and profile
the first phase of
are the major
implementation being
determinants for area
on the Government
allocation and
land parcel
designing
Resizing and
It would defer the
redesigning of the
project planning,
project to maximise
finalisation and
profitability
subsequently,
Selection of an
implementation
alternative land parcel
It would affect project
feasibility due to price
escalations over time
It would create
obstructions in the
projects progress
especially for
procuring Government
grants/ aids

Marketability

Low

High impact
Products designed to
Unsold inventory
cater to all sections
Reduction in private
and segments of
sector interest
society
Implementation will be Proposed to be
difficult for the later
developed as a
phases of
big-ticket project to
development of the
bring in big names in
project
the real estate
Impact on project size
development sector
Utilities can be
provided on an
economic scale with
government funding to
attract private
participation

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

TABLE 2
Ri sk

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation

Administrative
responsiveness

low

High
Public consensus for
Significant for land
the implementation of
amalgamation for the
the project and
area-based
consent of the l
development and
landowners of the
statutory
majority share of the
approvals/sanctions,
land parcels have
exemptions, etc. ;
already been obtained
untimely execution of
to facilitate the
which may result in
process
deferring the projects Roping in private
The financial model
participation as much
will be impacted in
as possible for more
case of absence of
effective
Government
implementation
facilitation for project
funding under various
convergence schemes
and a proper
administrative push

Lack of private sector


interest

Medium

High
Sourcing funds from
The project structure
Government grants
and financial model
under Smart City
might be impacted,
convergence schemes
with a significant effect and development of
on the design
the project in Phases
products/mix and
in sync with market
implementation
forces;
Severe impact on
Resizing of project
project affected
Funding through debt
people
subject to appropriate
terms and conditions

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

TABLE 2
Ri sk

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation

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16. ESSENTIAL FEATURES ACHIEVEMENT PLAN


Describe a plan for achieving the Essential Feat ures in your area-based proposal. Importantly,
accessible infrastructure for the differently-abled should be included. List the inputs (eg. resources)
that will be required for the activities that you will conduct, leading to the outputs. Please note that all
Essential Elements, item-wise, have to be included in the area-based propos al. (max. 2000 words)

Inputs for all the essential elements type-wise, are given hereunder:
1. Continuous electricity supply with at least 10% of the smart citys energy requirement
coming from solar energy
i. Layout of a grid system, comprising a dedicated electrical sub-station, underground
cabling for distribution and transmission through dedicated service corridors,
ancillary fittings, etc.
ii. Layout for grid connected or off-grid electricity from solar energy, comprising
rooftop solar panels on various on-site locations, street light poles, building surfaces,
etc.; macro/micro grid arrangement
iii. Smart meters
iv. RFID Asset Tagging and Tracking set-up; monitoring technology such as SCADA
(with integrated RFID readers), etc.
2. Adequate water supply, including waste water recycling and storm water reuse
i. Layout for potable water supply, comprising pumping sources, water treatment
plants, storage and an underground piped distribution network for potable water
supply to individual units. The entire network would be accommodated in the
dedicated service corridor.
ii. Layout for the reuse of waste water, comprising a piped network for the collection of
toilet and kitchen waste water (dual pipeline for gray and black water) to sewerage
treatment plants (STP); piped network for the circulation of the treated disposal from
the STP for reuse in landscaping, gardening, flushing, fire hydrants, etc. via tertiary
treatment plants. The entire network would be accommodated in the dedicated
service corridor.
iii. Water requirement: 20 MLD; Sewage: 16 MLD
iv. Smart meters to supply potable and recycled water
v. Water management system through GIS-based mapping of the network and
geo-referenced appurtenance for water supply
vi. Dynamic modelling / analytics integrated-GIS / SCADA (RFID-enabled) system
along the sewerage network for performance and asset management
vii. Installations to monitor the quality of waste water discharge from the STP and
tertiary plants
viii. Smart manholes with ultrasonic sensors integrated with the GSM modem to
monitor sewerage levels
3. Sanitation, including solid waste management
i. Layout for waste water collection, comprising a piped network of sewers (trunk
sewer lines, separate for gray and black water) and an STP. Sewer lines would be
accommodated in the dedicated service corridor.
ii. Smart metering for recycled water supply
iii. Dynamic modeling / analytics integrated-GIS / SCADA (RFID enabled) system
along the sewerage network for performance and asset management
iv. Installations to monitor the quality of the waste water discharge from the STP and
tertiary plants
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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

v. Smart manholes with ultrasonic sensors integrated with the GSM modem to monitor
sewerage levels
vi. Central command system for distribution and monitoring
vii. Provision of adequate public toilets
viii. Smart solid waste management, comprising the segregation of solid waste at the
source into biodegradable and non-biodegradable (for households and public
places) waste via household and community bins with RFID tags; common refuge
chute for buildings; GPS and RFID reader-enabled door-to-door garbage collection
vehicles; transfer station for the composting of biodegradable waste and temporary
storage of non-biodegradable items to be transported to AMC.
ix. Formulation and enforcement of regulations, including penalty and incentive
structures for overuse of resources.
4. Rainwater harvesting
i. Layout for rainwater collection, comprising a piped network for the collection of
rooftop rainwater from individual buildings and directing it into ground water
recharge bores spread intermittently across the site;
ii. Around 200 ML of rainwater is estimated to be collected annually.
5. Smart metering
i. Installation of smart meters for potable water supply, recycled water and electricity.
ii. Control rooms for private operators.
iii. Formulation and enforcement of regulations, including penalty and incentive
structures for overuse of resources.
6. Robust IT connectivity and digitisation
i. Installations: Wi-Fi devices, routers, etc.
ii. Optical fibre networks
iii. GIS Mapping
7. Pedestrian-friendly pathways
i. Construction of a 3-m-wide pedestrian pathway on both sides of roads; plantations
along footways
ii. Earmarked junctions for crossing; traffic signalling with on-call facilities
iii. Pavement lighting
8. Encouragement of non-motorised transport
i. Construction of a 3-m-wide pedestrian pathway and a 3-m-wide cycle track on both
sides of roads
ii. Introduction of battery-operated cars
iii. Innovative bicycle path with crowning trees, comprising thousands of sparkling
stones, creating patterns that charge during the day and emit light in the evenings
9. Intelligent traffic management
i. Construction of four-lane roads with medians, zebra crossings; signalling for
crossings; roundabouts, etc.
10. Non-vehicle streets/zones
i. Identification and segregation of car-free zones
ii. Installation of automatic boom barriers to restrict vehicle movement
iii. Development of street malls with local craft and handicraft displays, promenades,
etc., which could double as tourist attractions
11. Smart parking
i. Basement/ Surface parking for commercial, public and semi-public vehicles
ii. Covered parking for residential use
iii. Smart parking system comprising sensors, overtime indicators, dynamic signage
and mobility applications, static signage, parking management software, etc.

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12. Energy-efficient street lighting


i. LED street light poles
ii. Installation of solar panels on light poles
iii. Installation of environment sensors on light poles to detect existing pollution levels
iv. Light intensity detection sensors to detect the amount of illumination required on the
street and help save electricity through dimming of lights
v. Time-based automatic system to switch on/off individual or a group of street lights
vi. Central command system for monitoring and asset management
13. Innovative use of open space
i. Public open space is one of the most important components of any city or
neighbourhood. Hence, built form and streetscape treatments are proposed, with an
attractive, safe and comfortable pedestrian environment, while maintaining the
overall visual cohesiveness of the area. This is proposed to be achieved through a
variety of design responses, which include, but are not limited to, ground-level
facade treatments, architectural details, paving patterns, shade, seating, adequate
sidewalk width, etc.
ii. Development of a central plazas/ squares
iii. Development of a theme park and other open spaces, which will also act as
Tourism resource
14. Visible improvement in the area
i. Removal of utilities lines, cluttered overhead electricity lines; creating green open
spaces, landscaping, etc.
15. Safety of citizens, especially children, women and senior citizens
i. Installation of street lights
ii. Police station
iii. Introduction of helplines and mobile applications
iv. Integrated surveillance system for safety and security, such as CCTVs
v. Video analytics-enabled integrated command and control system
16.Development of 90% of the buildings to be energy efficient and green
i. Preparation of sustainable site designs
Preservation of key environmental assets through a careful examination of each
site and other elements, such as a sun-path diagram, etc.
Designing a process that minimises site disturbance, and which values, preserves
and restores/regenerates habitat, green space and associated ecosystems
ii. Introduction of water quality management and conservation practices
Minimisation of unnecessary and inefficient use of potable water on the site, while
maximising the recycling and reuse of water, including harvested rainwater, storm
water, and grey water.
Emphasis on the retention of storm water, on-site infiltration and ground water
recharge.
iii. Conservation of energy and the environment
Minimisation of adverse impacts on the environment (air, water, land, natural
resources) through optimised site planning, building design, material selection and
aggressive use of energy conservation measures;
iv. Development of design elements for the maintenance of indoor environment quality
Preparation of building designs with the best possible conditions in terms of
indoor air quality, ventilation, thermal comfort, access to natural ventilation and
day lighting.
v. Use of energy-efficient materials and resources

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Minimisation of the use of non-renewable construction materials and other


resources, such as energy and water, through efficient engineering, design
Maximisation of the use of recycled content materials, modern resource-efficient
composite type structural systems.
Maximisation of use of reusable, renewable, and bio-based materials
17. Development of minimum 20% affordable housing
EWS, LIG and MIG affordable housing
18. Smart infrastructure management
i. Development of a GIS-based platform for almost all utilities, or procurement of other
technology for infrastructure management
ii. A dedicated service corridor (6 m) with segregation of storm water drains (3 m), is
proposed to be developed to accommodate all utility networks
19. Smart applications
Development of a mobile application for all civic services, safety, crises
management, etc. Tourism-centric attributes, such as online booking, e-guides,
smart service centres, etc. would also be included.
20. Piped gas lines
i. Layout for piped gas lines including meters, valves, etc.
ii. Central command centre
21. Smart solutions for the development of the local economy
i. Development of tourism and hospitality resources, such as intelligent and interactive
interpretation centres, on the Ajanta and Ellora caves and other heritage
monuments; development of plush and interactive theme parks spread over a huge
area, smart museums, street malls, etc.
ii. Development of state-of-the-art accommodation facilities
iii. Development of website, online booking facilities, etc.
22. Smart solutions for local resource development and capacity building
i. Development of hospitality-related skill development training institutes, with training
programmes in the latest trades
ii. Introduction of training modules in healthcare, education, etc.
iii. Development of exhibition and display centres
iv. Development of website and online application procedures for training modules
23. Infrastructure for the differently-abled
Barrier-free designing is proposed
24. Smart designing procedure
i. Land survey on a GIS platform
ii. Preparation of all designs on a GIS platform. This will help in infrastructure
management and improve online allotment, service delivery, collection of O&M
charges, etc.
25. Intelligent and interactive roads
i. Glowing lines: glow-in-the-dark road lining that will absorb energy during the day
and glow in the dark
ii. Dynamic paint: temperature-controlled marking to light up and become transparent.
The marking will warn users about slippery roads.
iii. Interactive light: sensor-controlled lighting that turns on only when traffic approaches
26. Smart service delivery
i. Integration of a common portal for end users
ii. Online complaint registration, grievance redressal, approvals, etc.
iii. Online payment of user charges, etc.
iv. Central Command Centres & Enforcement of bye laws

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17. SUCCESS FACTORS


Describe the three most significant factors for ensuring the success of the area-based development
proposal. What will your city do if these factors turn out to be different from what you have assumed?
(max. 500 words)

