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Health, Education, Social Protection

News & Notes 11/2010


A bi-weekly newsletter supported by GTZ
(Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit)
23 May 2010

You can download back issues (2005 - 2010) of this newsletter at:
http://german-practice-collection.org/en/newsletters/hesp-news-and-notes

Table of Contents:

NEWS FROM THE GERMAN BACKUP INITIATIVE .......... 4


Elements of Successful Preparation of HIV Proposals to the Global Fund to Fight Aids,
Tuberculosis and Malaria ........................................................................................................ 4

BOOKS ................................................................................ 4
World Health Statistics 2010 ................................................................................................... 4
Equity, social determinants and public health programmes.................................................... 4
Improving Health Service Delivery in Developing Countries................................................... 5
Health Systems in Action: An eHandbook for Leaders and Managers................................... 5
Just Give Money to the Poor: The Development Revolution from the Global South .............. 5
Unpacking the Issue of Counterfeit Medicines........................................................................ 6

ONLINE PUBLICATIONS .................................................... 6


HIV - AIDS - STI ........................................................................................................... 6
Rationing Funds, Risking Lives: World backtracks on HIV treatment..................................... 6
Progress made in the implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS and
the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS ..................................................................................... 6
The Global AIDS Transition: A Feasible Objective for AIDS Policy ........................................ 7
When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy....................................................................................... 7
‘Turning the Page’: A preview of AVAC Report 2010 ............................................................. 7
Turning crisis into opportunity for children affected by HIV and AIDS: responding to the
financial, fuel and food crises.................................................................................................. 8
Antiretroviral therapy outcomes in resource-limited settings for HIV-infected children <5
years of age............................................................................................................................. 8
HIV decline in Zimbabwe due to reductions in risky sex? Evidence from a comprehensive
epidemiological review ............................................................................................................ 8
Combined antiretroviral treatment and heterosexual transmission of HIV-1: cross sectional
and prospective cohort study .................................................................................................. 9
Concurrent Partnerships as a Driver of the HIV Epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa? The
Evidence is Limited ................................................................................................................. 9
Social Discrimination Against Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM): Implications for HIV
Policy and Programs ............................................................................................................... 9
Scaling Up the Response to HIV Stigma and Discrimination................................................ 10
Sexual & Reproductive Health ................................................................................... 10
The Role of Policymakers in Ending Female Genital Mutilation: An African Perspective .... 10
Experience with Side Effects Among Users of Injectables, the IUD, and Oral Contraceptive
Pills in Four Urban Areas of Honduras.................................................................................. 10
Excluding pregnancy among women initiating antiretroviral therapy: efficacy of a family
planning job aid ..................................................................................................................... 11
The World Bank’s Reproductive Health Action Plan 2010-2015........................................... 11
Why Family Planning and Reproductive Health are Critical to the Well-Being of Youth ...... 11
Parent-child communication about sexual and reproductive health in rural Tanzania:
Implications for young people’s sexual health interventions ................................................. 11

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 1


Implants Toolkit ..................................................................................................................... 12
Maternal & Child Health ............................................................................................. 12
“I can’t afford justice”: Violence against women in Uganda continues unchecked and
unpunished............................................................................................................................ 12
The health of our children...................................................................................................... 12
Giving developing countries the best shot: An overview of vaccine access and R&D ......... 13
Improving immunisation coverage in rural India: clustered randomised controlled evaluation
of immunisation campaigns with and without incentives....................................................... 13
Malaria........................................................................................................................ 13
Options for improving malaria treatment ............................................................................... 13
Successful introduction of artesunate combination therapy is not enough to fight malaria:
results from an adherence study in Sierra Leone ................................................................. 14
Understanding caretakers’ dilemma in deciding whether or not to adhere with referral advice
after pre-referral treatment with rectal artesunate................................................................. 14
Tuberculosis ............................................................................................................... 14
Tuberculosis Series - The Lancet .........................................................................................14
New and improved tuberculosis diagnostics: evidence, policy, practice, and impact........... 15
Tuberculosis - resistance, funding, and drugs ...................................................................... 15
Global Drug Facility - Stop TB Partnership ........................................................................... 15
Other Infectious Diseases .......................................................................................... 15
Epidemiology and control of trachoma: systematic review ................................................... 15
A Meta-analysis of the Effectiveness of Albendazole Compared with Metronidazole as
Treatments for Infections with Giardia duodenalis................................................................ 16
Factors Associated with Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever.......................................................... 16
Essential Medicines.................................................................................................... 16
Tide turns for drug manufacturing in Africa ........................................................................... 16
Development of and Access to Products for Neglected Diseases........................................ 17
Social Protection ........................................................................................................ 17
Social protection in health: the need for a transformative dimension ................................... 17
The Landscape of Microinsurance in Africa .......................................................................... 17
Can micro health insurance reduce poverty? Evidence from Bangladesh ........................... 18
Cash transfers: affordability and sustainability...................................................................... 18
Impact of Oportunidades on Skilled Attendance at Delivery in Rural Areas......................... 18
Microfinance and HIV/AIDS Prevention ................................................................................ 19
Human Resources...................................................................................................... 19
Increasing access to health workers in underserved areas: a conceptual framework for
measuring results .................................................................................................................. 19
Restricting Migration: a bad (development) idea................................................................... 19
Health Systems & Research ...................................................................................... 19
Basic Statistics on Health Facility Status and Readiness to Deliver Quality Services.......... 19
Health Systems Management and Leadership Strengthening Handbook ............................ 20
Blueprint for the Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practices in Health Care...................... 20
Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and middle-income
countries: a survey of researchers ........................................................................................ 21
Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and middle-income
countries: a survey of health care providers ......................................................................... 21
Non-Communicable Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case for Cohort Studies .......... 21
An adequacy evaluation of a 10-year, four-country nutrition and health programme ........... 22
Health Systems Institutional Characteristics: A Survey of 29 OECD Countries ................... 22
Information & Communication Technology ................................................................ 22
Barriers and Gaps Affecting mHealth in Low and Middle Income Countries: Policy White
Paper ..................................................................................................................................... 22
Women and ICTs in Africa ....................................................................................................23
UNICEF and Text to Change ................................................................................................ 23
Education ................................................................................................................... 23
The Future is Now: Education for Children in Countries Affected by Conflict....................... 23
Caring and Learning Together ..............................................................................................23
Towards Measuring the Volume Output of Education and Health Services: A Handbook ... 24
Harm Reduction and Drug Use .................................................................................. 24
Three cents a day is not enough: Resourcing HIV-related Harm Reduction on a Global
Basis...................................................................................................................................... 24

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 2


Injecting Equipment Sharing in Russian Drug Injecting Dyads............................................. 25
Epidemiology of HIV among Injecting and Non-injecting Drug Users: Current Trends and
Implications for Interventions ................................................................................................ 25
Detention as Treatment......................................................................................................... 25
Millennium Development Goals.................................................................................. 26
The MDG fundamentals: improving equity for development................................................. 26
How should MDG Implementation be Measured: Faster Progress or Meeting Targets? ..... 26
Development Assistance............................................................................................ 26
The International Health Partnership and Related Initiatives (IHP+) Results Update .......... 26
Why Accountability Matters ...................................................................................................27
Others......................................................................................................................... 27
Worldwide mortality in men and women aged 15-59 years from 1970 to 2010: a systematic
analysis.................................................................................................................................. 27
Urban World: A New Chapter in Urban Development........................................................... 27
The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and their Health
(INDEPTH), the Importance of Core Support........................................................................ 28

JOB OPPORTUNITIES...................................................... 28
Experts to serve the Global Fund on its Technical Review Panel ........................................ 28

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES ............................................ 28


The German Health Practice Collection (GHPC) .................................................................. 28
The Primary Surgery Wiki .....................................................................................................29
The World Open Health Assembly (WOHA) 2010 ................................................................ 29
CD-ROM: Understanding Health Economics for Development ............................................ 29
Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).......................................................................... 29
TDR-News No. 85 - May 2010 ..............................................................................................30
FHI Insight - May 2010 .......................................................................................................... 30
Southern Sudan Medical Journal - Volume 3, Number 2...................................................... 30
International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) Newsletter ........................................ 30

INTERESTING WEB SITES .............................................. 31


Evidence-Based Tuberculosis Diagnosis.............................................................................. 31
mPedigree Network............................................................................................................... 31
The People Living with HIV Stigma Index ............................................................................. 31
The Anglican Health Network................................................................................................ 31

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES............................................ 32
Introduction to Infectious Disease Modelling and its Applications ........................................ 32

CARTOON ......................................................................... 32

TIPS & TRICKS ................................................................. 32


Close Tabs with your Mouse Wheel...................................................................................... 32
Signs of Malware................................................................................................................... 33
Internet Safety - Keeping Your Computer Safe on the Internet ............................................ 34

Fair Use:
This Newsletter is produced under the principles of 'fair use'. We source relevant news articles, resources and research
documents and strive to attribute sources by providing reference and/or direct links to authors and websites.

