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This is the lab supporting Module 2, FTOS CLI Basics .

Lab 2-1

The lab for this course is physically located in Kawasaki, Japan.


Physically the equipment is racked as shown in the diagram below. You will be
assigned a switch.
The diagram shows the Name, Power connection/plug for each unit, the IP
Address of each unit and the Console Port on the console server for each unit.
We will be using six Dell Networking S60 and six S4810s. They have been cabled
as shown on the following page to complete the exercises in this Lab Guide.

Lab 2-2

Lab 2-3

Lab 2-4

Lab 2-5

Lab 2-6

This is the lab supporting Module 2, FTOS CLI Basics .

Lab 2-1

Important Reminder for the Instructor: Ensure all routers are in initial lab
configuration per setup guide on slide 1 notes.
Setting switches to initial lab configuration procedure.

In exec privilege mode (# prompt) check the directory of flash with #dir
flash:

Look for startup-config, if present

Delete startup-config with #delete flash:startup-config

Do a show run and check for a prompt of Force10>

You will repeat this step before each lab (no during exercises in each lab) to
ensure there is no left over configuration. The one exception is after the OSPF lab
where the configuration is saved for the next lab.

In this lab, the Command Line Interface (cli) exercises are performed beginning
with basic display commands, viewing chassis components and boot parameters.
Contents of the flash memory are examined to confirm boot variables are present
and correct
The section on software upgrading is provided but not performed due to several
instance of students deleting critical flash files.

Lab 2-2

It is recommended the Instructor create and result a continuous boot loop as a


class demonstration.
Refer to the individual exercise notes for responses to questions asked by the lab
guide instructions.

Lab 2-2

Note: Exercise 4 and 5 and provided for informational purposes. Students do not
need to manipulate software files nor perform a continuous boot loop recovery.
The Instructor may choose to demo the boot loop to show the proper method of
set boot variables and working in u-Boot

Lab 2-3

Lab 2-4

Lab 2-5

Instructor Reminder: Remind students that the enable command is how to reach
executive privilege mode.
Have the students record the requested information next to the question mark.
Each will response will vary from chassis to chassis and week to week.

Lab 2-6

Instructor Reminder: Remind students that the enable command is how to reach
executive privilege mode.
Have the students record the requested information next to the question mark.
Each will response will vary from chassis to chassis and week to week.

Lab 2-7

Write down the current version of FTOS in your switch.

Lab 2-8

Record the number of power supply and fan in your switch.

Lab 2-9

There should be RPMs and linecards present. Students do not need to create a
table as shown unless they want to on their own.
There should not be any protocols present such as OSPF. If so, have the students
return the chassis its initial configuration at the conclusion of the lab.

Lab 2-10

Lab 2-11

Answer: Primary since there is no redundant RPM in the lab. Stacking information
is displayed because the lab switches are stack capable.

Lab 2-12

Lab 2-13

Be prepared to answer chassis level questions as to why there may be alarms


present.

Lab 2-14

Lab 2-15

Allow students some time to explore with the help commands. Could easily turn
into an open discussion.
Typing help and the ? provides additional command information such as how
to complete a command.

Lab 2-16

The cli operation conf? completes the word in the command while conf ?
shows the available keywords after the command word itself.

Lab 2-17

Capital WORD indicates a name while lower case letters are actual, available
entries.

Lab 2-18

The hostname command is a global configuration event. Note that the naming
will be different depending on which router and lab they are logged into.

Lab 2-19

a) Answer: must be in Configuration mode

Lab 2-20

The copy running-config startup-config copies the current, active configuration


to non-volatile flash. The write memory command does the same thing.

Lab 2-21

Lab 2-22

Now you have saved changes by using the command :


Force10# copy running-config startup-config that saves the changes
from the running-config (Temporary memory) to the startup-config (permanent
memory)

Lab 2-23

Lab 2-24

Lab 2-25

Lab 2-26

Lab 2-27

Lab 2-28

Lab 2-29

The commands are listed in order on the slide.