Three most significant factors for ensuring the success of the area-based development
are as follows:
1. Land
Minimum land requirement for the viable development of an integrated and model
smart township, with a tourism and hospitality hub, affordable housing, skill
development centre and other mixed-use development in the context of Aurangabad:
550 acre; Land used for the proposed development: 582.50 acre
Advantage of the identified parcel at Chikalthana: 125 acre government land, which
improves the implementability of the project.
Committed exemption from the State Government regarding land use and FSI for this
parcel.
The strategic location (abutting Jalna Road, a state highway) of the Chikalthana land
is strategic for development.
2. Implementation of the project
Identification of a suitable development model
Designing the model for the accumulation of the required land parcel is crucial for
development
The identified land parcel has a private (457.50-acre) as well as a government
(125 acre) land share
For the private land: Land Pooling model proposed to obtain the land
o Legal framework already in place for Maharashtra
o Landowners can be amicably persuaded based on compensations: compensation
in the form of return of the balance developed land with re-classification of land
use/ FSI is recommended.
o Enforcement of development control regulations on the balance land parcel to be
returned
For the government land, the compensation could be in the form of the balance part
of the developed land, and/or a pre- agreed quantum of built-up mass catering to
public/semi-public utilities of the project in line with the project master plan or
shareholding in the SPV to be incorporated for the implementation of the project,
subject to the finalisation of the development model.
Implementation framework:
o Land development and infrastructure, along with their smart components and
amenities to be developed by an SPV
o The remaining land proposed to be developed under EPC, PPP or any other
suitable mode
Devising the operation and maintenance model is also crucial for the successful
execution of a project of this scale
Strategic intervention of government machinery and the availability of funds are also
very important for the successful execution of the model

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3. Other externalities and macro factors: Demand Parameter


Latent demand has been observed for the integrated township projects with affordable
housing and tourism facilities. However, these demands depend largely on external
factors, such as the continuous influx of tourists, especially foreign tourists, in the
current or greater quantum, the development and successful implementation of the
ShendraBidkin DMIC corridor, etc.
Measures for future encumbrances:
Land is the most important issue: a 340-acre land parcel at Nakshatrawadi has been
identified and agreed upon as the next best alternative for similar development.
Nakshatrawadi, with an almost 50% government share in the landholding, enjoys a
strategic location along the main arterial road, i.e. Paithan Road. Project designing in
consultation with the stakeholders has been conducted to a substantial extent.
Periodic re-evaluation of the development model, implementation framework,
operational costs, project sizing and phasing by the SPV
Facilitate immediate civic body and government intervention, if required.

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18. MEASURABLE IMPACT


What will be the measurable impact of the area-based development propos al, on the area and the
wider city, through scale-up and replication? Please describe with respect to the five types below, as
relevant to your city and propos als (max. 150 words each):
a. Governance Impact (eg. improvement in service provision and recovery of charges due to establishment
of SPV)

It is proposed to be implemented through the Smart City SPV, having significant


autonomous powers to ensure:
Timely implementation
Efficient and cost-effective performance management of utilities through input/output
efficiency measures
Optimisation of operation and management costs
Efficient user charge recovery percentage
Efficient dispute resolution/ grievance redressal/ crises management, etc.
mechanisms through MIS, online processes etc. ; Increased access to data
Improvement in the number of approvals/sanctions through a single window or
mobile application system
Availability of a citizen-level database or reckoner through the introduction of an online
registration mechanism. The data would act as the backbone for any reforms,
mitigation measures or crises management.
Participatory and consensus-oriented administration through increased online polling,
etc.
Measurement of citizen satisfaction through the introduction of various composite
well-being indices
b. Spatial Impact (eg. built form changed to incorporate more density or more public space)

Uniform population density across different zones of the proposed development and in
the city on the replication of modules
Regulation of urban built forms and designs
Regulations for the percentage of green space in the proposed development and the
subsequent increase in the share of open spaces of the city; improvement of the green
quotient
Increase in the quantum of public places, plazas, squares, etc.
More legalised development, with periodic monitoring and revision/amendment of
building laws for further efficiency and more rationalisation
Uniform and designed load on city utilities (benchmarking and monitoring per capita
consumption)
Equitable distribution of amenities
Increase in pedestrian roads by 15 km
Reduction in vehicular traffic, leading to a reduction in carbon emissions and
improvement of the quality of life.

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c. Economic Impact (eg. new commercial space created for organized economic activity)

The project envisages an investment to the tune of 8000 Cr over the next 15 years
Organised tourism amenities and the infrastructure proposed in the township will be key
contributors to the local economy
Organised commercial spaces proposed to be developed in the township would be a
boost to the local economy
The proposed skill development centre will help in building the capacity of the local
resources, and this, in turn, will increase employability
A development of this scale will also have an immense economic impact on the direct
and indirect employment of the town and region
The project, once implemented, envisages creation of direct employment of around
8-10000 and indirect employment of about 7-8000 persons
It also targets the development of around 2600 skilled resources annually
Investment of around Rs 8000 Cr distributed over a period of 15 years will is estimated
to generate revenues to the tune of Rs 1200 Cr spread across different segments of
activities
It also targets the development of around 2600 skilled resources annually

d. Social Impact (eg. accessible features included in the Proposal)

Affordable housing, one of the salient features of the proposal, makes the township
development extremely inclusive in the context of social development
Around 2058 affordable housing units and around 2,544 Government HIG units are
envisaged
The number of private housing stock is estimated to be more than 12,000
The project also proposes to house state-of-the-art health, education and other
infrastructure amenities involving primary to tertiary facilities
These factors will contribute to the upgrade of the overall social conditions of the city
and region, and have a holistic impact on the quality of life.
Being the first of this type of model and smart cluster, the area development proposal
will have a major impact on the branding of the town, with ensuing new dynamics in the
real estate and associated anthropological structure.

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e. Sustainability, including environmental impact (eg. int ensive 24X7 us e of public spaces results in reduced
traffic and reduced pollution)

The extensive open spaces will help in the development of a sustainable environment
for the region. Around 100 acres of designed open space, including road area, is
envisaged.
More than 90 acres of green space is envisaged to be developed.
Plantations, gardens, landscaping, non-motorised zones, walkability, etc. will add to the
green quotient of the development, thereby improving the overall quality of life. Around
four lakh trees are estimated to be planted in the proposed development.
Improves the overall quality of life, which can be measured through various indicators
The integration of smart and green infrastructure, smart solid waste management, an
intelligent traffic management system, green buildings, barrier-free designs, walkability,
etc. will help in improving the eco friendliness of the project, with a resultant improved
sustainability.
The integrated green infrastructure and enforcement of bylaws with penalties/incentives
will help generate awareness among users for their immediate and the overall
environment.

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C. PAN-CITY PROPOSAL (S)


A pan-city smart solution should benefit t he entire city through application of ICT and resulting improvement
in local governance and delivery of public services. The S CP should contain one or two such Smart
Solutions. Generally, smartness refers to doing more with less, building upon existing infrastructural assets
and resources and proposing resource efficient initiatives.

19. SUMMARY
Summarize your idea(s ) for the pan-city proposal(s). (max. 100 words)

AMC aims to use integrated-technology platform to realize its vision of Nishkam Jan
Sevaye Samarpita, dedicated to Citizens Services, by creating citizen centric and an
efficient organization. We envisage creation of Central Command and Control Centre
through convergence of various technologies and integrating multiple services through
shared PAN City ICT infrastructure and applications. Key components of all such
solutions would include Energy Efficiency Management, Waste Water Recycling,
Municipal Solid Waste Management, Smart Urban Mobility and citizens engagement
through efficient e-Governance System. The proposed system should facilitate efficient
resources and services management, transparent and real time performance monitoring
by all stakeholders.

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20. COMPONENTS
List the key components of your pan-city proposal(s). (max. 250 words)

Technology interventions, described below, are expected to transform the quality of life of
Citizens:
Central Command and Control Centre, to manage and monitor important civic services
through smart technologies; with Central dashboard, integrated with GIS platform,
Citizens Mobile APPs, and technology feeds from citys ICT based solutions;
Energy Efficiency Management, by way of smart Solar Panel Mounted LED Street
lighting system, controlled by Light Intensity Detection Sensors; and GIS mapping for
an energy generation potential for different parts of the City;
Waste-Water Recycling, through level controllers, online smart monitoring system like
level switches, tranducers, DO sensors, Solonoid valves;
Smart MSWM through Consumer Bins with RFID tag, Community Bins with RFID tag
and Weight Scanner; In-Vehicle IT-System, consisting of an RFID reader, antenna,
GPRS transmitter, lift sensor, and on-board computer, working in conjunction with
Central Command Office, providing real-time operational visibility; RFID and Weight
Sensor at Weigh-Bridge, at Transfer Station and Processing Plant; Heat Sensors; and
Leachate management, monitoring of characteristics of emissions and outflow of
treated leachate
Smart Urban Mobility, through Smart Signaling & Traffic Lights; Video Analytics
Incident Management, Real Time Traffic Monitoring; Peak load balancing policies; Side
Walks, FoB, Subways; and Smart Parking Solutions
Smart e-Governance, through Integrated Document-File Management System,
Citizens e-Vaults, Intranet Portal for cross domain collaboration, City Operations
Dashboard, and IT Infrastructure Management for AMC Data Centre
Smart Ultrasonic Metering, by way of monitoring water usage and rooftop solar system
through smart automatic meters; and
Citizens participation through mobile APP, as they can resolve grievances through
easy-to-operate free mobile APP, pay bills online, assess service level in a real-time

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21. APPROACH & METHODOLOGY


What is the approach and methodology followed in selecting/identifying the pan-city proposal(s)?
Describe the reasons for your choice based on the following (max. 1000 words):
a. The city profile and self assessment;
b. Citizen opinion and engagement
c. Opinion of the elected representatives
d. Discussion with urban planners and sector experts
e. Discussion with suppliers/ partners

APPROACH & METHODOOLOGY


Step I: Understanding the city profile to identify the PAN- city level interventions required
through:
Base line Survey of present condition of City Infrastructure
Secondary data collection;
Consultation with parastatal department/stakeholders/experts
Research & Benchmarking
Step II: Shortlisting (technical assessment) of PAN-city level issues for Aurangabad
which need interventions
Short-listed areas which require intervention at pan-city level are as follows:
Energy Consumption; Solid Waste Management; Tourism; Sewerage, EGovernance, Urban Mobility, Water Supply & Sanitation, Safety and Security,
Affordable Housing, Environment
Selection criteria
Gaps and prospective areas of interventions relevant for the city's development
Multi-criteria analysis matrix for prioritisation of the PAN city issues with the
following parameters (indicative list):
Population coverage, impact on the city environment, viable integration of smart
infrastructure with the present city infrastructure, application of smart solutions,
cost & operational efficiency, financial viability, etc.
Step III: Stakeholder validation for final selection through:
Citizen consultations;
Opinions of elected representatives and administrative officials;
Discussions with urban planners and sector experts;
Discussions with suppliers/partners
Rationale for the selection of the proposed PAN city development on the given
parameters:
RRATIONALE 1: CITY PROFILE: PAN CITY ISSSUES WITH SCOPE OF EFFECTIVE
INTERVENTION FOR CITY'S HOLISTIC DEVELOPMENT
Areas/ sectors identified and their present status are as follows:
1. Citys Energy Consumption
Electricity is supplied through Grid to a strong customer base of 2, 59,000
Aurangabad City. though it has reduced from 22.53But distribution losses are at
19.1% for Mar 2015 Quarter.
MSEDCL is working towards bringing down AT&C losses down to 8-12%
Absence of Smart solutions for the city like LED lighting, solar panels; Few
initiatives have been taken to adopt renewable source of energy