Disclaimer:
The views expressed in this newsletter, do not necessarily represent those of GTZ or the editor of HESP-News & Notes.
While we make every effort to ensure that all facts and figures quoted by authors are accurate, GTZ and the editor of the
Newsletter cannot be held responsible for any inaccuracies contained in any articles. Please contact dneuvians@gmx.de
if you believe that errors are contained in any article and we will investigate and provide feedback.

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 3


NEWS FROM THE GERMAN BACKUP INITIATIVE
http://www.gtz.de/backup

Elements of Successful Preparation of HIV Proposals to the Global Fund to


Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria
Implications for Technical Support to 11 countries with consecutive unsuccessful pro-
posals
Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), February 2010

27 pp. 373 kB:


http://groups.google.com/group/health-education-social-protection-news-
notes/web/HIV-Proposals.pdf

The UNAIDS Secretariat convened a meeting 17-19 February 2010 in Tunisia with
technical support providers and key stakeholders involved in HIV proposals to the
Global Fund to discuss lessons learned in developing HIV proposals and technical sup-
port provision. The purpose of the meeting was to gain a common understanding of is-
sues related to unsuccessful HIV proposals to the Global Fund, to learn countries’ ex-
periences preparing successful HIV applications, and to identify actions required by
various stakeholders to ensure that these countries are equipped to develop sound HIV
proposals in their next submissions.

BOOKS
World Health Statistics 2010

by Ties Boerma, Carla AbouZahr, Jessica Ho et al.


World Health Organization (WHO), May 2010

177 pp. 4.6 MB:


http://www.who.int/whosis/whostat/EN_WHS10_Full.pdf

Available in other languages (Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Spanish) at:


http://www.who.int/whosis/whostat/2010/en/index.html

World Health Statistics 2010 contains WHO’s annual compilation of data from its 193
Member States, and includes a summary of progress towards the health-related Millen-
nium Development Goals and targets. Indicators have been included on the basis of
their relevance to global public health; the availability and quality of the data; and the re-
liability and comparability of the resulting estimates.

***

Equity, social determinants and public health programmes

Edited by Erik Blas and Anand Sivasankara Kurup


World Health Organization, 2010

303 pp. 2.2 MB:


http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2010/9789241563970_eng.pdf

This book is a collection of analyses of the social determinants of health


that impact on specific health conditions. Stemming from the recommendations of the
Commission on Social Determinants of Health, promising interventions to improve

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 4


health equity are presented for the areas of: alcohol-related disorders, cardiovascular
diseases, child health and nutrition, diabetes, food safety, maternal health, mental
health, neglected tropical diseases, oral health, pregnancy outcomes, tobacco and
health, tuberculosis, and violence and injuries.

***

Improving Health Service Delivery in Developing Countries


From Evidence to Action

Editors: David H. Peters, Sameh El-Saharty, Banafsheh Siadat et al.


The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World
Bank, 2009

366 pp. 2.4 MB:


http://www.enrecahealth.dk/news/e-
learning/Improving_Health_Service_Delivery.pdf

Despite the abundance of evidence on the efficacy of interventions that can save lives
at low cost, the pathways to delivering health services effectively in low- and middle-
income countries (LMICs) are not well known. Decision makers around the world need
better information about which strategies to improve health services work best, or how
to make current strategies more effective. The book presents evidence on strategies for
strengthening health service delivery, based on systematic reviews of the literature,
quantitative and qualitative analyses of existing data, and seven country case studies.

***

Health Systems in Action: An eHandbook for Leaders and Managers

by Sylvia Vriesendorp, Lourdes de la Peza, Cary Peabody Perry et al.


Management Sciences for Health, 2010

422 pp. 3.7 MB:


http://www.msh.org/Documents/upload/msh_eHandbook_complete.pdf

The handbook provides managers of health programs or health services with both prac-
tical and theoretical information to help strengthen and align the building blocks of a
health system. It emphasizes that people are the central, critical element of every health
system and shows how to build leadership and management skills. Numerous links
throughout the handbook to websites, reports, periodicals, tools, and other resources
make it possible for readers to gather even more information on topics of particular in-
terest.
***

Just Give Money to the Poor: The Development Revolution from the Global
South

by Joseph Hanlon, Armando Barrientos and David Hulme


Kumarian Press, 288 pp. April 2010; Paperback, ISBN:978 1 56549 333
9; Price: US$ 24.95

To order online go to:


http://www.styluspub.com/Orders/ShoppingCart.aspx?tcart=837921

Amid all the complicated economic theories about the causes and solutions to poverty,

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 5


one idea is so basic it seems radical: just give money to the poor. Despite its skeptics,
researchers have found again and again that cash transfers given to significant portions
of the population transform the lives of recipients. Countries from Mexico to South Africa
to Indonesia are giving money directly to the poor and discovering that they use it wisely
- to send their children to school, to start a business and to feed their families.

***

Unpacking the Issue of Counterfeit Medicines

by K M Gopakumar and Sangeeta Shashikant


Publisher: Third World Network, 2010, 72 pp. ISBN: 978-967-5412-23-3,
Price US$ 10.00
To order the Book contact Third World Network at: 131 Jalan Macalister,
10400 Penang, Malaysia, Tel: +604-2266159, Fax: +604-2264505; e-
mail: twnet@po.jaring.my

This book discusses the background to the issue of ‘counterfeit medicines’ in the WHO
as well as the problems of using the term ‘counterfeit’ (in connection with intellectual
property [IP] rights violations) to refer to products with compromised quality, safety and
efficacy issues against a background of anti-counterfeiting initiatives. It also discusses
origins of the International Medical Product Anti-Counterfeit Taskforce and analyses is-
sues and concerns about the Taskforce pertaining to legitimacy, transparency, account-
ability, links to IP enforcement, and the creation of barriers to trade in, and access to, af-
fordable generic medicines.

ONLINE PUBLICATIONS
HIV - AIDS - STI

Rationing Funds, Risking Lives: World backtracks on HIV treatment


On-the-ground research in India, Kenya, Latvia, Malawi, Swaziland, and Venezuela

Pawan Dhall, Saumitra Poddar, Mohammed Gulrez et al.


International Treatment Preparedness Coalition, April 2010

72 pp. 567 kB:


http://www.itpcglobal.org/images/stories/doc/ITPC_MTT8_FINAL.pdf

Rationing of antiretroviral treatment in low and middle-income countries is


on the rise, and if international donors persist in attempts to cap future support for the
Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria below current levels, rationing is likely to be-
come widespread. The consequences are dire both for the millions who have been able
to access lifesaving treatment in recent years and the millions more in need.

***

Progress made in the implementation of the Declaration of Commitment on


HIV/AIDS and the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS

Report of the Secretary-General


United Nations General Assembly, April 2010

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 6


23 pp. 1.5 MB:
http://data.unaids.org/pub/BaseDocument/2010/a64735_sgreport_2010_en.pdf

The present report summarizes the progress countries have made towards implementa-
tion of the commitments set forth in the 2001 Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS
and the 2006 Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS. The epidemic is in transition, highlight-
ing the importance of ongoing vigilance regarding the most current modes of transmis-
sion within each country and the need for flexibility in national approaches.

***

The Global AIDS Transition: A Feasible Objective for AIDS Policy

by Mead Over
Center for Global Development, May 2010

58 pp. 1.7 MB:


http://www.cgdev.org/files/1424143_file_AIDS_Transition_Essay_1_Final_clean.
pdf

This essay proposes a new paradigm for combating AIDS and a new objective around
which international donors and recipient governments can coordinate their efforts. The
author calls this objective the “AIDS transition.” What exactly is an “AIDS transition”? It
is a dynamic process that holds AIDS mortality down - that is, preserves recently
achieved mortality reductions - while lowering the number of new infections even further
- so that the total number of people living with HIV/AIDS begins to diminish.