Lab 2-30

Lab 2-31

Lab 2-32

Lab 2-33

In this lab, student will configure various interface types and confirm connectivity
to the pod members and remote pods.

Lab 3-1

List the lab objectives as stated. Students will need to work in their own pod as
well as work with other pods to confirm connectivity. They are to set up Layer 2
and Layer 3 physical and virtual interfaces as listed.

Lab 3-2

Lab 3-3

Note: Ensure that course participants understand the topology diagrams. Mention
that each pod has its own the topology diagram. The global topology is
informational only to show how switches are connected in and between pods.

Lab 3-4

Explain the lab topology from the perspective of one switch.


Lets break down this diagram.
The 1st and 2nd parts of the lab are self explanatory and are not shown here. The
diagram is really here to illustrate the interface configurations for L2, L3, VLANs
and Port Channels.
Lets look from the perspective of R0, each switch will partner with a different
switch for the following configuration tasks.
1. L2 and L3 interfaces Partner with R1 & R2 on the diagram
2. VLAN interface Partner with R1 & R2 on the diagram
3. Port Channel interface Partner R0 on other Pods on the diagram
Whenever more than one interface is used, as in VLAN and Port Channels, use the
IP address for Interface.

Lab 3-5

Lab 3-6

Lab 3-7

Lab 3-8

Lab 3-9

1. Work with the other routers within your Pod using the Interface to assign an IP
address to the interface (see IP addressing)
2. Enable the interface for Layer 2 mode

Note: the first interface configured will change to UP when the other

Related commands:
show interfaces configured
show interfaces switchport

Lab 3-10

Lab 3-11

Lab 3-12

Lab 3-13

Lab 3-14

Note: There are additional diagrams for the port-channel configuration in Exercise
3

Lab 3-15

Lab 3-16

Lab 3-17

Lab 3-18

Lab 3-19

Lab 3-20

Lab 3-21

This section has to two parts:


Part 1 Static port-channel
Part 2 Dynamic port-channel
Refer students back to Module 3b Port-Channel Configuration for sample
configurations

Lab 3-22

Lab 3-23

Explain the lab topology from the perspective of one router.


Individual pod diagrams are provided for the port-channel exercise.
The R0 routers are connected to the R1 routers and the R2 routers within the
same Pods using the interfaces g01 and g02 as untagged VLAN 10 and interfaces
g12 and g20 as tagged VLAN 20.
The R1 routers are connected to the R0 routers and the R2 routers using the
interfaces g01 and g12 as untagged VLAN 10 and interfaces g10 and g21 as
tagged VLAN 20.
The R2 routers are connected to the R0 routers and the R1 routers using the
interfaces g02 and g12 as untagged VLAN 10 and interfaces g20 and g21 as
tagged VLAN 20.
The R0 routers are connected to the R0 routers in the other Pods using the
interfaces g12, g13, g14, g21, g23, g24, g31, g32, g34, g41, g42 and g43 as static
Port Channels.
The R1 routers and the R2 routers are connected together between Pods using the
interfaces g38 and g39 as static Port Channels.

Lab 3-24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Step 2 is actually not necessary, but can be done for clarity. The configuration
steps on the next slide will automatically enable the appropriate port-channel, in
this case port-channel 32. As not necessary, tasks in Step 2 are shown in a single
screen capture.

32

LACP modes are shown below:


Active (send-receive PDUs),
Passive (receive PDUs only)
Off (do not send or receive).

33

34

Lab 3-35

VRRPs function is to provide redundancy between an internal and external


network. On a pod by pod bases, students will configure VRRP parameters and
confirm proper operation.

Lab 7-1

Part A establishes a VRRP group, mastership and membership values.


Part B establishes a test of the interface tracking feature of VRRP.

Lab 7-2

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
VRRP groups will be created with the other two routers in their pod.
VRRP Group IDs will be derived from router #s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
Each R0 router will be VRRP group

Lab 7-3

Each pod will complete a VRRP group configuration with the items listed. Point
out that each R0 will belong to its own pods VLAN and the VLAN where it is used
as a source of internal network traffic.