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2. Solid Waste Management


The city generates around 570 MT/day; Only about 50% of solid waste is
collected; No Segregation, No processing
Out of 1,800 employees, about 1,500 are involved into sweeping & collection
Inadequate number of Bins, only 65; Average distance of about 17 Kms from
Wards to Landfill Site
There is no organised & integrated solid waste management system for the town
3. Governance
Lack of present day E-governance solutions like online payment of taxes, service
delivery, grievance redressal, registration, etc.
4. Recycling of Waste Water
AMC in addition to their existing STP has undertaken a new project for
underground sewerage line and treatment plant; 4 STP totalling 216 MLD
treatment capacity and 200KM of existing sewerage network system. This will
result in generation of huge amount of treated water which can be re-used for
some selected purposes on secondary treatment.
Further a substantial demand for treated water (primary treatment) has been
observed in the industrial estates of Shendra and Bidkin
5. Transportation
Low Frequency of public buses
Current Increase in the number of 2-wheeler & 3-wheeler; total registered
two-wheelers in the city grew at a CAGR of 12.47% between 2010 and 2015
while the four wheelers reported a CAGR of 10.23%
40% of the citys major road network has footpath major road network but in poor
condition.
Air quality is cause of concern for the citizen of the city. Aurangabad being an
industrial town has a high concentration level of particle matters while sulphur
dioxide & nitrogen dioxide are within the prescribed limit. However no strategies
to decrease air pollution have; Hence, urban mobility is a significant area of
intervention for reduction of the pollution level of the city.
RATIONALE 2: CITIZEN OPINION AND ENGAGEMENT
Citizen sensitisation about the area-based development proposal through:
Ward-wise public consultation across six municipal zones;
Intensive coverage (300+ articles) in regional newspapers (8+ )
an outreach of 112,121 ON Face Book
Discussions posted on MyGov.in; 12000+ suggestions on WhatsApp
Youtube uploads, recording more than 167 views; 44 followers on Twitter
Radio publicity through jingles broadcast more than 3,000 times;
Bulk email of more than 25,000; Bulk SMS of approximately four Lakh;
Campaigning via smart city vans across 99 ward for a month;
Campaigning via banners and hoardings at more than 50 locations; and
Road shows at eight locations.
Essay Writing (99 Entries) & Photography Competition (69 Entries)
Public consultation for the selection of the desired area-based development:
Polling (offline and online) herein 5100 votes were case. Offline surveys were
conducted through 40 drop boxes across several locations in the town. There were
5450 offline suggestions; 700+ feedback on www.aurangabadsmartcity.co.in
Top priority areas identified through the above mentioned surveys includes energy
efficient management through smart solutions, solid waste management, treatment/
recycle of waste water, e-governance and urban mobility
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RATIONALE 3: OPINION OF ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES


Two orientation workshops for corporation employees and elected officials;
Regular interaction, feedback sessions with administrative officials & elected members
AMC general body passed a resolution selecting Energy Efficient Management
through Smart Solutions as the PAN city proposal for the town at their monthly
meetings on 21 November 2015 and 14 December 2015
RATIONALE 4: DISCUSSION WITH URBAN PLANNERS AND SECTOR EXPERTS
Orientation in over 12 degree and engineering colleges, and schools attended by more
than 5,000 students; workshop on the Smart City Mission for industrial associations
and other focus groups;
Three round table conferences attended by representatives of numerous engineer,
architect and builder associations
During the course of discussions, valuable and innovative suggestions were received
from the experts towards improvement of the citys infrastructure.
During all interactions with citizens and experts, majority opined that the devising of an
efficient management of the civic services system, addressing all issues identified
hereinabove, and not one particular issue, using smart features would be the most
suitable PAN city intervention for the town of Aurangabad. It was also opined that the
PAN City solution should have the largest coverage of the population of the city.
RATIONALE 5: DISCUSSION WITH SUPPLIERS/ PARTNERS
Essel,Shapoorji Palonji, s Samsung, Wipro, Oracle, various Industry Players and
Industry Association from Aurangabad, DMICDC, etc.,
have expressed their willingness to partner the development subject to appropriate
terms and conditions.
On technical assessment of the city parameters and analysis of stakeholders
consultation, Central Command and Control Office through Smart solutions, managing
multiple civic services efficiently has emerged as the best suitable and most accepted
PAN city solution for the town

22. DEMAND ASSESSMENT


What are the specific issues relat ed to governance and public services that you have identified during
city profiling and citizen engagement that you would like to address through your pan city proposal(s )?
How do you think these solution(s) would solve the specific issues and goals you have identified?
(max.1000 words)

AMCs main function is to provide basic and essential civic services to the Citizens in an
efficient and cost-effective manner. Currently AMC lacks adequate tools to deal
effectively with ever-growing requirements of the city, and with a rapid growth the
situation is becoming critical, and as a result, stakeholders face various issues, such as:
High energy consumption at AMCs Offices and Street Lights;
Ineffective solid waste management, i. e. Low Collection Efficiency at about 50%,
collected Littered Waste leading to insanitary living conditions and health issues, etc.;
Inadequate water availability for consumers, and lack of water conservation or
reclaiming efforts;
Inadequate traffic management system; and
No effective & efficient governance system available for citizens to address their
grievances
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There is a clear need to completely revamp the existing system, and technology is
expected to provide edge to the AMC in dealing with the situation, by converting its
adversaries into opportunities, by tackling issues efficiently in an entire service delivery
chain. AMC envisage a transformation, as a result of reliance on technology, in its three
basic components, namely, planning, implementation and management. The objective of
the new initiative is supported by a policy of 4-Rs Redesign entire system for efficient
service delivery, Reduce use of resources, e.g. energy consumption, Recover resources
going waste, e.g. recycle of waste-water and sale the same to industries improving
availability of drinking water, and Regenerate on a regular basis, e.g. renewable energy
and through integrated Central Command and Control Office deliver in a cost effective
and environment friendly manner, a safe and liveable city to the citizens. The ultimate
objective of the initiatives is, by focusing on:
Accurate Real-Time Database: The system would provide exact details like accurate
inventory, customer databases, frequency of service of a particular consumer in a
day/ week/ month, power consumed or saved or used in excess, exact leakages in
any of the service delivery and identification of exact bottleneck in the system and
efficient resolution, etc., eliminating ambiguity, if any. For AMC, the new technology
enabled system would provide an efficient tool to determine quick work-plans in a
real-time basis, help in an efficient designing and re-designing efficient system
leading to savings in an O&M costs;
Biometric tracking of AMC Employees: Currently there is no adequate mechanism to
measure the efficiency of a particular employee. Biometric tracking of AMC
employees, at the start and end of the day, with a clear works targets stipulated
during this period, should help in optimal utilization of the resources, and also take
care of the employees privacy related issues;
Citizens participation through mobile APP: AMC intends to actively involve its
Citizens in managing its civic services efficiently. A proposed easy-to-operate free \
mobile app, specifically for Aurangabad system would allow Citizens to resolve their
grievances, allow them to assess the timings of various services, e.g. water, MSW
collection Truck, timing of public bus, etc. in their community, pay bills through Mobile
APP, provide suggestions directly to the Central Command and Control Office etc.,
track the status of their complaints, helping AMC to not only improve response time
but would also help in fixing the responsibility;
Digital-e-City initiative of AMC should help achieve the goal of e-enabling all
stakeholders in reducing their dependency on physical papers and files by
electronically capturing most of the processes and consumers interactions, leading
to better Consumer experience, increased transparency, better decision making and
governance;
IT-enabled Energy Management: AMC plans to manage and monitor street lighting
systems and solar systems through wireless technology, allowing the dimming and/or
switching of the street lights, and determining the timings of the use between solar
and conventional energy sources to be controlled centrally.

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The new system would offer an ability to produce the right amount of light at the right
time at the right location. The system would enable two way communication of
information on the lamp life of individual lanterns to be relayed back to the control
centre, informing the operator whether or not any given lantern is operational, thereby
reducing unnecessary wastage of the energy.
The system would also offer a remote monitoring functionality with:
Improved fault identification and location;
Accurate lamp failure prediction based on out of tolerance monitoring of electrical
characteristics;
Interface with asset management database for sharing and analysing data; and
Reduced need for night scouting inspections.
Efficient and Responsive IT-enabled Collection, Transportation and Storage System:
At present, AMC manages to collect only about 50% of the solid waste in a city,
leading to a situation of littered waste at many places and insanitary living conditions.
Currently there is no system that can track the frequency of service of a particular bin
or locality, or an efficiency of a particular vehicle or employee. With RFID tags on all
consumer level bins and RFID tags and Weight Scanner for all community bins, the
Central Command Office can easily assess the history and requirement servicing for
such bins. The Weight Sensors at community bins would indicate waste collected in a
bin, and the timing at which the service is required. With this real-time information,
the Central Command Office can immediately re-direct the nearest collection vehicle
to the location. This would eliminate the need for paper routing and stop lists.
Electronic routing removes reliance on operator knowledge, increasing route flexibility
since any driver can be used for any route.
Promotion of Use of Recycled Water and Revenue Generation, by way of sale of
treated waste water to the upcoming DMIC industrial area, helping AMC to minimise
the O&M expenses of the ongoing Sewerage Project. The waste water is proposed to
be treated at four decentralized STP locations, as well as through small decentralized
STPs of capacity 100kld to 500kld based on the requirement of the gardening and
street sweeping of the local area.
Technology Enabled Transport System and Intelligent Traffic Management System,
should help in reduction in traffic congestion, decrease in private vehicle usage,
reduction in pollution index, walking or cycling could be new mobility option, improved
incident management system, Incremental productivity of the city public transport
system, and cost savings & increased transparency at AMC level.

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23. INCLUSION
How inclusive is/are your pan-city proposal(s)? What makes it so? (max. 150 words)

The IT Enabled Central Command and Control Office will touch upon not only the entire
population of the Aurangabad, but would also benefit the business and leisure tourists, by
way of:
Boost to brand equity, a clean, healthy and citizens-environment friendly city, supported
by an efficient public amenities should certainly improve the brand equity of the City,
supporting the growth of the local business and tourism, creating job opportunities for
local youth and improve the local GDP;
Improvement in Quality of Life, by way of clean and healthy city, drop in pollution levels,
ease in commuting within city, adequate availability of water, and responsive civic
administration
Improved Disposable Income in the hand of Citizens: Reduction in power / medical bills
and commuting expenses, accurate billing for services received, should improve
savings and Citizens can spend more on education, food, and for better
hygiene-conditions, etc.;

24. RISK MITIGATION


What are the three greatest risks that could prevent the success of the pan-city proposal(s)? In table 3, describe
each risk, its likelihood, the likely impact and the mitigation you propose. (max. 50 words per cell)

TABLE 3
Ri sk

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation

Resistance or an inability of AMC


employees as well as citizens in
using cutting edge technology
solutions

Resistance from:
AMC Employees:
Moderate to High, new
technology could be
perceived as a threat to
employees freedom, fear
of extra-work, and general
lack-of-exposure to the
technology; and
Citizens: Low, as they
could perceive technology
as a tool to improve
situation in their city

The City would continue to


manage its services in a
way it is being managed
currently. This would fail
the very purpose of the
new system, i.e. to
manage its services in a
much efficient manner,
engage citizens and to
provide a better, clean
and environmentally
friendly city to the
stakeholders.

AMC plans:
Consultation, with
employees, explaining
about the technology, its
benefits in terms of
better working
conditions;
Training for
employees, creating
awareness of use of the
technology; and
An awareness
campaign for the
citizens, explaining
about the new system
and their role in
improving the service
level

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

TABLE 3
Ri sk

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation

Citizens resistance to pay


additional service charges

Moderate: At present,
citizens are not used to
pay for many of ULB
services. Converting them
to act responsibly and
make a payment for the
services is a challenge.

Inability to collect charges AMC plans:


for the services offered
An awareness
could impact the financial
campaign for the
viability of the Project, and citizens, explaining
AMC would have to
new system, expected
allocate funds from its
improvement in
budget, impacting other
services
development/ O&M works. post-implementation,
the cost part and need
for charges
A new set of Byelaws
could be considered
stipulating required
Charges, among other
provisions
Offer slabs for
proposed charges for
residential and
commercial consumer
categories, reducing
possible impact

Technology do not offer desired


result

Low: As there are enough


technology interventions
available in a market to
manage these situation

Any failure on part of the


Technology would affect
AMCs goal in
transforming its service
level for betterment of its
Citizens

AMC plans to:


Use proven
technology;
Take adequate
measure in designing
and operating the new
system;
An awareness
campaign for the
citizens, explaining the
importance and
necessity of their
support to achieve
better result

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

TABLE 3
Ri sk

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

25. FRUGAL INNOVATION


Which is the model or best practice from another city that you are adopting or adapting in your
proposal(s)? How are you innovating and ensuring best use of resources? Is there an aspect of frugal
innovation in your proposal(s)? (max. 500 words)

There is no single City or best practice, but a combination of multiple proven


technologies and solutions in different parts of the global cities that AMC have adopted
for its fully integrated IT Enabled Central Command and Control Office. Following are few
examples which have been considered while formulating this Proposal:
Birmingham Street-Light LED Project signed a contract with private operator to
maintain a road network of 2,250 Kms and to replace about 90,000 street-lights with
LED. The system has Central Management System, allowing full dynamic control of
each unit with flexibility to remotely dim (vary the light output) of individual or groups of
street lights and for switching on and off times for precisely controlling lit periods and
luminance levels. This approach promotes greater management capability over energy
consumption with intervention potential. As of now, the City is saving about 50% of its
energy cost, and requires minimal O&M as compared to traditional Sodium
Luminaries. It is expected that the City would save about GBP 100 Mn over a period of
next 25 years. The carbon emission has come down by about 50%. Birmingham
believes that the Project would be able to support:
- Citys aspiration to be a world class city attracting business and tourism;
- A vibrant night-time economy;
- In promoting and be recognised internationally for innovation and use of leading
technology; and
- Improvement to the Street Scene
The City of Harrison, Arkansas (USA) shifted to automate collection services by
providing Harrison residents with refuse and recycling collection containers that could
be emptied by trucks with automated grabber arms. All residents received a 96 gallon
recycling cart and were given smaller size options for their refuse cart, forming the
foundation for a volume-based pricing model. The City equipped each refuse and
recycling cart with an RFID tag. The onboard truck system has been installed on each
of collection vehicles. Each truck system consists of an RFID reader, antenna, GPS
transmitter, lift sensor, and onboard computer. Onboard truck systems work in
conjunction with back office software to provide visibility into their daily collection
operations in real-time. This information can be used to make adjustments to collection
routes without delay using direct office-to-truck communication, optimizing each trucks
route according to changing field conditions. Routes are updated in real-time using
in-cab touch screens. Each drivers collection route is displayed on-screen, eliminating
the need for paper routing and stop lists. Electronic routing removes reliance on
operator knowledge, increasing route flexibility since any driver can be used for any
route.
New York (USA), Smart waste management uses integrated wireless sensors to
detect trash level and alerting sanitation which increased the efficiency from 50% to
80%.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

NEWater, Singapore reclaims its water from treated wastewater that has been purified
using dual-membrane (via microfiltration and reverse osmosis) and ultraviolet
technologies, in addition to conventional water treatment processes. About 6% of this
reclaimed water is being used for indirect potable use, equal to about 1% of
Singapore's potable water requirement, and the rest is used at wafer fabrication plants
and other non-potable applications in industries.

26. CONVERGENCE AGENDA


In Table 4, list the Missions/Programmes/Schemes of the Government of India (eg. SBM, AMRUT,
HRIDAY, Shelter for All, Digital India, Make in India, Skill India) and relevant external projects and
describe how your proposal(s) will achieve convergence with these, in terms of human and financial
resources, common activities and goals. (max. 50 words per cell)
TABLE 4
S.No

Missi ons/Programmes/Schemes/Projects

How to achieve convergence

AMRUT

AMRUT The City would seek funding under


GoIs AMRUT Scheme , from Central and from
State Government for:
Proposed Waste Water Recycling System;
Proposed Urban Mobility

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

TABLE 4
S.No

Missi ons/Programmes/Schemes/Projects

How to achieve convergence

Swachh Bharat Mission

Aurangabad intends to implement integrated


end-to-end IT Enabled Zero-Garbage MSWM
programme for about 600 MT/day. The initiative
would seek grant funding, under Government
of Indias SBM initiative for:
Project cost
Public awareness & IEC Activities; and
Capacity build-up at AMC

Digital India

The cost of technologies, such as Central


Command and Control Office, Central
Dashboard, Light/Heat Sensors, RFID tags,
development of Mobile APPs, in-Vehicle
System, Sensors, GPRS connectivity, Smart
Urban Mobility Solutions, etc. will seek an
entire funding under Digital India.

Integrated Power Development Scheme

AMC will seek funding under Integrated Power


Development Scheme for technologies such as
to be installed under this Proposal.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

TABLE 4
S.No

Missi ons/Programmes/Schemes/Projects

How to achieve convergence

Grid Connected Rooftop Small Solar Plant

AMC will seek a grant funding for the cost of the


solar system on AMC and Institutional
buildings, under Central Governments Grid
Connected Rooftop Small Solar Plant Scheme.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

27. CONVERGENCE IMPLEMENTATION


Describe how the convergence will be implement ed? (max. 350 words)

AMC intends to seek a convergence grant under five central government schemes:
AMRUT: GoI has launched AMRUT Scheme with an objective to improve basic city
level amenities, considering a project level approach. It is expected that under the
Scheme, Central Government would offer 33% of Project cost as grant, while 17% will
be provided by the State Government. AMC will invest balance 50% by way of PPP
route, for its proposed initiative to reclaim its waste water.
SBM: Government of India has launched a Swachha Bharat Mission with an objective of
making cities clean, creating awareness among stakeholders. The Central Government
offers 20% of Project cost as a grant to the Municipal Local Body to implement the
Project. AMC intends to implement and O&M the proposed pan-city MSWM through
private participation.
Digital India: AMC intends to use technology extensively to transform its Service
Delivery System, and wold seek grant under Digital India scheme for various technology
components.
IPDS: AMC intends to seek a grant under IPDS Scheme for various components. The
proposed SPV, being State Government Agency, should be eligible for receiving grant
under this scheme. The SPV will request a tri-partite agreement between PFC, State
Government and MSEDCL, and implement the respective components within 24
months of sanction. The SPV will seek a grant of 60% of the cost of the applicable
project components from GoI and request PFC to convert the 50% of the loan (30% of
Project Cost) for this component into grant, i.e. total grant of 75% of the total cost of the
project components.
GCRSPP: AMC will seek 30% of the benchmark cost as a grant under this scheme for
its Grid Connected Rooftop Small Solar Power Plants for PV modules, inverters,
minimum storage battery, cost of meters, local connectivity cost, cost of civil works,
foundations, installation, operation and maintenance for a period of five years,
comprehensive maintenance for a period of 5 years, warranty for the complete systems,
etc.

28. SUCCESS FACTORS


Describe the three most significant factors for ensuring the success of the pan-city proposal(s). What
will your city do if these factors turn out to be different from what you have assumed? (max. 250
words)

The following are the key elements that would ensure the success of the proposal:
Technology integration with the existing as well as proposed system will either make or
break the Project. The technology will act as a backbone of the Project. AMC intends to
use user-friendly technologies for lower-grade employees and citizens and cutting-edge
technologies for the Central Command Office. In order to avoid a situation where AMC
would have implemented a technology solutions but users are not in a position to use it
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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

effectively, AMC proposes technology implementation first in 1-2 Zones on a pilot basis,
and then across City, after taking into consideration the learnings from the experience;
Active Participation by Stakeholders is an absolute necessity for the successful
implementation of the Project. It is necessary that AMC employees adopt to new
technology and processes quickly, and Citizens help AMC in improving its services, by
actively using technology to report any non-service, online-payment through Mobile App
or Netbanking, etc. Any inability or resistance from any group of the stakeholders could
impact the progress of the Project as it has been envisaged. In order to reduce any such
probability, AMC plans awareness campaign and consultation with stakeholders, and
training for employees;

29. BENEFITS DELIVERED


How will you measure the success of your pan-city proposal(s) and when will the public be able to
see or feel benefits: immediately, within Year 1, or in t he medium or long term, 3-5 years? (max. 150
words)

The success of the Proposal would be measured and determined as:


Immediate, within 3 months, launch of smart Mobile APP and Central Command Office,
providing a new platform for Citizens to communicate with AMC, providing a feeling of
inclusiveness, and start creating awareness about the technology, proposed system,
Citys vision of Nishkam Jan Sevaye Samarpita, etc. through online media and FM
Radio;
Short-to-Medium Term, 06-18 months: Improvement in efficiency of services, and
Citizens see a well illuminated, clean and aesthetic city, providing a feeling of safety for
elders, children and women and providing a feeling of satisfaction and improvement in a
social life;
Medium-to-Long Term, 18-60 months: Citizens can feel and see an improvement
AMCs service delivery, availability of water, general health index, better urban mobility,
energy efficiency and also an improvement of the brand equity of the City

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

30. MEASURABLE IMPACT


What will be the measurable impact of your pan-city proposal(s)? Please describe with respect to the
following types given below, as relevant to your city and proposals (max. 150 words)
a. Governance Impact (eg. government response time to citizen complaints halved, creating faster service
delivery overall)

Development of Mobile APP, Central Command Office and a website, dedicated for
improvement in service delivery should help AMC improving response time for any
grievances by almost 90% of reduction in time. The new system should also help AMC
addressing consumers grievances related to the user charges immediately online in a
real-time basis, and AMC should be able to resolve at least 80% of billing related issues
on the same day and balance 20% in 72 hours. The consumers can pay their user
charges through online-payment gateways through Mobile App or Netbanking, etc., which
should help citizens in saving considerable time and create an online records, eliminating
or reducing billing related issues going forward. AMC intends to resolve minimum 50%
billing related grievances as well as billing transactions online within first 3 years of
Project.

b. Impact on public services (eg. real-time monitoring of mosquito density in the atmosphere reduces
morbidity)

The most visible and measurable impact on public services would be 100% sweeping and
collection of waste from consumers on a daily basis, improvement in water availability,
savings of energy cost, and better urban mobility. At present Citizens have hardly any
platform available to communicate directly to AMC for resolving their civic services related
issues. Development of Mobile APP, Central Command and Control Office and a
Dashboard, dedicated to the City should offer consumers number of platforms to interact
and resolve issues in a real-time, improving service level and sentiments considerably.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

D. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
31. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
In Table 5, describe the activities/components, targets, resources and timelines required to complete the
implementation of your area-based development and pan-city solution/s. This should include the items
mentioned as Essential Features in Q. No. 16 plus other smart solutions, including accessible infrastructure
for differently-abled. (max. 50 words per cell)

S
.
N
o

Activity/component

Indicator

Table 5

Baseline
(as on)

Target

Resources
required

Likely date
of
completion

Consultants for
technical, legal,
financial, IT and
procurement

Formation of
SPV;
finalisation of
board & core
team: 30
June 2016

1.12.2015

AREA-BASED DEV ELOP MENT


Initiation and formalisation of
preliminary and preoperative
tasks (Pre-Construction stage)

Development of core
infrastructure

Incorporation of
the SPV and
induction of
board members
Procurement of
consultant and
transaction
advisor
Finalisation of
business plans,
land pooling
Procurement of
consultants
GIS mapping
Preparation of
master plan,
statutory
approvals
Selection of
contractor for
construction of
infrastructure
& affordable
housing

Resolution of
the General
Body of AMC
for formation
of the SPV &
Smart City
Challenge
proposal
In-principle
consent from
majority of
landowners
for land
pooling for
Greenfield
Development
option
Preliminary
consent from
the State

Preliminary stage
activities to be
completed within
a year from the
date of selection
under the Smart
City Mission

Laying of the
water supply
network
Sewerage:
distribution
network with
tertiary treatment
Roads:30-m
wide trunk roads
Integrated solid
waste
management
Safety and
security
Power
infrastructure
Optical fibre
network
Landscaping
Construction of
command
centres

Main
access road is
linked to three
major
highways that
connect the
area with city.
Power
infrastructure
has already
reached the
site.
The water
supply line
can be
extended from
the nearest
location,
which is well
within the
reach of the
location.

Water supply:
Execution of
Start of
24x7 water
EPC/PPP
construction
supply with dual
concessions,
by 2016piping
including all kinds
2017
Sewerage:
of resources
Completion
100% collection
Corpus capital
of
network with
supported through
construction
tertiary treatment
Smart City
by March
Integrated solid
Mission
2020
waste
(central/state/
management
local)
Roads:
convergence
Emphasis on
of various
non- motorised
schemes for the
transport with
implementation of
underground
infrastructure
service ducts.
Provision for
smart ICT-based
solutions
Power with a
provision of 10%
of generation
from solar

There is a
provision for
preoperative
expenses under
the mission

Statutory
approvals:
30 Sept 2016
DPR
concession
agreement:
31 Dec 2016
Selection of
Contractor
for
construction
of affordable
housing: 31
Mar 2017

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S
.
N
o

Table 5

Activity/component

Indicator

Baseline
(as on)

Target

Resources
required

Likely date
of
completion

Construction of Affordable
Housing by SPV

Construction of
affordable
housing
Handover of
affordable
housing units to
target population
in-line with
annual income
Construction and
sale of HIG/villas
by SPV

There are over


50,000
households
currently in
slum/gunthewa
ri areas due to
the nonavailability of
affordable
housing.
Demand for
quality
affordable
housing from
existing
industrial
workforce
employed in
adjoining
MIDCs
observed.

To avail of at
least 20% of the
housing stock
within the
affordable
category, with
four phases
over seven
years and 2058
units
Price band: Rs
413 Lakh
Area of each
housing unit:
2565 sq m
Every building
will be
green-compliant

Housing
development
would be
undertaken on
PPP (Joint
Development
model). Land as
equity to
development
would be provided
by SPV with
Private developer
undertaking
CAPEX for
development. The
concessionaire
would hand over
the affordable units
to the SPV free of
cost.

1st phase
(25%): 31
March 2018

Installation of
SCADA for
different utilities
CCTVs, etc.
Solar panels
Smart meters
Ground water
recharge bores
ICT component
of solid waste
management,
such as RFID
tags and
tracking, etc.
Wi-Fi
Construction of
footways and
cycle tracks

The main
approach road
to the site is
present.
There is
enough
capacity
(bandwidth)
due to the
upcoming
DMIC, which
can utilised.

Provision of
smart utilities
Provision of
ICT- enabled
intelligent
operation,
maintenance
and monitoring
mechanisms
through the
central
command
centre

ICT consultants

Installation/co
nstruction: 31
March 2020

Land
development for
the subject plot
Auctioning of
land
Leasing of land
Regulations for
the construction
of facilities

Identification
Handover of the Legal, real estate
of survey
balance part of
experts
numbers
the developed
comprising
land to the
the private
according to
share of the
their share
project site
Approvals for
Identification
the development
of land use for
policy
the identified
Formulation of
parcels
development
Identification
control
of ownership
regulations for
Identification
further
of rates from
development
the ready
reckoner
Formulation
of the
compensation
policy

Installation of ICT components

Handover of land to private


landowners

Corpus capital
supported
through the Smart
City Mission
(central/state/
local)
convergence of
various schemes
for the
implementation of
infrastructure

2nd phase
(25%) : 31
March 2019
3rd phase
(25%) : 31
March 2019
4th phase
(25%) : 31
March 2020

By April 2020

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S
.
N
o

Table 5

Activity/component

Indicator

Baseline
(as on)

Target

Construction of commercial
facilities

Land
development for
the subject plot
Auctioning of
land
Leasing of land
Regulations for
the construction
of facilities

Identification
of survey
numbers
Identification
of land use for
the identified
parcels
Identification
of rates from
the ready
reckoner
Identification
of demand for
the
commercial
development

Construction of
Legal advisors
shopping centres,
central business
Contractors
district, and
tourism and
Government
hospitality
facilitation,
E-auctioning
portal, etc.
E-governance
support

Land auction:
By 31 March
2023

Land
development for
the subject
Government plot
Handover of land
to the
Government
Leasing of land
for other social
amenities
Regulations for
the construction
of facilities

Identification
of survey
numbers,
comprising
the
Government
share of the
project site
Identification
of land use for
the proposed
parcels
Identification
of ownership
Identification
of rates from
the ready
reckoner

Development
Skill
Development
Centre
Development of
hospitals
Development of
Education
Institutions
Green space

Financial expert,
Legal advisors

Land auction:
By 31 March
2023

Maintenance of
the core
infrastructure and
ICT components
by the SPV
Creation of
bylaws

Service
providers for
telecommunicat
ions; power
already exists,
which can
extend their
services

Entire
management and
monitoring will be
ICT- enabled,
with smart
features

Facility
management
service providers

Construction of social facilities

Operation maintenance setup

Resources
required

Likely date
of
completion

Construction
of the
facilities:
Within 57
years of the
auction

Contractors
Government
facilitation

Initial two years


of funds will be
from the SPV
corpus

Construction
of the
facilities:
Within 57
years of the
auction

The project is
expected to
be fully
operational in
four years
from the start
of the
construction
of the core
infrastructure.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S
.
N
o

Activity/component

Table 5

Indicator

Baseline
(as on)

Target

Resources
required

Likely date
of
completion

PAN-CITY SOLUTION
Central Command Office,
Dashboard, Mobile APPs,
Implementation of Biometric
Attendance System

AMC has
developed the
identified
components.

Mobile APPs,
Dashboard,
Central Command
Office, and
Biometric
Attendance
System are
operational

Grant under Digital


India, release of
funds by Central
and State
Government on
time

3 months
from
implementatio
n of the
Project;
Awareness
Campaign
60 months

Smart Energy Efficiency


Management

Installation of
50,000 Solar panel
mounted
Streetlight Poles;
Environmental
Sensors at 1,000
poles;
Light Detection
Sensors at 2,500
poles; AMC
installs 10,000
LED Bulbs

AMC saves
minimum 50% of
energy cost for
its Offices and
streetlight
system; and
AMC produces
0.4MW energy,
achieving CUF
of 20%

Grant under IPDS,


GCRSSP, and
Digital India,
release of funds by
Central and State
Government on
time

For
Streetlights 18 months
For GCRSSP
32 months
Awareness
Campaign
36 months

E-governance

Integration of
services,
Grievances
Management
System, Free
Wi-Fi Zones

AMC developed
Wi-Fi Zones at
important
locations;
Integration of all
services on
single
Dashboard; and
Reduction in
Grievances
redressal time
by minimum
50%

Grant under Digital


India, release of
funds by Central
and State
Government on
time

Wi-Fi Zones
12 months;
Integration of
all services
24 months;
and
Grievances
management
system 18
months

AMC has
certain
e-Governance
modules
operational
under
JNNURM
reforms

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S
.
N
o

Table 5

Activity/component

Indicator

Baseline
(as on)

Target

Resources
required

Likely date
of
completion

IT Enable Municipal Solid Waste


Management

Installation of
RFID Tags on all
Bins;
Installation of
In-Vehicle
System;
W-to-E Plant;
Landfill and
Leachate
Management
System

Collection
Efficiency of
50%;
No In-Vehicle
System;
No MSW
Processing;
No Landfill and
Leachate
Management

MSWM System
being able to
assess solid
waste system
online;
Collection
Efficiency 100%;
In-Vehicle
System for all
Transportation
vehicles;
Operationalizatio
n of W-to-E
Plant;
Scientific
Landfill and
Leachate
Management

Grant under Digital


India, SBM,
release of funds by
Central and State
Government on
time

RFID tags on
all Bins 30
months;
Collection
Efficiency
100% - 18
months;
In-Vehicle
System for all
Transportatio
n vehicles
24 months;
Operationaliz
ation of
W-to-E Plant
24 months;
Scientific
Landfill and
Leachate
Management
30 months

Urban Mobility Solutions

Intelligent Traffic
Management
System;
Pedestrian
Walkways; Public
Transport Facility

No Public
Transport
System;
No Traffic
Management
System

Installation of
Integrated
Traffic
Management
System in the
entire City;
10% of Office
Goers using
Walkways as a
preferred
commuting
route; and
50% of City
Commuters
using the Public
Transport
System

Grant under Digital


India, AMRUT,
release of funds by
Central and State
Government on
time

Intelligent
Traffic
Management
System 18
months;
Pedestrian
Walkways
36 months;
Procurement
of Public
Transport
Vehicles 18
months

Waste Water Recycling

Decentralized
Wastewater
treatment plants;
Pipe Network for
Recycled Water;
Smart Meters

Currently STPs 100% treatment


of 216 MLD are
of Wastewater;
being
Utilization of
implemented;
100% treated
No use of
wastewater; and
treated
100% Automatic
wastewater; No
reading of
smart metering
consumer
system
meters

Grant under Digital


India, AMRUT,
release of funds by
Central and State
Government on
time

Decentralized
Wastewater
treatment
plants 24
months;
Pipe Network
for Recycled
Water 24
months;
Smart Meters
24 months

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

32. SCENARIOS
Using information from Table 5, describe the critical milestones, realistic timelines and sequencing of
efforts and events that you are projecting as the short -, medium- and long-t erm scenarios for your
smart city. If nec essary, include PERT and CPM charts in Annexure 3. (max. 500 words)

AREA BASED DEVELOPMENT


Activity1: Initiation and formalisation of preliminary and preoperative tasks
Short-term events: Formation of the SPV and finalisation of board and core team,
statutory and legal approvals; Medium-term events: DPR preparation and pre-tender
activities for appointment of Contractor; Critical milestone: Obtaining statutory & legal
approvals.
Activity 2: Development of core infrastructure
Medium-term events: Development of roads, Development of land with required
landscaping, water supply, sewerage and electrical work, solid waste management,
security infrastructure, laying of LP gas pipeline and central command centre.
Critical milestone: Development of roads, which facilitates the laying of other utilities.
Activity 3: Construction of affordable Residential housing Units
Short-term events: Handing over land to the contractor; Medium-term events:
development of affordable (LIG, MIG), HIG & villas residential units in four years..
Critical milestone: Handing over land to contractor
Activity 4: Installation of ICT components
Short-term events: Intelligent government services, air quality & energy efficiency.
Medium-term events: Transportation and mobility solutions, IT connectivity, energy
sources and command system; Critical milestone: Installation of systems and energy
sources
Activity 5: Handover of land to private landowners
Short-term event: Handing over land to landowners. The long-term construction activity
will be completed by owners according to their requirements; Critical milestone:
Handing over of land within one year
Activity 6: Construction of commercial facilities
Medium-term events: Auction of land and construction of a shopping centre, central
business centre, tourism & hospitality facilities; Critical milestone: Timely auction of land
at different stages as per developed area.
Activity 7: Construction of Social Facilities
Short-term events: Handing over land to government department; Medium-term event:
Sale of land and development of social services, Healthcare & educational institutions.
Critical milestone: Handing over of land within two years
Activity 8: Operation and maintenance setup
Short-term events: Installation of monitoring equipment, smart solutions, testing labs in
command centre for long term event of regular operation and maintenance.
PAN- CITY PROPOSALS
Energy efficiency:
Short-term events: GIS mapping and developing mobile application
Medium-term events: Replacement of conventional light fittings with LEDs at all AMC
offices, institutions, installation of new solar panel-mounted LED lights & sensors.
Long-term events: Installing grid-connected rooftop solar systems, awareness campaign
for citizens and employees; Critical milestone: Awareness campaign for implementation
within three years.
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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

E-Governance :
Short-term events: Integration of Services, Grievance Redressal Mechanism,
Development of Free Wi-Fi zone at important locations, web based/ mobile App for
citizens; Critical milestone: Integration of Services within two years.
Solid Waste Management :
Short-term events: Development of Mobile APP, Central Command Office and
procurement and refurbishment of existing vehicles; Medium-Term Events: Installations
of RFID Tags on all Bins with Weight Scanner, In-Vehicle IT-System, West-to-Energy
Plant, Scientific Landfill Site and Leachate management System; Critical milestone:
Waste-to-Energy Plant within two years.
Urban Mobility Solutions:
Medium-term events: Intelligent traffic Management system, Development of Pedestrian
Walkways, Procurement of Public Transport facilities
Critical milestone: Development of Pedestrian Walkways within three years.
Waste water recycling:
Short-term events: Decentralized Treatment Plant, Pipe Network and Setting up of
Smart Meters and Control Room; Critical milestone: Setting up of Decentralized
Treatment Plant within two years.

33. SPV
The SPV is a critical institution for t he implementation of the P roposal. Describe the SPV you propose
to create in your city, with details of its composition and structure, leadership and governanc e, and
holding pattern. Based on your responses in Table 6 describe how you envision the SPV to fulfill the
role set out in the Mission Guidelines. (max. 500 words)

S. No.

Table 6
(CHECKLIST: supporting documents for 1-7 must be submitted in Annexure 4)
Acti vity

Ye s/No

1.

Resolution of the Corporation/Council approving Smart City Plan including


Financial Plan.

2.

Resolution of the Corporation/Council for setting up Special Purpose Vehicle.

3.

Agreement/s with Para Statal Bodies, Boards existing in the City for
implementing the full scope of the SCP and sustaining the pan-city and areabased developments.

4.

Preliminary human resource plan for the SPV.

Yes

5.

Institutional arrangement for operationalisation of the SPV.

Yes

6.

If any other SPV is operational in the City, the institutional arrangement with
the existing SPV

7.

Additional document/s as appropriate

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

The proposed Special Purpose Vehicle, to be incorporated under Companies Act


2013, will have equal equity contribution from Government of Maharashtra and
Aurangabad Municipal Corporation with each holding 50% stake. The composition of
the Board would be as under
1. Chairman: Municipal Commissioner
2. Chief Executive Officer: To be selected from Government not below the rank of Dy
Secretary or Chief Engineer or Professional with relevant experience from Private
Sector
Directors:
3. Mayor ( or any other nominee frim AMC)
4. Nominee, Government of Maharashtra ( Urban Department)
5. Nominee Government of Maharashtra ( Finance or Industry Department)
6. Nominee : Government of India
7. Independent Directors ( Technocrat)
8. Independent Directors ( Senior Management Expert or Banker)
9. District Collector : Aurangabad
10. Police Commissioner : Aurangabad
AMC has already passed resolution for submission of the smart city Challenge
proposal to MOUD and its readiness to contribute Rs.50 Cr to equity of the SPV for
next five years
AMC envisages the SPV to be functioning in an autonomous manner under the
supervision of the Board of Directors with significant operational and management
freedom to ensure smooth implementation of the business plan as approved by the
Board. The strategic intent of the SPV would be to create positive disruption in the
processes, people and governance so as to facilitate the transformation in
development of urban infrastructure and delivering civic services in an effective
manner.
SPV would also put in place a management and Governance structure including
various committees including Finance, Audit, HR, and Technical to bring transparency
and effectiveness in functioning.
Forming partnership with various Companies / Developers / Vendors to execute or
operations and maintenance or EPC will be strategic to project implementation and
management. SPV would also aim to explore raising raising financial resources
through FIs and Banks including multilateral institutions , Financial Investors to
augment resources to undertake large-scale development.
Economic and Financial sustainability will be at the core of the development strategy
while ensuring Value Engineering and value proposition to all stake holders.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

34. CONVERGENCE
In Table 7, give details of the government (Central, state/ULB) departments, parastatal organizations
and public agencies who will be involved with the time-bound execution of each of the project
activities/components (both area-based and pan-city) you have identified. (In Annexure 3, include a
flowchart showing the network/relationships that the SPV will form with government and nongovernment agencies, and indicating the nature of connection with each entity.) (max. 50 words per
cell)
S.No

Acti vity/ Component

TABLE 7
Department/agency/
organization

Role/responsibility

Overall guidance and monitoring for the Smart High Powered State
City Mission
Committee (HPSC) for
Maharashtra

Guidance for progress on the


Mission
Reviewing the SCPs and
sending them to the MoUD for
Smart City Advisory Forum participation in the Challenge.

State Level Project Facilitation

Urban Development
Parent Department for
Department, Government of implementation
Maharashtra
Periodic progress monitoring
Quality review of the SCP
Advise and enable
collaboration among various
stakeholders at the city/district
levels
Facilitation for the
convergence of the eligible
components of the area-based
and pan-city development
under the AMRUT and SBM
schemes

Project inception and the provision of utilities


during the implementation of the area-based
and pan-city development

Aurangabad Municipal
Corporation

Smart City SPV incorporation


Appointment of board
members
Facilitation for Government
grants and approvals
Consent and statutory
approvals for construction
Provision of utility support
during execution

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S.No

Acti vity/ Component

TABLE 7
Department/agency/
organization

Role/responsibility

Area-based development: Greenfield


development at Chikalthana

Smart City SPV

Land Pooling
Conduct surveys & mapping
for master plan preparation
Expert engagement for master
plan preparation & transaction
Statutory approvals
Development of residential
facilities
ICT- enabled smart core
infrastructure development
Auction of plots
for commercial and social
development
Operation and maintenance

Land amalgamation for the area-based


development

Land Department,
Government of
Maharashtra; District
Magistrates Office,
Aurangabad

Identification and consent for


125 acres of land to be used
Agreement for the devolution
of development rights to the
Smart City SPV on the land
parcel

Statutory approvals for the designs for the


area-based and pan-city development

Town and country


planning
Pollution Control Board
Airport Authority
Fire department
Traffic department
Road (PWD)/ AMC
Maharashtra Jal Vikas
Pradhikaran

Issue of consent/ NOC for


construction, if required

Provision of power infrastructure for the


area-based and pan-city development

MSEDCL/MEDA
Power supply
Power Finance
PFC is the nodal agency for
Corporation (PFC) and
convergence under IPDS
State Electricity Regulatory
Commission (SERC)

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S.No

Acti vity/ Component

TABLE 7
Department/agency/
organization

Role/responsibility

Provision of gas and broadband supply for the Mahanagar Gas,


area development
BSNL, etc.

Distribution of utilities, such as


power, broadband, gas,
telephone, etc. within the
project area

Overall Development of Pan-city Solution

Project preparation and


execution
Operation and maintenance

Smart City SPV

10

11

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

35. PPP
In Table 8, give details of all the private companies/corporations/organizations that need to be
engaged with the execution and operations

&maintenance of the

various

activities

and

componentsenvisaged in this proposal, along with a description of their roles and responsibilities as
basic TORs. Use appropriate terms such as vendor, concessionaire, JV partner, etc. (max. 50
words per cell)
S.
No

Acti vity/ Component

TABLE 8
Company/corporation/
organization

Role/responsibility
(basi c TOR)

Project planning for all area-based and


pan-city solutions

Organisation
(consultants/experts)

GIS mapping
Preparation of a land pooling
business plan
Preparation of a proposal for
land conversion, etc.
Preparation of the master plan
Selection of an ICT solutions
technology partner
Selection of transaction
advisors
Selection of legal advisors for
agreement formulation

Construction of core infrastructure for the


area-based development

EPC contractor

Construction of the
infrastructure part in
consultation with ICT experts
and as per the master plan

Installation of ICT components for the


area-based development and pan-city
solutions

EPC contractor(s)

Designing of ICT components


in line with the master plan
Installation
Operation management for a
preliminary period

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S.
No

Acti vity/ Component

TABLE 8
Company/corporation/
organization

Role/responsibility
(basi c TOR)

Development of residential facilities for the


area-based development

EPC Contractor

Development of affordable
housing to be handed over to
the Smart City SPV
Development of other
residential facilities, such as
HIG and villas

Development of commercial facilities for the


area-based development

Private developer

Obtaining plots earmarked for


commercial development
through auctions/Lease
Development of commercial
facilities as per the master
plan

Development of social facilities for the


area-based development

Private developer

Obtain land parcels earmarked


for the development of social
facilities, on lease
Development of social
facilities, such as hospitals

Provision of utilities in the area-based


development

Private organisations
(operators)

Provision of electricity
Provision of the Internet
Provision of fixed lines
Provision of LPG gas, etc.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

S.
No

Acti vity/ Component

TABLE 8
Company/corporation/
organization

Role/responsibility
(basi c TOR)

10

11

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

36. STAKEHOLDER ROLES


Attach one A-4 sheet (part of 'Annexure 3'), containing an organogram showing the relations hips:
a) MPs, MLAs, MLCs.
b) Mayors, Councilors, other elected representatives.
c) Divisional Commissioner
d) Collector
e) Municipal Commissioner
f) Chief Executive of the Urban Development Authority/ Parastatal
g) Consultant (S elect from empanelled list)
h) Handholding Organisation (Select from following list: World Bank, ADB, JICA, US TDA, AFD, KfW,
DFID, UN Habitat, UNIDO, Other)
i) Vendors, PPP Partners, Financiers
j) Others, (eg. community representatives) as appropriate to your city

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

E. FINANCIAL PLAN
The development of bankable proposals will be a key success factor in the Smart City Mission. In order to
arrange appropriate amounts and types of funding and financing for your SCP, you must keep financial
considerations always in mind while preparing your overall strategy and the pan-city and area-based
proposals. It is anticipated that innovative means of funding and financing the projects will be necessary. For
this purpose, you must evaluate the capacity of the ULB and the SPV to undertake self-funded development
projects, the availability of funds from other government schemes that will converge in your S CP (refer
Questions 13 and 26), and the finance that can be rais ed from the financial market.

37. ITEMISED COSTS


What is the total project cost of your Smart City Proposal (SCP )? Describe in detail t he costs for each
of the activities/components identified in Questions 31. (Describe in Max. 300 words)

PROJECT PREPARATION:
Post incorporation, the SPV would incur organisational expenses such as Incorporation
charges, and office infrastructure and recruitment cost. Comprehensive project
preparation is crucial to the realization of project goals. Thus, consultancy to prepare a
business plan, hand-holding support, master plan preparation, detailed project reports,
financial and technical feasibility studies, project management consultants etc. would be
undertaken and technologies such as GIS mapping used for effective decision-making
and project execution. The SPV will incur 10% of the total uninflated project cost (113.46
cr) over five years.
GREENFIELD DEVELOPMENT:
Core infrastructure development on 582.5 acres of identified land (Cost: 666.7 Cr) with
information and communication technology (ICT) solutions for Greenfield development,
consisting of mobility solutions, energy efficiency measures and IT connectivity and
systems for intelligent services (Cost: 99.3 Cr).
Of the 55.83 acres of land reserved for residential development, SPV will build 2,058
affordable housing units at a cost of 187.7 Cr and 588 HIG flats at a cost of 167.8 Cr
while development rights would be sold for the remaining residential land.
A total of 73.20 hectares of land would be returned to private land owners under land
pooling, and 21.0 Ha of commercial land auctioned by SPV would entail investment from
individuals/institutions thereby creating a self-sustaining economic ecosystem.
PAN CITY SOLUTION:
The Energy-Efficient Management System includes solar street lights, 2MW rooftop solar
systems, sensor based control, a mobile application and central command center (Cost:
219.1 Cr). Optimised use of available funds enable the SPV to undertake E-Governance
(34.2 Cr), Smart Solutions for Solid Waste Management (46.8 Cr), Urban Mobility
Solutions (78.2 Cr) and Waste water recycling (96.4 Cr) to enhance impact of Smart City
Proposal across Aurangabad.
The total project cost incurred by the SPV would be 1709.6 cr.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

38. RESOURCES PLAN


Describe the financing sources, the own-sources of income, the financial schemes of the Cent ral or
State governments for which your city/SPV is eligible, which can be used to fund the S CP proposals
and pay back loans. Briefly describe an action-plan for resource improvement to make the ULB
financially self-s ustaining. (max. 1500 words)

In addition to the equity contributed by GoI and GoM, the SPV meets project financing
needs through convergence with government schemes, internal accruals from project
and may opt for debt financing from multi-lateral institutions.
Government Equity:
The SPVs equity capital is contributed by GOI grant under the Smart City Mission and a
matching contribution from the State Government and AMC. Equity contribution is
phased over a five-year period whereby the equity capital commitment in conjunction to
funding received under convergence is used to undertake a CAPEX intensive project
and create a financially sustainable project.
Land cost:
The land acquisition cost for Greenfield development on 582.5 acres of land would have
been significant because of the 78.5% private sector land holding. For optimal use of
available financial resources, the SPV would undertake land pooling approach whereby
landowners would receive developed land with SMART infrastructure with a higher net
FSI and a change in land use (from NDZ/ green to residential) against their undeveloped
land. High social acceptance is envisaged as a significant portion of the value created is
transferred to landowners, validated by their intent to participate in the project (Annex 4).
Infrastructure development and PAN-City implementation:
SPV would undertake the development of trunk infrastructure and utilities on Smart City
principles at an indexed cost of 766.0 cr to support and trigger private sector investments
in Greenfield development. The SPV would further entail an indexed cost of 474.61 cr for
the implementation of pan-city solutions phased over five years.
Internal project accruals arising from sale of housing development and commercial land
meet partially the fund requirement whereby the phasing of land development is
undertaken to monetise and unlock potential value.
Convergence with Government schemes:
Projects undertaken by SPV can converge with missions of other government schemes
such as AMRUT, Swachh Bharat, IPDS and Digital India. The development of an
energy-efficient management system, enhancement of solid waste management system,
creation of urban mobility solutions and increasing the digital footprint of government
institutions entitle the projects to seek additional financing. Government grants under
AMRUT (85.1 cr), Swachh Bharat (11.2 cr), IPDS (10.3 cr) and Digital India (6.1 cr) are
estimated. The total grants from on-going schemes (112.6 cr) would partially meet the
funding requirements of SPV.
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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