***

When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

by Vivek Jain and Steven G. Deeks


Current HIV/AIDS Reports (2010) 7:60–68 (11 April 2010)

9 pp. 174 kB:


http://www.springerlink.com/content/t30957l75g257144/fulltext.pdf

The question of when to start combination antiretroviral therapy for treatment-naïve pa-
tients has always been controversial. This is particularly true in the current era, with ma-
jor guidelines recommending very different treatment strategies. Despite a lack of clarity
regarding the optimal time to begin therapy, there has been a recent shift toward earlier
initiation. For patients who are motivated and willing to initiate early treatment, the col-
lective benefits of early therapy may outweigh the well-documented risks of antiretroviral
medications.
***

‘Turning the Page’: A preview of AVAC Report 2010


Featuring an excerpt of “The Thai Way Forward”

by Tom Paulson
Global Advocacy for HIV Prevention (AVAC), May 2010

16 pp. 1.7 MB:


http://www.avac.org/ht/a/GetDocumentAction/i/27164

This special excerpt of AVAC Report 2010: “Turning the Page” includes a provocative,

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 7


on-the-ground article about RV144, also known as the Thai Prime-Boost study, which
provided evidence that an AIDS vaccine is possible. This piece looks at some of the
questions and reactions that this landmark study raised for the Thai participants, scien-
tists and advocates. The full AVAC Report 2010, which will be published in July, reviews
the broader state of - and debates around - AIDS vaccines and other HIV prevention re-
search.
***

Turning crisis into opportunity for children affected by HIV and AIDS: re-
sponding to the financial, fuel and food crises

by Caroline Harper and Nicola Jones


Overseas Development Institute, March 2010

8 pp. 325 kB:


http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/download/4637.pdf

There has been no comprehensive review of the impacts of the financial, fuel and food
crises on children and caregivers affected by HIV and AIDS. This is critical, given that
the mortality rate among infected children is disproportionate to that faced by adults,
and that relatively fewer children have access to necessary antiretroviral therapy (ART).
There is a risk that children living with the disease or highly vulnerable to infection will
remain invisible in the crisis unless they receive urgent policy attention.

***
Antiretroviral therapy outcomes in resource-limited settings for HIV-
infected children <5 years of age

by Delphine Sauvageot, Myrto Schaefer, David Olson et al.


Pediatrics Vol. 125, Nr. 5, e1039-e1047, May 2010

9 pp. 428 kB:


http://fieldresearch.msf.org/msf/bitstream/10144/98893/1/Sauvageot_peds-
ART_Pediatrics-2010-125-e1039.pdf

The authors describe medium-term outcomes for young children receiving antiretroviral
therapy (ART) in resource-limited countries. They conclude that large-scale ART for
children <5 years of age in resource-limited settings is feasible, with encouraging clinical
outcomes, but efforts should be increased to improve early HIV diagnosis and treat-
ment.
***

HIV decline in Zimbabwe due to reductions in risky sex? Evidence from a


comprehensive epidemiological review

by Simon Gregson, Elizabeth Gonese, Timothy B Hallett et al.


International Journal of Epidemiology 2010;1-13 (20 April 2010)

13 pp. 484 kB:


http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/dyq055v1

Recent data from antenatal clinic (ANC) surveillance and general population surveys
suggest substantial declines in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence in Zim-
babwe. These findings provide the first convincing evidence of an HIV decline acceler-
ated by changes in sexual behaviour in a southern African country. However, in 2007,
one in every seven adults in Zimbabwe was still infected with a life-threatening virus and

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 8


mortality rates remained at crisis level.
***

Combined antiretroviral treatment and heterosexual transmission of HIV-1:


cross sectional and prospective cohort study

by Jorge Del Romero, Jesús Castilla, Victoria Hernando et al.


BMJ 2010;340:c2205 (14 May 2010)

8 pp. 127 kB:


http://www.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/340/may14_1/c2205

The heterosexual infectivity of HIV-1 in individuals taking effective antiretroviral treat-


ment is low. Avoidance of unprotected intercourse and receipt of antiretroviral treatment
by the infected partner in accordance with protocols are complementary measures to
prevent HIV transmission.
***

Concurrent Partnerships as a Driver of the HIV Epidemic in Sub-Saharan


Africa? The Evidence is Limited

by Mark N. Lurie and Samantha Rosenthal


AIDS and Behavior (2010) 14:17–24 (February 2010)

8 pp. 199 kB:


http://www.springerlink.com/content/w21330981283021w/fulltext.pdf

Recently it has been proposed that concurrent sexual relationships - those that overlap
in time - are a major driver of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In this article the
authors review the concurrency hypothesis and the evidence put forth. They conclude
that, despite the assertion that “enough evidence exists”, the evidence base is in fact
weak and that more targeted research with more refined definitions is needed.

***

Social Discrimination Against Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM): Impli-
cations for HIV Policy and Programs

by George Ayala, Jack Beck, Krista Lauer et al.


The Global Forum on MSM and HIV (MSMGF), May 2010

14 pp. 1.4 MB:


http://msmgf.org/documents/MSMGF_Social_Discrimination_Policy_Brief.pdf

This policy brief is an overview of social discrimination against gay men and other men
who have sex with men (MSM) as it relates to HIV, and includes recommendations for
concerted action and policy development. A review of literature that demonstrates the
linkages between homophobia and vulnerability to HIV disease is presented with related
examples. The recommendations are intended for a global audience of advocates, re-
searchers, service providers, public health practitioners, donors and policy makers.

***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 9


Scaling Up the Response to HIV Stigma and Discrimination

by Dara Carr, Traci Eckhaus, Laura Brady et al.


International Center for Research on Women and London School of
Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 2010

16 pp. 1.0 MB:


http://www.icrw.org/files/publications/Scaling-Up-the-Response-
to-HIV-Stigma-and-Discrimination.pdf

Scaling up current efforts to reduce HIV-related stigma would optimize investments in


prevention, care and treatment. The challenge, however, is that most efforts to address
stigma are still small in scale or in a pilot phase. Securing ongoing funding for programs
also remains a serious challenge. Sustained advocacy is needed to push for increased
resources to expand stigma-reduction efforts. This brief lays out the rationale for intensi-
fied action and what can - and must - be done to reduce HIV stigma and discrimination
worldwide.

Sexual & Reproductive Health

The Role of Policymakers in Ending Female Genital Mutilation: An African


Perspective

by Ambassador Amina Salum Ali


Population Reference Bureau Occasional Paper, April 2010

4 pp. 304 kB:


http://www.prb.org/pdf10/endingfgm.pdf

As we look for solutions to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), we must remember that it
is not just about abandonment, it is also about empowerment - empowerment through
educating women, men, and communities at large. It is about raising consciousness so
that people can change their attitudes toward this outdated cultural practice. The elimi-
nation of FGM is a health, social, and economic issue to be vigorously pursued by poli-
cymakers everywhere.
***

Experience with Side Effects Among Users of Injectables, the IUD, and Oral
Contraceptive Pills in Four Urban Areas of Honduras

Janine Barden-O’Fallon, Ilene Speizer, Francisco Rodriguez et al.


Health Care for Women International, 30:475-483, 2009

9 pp. 95 kB:
http://www.phishare.org/files/8960_731218518_910965541.pdf

Contraceptive side effects are often the most commonly reported reason for method
discontinuation, particularly of modern methods. Although side effects are a common
reason for discontinuation in the study population, less than half of the surveyed women
were informed about potential side effects by a health worker on the day of the inter-
view.
***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 10


Excluding pregnancy among women initiating antiretroviral therapy: effi-
cacy of a family planning job aid

Kwasi Torpey, Lona Mwenda, Mushota Kabaso et al.


BMC Public Health 2010, 10:249 (14 May 2010)

18 pp. 126 kB:


http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2458-10-249.pdf

Recently, the World Health Organization added a family planning job aid called the
‘pregnancy checklist’ as a recommended tool for screening new ART clients to exclude
pregnancy. The pregnancy checklist is effective for excluding pregnancy in many
women initiating ART, but its moderate sensitivity and specificity precludes its use to
completely replace pregnancy testing. Its use should be encouraged in low resource
settings where pregnancy tests are unavailable or must be rationed. Family planning
methods should be available and integrated into ART clinics.

***

The World Bank’s Reproductive Health Action Plan 2010-2015

The World Bank, May 2010

66 pp. 1.1 MB:


http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/lib.nsf/db900sid/EGUA-85DLVU/$file/WB-
RHActionPlan-Apr2010.pdf?openelement

This document presents a detailed operationalization of the Reproductive Health (RH)


component of the Bank’s 2007 Health, Nutrition, and Population (HNP) Strategy. In tan-
dem with the global re-emphasis of RH and in recognition of the importance of RH for
human development, this Action Plan aims at reinvigorating the Bank’s commitment to
helping client countries improve their RH outcomes, particularly for the poor and the vul-
nerable.
***

Why Family Planning and Reproductive Health are Critical to the Well-
Being of Youth

Population Action International, 2009

4 pp. 449 kB:


http://www.populationaction.org/Publications/Fact_Sheets/FS38/youth_2009.pdf

An unprecedented number of young people are entering their reproductive years, most
of whom live in the developing world. Policymakers should assist in effort to ensure that
youth worldwide are able to make informed decisions about their sexuality and receive
the family planning and reproductive health care that they require. The U.S. should sup-
port these efforts by providing adequate funding for international family planning and re-
productive health programs.
***

Parent-child communication about sexual and reproductive health in rural


Tanzania: Implications for young people’s sexual health interventions

by Joyce Wamoyi, Angela Fenwick, Mark Urassa et al.


Reproductive Health 2010, 7:6 (12 May 2010)

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 11


52 pp. 212 kB:
http://www.reproductive-health-journal.com/content/pdf/1742-4755-7-6.pdf

Due to the consequences of the HIV pandemic, parents are making attempts to com-
municate with their children about sexual and reproductive health (SRH). They are how-
ever, limited by cultural barriers, and lack of appropriate knowledge. With some skills
training on communication and SRH, parents may be a natural avenue for channeling
and reinforcing HIV/AIDS prevention messages to their children.

***
Implants Toolkit

http://www.k4health.org/toolkits/implants

The Implants Toolkit is your one-stop source for reliable and relevant information about
hormonal implants. It contains information on the new implants: Implanon, Jadelle, and
Sino-implant (II). It provides policy makers, health care providers, and program manag-
ers across the globe with state-of-the-art information on this highly safe and increasingly
popular contraceptive method.

Maternal & Child Health

“I can’t afford justice”: Violence against women in Uganda continues un-


checked and unpunished

Stop Violence against Women Campaign, Amnesty International Publica-


tions, April 2010

72 pp. 962 kB:


http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/AFR59/001/2010/en/f368
8aa0-b771-464b-aa88-850bcbf5a152/afr590012010en.pdf

Violence against women is pervasive in most parts of Uganda and is widely accepted as
justified by "traditional values". Women who have been subjected to violence face nu-
merous obstacles if they seek justice. This report highlights the reasons why women are
reluctant to report violence to the authorities, failures in the collection of forensic evi-
dence, police investigations and trials, and the inadequacy of existing laws.

***

The health of our children


South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence, Behaviour and
Communication Survey, 2008

by Olive Shisana, Thomas Rehle, Leickness Simbayi et al.


Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, May 2010

103 pp. 3.4 MB:


http://www.hsrc.ac.za/Document-3611.phtml

Although the report highlights that much progress has been achieved in preventing and
mediating the impact of HIV/AIDS on South Africa’s children as well as advancing some
aspects of both maternal and child health on the country, it also points out areas of

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 12


great concern such as maternal and neonatal mortality, poor immunisation rates and
poor infant feeding practices, which urgently require attention, and where some tangible
recommendations about how this can be achieved can be given.

***

Giving developing countries the best shot: An overview of vaccine access


and R&D

by Paul Wilson and Andrew Jones


Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and Oxfam, April 2010

31 pp. 716 kB:


http://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/giving-
developing-countries-best-shot-vaccines-2010-05.pdf

Vaccines have contributed to some of the greatest public health successes of the past
century, averting 2.5 million child deaths every year and millions more bouts of illness
and disability. This report provides critical insights on the existing challenges to ensure
children across the developing world get timely, affordable and appropriate access to
vaccines, while ensuring that the unmet needs of poor children are met by the public
and private sector in the coming years.
***

Improving immunisation coverage in rural India: clustered randomised


controlled evaluation of immunisation campaigns with and without incen-
tives

by Abhijit Vinayak Banerjee, Esther Duflo, Rachel Glennerster et al.


BMJ 2010;340:c2220 (17 May 2010)

9 pp. 143 kB:


http://www.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/340/may17_1/c2220

Immunisation is a highly cost effective way of improving survival in children in develop-


ing countries. Improving reliability of services improves immunisation rates, but the ef-
fect remains modest. Small incentives have large positive impacts on the uptake of im-
munisation services in resource poor areas and are more cost effective than purely im-
proving supply.

Malaria

Options for improving malaria treatment


EVIPNet Africa’s first series of policy briefs to support evidence-informed policymaking

International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care (IJTAHC),


26:2, April 2010
Free access at:
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayIssue?jid=THC&volumeId=26&
issueId=02&iid=7527604

This Theme Section of IJTAHC presents summaries of six policy briefs that address
scaling up of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the treatment of un-
complicated falciparum malaria in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic,

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 13


Ethiopia, Mozambique and Uganda. The methods used to develop the policy briefs are
described in the Section Editorial. Each summary assesses the problem, potential policy
options to address the problem, and strategies for implementing those options.

***

Successful introduction of artesunate combination therapy is not enough


to fight malaria: results from an adherence study in Sierra Leone

by Sibylle Gerstl, Sophie Dunkley, Ahmed Mukhtar et al.


Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
104 (2010) 328-335 (2 February 2010)

8 pp. 185 kB:


http://fieldresearch.msf.org/msf/bitstream/10144/98691/1/Gerstl%20
Transactions%20Successful%20ACT%20not%20enough%20in%20SL.pdf

A study to measure adherence to artesunate and amodiaquine (AS+AQ) therapy in pa-


tients treated for uncomplicated malaria in community health centres (CHC) was con-
ducted in Sierra Leone. Adherence to antimalarial treatment should not be taken for
granted. Instructions on correct AS+AQ use should include discussion of disease symp-
toms as well as possible treatment side effects and how to manage them. Other factors
are more difficult to influence, such as patients forgetting to take the treatment.

***

Understanding caretakers’ dilemma in deciding whether or not to adhere


with referral advice after pre-referral treatment with rectal artesunate

by Daudi O Simba, Deodatus C Kakoko, Marian Warsame et al.


Malaria Journal 2010, 9:123 (12 May 2010)

32 pp. 148 kB:


http://www.malariajournal.com/content/pdf/1475-2875-9-123.pdf

A single rectal dose of artesunate before referral can reduce mortality and prevent per-
manent disability. However, the success of this intervention depends on caretakers’ ad-
herence to referral advice for follow-up care. Some caretakers did not adhere when their
children improved and some who adhered did so without understanding why they
should proceed to the facility. Successful implementation of the rectal artesunate strat-
egy depends upon effective communication regarding referral to clinic.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis Series - The Lancet

http://www.thelancet.com/series/tuberculosis

Launched in Geneva, 19 May, the series looks at the global preva-


lence and burden of tuberculosis, and the challenges faced to re-
duce worldwide cases rapidly and eliminate this disease as a threat by 2050. It also
highlights the optimism stemming from the continuing development and identification of
new tuberculosis drugs, vaccines, biomarkers, and diagnostics.

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 14


New and improved tuberculosis diagnostics: evidence, policy, practice,
and impact

by Madhukar Pai, Jessica Minion, Karen Steingart and Andrew Ramsay


Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine 16(3):271-284, May 2010

14 pp. 3.9 MB:


http://www.tbevidence.org/documents/whatis/Pai_COPM_2010.pdf

In 2010, poor diagnosis remains a major obstacle to global tuberculosis (TB) control. In
most high-burden countries, TB is still diagnosed using tools such as direct sputum mi-
croscopy and chest radiographs. Fortunately, the past few years have seen an un-
precedented level of interest, funding support, and activity focused on the development
of new tools for TB diagnosis, and the new diagnostics pipeline for TB is rapidly expand-
ing.
***

Tuberculosis - resistance, funding, and drugs

by Talha Burki
The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Vol. 10, Issue 5, pp. 297-298, May 2010

2 pp. 256 kB:


http://download.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/laninf/PIIS1473309910700839.pdf?id
=40bade4753939e7f:-17b4a6e7:1288d86b77b:-46d31273685895373

The tuberculosis component of Millennium Development Goal 6 - halting and reversing


the incidence of the disease by 2015 - is likely to be achieved; indeed incidence has
been falling since 2004. But this target is becoming less relevant. We are replacing an
epidemic of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, with an epidemic of multidrug-resistant tuber-
culosis.
***

Global Drug Facility - Stop TB Partnership


Progress Report: 1 January 2009 - 31 December 2009

Stop TB Partnership Secretariat, Geneva, Switzerland, 2010

40 pp. 931 kB:


http://www.stoptb.org/assets/documents/gdf/whatis/GDF%20Annual
%20Report%202009%20Annual%20report%20FINAL%2007052010.pdf

Global Drug Facility (GDF's) mandate is to contribute to the realization of the TB-related
Millennium Development Goals and to the eventual elimination of TB through the provi-
sion of timely, quality assured and affordable anti-TB medicines and related supplies.
This report covers the activities of the Global Drug Facility from 1 January to 31 Decem-
ber 2009.

Other Infectious Diseases

Epidemiology and control of trachoma: systematic review

by Victor H. Hu, Emma M. Harding-Esch, Matthew J. Burton et al.


Tropical Medicine & International Health, Vol. 15, Issue 6, pp. 673-691; 4 April 2010

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 15


19 pp. 345 kB:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/123340210/PDFSTART

Trachoma is the commonest infectious cause of blindness. The WHO


promotes trachoma control through a multifaceted approach involving
surgery, mass antibiotic distribution, encouraging facial cleanliness and
environmental improvements. This has been associated with significant
reductions in the prevalence of active disease over the past 20 years, but
there remain a large number of people with trichiasis who are at risk of
blindness.
***

A Meta-analysis of the Effectiveness of Albendazole Compared with Met-


ronidazole as Treatments for Infections with Giardia duodenalis

by Shahram Solaymani-Mohammadi, J. M. Genkinger, Christopher A. Loffredo et al.