Lab 7-4

Lab 7-5

Lab 7-6

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
VRRP groups will be created with the other two routers in their pod.
VRRP Group IDs will be derived from router #s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
Remind the group that tracked interfaces are NOT members of the VRRP
group

Lab 7-7

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
VRRP groups will be created with the other two routers in their pod.
VRRP Group IDs will be derived from router #s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
Remind the group that tracked interfaces are NOT members of the VRRP
group

Lab 7-8

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
VRRP groups will be created with the other two routers in their pod.
VRRP Group IDs will be derived from router #s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
Remind the group that tracked interfaces are NOT members of the VRRP
group

Lab 7-9

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
VRRP groups will be created with the other two routers in their pod.
VRRP Group IDs will be derived from router #s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
Remind the group that tracked interfaces are NOT members of the VRRP
group

Lab 7-10

Lab 7-11

Lab 7-12

Verify connectivity by pinging other routers across


these links
Note the /24 mask. If you cannot successfully ping neighboring
routers, work with fellow course participants to establish connectivity

Lab 7-13

Lab 7-14

Lab 7-15

The presence of a Master IP address indicates


that the VRRP group is active and sending
VRRP packets

Lab 7-16

Lab 7-17

Lab 7-18

The priority on the master VRRP router tracking an interface should decrease by
the amount of the configured priority-cost. The priority-cost must be enough to
cause the master to lower its priority below the backup VRRP router to allow the
backup to takeover the group.

Lab 7-19

If student continue before pod members have completed their assignments, lab
results will not match the intended lab results.

Lab 6-20

The Master should now have changed. Your initial gateway has lost its link to the
outside world, but you can still see the Internet, as VRRP has dynamically shifted
the default gateway, without using a dynamic routing protocol.

Lab 7-21

If the original Master does not return on each VRRP-Group, troubleshoot as


necessary.

Lab 7-22

Review the lab with the students to determine if there are any questions
concerning VRRP configuration, operation and troubleshooting.

Lab 7-23

Lab 5-1

MSTP priority determines which switch will be responsible for topology


management using a single BPDU with multiple VLANs present, each with their
own topology.
Students set and verify the proper root bridge is selected in each pod.

Lab 5-2

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.

Lab 5-3

Student will configure an MSTI environment supporting multiple VLANs. They will
also confirm their results and discuss the resulting topology with the Instructor.

Lab 5-4

Take time to explain the topology diagram for a sample pod to insure student
understanding.

Lab 5-5

Lab 5-6

Lab 5-7

Lab 5-8

Lab 5-9

Lab 5-10

Insure the students know that each pod uses specific interfaces for this exercise;
particularly for connections to switches outside their own pods. Refer them back
to the topology maps for their pod.
Verify they understand this point clearly.
Pod A0 uses gi 0/1, gi 0/2, gi 0/12, and gi 0/44
Pod A1 uses gi 0/1, gi 0/12 and gi 0/38
Pod A2 uses gi 0/2, gi 0/12 and gi 0/46
Pod B0 uses gi 0/1, gi 0/2, gi 0/12, and gi 0/47
Pod B1 uses gi 0/1, gi 0/12 and gi 0/47
Pod B2 uses gi 0/2, gi 0/12 and gi 0/38
Pod C0 uses te 0/1, te 0/2, te 0/30, and te 0/34
Pod C1 uses te 0/1, te 0/12 and te 0/45
Pod C2 uses te 0/2, te 0/12 and te 0/38

Lab 5-11

Pod D0 uses te 0/1, te 0/2, te 0/32, and te 0/34


Pod D1 uses te 0/1, te 0/12 and te 0/38
Pod D2 uses te 0/2, te 0/12 and te 0/38

Lab 5-11

protocol spanning-tree mstp


MSTI 1 VLAN 10-12
MSTI 2 VLAN 222
MSTI 3 VLAN 33
MSTI 4 VLAN 4000

Lab 5-12

Since MSTP is disabled by default, it is enabled by the no keyword before the


protocol in the configuration mode. This allows MSTP to activate globally and
makes configuration keywords available.

Lab 5-13

Lab 5-14

Lab 5-15

Lab 5-16

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
NOTE: A0 is root for MSTI 1.

Lab 5-17

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
NOTE: A0 is root for MSTI 2.

Lab 5-18

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
NOTE: A0 is root for MSTI 3.

Lab 5-19

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups
NOTE: A0 is root for MSTI 4.

Lab 5-20

Lab 5-21

Remind students the reason for setting the priority numbers this way is to ensure
that there is designated backup root bridges.

Lab 5-22

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups

Lab 5-23

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups

Lab 5-24

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups

Lab 5-25

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram.
MSTP groups will be created with the other two bridges in their pod.
MSTP Group IDs will be derived from bridge # s as listed on the diagram
Links between pods will be configured as a tracked interface for both groups

Lab 5-26

Summarize the discussion points from the review with the students. Ask for
questions to see if anyone is still unclear on the MSTP protocol operation.

Lab 5-27

OSPF is an TCP/IP based protocol that serves as a common Interior Gateway


Protocol (IGP) in a large number of networks. The lab has students configure both
single and multiple area OSPF environments and examine the LSDB to confirm
proper operation.

Lab 8-1

Much of this lab is dedicated to becoming familiar with the Link State Data Base
(LSDB) and its contents.
Comparing what you expect to see in the LSDB with what you actually see - and
correcting any discrepancies is key to understanding implementation of OSPF
with FTOS.

Lab 8-2

Note: Ensure that course participants understand the topology diagrams. Mention
that each areas ID number is shown on the topology diagram. Pod A is in Area 1;
Pod B is in Area 2; Pod C is in Area 3; and, Pod D is in Area 4.

Lab 8-3

Lab 8-4

Lab 8-5

Lab 8-6

Lab 8-7

Note: State the importance of making sure the loopback interface is addressed
and brought up BEFORE configuring OSPF. The lo0 address will become the RID.

Lab 8-8

Note: Many prefer to use area 0 for a single-area OSPF configuration, but as
long as routers in the same area agree on area ID, you can use other than
area 0 for this configuration. This will avoid the need to change area
numbers in the Multiple Area OSPF lab to follow. When configuring
multiple areas, the backbone will need to be area 0.

Lab 8-9

Lab 8-10

Lab 8-11

Lab 8-12

Lab 8-13

The Designated Router (DR) will be the one with the highest configured OSPF
priority. Otherwise, the highest IP address becomes the DR.

Lab 8-14

Lab 8-15

Lab 8-16

Type 1 & 2 LSAs are present only within an area.


The number of each type of LSAs in the database are LSA type dependent. Router
(type 1) LSAs represent the number of OPSF routers that are advertising their RID
(usually loopback 0) while Network (type 2) LSAs represent the number of
Ethernet segments in an OSPF area.
Note that Type 2 LSAs are not necessarily always present they are media-type
specific. There is not necessarily a one-to-one relationship between number of
Type 1 LSAs and Type 2s (although some course participants may make this
assumption). They will be present on LANs (broadcast/multi-access), even though
we only have two hosts on each LAN.

Lab 8-17

Lab 8-18

Lab 8-19

Lab 8-20

Lab 8-21

Lab 8-22

Lab 8-23

Note: Be prepared to discuss the concept of route redistribution. Multiple


protocols configured on a router pass like ships in the night, and do not share
routing information by default. Static routes can be considered a protocol with
respect to being a source of routing information (some refer to them as a
pseudo-protocol to distinguish them from a dynamic routing protocol.

Lab 8-24

Lab 8-25

Note: Routers are all now ASBRs as they are redistributing routes into OSPF.
Since each pod is a non-backbone area, AS External routes are type 5 and now
appear in the LSDB.