Financial sustainability:
The emphasis to create a self-sustainable organization, greenfield project design and
pan-city solutions aim to generate recurring cash flows from capital engaged in core
infrastructure. The project mix has been designed to align project accruals comprising
capital revenues and operational revenues to recover investments in infrastructure and
create recurring cash flows to meet debt obligations as well as operation and
maintenance expenses so as to become financially self-sustaining. The Project accruals
can be classified as follows:
Affordable Housing
Strong demand for affordable housing has been observed and highlighted by
numerous stakeholders. SPV will undertake development of affordable housing by
constructing 715 EWS, 794 LIG and 550 MIG housing units in price range of 4.3-13.2
lakhs at cost of 187.7 cr and make negligible margin by selling the 2,058 housing
units for 205.5 cr. The development would be phased over four years aligned to
development of core infrastructure and meet housing stock demand.
Residential Land Monetization:
On part of the 55.83 acres of residential land, SPV would undertake development of
588 HIG units itself, whereby constructing 64,700 sq.m of built-up area at a cost of
167.8 cr. The development will be initiated in Year 2 with major development
focussed in Year 3,4 and 5 as land development takes shape. Revenue proceeds for
SPV would be approximately 342.3 cr in-line with current real-estate trends in
Aurangabad. With smart infrastructure complementing quality of life, SPV may realise
higher revenue potential from sale of premium HIG housing.
SPV would not undertake development of housing on the entire land earmarked for
residential use to limit its capital requirement outlay and minimise inherent risks.
Development rights for the remaining residential land parcel whereby 2,92,680 sq. m
of built-up area can be constructed would be sold by SPV thereby garnering 180.6 cr
over a period of seven years beginning from year 2.
Commercial Land Monetization:
Commercial land of 52.4 acres would be monetised by the SPV on undertaking the
auction of developed land for the development of shopping center, central business
district and tourism/ hospitality infrastructure. The auction would commence from
Year 3 and is estimated to be completed by Year 7, in-line with the real estate
absorption trends of Aurangabad. SPV is estimated to generate 509.7 cr from sale of
commercial land, whereby partially meeting infrastructure development cost in the
initial years.
Social Assets:
As part of the master plan, 50.1 acres of land have been reserved for the
development of a hospital, skill development center and educational Institutes. From
Year 3 onwards, the developed land would be sold to the private sector at a
discounted price of 2,421 per Sq. M to undertake development and operation of
social institutions such as hospital, training institute and educational facilities.
State-of-the-art institutional infrastructure would be developed by
individuals/institutions, thereby reducing the CAPEX to be incurred by the SPV and
transfer the operational risk while ensuring quality services are extended to the
citizens of Aurangabad.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

Operation and Maintenance (O&M):


The SPV would undertake the O&M of the pan-city solution and Greenfield
development. The occupants of the Greenfield development would pay an annual user
fee linked to the size and type of establishment. SPV would be reimbursed by AMC for
undertaking the operations of PAN City solutions on cost plus approach whereby SPV is
financial sustainability.
Resource improvement at the ULB level would be observed as incremental property tax
is collected from Greenfield Development and cost savings resulting from the adoption
of PAN City solutions on account of electricity by Energy-Efficient Management System
and Waste Water Recycling which would reduce pumping costs. The implementation of
the E-Governance system would increase penetration and access to services; as a
result collection efficiency to recover property tax is expected to increase significantly.
Financial and operational efficiencies at both SPV and AMC levels are expected and
activities undertaken complement each others initiatives.
Financial Summary:
The SPV is self-sufficient to meet funding requirements for infrastructure development
and operation and maintenance. SPV has the potential to create an annual cash surplus
for the redeployment of capital in projects on Smart City principles backed by revenue
generating assets. In endeavour to have maximum social impact, the SPV could use the
funds available as leverage with private sector participation, and thereby undertake a
wider service offering under PAN City solutions for maximum outreach.
The total indexed cost, including soft costs of the SCP is 1,709.6 cr whereby 613 cr
through central government grant and over 595.5 cr of internal accruals meet the CAPE
The financial structure chalked out eliminates the requirement to undertake debt which
may be raised either from infrastructure financing organizations or at a discounted rate
from multi-lateral institutions. The SPV may opt to accelerate the deployment of pan city
solutions and focus development over a shorter span of time period and undertake more
prominent role in development of end-user infrastructure as part of the Greenfield
development. If the option is exercised by SPV, the demand drivers and potential to
recover O&M cost with a margin create a financially attractive bankable project which
has the capacity to payback loans taken towards development.
Replicability and Scalability:
With the cash surplus generated SPV can undertake similar Greenfield development at
Nakshtrawadi and Mukundwadi, incorporating Smart City principles, wherein contiguous
land parcel of 330 acres and 1000 acres respectively have been identified. Aspects
related to the regional neighbourhood, probable demand, current land use and potential
to develop have been assessed thereby creating a project pipeline for the SPV to
consider. Additional projects to be developed by the SPV would give the regional
economy the required impetus and address concerns related to affordable housing,
access to core infrastructure services and integrate technological solutions to enhance
the quality of life.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

39. COSTS
What is the lifetime cost estimated for your area-based development and your pan-city solution/s? A dd
O&M costs wherever applicable. (max 500 words)

GREENFIELD DEVELOPMENT
Infrastructure development including ICT solution implementation for Greenfield
development on the 582.5 acre land parcel would entail an uninflated expenditure of
706.87 cr by the SPV, in addition to pre-operative expenses. As the implementation is
phased over five years, the SPV would incur 766.0 cr accommodating a 5% inflationary
impact. The SPV would undertake the O&M of the developed area to ensure that the
benefits on account of the Smart City components are passed to residents and users.
Over an operational period of 18 years, SPV would incur cost of 1,164.7 cr comprising
the maintenance of roads, sewerage, water supply, LPG pipelines etc. and include
operational expenditure for security, central command center operations, landscaping
and ICT solution offerings such as IT connectivity, traffic management, and governance.
O&M expenses have been estimated to accommodate an inflation of 7% on account of
CPI trends.
The residential development undertaken by SPV would be undertaken at a cost of 355.5
cr while the development rights sold by SPV would entail a further investment in range of
650 cr from private sector.
Under land pooling, 73.2 hectares of land returned to land owners would be developed
under residential land use. The commercial and institutional land (41.2 hectares)
auctioned leased by the SPV would attract private investment for development. Private
investments in the range of 4,800-5,400 cr are envisaged over the next 7-10 years to
meet the demand for quality infrastructure and amenities.
PAN CITY IMPLEMENTATION
As part of the SCP, the SPV will undertake the implementation of the energy-efficient
management system, comprising solar-powered LED street lights, 2 MW rooftop solar
systems and smart solutions, such as sensor-based control, a mobile application and a
central command centre, at a cost of 219.1 cr. Operations would be initiated from Year 4
onwards and entail an initial annual O&M cost of 6.2 cr and a total of 209.1 cr over 17
years of operation, including electricity, repair and replacement costs. Widespread social
impact and a positive environmental impact are reasons to undertake the
CAPEX-intensive energy-efficient management system.
To complement the current initiatives in e-governance, the SPV will undertake
e-governance implementation across functions and address gaps felt by users to
increase transparency and accessibility at a cost of 31.8 cr. The e-governance system
O&M would be outsourced for maximum efficiency, leading to an initial annual cost 0.95
cr, and amounting to 32.4 cr over 17 years of operation.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

The SPV is financially equipped to positively impact the lives of citizens by undertaking
the implementation of smart solutions for solid waste management (initial cost: 46.8 cr),
urban mobility solutions (78.2 cr) and waste water recycling (96.4 cr). The SPV would
incur O&M costs of 64.8 cr, 93.4 cr and 182.9 cr, respectively, for these projects, over
the next 16 years.
The cumulative indexed CAPEX outlay for pan-city solutions is 474.61 cr, with O&M
costs over 17 years post completion at 582.6 cr.

40. REVENUE AND PAY-BACK


How will the area based development and the pan-city smart solutions(s) of your city be financed? If
you plan to seek loans or issue bonds, what revenue sources will be used to pay back the loans ?
(max. 250 words)

The requirement to assume debt by issuance of bonds or undertaking debt does not
exist as the SPV has the inherent potential to execute a project of 1709.6 cr by phasing
development backed by sound project preparation and demand drivers identified during
project conceptualization.
Funds of 112.6 cr from convergence with on-going government schemes will partly
finance implementation of smart solutions and Greenfield development. The
implementation of the pan city solutions is phased over a period of five years whereby
individual solutions are implemented in a sequential manner. The development of core
infrastructure as part of the Greenfield development is undertaken in phases whereby
potential land value can be unlocked in phases to generate revenues to meet capital
outlay requirements.
The initial capital outlay is financed from the GoI grant under Smart City mission and
matching contribution from State Government and AMC. Funding under convergence
partly meets project requirements.
Sale of housing units and sale of commercial land generates ample revenues to meet
gap in funding requirements for undertaking project implementation and generate a cash
surplus.
If the SPV during implementation envisages to increase project size to be executed or
accelerate implementation, financing may be undertaken to meet short term fund
requirements which can be paid back by committed grant from GoI and from strong cash
flows accruing to the project.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

41. RECOVERY OF O&M


What

is your plan for covering the Operations

&

Maintenance costs

for each of the

activities/components identified in Questions 31? (max. 1000 words)

GREENFIELD DEVELOPMENT:
The SPV is responsible for the O&M of the Greenfield development, and will undertake
scheduled maintenance of the core infrastructure and incur operational expenditure on
account of service offerings such as traffic management, security, landscaping, solid
waste management, etc. The SPV will recover the cost of operations by charging
dwellers/users an annual user fee, which would be linked to the type and size of their
establishments.
The user fee would be escalated on an annual basis to meet the inflation impact on
operational expenses, and the surplus collected would lead to a minimal operating
margin and the creation of a cash buffer for major maintenance of the core
infrastructure.
Initial O&M expenses are lower as the development is phased with only part of 582.5
acres being operational with delivery of housing units constructed phased over four
years and development of land transferred to private land owners is developed by them.
The O&M costs amount to 1,164.7 cr over 18 years of operations. The user fees
charged varies according to type of land use such as Rs. 2.5/sq.ft per month for
commercial, Rs. 2/sq.ft per month for HIG housing development, and Rs. 0.75, 1, 1.5 for
EWS, LIG and MIG per sq.ft. per month respectively. The user fees charged suffices to
recover the O&M cost incurred by the SPV while generating a minimal margin accruing
to the SPV.

PAN-CITY SOLUTION
Service offerings under the pan-city solution will have widespread impact across the city
and multitudes of beneficiaries will exist, whereby the collection directly from users will
not be feasible for the SPV. As the SPV complements the existing service offerings
provided by the AMC, the potential to increment tax collections on account of enhanced
and wider service offerings is possible for AMC thereby increasing its revenues.
For the O&M cost recovery on account of pan-city operations for energy efficiency
management, e-governance, solid waste management, urban mobility solutions and
waste water recycling, the SPV will be compensated by the AMC with the payment of an
annual fee. The fees charged by the SPV to AMC would be on cost plus approach
whereby SPV apart from recovering the O&M costs, generates a margin on service
offered.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

Payment of annual fees by AMC to SPV can be justified on the following as value is
created for AMC and the citizens:
Energy Efficient Management system will lead to reduction in electricity cost
currently paid by AMC and also out-sources the operations of the street light
infrastructure thereby limiting operational expenditure incurred by AMC. Direct cost
saving on account of operations is evident apart from mitigating the need for AMC to
incur upfront capital expenditure to improve the existing street light infrastructure and
expand its coverage which will be borne by the SPV.
Incremental effectiveness of E-Governance system will increase collection
effectiveness and complement initiatives to make the systems citizen centric. AMC is
expected to positively benefit on account of improving collection efficiency due to
E-Governance implementation under Pan-City Solutions.
The smart solutions for Solid Waste Management will complement current initiatives
of AMC to improve collection and treatment efficiencies whereby revolutionising
current practices which will enable AMC to undertake differential pricing on account
of type of user and amount of waste generated with integration of technology.
AMC is undertaking a safe city project with limited coverage which will be
complemented by the urban mobility solution to be implemented by the SPV. The
urban mobility solution with centralised control will lead to incremental productivity of
citizens on account of time and fuel saving; while leading to incremental revenues on
account of smart parking solutions and share of advertising revenues from
pedestrian walkways to be developed by SPV.
Recycled waste water suitable for non-potable purposes would be sold by AMC to
institution and government departments to strengthen its revenue stream. On
account of waste water recycling, the demand for raw water supply will reduce
proportionately, thereby reducing the pumping costs incurred by the AMC.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

42. FINANCIAL TIMELINE


What is the financial timeline for your smart city agenda? Describe the milestones and target dates
related to fund flows, payback commitments, etc. that must be adhered to for the proposal to achieve
the vision set out in Table 5 (question 31)? (max. 1 page: A4 size)

Stage

Capital Deployment / Funding Sources

Target Date

Project
Preparation
(PreConstruction
Stage)

Preliminary activities would be primarily be funded from SPV equity


contributed by GoI and GoM. Approximately 20% of preoperative
expenses will be incurred as land pooling scheme formulation,
feasibility and technical studies for PAN City solution and
Greenfield Development are conducted in conjunction with detailed
stakeholder consultations which would entail an expense of 22.7 cr.
Consultancy services for DPR, transaction advisory, business
planning, organizational structure etc. would be covered.