PLoS Negl Trop Dis 4(5): e682 (11 May 2010)

10 pp. 258 kB:


http://www.plosntds.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=BCC621563B4BF0FBC0B
E1712FD9E5AB5?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0000682&representation=PDF

Results showed that albendazole was as effective as metronidazole for the treatment of
giardiasis in humans and people receiving the drug tended to have fewer side effects
compared with those who received metronidazole. Given the safety, effectiveness, and
low costs of albendazole, this drug may be considered a potential alternative and/or a
replacement for the existing widely used metronidazole in the treatment of giardiasis in
humans.
***

Factors Associated with Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever

by Paul Roddy, Sara L. Thomas, Benjamin Jeffs et al.


The Journal of Infectious Diseases 2010; 201(12):1909-1918

10 pp. 377 kB:


http://fieldresearch.msf.org/msf/bitstream/10144/99154/1/Roddy%
20-%20Factors%20Associated%20with%20MHF.pdf

Reliable on-site polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for Marburg hemorrhagic fever
(MHF) is not always available. Therefore, clinicians triage patients on the basis of pre-
senting symptoms and contact history. Using patient data collected in Uige, Angola, in
2005, the authors assessed the sensitivity and specificity of these factors to evaluate
the validity of WHO-recommended case definitions for MHF.

Essential Medicines

Tide turns for drug manufacturing in Africa

by Tatum Anderson
The Lancet, Vol. 375, Issue 9726, pp. 1597-1598, 8 May 2010

2 pp. 166 kB:


http://download.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140673610606873.pdf

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 16


With several efforts underway to increase the local production of drugs in developing
countries, the author assesses the pros and cons of manufacturing medicines in Africa.

***

Development of and Access to Products for Neglected Diseases

by Joshua Cohen, Maria Staroselsky Dibner, Andrew Wilson


PLoS ONE 5(5): e10610 (12 May 2010)

5 pp. 84 kB:
http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=639669D4A5D09BD78B31
4A2947D06E00?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0010610&representation=PDF

Prior research on neglected disease drug development suggested inadequate funding


was responsible for relatively few new approvals. Progress has been uneven, with ma-
laria appearing to benefit most in the short run from increased funding, while less suc-
cess has been booked in other disease categories. Uneven progress suggests funding
could be better targeted, particularly with regard to neglected diseases that have hith-
erto received scant attention.

Social Protection

Social protection in health: the need for a transformative dimension

by Joris J. A. Michielsen, Herman Meulemans, Werner Soors et al.


Tropical Medicine & International Health, Vol. 15, Issue 6, pp. 654-658; Published
Online: 29 March 2010

5 pp. 58 kB:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/123334650/PDFSTART

For many people worldwide, affordable health care of good quality remains elusive. Es-
pecially in developing countries, large groups of citizens remain uncovered by adequate
mechanisms for Social Protection in Health (SPH) of any kind. For the excluded, illness
jeopardises more than just their health. Their predicament often boils down to the un-
easy choice between forgoing treatment and getting trapped in a downward spiral of im-
poverishment because of high health care expenses. The authors argue that SPH, in
addition to important provision, prevention and promotion functions, also needs to ad-
dress the structural determinants of health-related social vulnerability.

***

The Landscape of Microinsurance in Africa

by Michal Matul, Michael J. McCord, Caroline Phily et al.


International Labour Organization, March 2010

59 pp. 1.7 MB:


http://www.ilo.org/public/english/employment/mifacility/download/m
paper4_landscape_en.pdf

In 2009, the Microinsurance Innovation Facility published, in its Briefing Notes series,
the results of a study that revealed the current landscape of microinsurance in Africa
(see Health, Education, Social Protection News & Notes 26/2009). This paper is an ex-

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 17


panded version of those briefing notes, presenting more detailed results of the study
and setting them in context.
***

Can micro health insurance reduce poverty? Evidence from Bangladesh

by Syed Abdul Hamid, Jennifer Roberts and Paul Mosley


University of Sheffield, Economic Research Paper Series, January 2010

32 pp. 150 kB:


http://www.microfinancegateway.org/gm/document-
1.9.43777/Can%20Micro%20Health%20Insurance%20Reduce%20Poverty.pdf

This paper examines the impact of micro health insurance on poverty reduction in rural
areas of Bangladesh. A number of outcome measures relating to poverty status are
considered; these include household income, stability of household income via food suf-
ficiency and ownership of non-land assets, and also the probability of being above or
below the poverty line. The results show that micro health insurance has a positive as-
sociation with all of these indicators, and this is statistically significant and quantitatively
important for food sufficiency.
***

Cash transfers: affordability and sustainability

by Anna McCord
Overseas Development Institute (ODI), November 2009

4 pp. 94 kB:
http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/download/3508.pdf

Drawing on case studies in Kenya, Malawi and Zambia, this paper explores the afforda-
bility and sustainability of providing cash transfers to alleviate poverty. The paper re-
views cash transfer program coverage and costs, the fiscal implications of program ex-
tension to cover all eligible beneficiaries, the extent of national government resource al-
location to cash transfers, the role of donor funding and perceptions of affordability and
prospects for the sustainability of cash transfer programming.

***

Impact of Oportunidades on Skilled Attendance at Delivery in Rural Areas

by Jose Urquieta, Gustavo Angeles, Thomas Mroz et al.


Economic Development and Cultural Change, 57:539-558, April 2009

20 pp. 181 kB:


http://www.phishare.org/files/8964_596598.pdf

Oportunidades (formerly PROGRESA) is a conditional cash transfer program run by the


Mexican federal government designed to break the intergenerational cycle of poverty.
Among other activities, it provides free delivery attendance for women enrolled in the
program. The main results of the study indicate that Oportunidades had, at best, only a
small effect on skilled attendance at delivery in treatment communities. These results
should lead to a review about the strategies used by Oportunidades to increase skilled
attendance at delivery.
***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 18


Microfinance and HIV/AIDS Prevention

by Shari L. Dworkin and Kim Blankenship


AIDS and Behavior (2009) 13:462-469 (18 March 2009)

8 pp. 182 kB:


http://www.springerlink.com/content/j5386g62358770x1/fulltext.pdf

This paper assesses how poverty and gender inequality intensify the spread of
HIV/AIDS and the extent to which economic empowerment assists prevention and miti-
gation of HIV/AIDS, especially for women. The paper examines promises and limits of
integrated HIV/AIDS prevention and microfinance programs and proposes future re-
search initiatives that may help clear current ambiguities about economic programs’
contribution to HIV/AIDS risk reduction efforts.

Human Resources

Increasing access to health workers in underserved areas: a conceptual


framework for measuring results

by Luis Huicho, Marjolein Dieleman, James Campbell et al.


Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2010, 88:357-363 (5 May 2010)

7 pp. 934 kB:


http://www.who.int/entity/bulletin/volumes/88/5/09-070920.pdf

Health workers’ willingness to practise in underserved areas, such as rural, remote or


poor areas, is a recognised challenge in achieving equitable access to health services.
Many countries have developed strategies to attract and retain qualified health workers
in these areas. But the evidence on the successes or failures of such interventions is
scarce and weak, and it is difficult to compare lessons and measure results from the few
evaluations that are available.
***

Restricting Migration: a bad (development) idea

by Massimiliano Calì
Overseas Development Institute, May 2010

2 pp. 81 kB:
http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/download/4845.pdf

Migration is a vexed domestic issue, but on a world scale there is strong evidence that
migration is good for development. There is no empirical evidence that restricting migra-
tion reduces skills shortages in developing countries, instead the emphasis should be
on investing in higher education and vocational training in developing countries. Recipi-
ent countries should also reduce the cost of remitting funds to countries of origin.

Health Systems & Research

Basic Statistics on Health Facility Status and Readiness to Deliver Quality


Services

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 19


by Nancy Fronczak, Bates Buckner, Bolaji Fapohunda et al.
International Health Facility Assessment Network (IHFAN), 2009

40 pp. 615 kB:

http://www.phishare.org/files/8968_ms_09_37.pdf

This chartbook presents comparable cross-country information on key


indicators that represent the capacity of a health facility to provide qual-
ity services. These indicators provide a baseline for measuring
changes in infrastructure and resources over time. This information will
help stakeholders for health to identify key aspects of facility-based
services that are internationally assessed as important to quality of ser-
vices.
***

Health Systems Management and Leadership Strengthening Handbook

World Economic Forum, 2010

Guide for Health Leaders to Build a Health Systems Management and


Leadership Strengthening Programme (9 pp. 366 kB):
http://www.weforum.org/pdf/health/WEF_Health_toolkit_leaders.pdf

Toolkit for a Secretariat to Support a Health Systems Management and Leadership


Strengthening Programme (14 pp. 692 kB):
http://www.weforum.org/pdf/health/WEF_Health_toolkit_secretariat.pdf

This handbook was developed based on a public-private partnership between the Minis-
try of Health in Ghana and the World Economic Forum. It provides strategic guidance to
ministries of health, or other ministries in sub-Saharan Africa, interested in implementing
a programme to build leadership and management capacities within their institution, and
in doing so, contributing towards strengthening the overall health system.