Lab 8-26

Ask students to confirm they have saved the single area OSPF file as it will be used
in the BGP lab which follows. Failure to save the file results in delays in completing
the BGP lab.

Lab 8-27

Lab 8-28

Lab 8-29

Note: Take a moment to ensure that course participants understand the topology
diagram. Mention that inter-area communication should be through the backbone
(Area 0) only there should be no back door links.

Lab 8-30

Lab 8-31

Lab 8-32

Lab 8-33

Lab 8-34

Lab 8-35

Note: Be prepared to discuss these questions and provide correct answers. We


now see Type 3 and Type 4 LSAs. Be prepared to discuss their purpose and be
able to explain why they are not present in a single-area topology.
Although we will not configure summarization in this lab, be prepared to discuss
the possibility of having fewer Type 3 LSAs in the backbone to represent Type 1
and Type 2 LSAs in normal areas and what the benefit of this would be. See the
example configuration below:
Force10(conf-router_ospf-1)#show config
!
router ospf 1
network

192.168.1.10/32 area 1

network 10.11.1.0/24 area 1


network 10.11.2.0/24 area 1
area 1 stub no-summary

Lab 8-36

Optional Question:
There should be one external route (type 5) for each of the 12 routers since their
static routes are the AS external ones
LSA type 7 are injected into an NSSA and replace the type 5 from before
Type 7 LSAs are converted to type 5 by the ABR connected to the backbone
area

Lab 8-37

Only ABRs know routes to ASBRs so a non-ABR router cannot resolve the route
See previous explanation for the last 2 questions

Lab 8-38

Lab 8-39

Lab 8-40

Lab 8-41

Lab 8-42

In this lab you will:


Configure Layer 2 multi-pathing using VLT (Virtual Link
Trunking).

Lab 8-1

Lab 8-2

Refer to the diagram entitled VLT Lab Topology for your specific pod.
The diagram displays the interfaces you should configure to peer with other
switches and the addressing assignments for those interfaces.

Lab 8-3

Lab 8-4

Lab 8-5

Lab 8-6

Lab 8-7

Lab 8-8

Lab 8-9

Lab 8-10

Lab 8-11

Lab 8-12

Lab 8-13

Lab 8-14

Lab 8-15

Lab 8-16

Lab 8-17

Lab 8-18

Lab 8-19

Lab 8-20

Lab 8-21

Lab 8-22

Lab 8-23

Stacking is a feature that allows a customer to pay as the network grows. It also
provides redundancy in critical operations such as data centers.
This lab demonstrates the necessary hardware and software required to set
multiple Dell Force10 switches into a stacked environment.
Three S4810s are daisy chained in the lab and will be used in the demo. The only
configuration is on stacking parameters and there is no connectivity to the
remainder of the lab equipment (currently 12 S55s).

Lab 10-1

The lab focuses on configuration and management of a stack.


If you not see the expected results of your configuration, you will troubleshoot the
problem on your local router and, if necessary, with other course participants.
Cabling is handled remotely and must be coordinated and scheduled for lab
support.
The lab examines how each stack member is configured and performs within the
stack.

Lab 10-2

Lab 10-3

Lab 10-4

Lab 10-5

Lab 10-6

Lab 10-7

Lab 10-8

Lab 10-9

Lab 10-10

Lab 10-11

Lab 10-12

Note: The switch front panel will show a steady light in the MASTER LED for the
Master unit, and a blinking light for the Standby and Member units. You will not be
able to see the lights since you are working on a remote lab.

Lab 10-13

Lab 10-14

Lab 10-15

Lab 10-16

Lab 10-17

Lab 10-18

Lab 10-19

Lab 10-20

Complete the lab demo on stacking by reviewing the topics on the slide
Confirm the students understand how a stack functions and performs a role
change based on whether it is a power issue or a cable issue
Confirm the stack has returned to is 3 member relationship and the students
understand steps needed to accomplish this task.

Lab 10-21