SPV formation / Institutional


arrangement to be completed
by Q1 of Year 1
Detailed feasibility and
technical studies, appointment
of consultants, amalgamation
of Land to be completed by
end of Q3 of Year 1

Development of
Core
Infrastructure Greenfield
Development

Development of Infrastructure is partially funded from convergence


from on-going government schemes such as SBM, AMRUT and
digital India. Capital outlay of 123.5, 194.4, 170.1 and 178.6 cr in
Year 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively would be incurred. SPV equity
supplemented by internal accruals would meet capital outlay
requirements.

Infrastructure development to
be initiated in Q3 of Year 1 and
to be completed by Q4 of Year
4. Project will meet deadlines
estimated on account of sound
project preparedness

ICT Solution
implementation
across
Greenfield
Development

ICT solution implementation would be aligned to development of


core infrastructure development. CAPEX outlay of 28.2, 29.6 and
41.5 cr in Year 3, 4 and 5 respectively would be incurred. Funding
requirements would be met through mix equity, government grant
and project accruals as revenues from land monetization accrue to
SPV

ICT implementation to be
initiated from Year 2 and
completed by end of Year 4.
ICT implementation dependent
on completion of core
infrastructure.

Construction of
Affordable
Housing & HIG
Unit

SPV will undertake development on part of 55.8 acre residential


land by incurring a CAPEX of 187.7 cr from Year 2 to 4 for
development of 2,058 affordable houses. Development of HIG
housing is phased over Year 2 to 4 at a cost of 167.8 cr to generate
returns and ensure financial sustainability.

SPV initiates development of


houses in Year 2 and
completes in Year 5. Phasing
coincides with the probable
demand for housing stock and
fund availability

Implementation
of Energy
Efficient
Management
System

10% project implementation in Year 1 post project preparation


stage will be possible at a cost of 20.5 cr. Implementation would be
phased over year 2 and 3 equally on account of size of
implementation of the project at a cost of 96.9 and 101.7 cr
respectively. Partial funding would be through IPDS with balance
from Equity contributed and grant under Smart City Mission.

Project completion is linked


only to project preparation
including site surveys and
material procurement which will
be completed by Q3 of Year 1
with project implementation
completion by end of Year 3

Implementation
of additional
four PAN City
Solutions

Financial leverage enables SPV to maximize impact on city


implementation of E-Governance and solid waste management
initiated in Year 2, Urban Mobility & Waste Water Recycling in Year
3. Implementation to be funded through mix of Convergence,
Internal Accruals and Equity

E-Governance completion by
Year 3, Solid waste
Management by Year 4 and
Urban Mobility and Waste
Water Re-cycling by Year 5.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

43. FALL-BACK PLAN


What is your plan for mitigating financial risk? Do you have any alternatives or fall-back plans if t he
financial assumptions do not hold? (max. 250 words)

Land availability under land pooling is essential for Greenfield development, to avoid
upfront land acquisition costs. Our land pooling scheme offers 40% land back with
changed land use, higher net FSI and developed land with Smart City characteristics. This
structure creates immense value for land contributors, thereby reducing the risk of
non-participation in the development. Project awareness among stakeholders and consent
from the majority of the owners would offset the land acquisition financing risks.
GoI and GoM have committed equity capital, thereby enabling the SPV to raise debt
financing for initial capital outlays, which would be repaid by internal accruals with equity
commitment in future years, mitigating any default risk. The SPV has been depicted not to
undertake debt while it has the option it may explore during implementation.
Core infrastructure development is scheduled after undertaking a detailed project
preparation and feasibility analysis primarily focussed in Year 1 to address potential
design, financial and technical risks, and appoint PMC consultants during implementation
to reduce implementation risks
The financial risk during operations is mitigated by supporting operational revenue with
cash accruals from capital revenue generated from land monetization during initial years
to cover operational expenses if revenue accruals are inadequate in short term.
Project spreading over 582.5 acres may be developed in phases as fall-back plans, in
case challenges related to financing, land availability and procurement are encountered
during the detailed project preparation.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

ANNEXURE 1
S. No

Feature

Definition

1.

Citizen participation

A smart city constantly adapts its strategies incorporating views of its


citizens to bring maximum benefit for all. (Guideline 3.1.6)

2.

Identity and culture

A Smart City has a unique identity, which distinguishes it from all


other cities, based on some key aspect: its location or climate; its
leading industry, its cultural heritage, its local culture or cuisine, or
other factors. This identity allows an easy answer to the question
"Why in this city and not somewhere else?" A Smart City celebrat es
and promotes its unique identity and culture. (Guideline 3.1.7)

3.

Economy and
employment

A smart city has a robust and resilient economic base and growth
strategy that creates large-scale employment and increases
opportunities for the majority of its citizens.
(Guideline 2.6 & 3.1.7 & 6.2)

4.

Healt h

A Smart City provides access to healthcare for all its citizens.


(Guideline 2.5.10)

5.

Education

A Smart City offers schooling and educational opportunities for all


children in the city (Guideline 2.5.10)

6.

Mixed use

A Smart City has different kinds of land uses in the same places;
such as offices, housing, and shops, clustered together.
(Guidelines 3.1.2 and 3.1.2)

Compactness

A Smart City encourages development to be compact and dense,


where buildings are ideally within a 10-minute walk of public
transportation and are loc ated close together to form concent rated
neighborhoods and cent ers of activity around commerce and
services. (Guidelines 2.3 and 5.2)

8.

Open spaces

A Smart City has sufficient and usable public open spaces, many of
which are green, that promote exercise and outdoor recreation for all
age groups. Public open spac es of a range of sizes are dispersed
throughout the City so all citizens can have access. (Guidelines 3.1.4
& 6.2)

9.

Housing and
inclusiveness

A Smart City has sufficient housing for all income groups and
promotes integration among social groups. (Guidelines 3.1.2)

10.

Transportation &
Mobility

A Smart City does not require an automobile to get around;


distances are short, buildings are accessible from the sidewalk, and
transit options are plentiful and attractive to people of all income
levels. (Guidelines 3.1.5 & 6.2)

11.

Walkable

A Smart Citys roads are designed equally for pedestrians, cyclists


and vehicles; and road safety and sidewalks are paramount to street
design. Traffic signals are sufficient and traffic rules are enforced.
Shops, restaurants, building entrances and trees line the sidewalk to
encourage walking and there is ample lighting so the pedestrian
feels safe day and night. (Guidelines 3.1.3 & 6.2)

12.

IT connectivity

A Smart City has a robust internet network allowing high-speed


connections to all offices and dwellings as desired. (Guideline 6.2)

7.

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

13.

Intelligent government
services

A Smart City enables easy interaction (including through online and


telephone servic es) with its citizens, eliminating delays and
frustrations in interactions with government. (Guidelines 2.4.7 &
3.1.6 & 5.1.4 & 6.2)

14.

Energy supply

A Smart City has reliable, 24/7 electricity supply with no delays in


requested hookups. (Guideline 2.4)

15.

Energy source

A Smart City has at least 10% of its electricity generated by


renewables. (Guideline 6.2)

16.

Water supply

A Smart City has a reliable, 24/ 7 supply of wat er that meets national
and global health standards. (Guidelines 2.4 & 6.2)

17.

Waste water
management

A Smart City has advanced water management programs, including


wastewater recycling, smart meters, rainwater harvesting, and green
infrastructure to manage storm wat er runoff. (Guideline 6.2)

18.

Water quality

A Smart City treats all of its sewage to prevent the polluting of water
bodies and aquifers. (Guideline 2.4)

19.

Air quality

A Smart City has air quality that always meets international safety
standards. (Guideline 2.4.8)

20.

Energy efficiency

A Smart City promotes state-of-the-art energy efficiency practices in


buildings, street lights, and transit systems. (Guideline 6.2)

21.

Underground electric
wiring

A Smart City has an underground electric wiring system to reduce


blackouts due to storms and eliminate unsightliness. (Guideline 6.2)

Sanitation

A Smart City has no open defecation, and a full supply of toilets


based on the population. (Guidelines 2.4.3 & 6.2)

22.

23.

Waste management

A Smart City has a waste management system that removes


household and commercial garbage, and disposes of it in an
environmentally and economically sound manner. (Guidelines 2.4. 3
& 6.2)

24.

Safety

A Smart City has high levels of public safety, especially focused on


women, children and the elderly; men and women of all ages feel
safe on the streets at all hours. (Guideline 6.2)

Page 88 of 92

INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

ANNEXURE 2
Self-Asse ssment Form
Attach self-a sse ssment format given in supplementary template (Excel sheet),
with columns I-L duly filled

Page 89 of 92

INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

ANNEXURE 3
Twenty sheets ( A-4 and A-3) of annexures, including
annexures mentioned in questions 32, 34, 36
S. No

Particulars

Summary of Public Consultation

Map Showing the Regional Settings of Aurangabad Town

Map Showing the Regional Industrial Estates

Base Map: Physical Infrastructure

Base Map: Social Infrastructure

Base Map: Tourism

Base Map: Slums & Gunthewaris

Green field development: Map showing the Zoning Plan

Green field Development: Master Plan

10

Project Implementation Schedule - All proposals under Smart CIty Missions

11

Project Implementation Schedule - PAN City Solutions

12

Project Execution Flow Chart (Question 34)

13

SPV Organogram (Question 36)

14

Assumptions and Capital Outlay for Greenfield Development and Pan-City Implementation

15

Capital and Operational Revenues accruing from Greenfield & Pan-City Solutions

16

Project Return Calculations for Aurangabad Smart City SPV

17

Overview of City Base Line Data & Statistics

18

List of Acronyms

19
20

Page 90 of 92

INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

ANNEXURE 4
(Supporting documents, such as government orders, council resolutions,
response to Question 33 may be annexed here)
S. No

Particulars

AMCs General Body Resolution No. 242 dt. 20/11/2015, providing approval for Preparation
of Smart City Proposal

Consent Letter dt. 04/12/2015 by Landowners and for providing their land for Greenfield
Development Option

Work Order dt. 01/07/2014 and Agreement dt. 16/06/2014 of Underground Sewerage
Scheme under UIDSSMT signed between AMC and Project Contractor

Work Order dt. 20/20/2015 for development & beautification of Road Dividers under
Aurangabad Tourism Mega Circuit

Work Order dt. 03/03/2014 for development & beautification of Rose Garden at Majnu Hills
under Aurangabad Tourism Mega Circuit

Details of Sulabh Shauchalay developed through AMC Funds and BOT basis

Agreement dt. 22/09/2011 between AMC and Aurangabad Water Utility Co. Ltd.

AMCs General Body Resolution No. 60 dt. 20/07/2015, for providing approval for AMCs
Contribution of Rs.50 Cr. per year towards Smart City Project

AMCs General Body Resolution providing approval for formation of Special Purpose
Vehicle for Smart City Mission Project for Aurangabad City

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

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INDIA SMART CITY MISSION

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40

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