***

Blueprint for the Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practices in Health


Care

by Christina T. Yuan, Ingrid M. Nembhard, Amymy F. Stern et al.


The Commonwealth Fund, May 2010

16 pp. 618 kB:


http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/Files/Publications/Issue%20Brief/201
0/May/1399_Bradley_blueprint_dissemination_evidencebased_practices_ib.pdf

Despite the substantial literature on evidence-based clinical care practices that have
proven effective in controlled environments and trials, a major challenge for health care
systems has been to spread these advances broadly and rapidly. Aimed at fostering the
broad adoption of effective health care interventions, this report proposes a blueprint for
improving the dissemination of best practices by national quality improvement cam-
paigns.
***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 20


Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and mid-
dle-income countries: a survey of researchers

by John N Lavis, G Emmanuel Guindon, David Cameron et al.


Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), 3 May 2010

12 pp. 582 kB:


http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/rapidpdf/cmaj.081164v1

Many international statements have urged researchers, policy-makers and health care
providers to collaborate in efforts to bridge the gaps between research, policy and prac-
tice in low- and middle-income countries. The findings suggest potential areas for im-
provement in light of the bridging strategies targeted at health care providers that have
been found to be effective in some contexts and the factors that appear to increase the
prospects for using research in policy-making.

***

Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and mid-
dle-income countries: a survey of health care providers

by G Emmanuel Guindon, John N Lavis, Francisco Becerra-Posada et al.


CMAJ 10.1503; Published online ahead of print May 3, 2010

11 pp. 495 kB:


http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/rapidpdf/cmaj.081165v1

Locally conducted or published research has played an important role in changing the
professional practice of health care providers surveyed in low- and middle income coun-
tries. Increased investments in local research, or at least in locally adapted publications
of research-based evidence from other settings, are therefore needed. Although access
to the Internet was viewed as a significant factor in whether research-based evidence
led to concrete changes in practice, few respondents reported having easy access to
the Internet. Therefore, efforts to improve Internet access in clinical settings need to be
accelerated.
***

Non-Communicable Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case for Cohort


Studies

by Michelle D. Holmes, Shona Dalal, Jimmy Volmink et al.


PLoS Med 7(5): e1000244 (11 May 2010)

8 pp. 278 kB:


http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=F1BE5EF98019299BEEB98
CF713AD3FD4?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1000244&representation=PDF

The authors argue that there is an urgent need for longitudinal cohort based studies in
sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to address the growing burden of non-communicable dis-
eases in the region. They estimate the costs of establishing cohort studies in SSA and
describe the response needed to correct the disparities in research investment between
SSA and the world’s more wealthy regions.

***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 21


An adequacy evaluation of a 10-year, four-country nutrition and health
programme

by Peter R Berti, Alison Mildon, Kendra Siekmans et al.


International Journal of Epidemiology 2010 39(2):613-629 (3 March 2010)

17 pp. 155 kB:


http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/39/2/613

Evaluations of large-scale health and nutrition programmes in developing countries are


needed for determining the effectiveness of interventions. This article critically analyses
a non-governmental organization (NGO)-led large-scale, multi-country, 10-year micronu-
trient and health (MICAH) programme with an ‘adequacy evaluation’, that is, a docu-
mentation of time trends in the expected direction.

***

Health Systems Institutional Characteristics: A Survey of 29 OECD Coun-


tries

by Valerie Paris, Marion Devaux and Lihan Wei


Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) April 2010

140 pp. 919 kB:


http://www.olis.oecd.org/olis/2010doc.nsf/LinkTo/NT000029DA/$FILE/JT03282545.PDF

In 2008, the OECD launched a survey to collect information on the health systems char-
acteristics of member countries. This paper presents the information provided by 29 of
these countries in 2009. It describes country-specific arrangements to organize the
population coverage against health risks and the financing of health spending. It depicts
the organization of health care delivery, focusing on the public/private mix of health care
provision, provider payment schemes, user choice and competition among providers, as
well as the regulation of health care supply and prices.

Information & Communication Technology

Barriers and Gaps Affecting mHealth in Low and Middle Income Countries:
Policy White Paper

by Patricia Mechael, Hima Batavia, Nadi Kaonga


et al.
Center for Global Health and Economic Development Earth Institute, Columbia Univer-
sity, May 2010

79 pp. 723 kB:


http://www.globalproblems-globalsolutions-files.org/pdfs/mHealth_Barriers_White_Paper.pdf

Still in its infancy, mHealth - the use of mobile technologies for health - runs the risk of
not realizing its full potential. This report identifies policy barriers and research gaps that
undermine the field of mHealth and offers recommendations on how to strategically
maximize its benefits. The paper provides an in-depth analysis of the current challenges
and obstacles hindering the meaningful implementation and scaling of mobile health
projects aiming to strengthen health systems and attain global health goals.

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 22


Women and ICTs in Africa

by Carlyn Hambuba
Southern African Gender & Media Diversity Journal, December 2009

10 pp. 562 kB:


http://www.genderlinks.org.za/attachment.php?aa_id=10910

According to this paper, information and communication technologies (ICTs) are an ef-
fective instrument for increasing choices for women, for multifaceted empowerment.
ICTs can be mechanisms for expanding knowledge and access to information among
different cohorts of women, especially rural women, and can enhance their abilities to
negotiate for their resource share and participation. However, despite the “revolutionary
progress” made in Africa in the ICT sector, ICT accessibility for women in Africa is still a
big challenge.
***

UNICEF and Text to Change

Pambazuka News Issue, 481 (16.05.2010)

Read online at: http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/internet/64513

Donorland has been littered with pilot projects over the last ten years that took interest-
ing technology and ideas and sought to make them work in the unforgiving African con-
text. All too often they had little idea of what potential users actually wanted and once
the funding ended, the water closed over them and that was that. There is now a sec-
ond generation of ICT4D projects that seem to have learnt the lessons of these early
failures.

Education

The Future is Now: Education for Children in Countries Affected by Con-


flict

by Frances Ellery and Katy Webley


Save the Children UK, May 2010

82 pp. 1.7 MB:


http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/en/docs/The_Future_is_Now_low_res.pdf

The publication describes how the barriers to accessing education can be overcome,
and how education quality can be improved. It looks at how schools in conflict-affected
countries can become agents of peace, rather than sites of conflict. And it describes
how recognition of education as an emergency response can and must be strength-
ened.
***

Caring and Learning Together


A Cross-National Study on the Integration of Early Childhood Care and Education
(ECCE) within Education

by Yoshie Kaga, John Bennett, Peter Moss

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 23


United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
(UNESCO), May 2010

141 pp. 2.3 MB:


http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001878/187818E.pdf

The report focuses on examining the policy option of integrating ECCE


within the education system, which is being adopted by a growing number
of countries. It analyses and documents the experience of five countries - Brazil, Ja-
maica, New Zealand, Slovenia and Sweden - and one municipality - Ghent in Belgium
Flanders - which have chosen this option, to generate a better understanding of the ra-
tionales, processes and consequences of integration-within-education. It also looks at
why other countries have not followed this course of action.

***

Towards Measuring the Volume Output of Education and Health Services:


A Handbook

by Paul Schreyer, Alain Gallais, Sandra Hopkins et al.


Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), April 2010

143 pp. 1.3 MB:


http://www.olis.oecd.org/olis/2010doc.nsf/LinkTo/NT000029F6/$FILE/JT03282602.PDF

The measurement of volumes of health and education services constitutes a challenge


for national accountants and price statisticians. In the past, such services have typically
been measured by the inputs used to provide them but such an approach neglects any
productivity changes in service provision. An increasing number of countries is now
working towards output-based measures of the volume of these services. The present
document summarizes country practices and provides methodological guidance for out-
put-based approaches in the measurement of health and education services.

Harm Reduction and Drug Use

Three cents a day is not enough: Resourcing HIV-related Harm Reduction


on a Global Basis

by Gerry V Stimson, Catherine Cook, Jamie Bridge et al.


The International Harm Reduction Association (IHRA), 2010

48 pp. 443 kB:


http://www.ihra.net/Assets/2518/1/IHRA_3CentsReport_Web.pdf

The report shows the small amount of money being invested in harm reduction. It is es-
timated that in 2007 approximately US$ 160 million was invested in harm reduction in
low and middle income countries, of which US$ 136 million (90%) came from interna-
tional donors. This figure is certainly almost an over estimate of actual spending on
harm reduction services, which would only have received about one third of this total
harm reduction investment. Spending on harm reduction needs to be increased urgently
and dramatically, especially for direct frontline services.

***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 24


Injecting Equipment Sharing in Russian Drug Injecting Dyads

by V. Anna Gyarmathy, Nan Li, Karin E. Tobin et al.


AIDS and Behavior (2010) 14:141-151; February 2010

11 pp. 197 kB:


http://www.springerlink.com/content/k40150526nt50j17/fulltext.pdf

In this study, the authors investigated how individual attributes, dyad characteristics and
social network characteristics may influence engaging in receptive syringe sharing, dis-
tributive syringe sharing and sharing cookers in injecting partnerships of injecting drug
users (IDUs) in St Petersburg, Russia. A combination of dyad and network interventions
that target both IDU partnerships and the entire IDU population may be most appropri-
ate to address injecting risk among IDUs.

***

Epidemiology of HIV among Injecting and Non-injecting Drug Users: Cur-


rent Trends and Implications for Interventions

by Steffanie A. Strathdee and Jamila K. Stockman


Current HIV/AIDS Reports (2010) 7:99-106 (11 April 2010)

8 pp. 209 kB:


http://www.springerlink.com/content/287pg142455x0241/fulltext.pdf

Injecting drug use is a major driver of HIV infections in Eastern Europe, the Common-
wealth of Independent States, North Africa, the Middle East, and many parts of Asia and
North America. The authors provide a global overview of the epidemiology of HIV infec-
tion among drug users and present current drug use trends that may constitute impor-
tant epidemic drivers. They present examples where HIV infection among non-IDUs who
use cocaine, crack, and methamphetamine by other routes of administration is similar to
that among IDUs, and discuss potential mechanisms of HIV spread in this overlooked
population.
***

Detention as Treatment
Detention of Methamphetamine Users in Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand

by Nick Thomson, Roxanne Saucier, Daniel Wolfe et al.


International Harm Reduction Development Program, March 2010

86 pp. 1.6 MB:


http://www.soros.org/initiatives/health/focus/ihrd/articles_publication
s/publications/detention-as-treatment-20100301/Detention-as-Treatment-20100301.pdf

The widespread availability and use of methamphetamine in Southeast Asia has been a
very real concern for families and communities. As this report details, the prevailing re-
sponse in Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia has been compulsory detention - generally
without medical management of detoxification. The report calls on the governments of
Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand to release those currently detained, and devise strate-
gies to permanently close drug detention centers.

***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 25


Millennium Development Goals

The MDG fundamentals: improving equity for development


Closing the gap between the haves and the have-nots

by Milo Vandemoortele
Overseas Development Institute, April 2010

4 pp. 276 kB:


http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/download/4751.pdf

Five years from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) deadline, there is growing
debate on how to accelerate progress in human development - particularly around the
2010 MDG review process. A more complete understanding of development is captured
by the MDGs, which include indicators for health, gender equality, education and the
environment. This paper argues that promoting equity in human development by reduc-
ing the gap between the haves and the have-nots will accelerate progress towards the
MDGs.
***

How should MDG Implementation be Measured: Faster Progress or Meet-


ing Targets?

by Sakiko Fukuda-Parr and Joshua Greenstein


International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth (IPC-IG), May 2010

28 pp. 350 kB:


http://www.ipc-undp.org/pub/IPCWorkingPaper63.pdf

This paper questions the methodology that is widely used to assess progress in imple-
menting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), a methodology that asks whether
the targets are likely to be met. This approach is inappropriate, since the MDGs were
neither designed as nor intended to be planning targets. The authors find that their as-
sessment of “progress” differs considerably from that arising from the conventional
methodology.

Development Assistance

The International Health Partnership and Related Initiatives (IHP+) Results


Update

by Ronald Labonté, Gill Walt, David McCoy et al.


IHP+ - May 2010

30 pp. 1.1 MB:


http://network.human-scale.net/servlet/JiveServlet/download/38-
2400/World%20Health%20Assembly%20IHP%2BResults%20Update.pdf

The International Health Partnership and Related Initiatives (IHP+) was established to
improve coordination and harmonization of international support to national health plans
in line with the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness; strengthen health systems; and
ensure access to health care is scaled up and health outcomes improved. A purpose of
the IHP+ was to bring greater coherence and coordination to the fragmented and bewil-
dering state of development assistance for health. It is therefore very disappointing to

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 26


see the lack of a common framework for all signatories, despite the diversity of interests
that have created challenges for developing such a framework.

***
Why Accountability Matters

by Leni Wild and Dan Harris


Overseas Development Institute, May 2010

2 pp. 78 kB:
http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/download/4847.pdf

Accountability is at the heart of what makes development effective. Accountability re-


form is not just about improving the way aid is delivered, it is also fundamentally about
improving the way governments relate to citizens and the roles and responsibilities that
govern the international system. Accountability and transparency go hand in hand and
support for it must cut across public, private and voluntary sectors.

Others

Worldwide mortality in men and women aged 15-59 years from 1970 to
2010: a systematic analysis

by Julie Knoll Rajaratnam, Jake R Marcus, Alison Levin-Rector et al.


The Lancet, Vol. 375, Issue 9727, pp. 1704-1720, 15 May 2010

17 pp. 9.2 MB(!):


http://download.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS014067361060517X.pdf?i
d=e16241398b8eb460:-357aa80d:1289b2a9540:1f3e1273918348098

Adult deaths are a crucial priority for global health. Causes of adult death are important
components of Millennium Development Goals 5 and 6. However, adult mortality has
received little policy attention, resources, or monitoring efforts. This study aimed to esti-
mate worldwide mortality in men and women aged 15-59 years.

***

Urban World: A New Chapter in Urban Development

by Nicholas You
Urban World, Volume 2, Issue 2, April 2010

72 pp. 14.4 MB(!):


http://www.unhabitat.org/pmss/getElectronicVersion.aspx?nr=2960&alt=1

The next two decades of the 21st century will be an unprecedented mo-
ment in human history. The global population will move from 50 percent urban to 70
percent. This transition to a predominantly urban world is irreversible and it brings with it
equally irreversible changes in the way we use land, water, energy and other natural re-
sources. This transition also places cities at the centre of the climate change agenda.

***

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 27


The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations
and their Health (INDEPTH), the Importance of Core Support

by Samson Kinyanjui and Ian M. Timæus


Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), 2010

66 pp. 571 kB:


http://evaluation.zunia.org/uploads/media/knowledge/Monitoringan
dEvaluation/user500823_The1274162037.pdf

INDEPTH is a network of 37 health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) sites


based in the developing world that was set up by its members to raise their research
productivity by sharing experience and skills and mounting multi-site research projects.
This report suggests some changes to INDEPTH’s structures and working procedures
that should enable it to function more efficiently. It also identifies some challenges that
the Network should address in order to enhance its achievements and further increase
its scientific and policy impact.

JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Experts to serve the Global Fund on its Technical Review Panel

Funding proposals submitted to the Global


Fund are reviewed by a 43-member Tech-
nical Review Panel (TRP). The review
takes place about once a year for two weeks, which current members have described as
‘a unique and memorable experience’. For this important task, experts must be able to
review large volumes of documentation under considerable time pressure and work ef-
fectively in small groups and large plenary sessions to reach consensus on funding rec-
ommendations.
If you would like more details on this challenging opportunity, please visit the website of
HLSP, the agency handling this recruitment:
http://www.hlsp.org/opportunities/globalfundTRP

Completed application forms should be emailed to globalfund.trp@hlsp.org to arrive no


later than 31 May 2010.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
The German Health Practice Collection (GHPC)

http://german-practice-collection.org

The German Health Practice Collection is a series of reports on German-


supported development cooperation programmes. In each publication,
concrete examples of promising practices in health, social protection, multi-sectoral HIV
programming or reproductive health and rights are presented. The collection is supple-
mented by more than 600 documents (manuals, training modules or presentations), au-
dio and video files developed for the respective health programmes.

GHPC is an initiative of the Division of Education, Health and Population Policy of the
German Ministry of Financial Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and of its four im-
plementing organisations, KfW Entwicklungsbank, German Technical Cooperation

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 28


GmbH (GTZ), German Development Service (DED) and Capacity Building International
(InWEnt).
***

The Primary Surgery Wiki


(based on Maurice King’s Volumes: Non-Trauma, Trauma and Anaesthesia)

The Canadian Network for International Surgery (CNIS)

http://ps.cnis.ca/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Primary Surgery was an original three part textbook first pub-


lished by Maurice King together with numerous experts two
decades ago. The work comprises the volumes Non-Trauma,
Trauma and Anaesthesia. It was created to supply doctors with
basic surgical knowledge to cope with all surgical symptoms far
away from referral centers. It has become an essential guide for
doctors working under limited conditions in developing countries over the years. The
original textbook contains clear step-by-step descriptions and illustrations demonstrating
examination and treating procedures.

The Primary Surgery Wiki is an online and ongoing project to update and expand the
content of Primary Surgery and to make it available for everybody.

***

The World Open Health Assembly (WOHA) 2010

http://www.imaxi.org/content/world-open-health-assembly-woha-2010

The first World Open Health Assembly (WOHA) is being held, online, to connect people
from around the globe with the World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva. WOHA 2010 -
organized by volunteers mainly from two different spheres: public health activists and
open-source IT developers - was conceived just a week before this year’s WHA. This
first WOHA will begin the building of WOHA 2011, so that next year’s World Health As-
sembly assembles more of the world.
***

CD-ROM: Understanding Health Economics for Development

This new tool developed by the HLSP Institute can be used both for self
learning and for training activities. It aims to help users understand the
basics of health economics, with a particular focus on low income country
settings. The CD-ROM introduces some of the key issues and challenges
for financing the health sector, and paying for health care and preventive
services, and will give users some idea of where health economists ‘are coming from’.
The CD is available free of charge on request. More information and ordering instruc-
tions at:
http://www.hlsp.org/Home/Resources/HealtheconomicsCDRom/tabid/1887/Default.aspx

***

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

http://www.doaj.org/

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 29


The aim of the DOAJ is to increase the visibility and ease of use of open access scien-
tific and scholarly journals thereby promoting their increased usage and impact. This
service covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals. It aims to
cover all subjects and languages. There are now 5,011 journals in the directory. Cur-
rently 2,058 journals are searchable at article level. As of today 393,176 articles are in-
cluded in the DOAJ service.
***

TDR-News No. 85 - May 2010

36 pp. 2.6 MB:


http://apps.who.int/tdr/publications/tdrnews/issue-85/pdf/TDRnews-issue-85.pdf

TDR-News is published twice a year by the Special Programme for Re-


search and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), sponsored by UNICEF /
UNDP / World Bank and WHO. The present issue deals among others
with promotion of science, technology, innovation and research as a driver
of economic growth and human development.

***

FHI Insight - May 2010

http://www.fhi.org/en/Publications/res_insight+May+2010.htm

This month’s issue of Family Health International’s (FHI) e-newsletter, insight, focuses
on maternal and child health with stories about our evidence-based programs that are
reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV and testing babies for HIV as early as pos-
sible. Also featured is an FHI partnership with UNICEF to promote infant and young
child health in Kenya.
***

Southern Sudan Medical Journal - Volume 3, Number 2

23 pp. 1.0 MB:


http://www.southernsudanmedicaljournal.com/assets/files/Jour
nals/vol_3_iss_2_may_10/SSMJ%20VOL%203,NO%202%20pdf.pdf

This issue of the Southern Sudan Medical Journal contains an


editorial introducing the new website and the following articles:
 Mapping the specialist medical workforce for Southern Sudan: devising ways for ca-
pacity building
 How to read an electrocardiogram. Part 1: Basic principles of the ECG. The normal
ECG
 Evidence-based medicine - searching the medical literature. Part 2.

***

International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) Newsletter


“The uselessness and usefulness of plans”

http://www.iiep.unesco.org/en/information-services/newsletter.html

Published three times a year, the International Institute for Educational


Planning (IIEP) Newsletter keeps readers informed of current trends in
educational planning and IIEP activities. It allows them to update their

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 30


planning skills and management techniques, but also to stay informed on major issues
facing education systems. The IIEP Newsletter is produced in printed and electronic
formats, and in four languages: English, French, Spanish and Russian.

INTERESTING WEB SITES


Evidence-Based Tuberculosis Diagnosis

http://www.tbevidence.org/

There is great excitement in the TB scientific community over the intro-


duction of new tools into TB control activities. The development of new
tools is an important component of the Global Plan to Stop TB and the
World Health Organization's new global Stop TB Strategy. While new tools offer great
promise in medicine and public health, limited resources and the movement toward evi-
dence-based guidelines require careful validation of new tools prior to their introduction
for routine use.
***

mPedigree Network

http://www.mpedigree.org/home/

MPedigree is a non-profit based in Ghana that advocates for the development of strate-
gies to fight counterfeiting. They work with technology providers worldwide to bring relief
to patients at risk of counterfeit medication in developing nations, where the WHO esti-
mates that up to 30% of drugs could lead to the horrid healthcare crises that fake drugs
often unleash. For more information see:
http://news.myjoyonline.com/features/201005/46200.asp

***

The People Living with HIV Stigma Index

http://www.stigmaindex.org/

The People Living with HIV Stigma Index provides a tool that will
measure and detect changing trends in relation to stigma and discrimi-
nation experienced by people living with HIV. In the initiative, the proc-
ess is just as important as the product. It aims to address stigma relating to HIV while
also advocating on the key barriers and issues perpetuating stigma - a key obstacle to
HIV treatment, prevention, care and support.

***

The Anglican Health Network

http://www.anglicanhealth.org/

The Anglican Health Network (AHN) aims to facilitate communication and cooperation
between Anglicans who are providing health services around the world. It will provide fo-
rums to share experience and best practice, and manage donor and insurance pro-
grammes to deliver new investment. In this endeavour it also seeks to make connec-
tions with its healing ministries to encourage a more holistic approach to well being.

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 31


TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
Introduction to Infectious Disease Modelling and its Applications
5th - 16th July, 2010
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), London,
United Kingdom

Course Content: Key concepts in infectious disease epidemiology,


methods for setting up deterministic and stochastic infectious disease models, analyses
of seroprevalence data, models for describing STD and HIV transmission and control,
practical applications of modelling (selection).

Target Audience: Medical and health professionals, policy makers, veterinary scientists,
medical statisticians, infectious disease researchers.
Language: English
Fees: GBP 1,880

For more information contact:


Emilia Vynnycky
mailto:emilia.vynnycky@lshtm.ac.uk
or see: http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/prospectus/short/siidma.html

For more courses and conferences see also:


http://www.going-international.at/index.php?lang=EN

CARTOON

TIPS & TRICKS


Close Tabs with your Mouse Wheel

When you are browsing the Internet, chances are that at any given time you have got at

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 32


least 6 to 10 tabs open in your browser. Obviously, you will need to close one or more of
those tabs at some point, but you will also need pin-point precision to click that little “x”
to do so.

Look at it:

So here is what you do. Instead of clicking the little “x” ever again, just use your mouse
wheel button to close tabs. Mouse over the tab and click with your middle mouse button.

This works in Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, so give it a try!

***
Signs of Malware

You all know there are millions of malware infections out there today. It seems as if
there are tons of new infections that pop up everyday. Today we cover some of the
signs your computer will show if it is possibly infected with a virus or some other type of
malware.

1. Your computer slows down severely. If your system slows down drastically, you
may have an infection. Viruses and adware use resources on your computer. They can
destroy files, send spam e-mail, re-direct your browser and many other things that will
slow your computer down.

2. Internet browser crash. If your Internet browser stops working or shuts down often,
you may be infected. Since most malware programmes use the Internet to spread them-
selves, they will affect the performance of your browser. If your Internet browser just
starts closing with no warning, you need to check for viruses.

3. Random e-mails. Many viruses spread through e-mail. If you use an e-mail client,
such as Outlook Express, MS Outlook or Thunderbird, a virus could infect it and start
sending spam e-mail out to all your contacts. If you start to receive strange e-mails like
“Message Undeliverable” or “Mailer Demon”, a virus may be sending e-mail with your
address.

4. Error messages at start-up. If you start receiving error messages when you turn
your computer on, you may have some type of malware infection. Malware programmes
usually turn on at start-up and they sometimes cause errors, so you need to keep an
eye out for that.

5. Things look “strange”. That seems a little vague, but sometimes you open some-
thing and it just looks funny. If you did not install something or make a change to your
system, there is no reason why something would change. Computers don’t make deci-
sions on their own. If something has changed and you did not initiate it, you should scan
for viruses and malware.

Those are the five most common signs of an infection. Many of them may indicate a vi-
rus, but that does not necessarily mean you are infected. Some of the signs could indi-
cate a hardware issue or a programme conflict. As a general rule, if you know of a re-
cent change that caused the actions, it is probably not a virus. If the signs happen for no
reason at all, you should be concerned and get your computer checked.

BTW: A good tool to check you computer for malware is: Malwarebytes’ Anti-Malware
that you can download (5.9 MB) for free at: http://www.malwarebytes.org/ You might be

HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 33


surprised how much malware the programme will find on your computer.

***

Internet Safety - Keeping Your Computer Safe on the Internet

by Leo A. Notenboom
Puget Sound Software, LLC, 2010

99 pp. 1.5 MB:


http://media.ask-leo.com/ebooks/InternetSafety.pdf

These days the very concept of “Internet Safety” seems like an oxy-
moron. Not a day goes by where we don’t hear about some new kind of threat aimed at
wreaking havoc across machines connected to the internet. In this book the author is
going to cover the basics - the things you must do, the software you must run and the
concepts you need to be aware of - to keep your computer and your data safe as you
use the internet. It’s not hard, and once things are in place it’s not even time consuming.
But it is necessary.

Best regards,

Dieter Neuvians MD

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HESP-News & Notes - 11/2010 - page 34