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Teacher Objective:

CCSS-ELA-RL: 3.2
Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures;
determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is
conveyed through key details in the text.
Student Learning Objective:
Students should be able to see the bigger picture of a story. Instead of
just knowing whats going on, they should be able to identify the moral of the
story; the lesson that the story is trying to teach readers.
Learning Activities:
We will do the lesson in the format of: I do, we do, and you do. I will
read one story out loud to the class, then I will do the activity for this story so
they can see what is expected of them. The worksheet will ask students to
summarize the story, identify the moral, and point out key points that made
them believe this is the moral. Next the students will popcorn read another
fable, and we will do the activity as a class. After this, the students will get
with partners; they will read a story together, and then do the activity with
each other.
Assessment:
The students will be given a fable to read to themselves. They will get
the same worksheet that we were doing before as a class, but they will do it
as independent work, sort of like a quiz.
Evaluation:
This activity is pass or no pass. If the student is able to identify the
moral of the story correctly, they are considered competent in the area. If
the student incorrectly identifies the moral of the story, they are
incompetent in the area and may need extra help. If they pass, they will
receive a 4, if they dont pass, I will work with them until they do pass.
(Mastery is key)

GRADE LEVEL: 3rd

CCSS-ELA-RL: 3.2
Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths
from diverse cultures; determine the central

message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is


conveyed through key details in the text.
Direct Instruction Lesson Focus: Reading popular
childrens fables, being able to determine the moral
of he story, and giving key details from the text to
support this idea.
Step 1: Orientation
or overview

Step 2: Direct
Instruction or
modeling

Step 3: Structured
practice

Step 4: Guided
practice

Students will get an overview of morals, and why


they are important. They will then be asked to
identify moral of several popular children fables.

The Tortoise and the Hare


Either using the white board or the smart
board, I will have a chart that corresponds with
the graphic organizer.
I will read the story out loud to the class.
I will tell the class what I believe the moral of
the story is.
I will voice my thoughts as to which parts of the
text lead me to believe this.
The Boy Who Cried Wolf
I will have the students popcorn read the story
The Boy Who Cried Wolf.
I will give each student a handout with the
graphic organizer on it.
What do you think the moral of the story is?
I will wait for the correct answer and write it
down on the smartboard.
Why do we think this is the moral of the
story?
Which part of the text made you think that this
is the moral?
The Grasshopper and the Ant
Students will choose a partner, and sit
anywhere in the classroom.
With their partners, students will read The
Grasshopper and the Ant.
I will give each student a handout with the
graphic organizer on it.
Students will fill out graphic organizer.

Step 5: Independent
practice

The Goose with the Golden Eggs


Students will do this activity individually.
Students will read The Goose with the Golden
Eggs.
I will give each student a handout with the
graphic organizer on it.
Students will fill out graphic organizer.

Step 6: Evaluation
activity

This activity is pass or no pass. If the student is


able to identify the moral of the story correctly, they
are considered competent in the area. If the
student incorrectly identifies the moral of the story,
they are incompetent in the area and may need
extra help. If they pass, they will receive a 4, if they
dont pass, I will work with them until they do pass.
(Mastery is key)

The Tortoise and the Hare


There once was a speedy hare who bragged about how
fast he could run. Tired of hearing him boast, Slow and
Steady, the tortoise, challenged him to a race. All the
animals in the forest gathered to watch.
Hare ran down the road for a while and then and paused
to rest. He looked back at Slow and Steady and cried out,
"How do you expect to win this race when you are
walking along at your slow, slow pace?"
Hare stretched himself out alongside the road and fell
asleep, thinking, "There is plenty of time to relax."
Slow and Steady walked and walked. He never, ever
stopped until he came to the finish line.
The animals who were watching cheered so loudly for
Tortoise, they woke up Hare.
Hare stretched and yawned and began to run again, but it
was too late. Tortoise was over the line.
After that, Hare always reminded himself, "Don't brag
about your lightning pace, for Slow and Steady won the
race!"

The Boy Who Cried Wolf


Once upon a time, a shepherd boy tended his masters sheep near a dark
forest not far from the village. Soon he found his days in the pasture very
dull.
There is no one to talk with, and there is nothing to do! he would moan. All
he could do was talk to his dog or play on his shepherds pipe.
One day as he sat watching the sheep and the quiet forest, he thought of a
plan to amuse himself.
His master had told him to call for help if a wolf should attack the flock, and
the villagers would come running to drive it away. If I alert the village that a
wolf is here, people will come. Then Ill have lots of people to talk to, and
what fun it will be! the shepherd boy thought.
So, though he had not seen anything that even looked like a wolf, he ran
toward the village shouting at the top of his voice, Wolf! Wolf!
As expected, the villagers who heard
the shepherd boys cry dropped their work and made for the pasture with
great haste. But when they got there they found the boy doubled up with
laughter at the trick he had played on them.
A few days later the shepherd boy again shouted, Wolf! Wolf! Once more
the villagers ran to help him, only to find that they had again been tricked.
Then, one evening
as the sun was setting behind the forest and the shadows were creeping out
over the pasture, a wolf really did jump out from the underbrush and start
chasing the sheep.
The boy ran toward the village shouting Wolf! Wolf! But though the
villagers heard the cry, they did not run to help him as they had before. He
cannot fool us again, they said.
The wolf carried away a sheep into the forest.

That day the shepherd boy learned an important lessonif you desire people
to believe and trust what you say, you must always be truthful.

The Grasshopper and the


Ant
One warm day, Grasshopper was in the grass.
He began to sing. Everyone heard his merry singing.
Before long, Ant came by. Ant heard the singing, too. Ant had
some corn.
Ant was very little.
The corn was very big, but it didnt fall.
Grasshopper glared at Ant. What are you doing? he asked.
Ant said, Im saving corn. Someday Ill need to have it.
But there is so much to eat, said Grasshopper. Just look!
There is so much to eat now, Ant told Grasshopper. But when it
is cold, you will see what will happen.
I cant think about that now, Grasshopper told Ant. Ill see what
will happen when it gets cold.
Every day, Ant worked in haste. She saved a lot of corn.
Soon snow began to fall.
Grasshopper looked for something to eat. But he did not see a
thing. Grasshopper went to see Ant.
Ant gave Grasshopper something to eat.
Next time, I will put away something before the cold comes,
Grasshopper said.
That will be good, Ant said. Now have a little more to eat.

The Goose That Laid


Golden Eggs
A farmer and his wife went to a fair in the next town. They wanted
to buy a new goose to eat the weeds in their garden. They found
a large, plump goose and took her home. They didnt know that
this was their lucky day.
The next morning the farmers wife went to collect eggs. She
found a big yellow egg in the gooses nest. She picked up the
strange egg and took it to her husband. Look at this egg the
goose laid, she said. It is very heavy and very yellow.
The farmer took the egg. His mouth fell open. This egg is made
of gold, he said.
The goose laid a golden egg every day. The farmer and his wife
grew very rich from selling the eggs. And they grew very, very
greedy.
Lets cut open the goose. Then we can get all of the golden eggs
at one time, said the farmer. But when they cut the goose open,
there was no gold. The goose was just like all geese inside. Now
the greedy farmer and his wife had no more golden eggs. And
they didnt have a goose to eat the weeds in the garden.
The farmer and his wife kept buying geese. They wanted to find a
new goose that laid golden eggs. But they were out of luck.

Graphic Organizer: