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Configuration in the CCMS

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Table of content

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Table of content
1 Configuration in the CCMS
2 Logon Load Balancing
2.1 Recommendations for Logon Load Balancing and Logon Groups
2.2 Questions and Answers: Logon Load Balancing
2.3 Checking the Logon Load
2.4 Configure Dynamic Logon Load Distribution for RFC Calls
2.5 Configuring Logon Groups
2.6 PC Installation
2.7 SAP Logon
3 Operation Modes
3.1 Setting Up Operation Modes
3.2 Switching Operation Modes
3.2.1 Switching Operation Modes Automatically
3.2.2 Switching the Operation Mode Manually
3.2.3 Simulating Operation Mode Switching
3.2.4 Rules for Work Process Distribution
3.2.4.1 Setting the Work Process Distribution
3.3 Operation Mode Errors
3.4 Defining Operation Modes
3.5 Defining Day and Night Operation
3.6 Prerequisites for Maintaining Operation Modes
3.7 Defining Normal Operation
3.8 Defining Exception Operation
3.9 Monitoring Servers and Work Processes
3.10 Checking the Operation Mode with the Control Panel
3.11 Consistency Check
4 Instances
4.1 Creating an Instance Definition for One Server
4.2 Creating an Instance Definition for All Servers
4.3 Prerequisites for Starting Remote Instances
4.4 Maintaining Instance Definitions
5 Profiles
5.1 Saving and Importing Profiles After Installation
5.2 General Information About Profiles
5.2.1 Variables in Profile Values
5.2.2 Where Do Profiles Come From?
5.2.3 Valid Profile Parameter Values
5.2.4 Starting SAP Services by Making an Entry in the Instance Profile
5.3 Profile Files
5.3.1 Default Profile
5.3.2 Instance Profiles
5.4 Maintaining Profiles
5.4.1 Changing and Switching Profile Parameters
5.4.2 Determining a Change to a Profile
5.4.3 Checking, Saving, and Activating Profiles
5.4.4 Checking Active Parameters
5.4.5 Deleting Profiles
6 External Operating System Command: Contents
6.1 Executing External Commands
6.2 Maintaining External Commands
6.3 External Commands: Overview
6.4 Authorizations for External Commands
6.5 What Information is Displayed?
6.5.1 Displaying Detailed Information
6.5.2 Additional Parameters
6.6 Profile Parameters in External Commands
6.6.1 Security Checks
6.6.1.1 Check Modules
6.7 Processing Illegal Changes to External Commands
6.7.1 Syslog Trace and System Alert Monitor

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Maintaining Database Connection Information

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Configuration in the CCMS

Purpose
This component enables you to manage the configuration of your SAP system with the Computing Center Management System (CCMS). The CCMS provides you
with extensive support when configuring your system, and you can use it to perform many functions within the SAP system.

Integration
The CCMS is a standard part of the SAP system. You can therefore easily use it as part of your overall configuration activities.

Features
The most important functions that you can configure with the CCMS are:
Logon Load Balancing
Operation Modes
Instances
Profiles

Logon Load Balancing

Purpose
Load distribution allows you to dynamically distribute the SAP users to application server instances. You can increase the efficiency of individual work groups by
setting up multiple logon workgroups that consist of one or more application instances.
You can assign one or more application servers to certain workgroups or specific applications. When users log on to the system, they are automatically logged on
to the server that currently has the best performance statistics and/or the fewest users.
Workgroups are configured and maintained centrally from in the SAP system. Each application server group is assigned maximum thresholds for response time
and number of users that can log on to any particular group server. You can assign particularly important workgroups with time-critical transactions to application
servers with better response time behavior. Setting up logon groups means that the activities of each server become more predictable, which allows you to tune
each specific server with respect to the working applications.
To log on to an SAP system, the user needs to know only the name of the SAP system and the logon group. The host name and system numbers are no longer
needed when you have logged on.
See also:
SAP Logon
Configuring Logon Groups
Configuring Logon Load Balancing for RFC Calls
Questions and Answers: Logon Load Balancing

2.1 Recommendations for Logon Load Balancing and Logon


Groups
Definition
Logon Load Balancing
Logon load balancing increases efficiency with respect to performance and the use of system resources for variously defined workgroups by distributing users
across available application servers based on requirements for workgroup service and utilization.
In a system landscape where there are multiple application server instances, specific servers are best assigned to a particular application workgroup, with the
available resources and buffers of that server tuned specifically to that application and not shared with other applications. This is highlighted in the following
sections:
Recommended:
With logon load balancing and servers assigned to specific applications:
Logon Group FI/CO

Logon Group SD

Server A FI/CO

Server B FI/CO

Server C SD

Server D SD

With logon load balancing and shared, or homogeneous, properties of servers across logon groups:
Logon Group FI/CO

Logon Group SD

Server A FI/CO

Server B FI/CO

Server C FI/CO

Server C SD

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Server D SD

Server E SD

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Not recommended:
With logon load balancing and servers available to all applications:
Logon Group PUBLIC
Server A FI/CO + SD

Server B FI/CO + SD

Server C FI/CO + SD

Server D FI/CO + SD

With only two servers with logon load balancing and servers assigned to specific groups:
Logon Group FI/CO

Logon Group SD

Server A

Server B

Logon Groups
Each SAP application has different resource requirements. Certain applications may therefore require more servers and logon groups. For example, you should
assign separate servers for the application component PP.
Generally, each logon group should have two servers. If one server is not available, the users are automatically connected to the second server. Servers can be
added or removed while the SAP system is running.
If it is not practical for you to assign separate servers to integrated applications such as the application components SD-MM and FI-CO, you should assign
common logon groups to these applications.
See also:
SAP Logon
Configuring Logon Groups
Questions and Answers: Logon Load Balancing

2.2

Questions and Answers: Logon Load Balancing

Process
Q: How can I define a default configuration for different PC's?
A: First create or check the files described in PC Installation . Then, from the SAP Logon Menu, create the desired entries. Copy the files sapmsg.ini,
saproute.ini, saplogon.ini and services to each of the PCs. SAP Logon then displays the configured entries on all these PCs.
Q: Can I use the SAPgui program in the same way as in previous releases?
A: Yes, sapgui behaves as it did in earlier releases.

2.3 Checking the Logon Load


Use
You can check the logon load by displaying a list of the servers that are available and an overview of load distribution in your system.
Procedure
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Logon groups Goto Load distribution.
This list also shows the current performance status of the application servers that are both assigned to logon groups and currently running. Every five minutes, or
after every five logons, each application server writes its own performance statistics data to a memory-resident table on the message server. The current logon
server is refreshed for each group.
1. To refresh the performance status of an application server, double-click an application server line in the Instance column.
To display which users are logged on:
1. Choose Goto Back and then choose Goto User list.
The list shows how users are distributed over the different servers, and whether a particular server is full. You can sort this list by:
user
instance
terminal
time of the last user action.

2.4 Configure Dynamic Logon Load Distribution for RFC Calls


Use
Dynamic logon load distribution should ensure that the load is distributed as evenly as possible over all available application servers in a logon group . To
achieve this, a program runs automatically every five minutes, determines the logon quality for each application server, and writes the quality to a table on the
message server. This quality is a numerical value that is calculated from various performance values, such as the number of users logged on and the response
time. The server with the best quality within a logon group is used for the next logon.
This mechanism is sufficient for dialog logons; for external RFC logons, which often have thousands of logons per second, this is not the case. The information
about quality in the message server is too static, meaning that the RFC server with the best quality would have to process too many requests before the table is
updated. The RFC client would also have to query with the message server which RFC server had the best quality for every logon, which would create additional
load.
Instead of this, an additional mechanism with the following properties was introduced as an extension with SAP Web Application Server 6.10:
For the first logon of an RFC client, the client queries the message server, as previously, for information about the quality of the RFC servers in the selected

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logon group. This information now also contains a value for the change in quality for an additional logon (Delta Quality). This negative value is added to the
quality after a logon, which gives a lower quality for the server.
For further RFC client logons, the client uses the quality and the delta quality to calculate locally which RFC server has the best quality for this logon. An
equal distribution of the logons is ensured in this way.
Only after the interval specified in a logon group, or after a specified number of RFC client logons does the RFC client read the values for quality (and delta
quality) from the message server again.
The mechanism for dynamic logon load distribution for RFC logons does not replace the distribution mechanism for dialog logons, but rather extends it in the
respect that an RFC client can find the RFC server with the best quality locally.
Prerequisites
You have already defined logon groups for dialog applications in transaction SMLG (CCMS: Logon Group Maintenance) (see Configuring Logon Groups ). You can
also use these logon groups for RFC logons.
Activating Dynamic RFC Load Distribution for a Logon Group
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Logon Groups, or call transaction SMLG.
2. Choose the required logon group by double clicking it. The system displays the Change Assignment dialog box.
3. Choose the Properties tab page and activate the Extern. RFC enabled indicator. Choose Copy.
Display Parameters for Dynamic RFC Load Distribution
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Logon Groups, or call transaction SMLG.
2. Choose Msg-Srv Status Area ( ). The system displays the Display Control/Status Area screen. In the Integer Storage list, the system displays, among
other information, the current quality for every system (6 th numerical column) and the delta quality (8 th numerical column).
3. To display the parameters for the dynamic logon load distribution for RFC calls, choose the required logon group in the Logon Favorite Storage list by double
clicking it. The parameters displayed in this dialog window have the following meanings:
Parameter

Meaning

Version

Version = 1: External RFC is not enabledVersion = 2. External RFC is enabled

Selection criteria

Best: The server for which the best quality was calculated is used for the next logon
Round Robin: Each server in the group is used in turn for the next logon.

Time to read

Time after which the RFC client reads new values for quality and delta quality from the
message server

Number logons to read

Number of logons after which the RFC client reads new values for quality and delta
quality from the message server

You can only display the parameters in this window. To make changes to the parameters, follow this procedure:
Change Parameters for Dynamic RFC Load Distribution
1. Call Transaction SE16 (Data Browser).
2. Enter the table name RZLLICLASS and choose Enter (

).

3. The system displays the screen Data Browser: Table RZLLICLASS: Selection Screen. Choose Execute (
4. To change an entry, select the entry and choose Change (

), to display all table entries.

). The column titles correspond to the following parameters:

Column

Parameter

Default Value

TIMERERD

Time to read

120 seconds

LOGRERD

Number logons to read

200

FAVTYPE

Selection criteria (possible values are B for Best or R for

Round Robin)

1. Save your entries.

2.5

Configuring Logon Groups

Use
In SAP Logon, you can create and delete group entries, remove instances from groups, and delete entire logon groups.

Note
When you call transaction SMLG, the CCMS: Maintain Logon Groupsscreen shows a table with entries for logon groups and the associated instances.An entry
in this table, which is characterized by an instance and a logon group, is known as as assignment.A logon group to which multiple instances belong therefore
consists of multiple assignments in this table, where an assignment contains one instance in each case.

Procedure
Creating a Logon Group or Adding an Instance to a Logon Group
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Logon Groups, or call transaction SMLG.
2. Choose
(Create Assignment), and specify the desired name of the logon group in the Logon Groupinput field. Enter the name of the desired Instancethat
is to belong to the logon group.

Note
The logon group SPACE is reserved for SAP; therefore, do not use this name.

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3. Repeat the last step until you have entered all instances that are to belong to the logon group.
4. Save your changes.
Deleting a Logon Group or Removing an Instance from a Logon Group
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Logon Groups, or call transaction SMLG.
2. Select any assignment for the logon group that you want to delete or from which you want to remove an instance.
3. To remove an instance from the selected logon group, choose
by choosing

Remove Instance, enter the desired instance on the next screen, and confirm your choice

(Delete).

4. To delete the desired logon group, choose


5. Save your changes.

Delete Group and confirm your choice by choosing

(Delete) on the next screen.

Changing Properties of an Assignment, a Logon Group, or an Instance


1. Choose CCMS Configuration Logon Groups, or call transaction SMLG.
2. To change the properties of an assignment, double-click the assignment, and switch to the Properties tab page.
3. You can change the following properties:
IP address of the application server
Only enter a value in this field if the application server associated with the instance needs to be addressed by the front end with a different IP address
to the one used for application server-internal communication. This value applies only for the selected assignment.
Settings for external RFC call
You can use this indicator to determine whether logon using an external RFC connection is to be permitted. This value applies to the selected logon
group.
Threshold values for dialog response time and number of users logged on
If you log on using a logon group, the logon is automatically performed using the instance of the group that currently has the best dialog quality. This
quality is a key figure that is calculated from the number of users logged on and the average dialog response time. To allow the different prerequisites
of different instance to be taken into account in this calculation, you can set threshold values for the dialog response time and the number of users
yourself. The larger the actual values for response time and the number of users are in comparison to the threshold values set, the lower the quality.
These figures apply for the selected instance.

Note
The values for Response Time and Users are not absolute limits, but rather thresholds. Even if the current value for response time or number of
users is higher than this threshold value, it is possible to log on to another instance. The threshold values only influence the calculation of the
current logon server of the logon groups.

Note
You can use a preview to see how the settings of the threshold values can affect the quality calculation, based on the current performance data.
Choose
4. Choose

Test to do this. In a logon group, the instance with the highest quality key figure is always selected for the logon.

Copy, and save your changes.

See also:
Recommendations for Logon Load Balancing and User Groups
Questions and Answers: Logon Load Balancing

2.6 PC Installation
Use
When you upgrade an SAP System from Release 2.x to Release 3.x, copy the file saplogon.exe to the directory in which the sapgui.exe file was installed. The
saplogon.ini file should be saved locally in the Windows directory. You should save the sapmsg.ini and saproute.ini files, however, in the frontend installation
directory.
Procedures
1. In your Windows installation directory, check the sapmsg.ini file.
With Windows 3.1/3.11, the files are normally in the directory c:\windows. Wiith Windows NT they are normally in the directory c:\winnt .
The first line must contain the entry [Message Server] . For each SAP System that is available, the following entry should exist:
<SID> = <host name on which the message server is running> .
[Message Server]
C11 = hostname.yourdomain
O01 = oss001
saproute.ini
The first line must contain the item [Router]
For each possible network connection, the following entry should exist:
<route name>=<route>
Here <route> is formulated as:
/H/<hostname on which the SAProuter is running>/S/<service>
You can concatenate several of these strings if the connection uses multiple SAProuters.
[Router]
SAP Walldorf=/H/hostname.your.saprouter/S/sapdp99/H/147.204.64.1/S/sapdp99
SAP Foster City=/H/hostname.your.saprouter/S/sapdp99/H/147.204.69.1/S/sapdp99
1. Ensure that the services file (with Windows 3.1/3.11 normally in the directory c:\windows ) for each system contains the following entry in the sapms.ini file:
sapms<SID> <nr.>/tcp

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sapmsC11 3670/tcp
sapmsO01 3616/tcp
The configuration data is stored in the saplogon.ini file in the Windows installation directory. You can configure the file names and the path specifications of the
saplogon.ini file as you like. You should also save this individually-configured file locally.
If you are the administrator and want to preset a particular selection for the user, you can either deactivate:
selection options for Group Selection and Server Selection
unrestricted user logon
To deactivate the selection options for Group Selection and Server Selection:
To log on to the system, you only need the saplogon.ini file. If sapmsg.ini and saproute.ini are not available locally, the selection options are not available to the
user.
Alternatively, you can call the saplogon.ini file and insert the entry Restricted Mode=1 in the Configuration section. To be on the safe side, save saplogon.ini as a
write-protected file. You could also set the environment variable to slg_restriction=1 for the entire system.
To deactivate unrestricted logon for the user:
You can use the saplgpad program so that users cannot edit or log on freely to the SAP Logon.
To log on to the system, you only need the preconfigured file saplogon.ini .
sapmsg.ini and saproute.ini are not required at runtime.
saplgpad and saplogon use .ini files from the installation directory. If no .ini files are available in the installation directory, the programs access the Windows
directory. If the system still cannot find any .ini files, saplogon creates saplogon.ini in the Windows directory as well as sapmsg.ini (if this is required).
When the user logs on, the system displays the SAP Logon. This only contains the selection list.

2.7 SAP Logon


Definition
The SAP Logon is a Windows program that you use to log on to SAP systems on your Windows PC. It mediates between the SAP system and the SAP GUI user
interface. The SAP Logon displays a list of available SAP systems and automatically selects servers with the best current response times. You can add and
remove items in the list of systems.

Use
Use SAP Logon to log on to SAP systems. Use the defined entries on the Systems tab to start an SAP system. Use this tab to log on to a specific application
server or to log on to a group to select the application server with the best response time automatically. Use the defined entries on the Shortcuts tab to start SAP
transactions, run reports, or execute system commands directly.

More Information
To start the SAP Logon, perform one of the following: You reach this help in an opened, active SAP Logon window by pressing the F1 key. The user help of the
SAP Logon is context-sensitive: The related section of the documentation is displayed depending on the screen that you are currently on.

Operation Modes

Purpose
Operation modes let you flexibly adapt the system configuration to varying requirements, maximizing the use of available system resources.
An operation mode defines a resource configuration for the instances in your system. It can be used to determine which instances are started and stopped, and
how the individual services are allocated for each instance in the configuration.
You can define operation modes to suit specific system requirements, for example, to provide additional dialog or background processing resources during a
particular period of time without having to restart the system.
Operation modes define:
The number of work processes used for each service in the instance
The times that the services are available
Operation modes support:
24 hour uninterrupted system operation
Automatic switching of work process types

Note
An instance is not created through an operation mode. Instances are created when the system is installed, and can be assigned to operation modes.
See also:
Example: Day and Night Operation
Instances
Consistency Check
Switching Operation Modes
Switching Operation Modes Automatically

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Switching Operation Modes Manually


Checking the Operation Mode with the Control Panel
Monitoring Servers and Work Processes
Operation Mode Errors
Defining Operation Modes

3.1

Setting Up Operation Modes

Use
The Computing Center Management System (CCMS) is shipped to every customer site pre-configured so that all internal functionality is intact. The consistency
and/or accuracy of this function depends to a significant degree on how you configure the operation modes .

Prerequisites
Note
To be able to work with the CCMS, you require the authorization S_RZL_ADM.
You receive administrator authorization with S_RZL_ADM 1.
You receive display authorization with S_RZL_ADM 3.
If operation modes, instances, or the timetable are not correctly defined, the CCMS will not display meaningful data. For example, in this case, the job scheduling
monitor will not be able to determine where background processes are currently running, and the alert monitor may report errors for the operation modes.
Before you can work with the CCMS, it must be set up correctly. To ensure the accuracy of the data of the monitored system, you must define at least one
operation mode and maintain the operation modes calendar.

Note
If no operation modes have been defined, the test operation mode DUMMY will be displayed. This operation mode is automatically configured so that system
functions such as the Control Panel and background processing can be used. The operation mode DUMMY cannot be used for operation mode switching.
Existing operation modes are listed as they were previously defined. For example, you may see one or more operation modes for daytime operation and one or
more for nighttime operation.

Procedure
1. To set up operation modes, choose CCMS Configuration Operation Modes/Instances or call transaction RZ04.
2. The screen CCMS: Maintain Operation Modes and Instances appears. You can create and change operation modes and instances from here.
More information:
Defining Operation Modes
Switching Operation Modes
Creating an Instance Definition for All Servers
Creating an Instance Definition for One Server
Maintaining Instance Definitions

3.2

Switching Operation Modes

Use
When operation modes are switched, the work processes are redistributed automatically without stopping and restarting the instances.
Only the work process types are changed. For example, a work process used as a dialog process can be switched for use as a background process.
The new process type is not activated until the process is free. This means that a process might not be switched immediately. Instead, a process is set to be
switched when next possible. For example, if all background processes to be switched to dialog processes still have jobs, the processes are switched one by
one when the jobs are completed.
Processing is not interrupted. Normal system operation continues uninterrupted during the operation mode switch.
Operation mode switches are recorded in the system log. The old process type and the new process type are recorded for each work process that is switched.

Additional Information About Switching Operation Modes


System Startup
When a server is started, it first runs without an operation mode. The number of work processes and their distribution is defined in the instance profile used to start
the server.
The status of the operation mode is checked at regular time intervals and the operation mode defined as active in the operation mode calendar is automatically
activated. If no operation mode is entered for the current time in the operation mode calendar, the system does not activate any operation mode.
Initial Operation Mode Switch
The first time an application server is switched to an operation mode, this is done by the ABAP program SAPMSSY6 . This program runs cyclically, collects the
alert values, performs profile checks and creates DUMMY operation modes. The profile parameter rdisp/autoabaptime controls the intervals at which the

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alert values, performs profile checks and creates DUMMY operation modes. The profile parameter rdisp/autoabaptime controls the intervals at which the
program runs. The default cycle is 300 seconds.
SAPMSSY6 only switches operation modes if the application server is not running in an operation mode. Normally, the system is switched within 5 minutes of
system startup to the operation mode defined in the operation mode calendar.
SAPMSSY6 does not perform a continuous switch. This means that a manual operation mode switch will not be switched back after 5 minutes.
Timed Operation Mode Switch
The exact times for operation mode switches are defined in the operation mode calendar.
A timed operation mode switch is started by the job scheduler (SAPMSSY2). The operation mode switch can therefore only be performed automatically if at least
one job scheduler is running in the system. This means that at least one background work process and parameter rdisp/btctime > 0 must be available.
The switch is always done for all servers defined in the operation mode.
If more than one job scheduler is running, only one job scheduler can activate an operation mode switch.
See also:
Switching Operation Modes
Switching Operation Modes Automatically
Normal Operation
Exception Operation
Switching Operation Modes Manually

3.2.1 Switching Operation Modes Automatically


Use
You can:
Switch operation modes automatically.
Switch operation modes manually.
Procedure
There are two ways to switch operation modes automatically:
Normal operation

The time intervals defined for the operation modes are repeated in a 24 hour cycle

Exception operation

The time intervals defined for the operation modes are activated once for a specified time
period

Only productive operation modes can be switched automatically. Test operation modes cannot be entered in the timetable.
See also:
Normal Operation
Exception Operation

3.2.2

Switching the Operation Mode Manually

Use
You can switch an operation mode manually at any time.
However, you must always ensure that a manual operation mode switch does not interrupt system operation, for example because there are too few dialog
processes available.

Note
Before you switch the operation mode manually in the system, you can perform a simulation of the switch .

Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.

Choose CCMS Control/Monitoring Control Panel, or call transaction RZ03. The system displays information about operation modes and server status.
Choose Choose operation mode. The system displays a list of defined operation modes.
Choose the operation mode that you want to switch to. You return to the list of operation modes and servers.
To switch the operation mode on all servers, choose Control Switch operation mode All servers. The servers remain in the manually activated
operation mode until the next switch time.

Note
You can also switch the operation mode on individual servers. However, you should only do this in exceptional cases, for example, if automatic
switching has not worked correctly.
If an operation mode switch cannot be performed on all of the selected servers, the system displays an error message. The test log for operation mode switching
(Log) provides information to help you decide whether or not to go ahead with the switch anyway.
More information:
Switching Operation Modes Automatically

3.2.3

Simulating Operation Mode Switching

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3.2.3

Simulating Operation Mode Switching

Use
Before you switch an operation mode in the system, you can simulate this switch.

Procedure
To start the simulation from the SAP Easy Access menu, choose Administration CCMS Control/Monitoring Control Switch Operation Mode
Simulation.
The test log describes the possible switches and the errors that may occur, which you can then avoid for the "real" operation mode switch.
See also:
Switching Operation Modes

3.2.4 Rules for Work Process Distribution


Definition
When you set work process distribution, observe the following points:
Number of work processes
The total number of work processes cannot be changed because it is defined in the instance profile. When the system is started, the defined number of
processes is generated at operating system level, and cannot therefore be changed during an operation mode switch.
Dialog processes
You cannot change the number of dialog processes directly. The number of dialog processes is calculated automatically from the total number of work
processes minus all the other work processes.
There must always be at least two dialog processes. The number of other work process types can only be increased if there are more than two dialog
processes.
Background processes
The number of background processes can be changed as required.
The number of background processes can be set to 0 for each server, but there must be at least 1 background process available in the system.
Class A jobs
The number of work processes reserved for job class A is a subset of the number of background processes.
You should only reserve work processes for job class A if it makes sense within your system organization. Work processes reserved for class A jobs are no
longer available for job classes B or C. For more information, see Prioritization Strategies: Keeping Work Processes Open for Class A Jobs .
Update processes
The number of update and V2 update processes can be increased as required, but cannot be reduced to 0. If no update process were available, the
update queue could not be processed during an operation mode switch.
If an instance is running without an update process, you cannot increase the number to 1 during an operation mode switch.
Enqueue processes
The number of enqueue processes can only be changed within certain limitations. An instance is defined as an enqueue server in the instance profile. You
can only change the number of enqueue processes as follows:
1 to n
n to 1
You can increase the number of enqueue processes to more than 1. However, most of the time there is no advantage in doing so. You should only increase
the number of enqueue processes to more than 1 after consulting EarlyWatch or your SAP consultant.
Spool processes
The number of spool processes cannot be changed.

3.2.4.1 Setting the Work Process Distribution


Use
When you create a new instance definition, you must set the work process distribution and assign the work process distribution to an operation mode.
Procedure
To change the work process distribution:
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Operation mode/instances. Alternatively, call Transaction RZ04.
2. Choose Instances/operation modes. In the list of productive instances, position the cursor on an operation mode name and choose Instance Maintain
instance WP distribution. The system displays the box CCMS: Maintain Work Process Distribution dialog box.
3. To change the work process distribution, position the cursor on the number of work processes, then choose '+' or '-'. The work processes are redistributed
automatically.
4. You can only change the assignment of work processes to services in the Number of work processes group box. You cannot change the total number of
work processes, or the start or system profiles.
5. Save your changes. The changes will take effect when the operation mode is next activated.
To assign the work process distribution to another operation mode:
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Operation mode/instances. Alternatively, call Transaction RZ04.
1. Choose Instances/operation modes. In the list of productive instances, position the cursor on an operation mode name and choose Instance Maintain
instance WP distribution. The system displays the box CCMS: Maintain Work Process Distribution dialog box.

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2. Choose Other operation mode and enter the name of an operation mode in the Operation mode field. Repeat this for all the operation modes whose work
process distribution you want to change.
3. Change the work process distribution for the new operation mode as required.
4. Save your changes.The changes will take effect when the operation mode is next activated.
To set the same work process distribution for all operation modes, enter ' * ' for all operation modes. This definition does not depend on the operating system.
See also:
Rules for Work Process Distribution

3.3 Operation Mode Errors


Purpose
If an operation mode switch fails, the most frequent cause is inconsistency in the instance definition. Two examples of this are:
A different number of profiles or a different total number of work processes are defined for day operation and for night operation.
A server was started with a different configuration than the configuration described in the instance definition.
If these problems occur, the Control Panel displays the message Operation mode non-standard or Work processes non-standard.
Process Flow
To solve this problem:
Make the necessary changes to the instance definition
or
Copy the current instance status to the instance definition.
Other Servers Cannot Be Started Remotely (UNIX systems only)
If you cannot start servers from the control panel, most likely the remote command rexec could not be executed. This is, in turn, often because the . netrc file
required for a remote logon on a UNIX server has not been correctly maintained.
See also:
Prerequisites for Starting Remote Instances

3.4

Defining Operation Modes

Use
You can define a new operation mode or change an existing operation mode.

Procedure
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Operation Modes/Instances, or call transaction RZ04.
The system displays a list of productive instances.

Note
If you have not yet defined any operation modes, the test operation mode DUMMY will be displayed. This operation mode is automatically configured so
that system functions such as the Control Panel and the scheduling of background jobs can be used.
If there is already a DUMMY operation mode, this is updated every time that the server is started, and is therefore adjusted to different system
relationships.
The operation mode DUMMY cannot be used for operation mode switching.
2. Create an operation mode (which can be automatically switched).
To do this, choose Operation Mode Create.
3. Enter the data in the following fields:
Operation Mode

Enter a name for the operation mode, such as DAY_OPERATION , and a short
description. You can enter any name for the operation mode, but it is advisable to
choose a name that is meaningful and that makes the task of the operation mode
clear.

Short Description

Enter a short description of the operation mode, such as "Day operation with 6 dialog
processes".

Monitoring Properties Variant

Enter the name of the monitoring properties variant in monitoring architecture


assigned the operation mode. When the operation mode is started, the settings that
the monitoring properties variant contains are automatically activated in the alert
monitor.

4. Save the data by choosing Operation Mode Save.


5. Repeat this procedure for all required operation modes.
When you have defined and saved your operation modes, you can define the instances and servers.

Note
You can call the operation mode maintenance from the Control Panel.
See also:
Instances

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Requirements for Maintaining Operation Modes


Switching Operation Modes Automatically
Switching Operation Mode
The Alert Monitor

3.5

Defining Day and Night Operation

Use
You can define separate operation modes for day and night operation. This means you can guarantee response times for important data entry transactions during
the day, and use more work processes at night for job processing.
Between 6:00 and 20:00, you will predominantly use the system for dialog processing. Outside that time, system resources are primarily required for background
jobs.
You can reconfigure your system dynamically at set times by switching operation modes and thus avoid the disadvantages of a system restart.
The diagram below illustrates the effect of an operation mode switch:

Procedure
You can display the status of the operation modes and instances using the control panel. To do this, choose CCMS Control/Monitoring Control Panel.

Note
Assume that your system has a total of ten work processes available. Define an operation mode for night operation to allow more efficient data processing at
night.
In the timetable for automatic operation mode switching, enter the times for the two operation modes:
6 a.m. to 8 p.m. for day operation
8 p.m. to 6 a.m. for night operation
Table: Operation mode switching: Day/night operation
Work Process Distribution

Day Operation6 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Night Operation8 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Dialog
Background
Update

5
1
2

2
4
2

Enqueue
Spool

1
1

1
1

Most resources will then be available for dialog processing during the day. At 8 p.m. the operation mode will be switched automatically, making more system
resources available for background jobs and data transfer from other systems. At 6 a.m. the next day, the day operation mode will automatically be activated,
making more system resources available for dialog processing.
See also:
Instances
Scheduling an Operation Mode Switch
Switching Operation Modes

3.6

Prerequisites for Maintaining Operation Modes

Definition
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Before you can maintain operation modes and instances in the CCMS, you must have correctly installed the SAP sytsem. The installation procedure for distributed
instances ensures that the following actions are carried out:
The shared file systems in the SAP system are automatically mounted on the host system of the distributed instance.
The instance directories are created.
The users are defined in the host system.
The operating system kernel for the instance is generated in accordance with the host system attributes.
Entries in the configuration files of the host system are maintained (such as hosts and services).
Start and system profiles are generated for the instances
You can use the program sapstart and the installed profiles to start the system.
After starting the SAP system, you begin the required configuration tasks.
See also:
Profile Files
Defining Operation Modes

3.7 Defining Normal Operation


Use
For normal operation, you must maintain the operation mode timetable.
Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Choose CCMS Configuration Operation mode timetable. Alternatively, call Transaction SM63.
Choose Normal operation (24 hr), and Display.
The system displays the timetable for the 24 hour cycle.
To assign other times to the operation mode, choose Normal operation (24 hr) and Change.
Double-click on the start time and end time that you require.
Choose Assign to assign these times to the operation mode.
Enter the name of the operation mode to be active for the time period that you defined.
You can only select productive operation modes.
Save the changes.
Finally, save the table.

You must always define a full 24 hour cycle, that is, the operation modes must be set up for 24 hour system operation. If the timetable is not defined:
The start configuration according to the profile will remain active
No unattended automatic operation mode switch is possible
The job scheduling monitor will not function properly
When a job is created or released with start date/time, it will not be possible to check whether background processes are available at the start time
Jobs that are scheduled to start when the operation mode is switched are not started.
See also:
Exception Operation
Switching Operation Modes

3.8 Defining Exception Operation


Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Choose CCMS Configuration Operation mode timetable.


Alternatively, call Transaction SM63.
Choose Exception operation, and Display.
The system displays the timetable for the 24 hour cycle.
Go back and then choose Exception operation, and Change.
You can now change the date on which the operation mode is to be activated. Choose Day+1, Day-1, Specify a day accordingly.
Choose Assign to set the time at which the operation mode is to be activated.
You do not need to define a full 24 hour cycle for exception operation. You must only define the period in which you want the operation mode to be active.
Save the changes.

See also:
Normal Operation
Switching Operation Modes

3.9

Monitoring Servers and Work Processes

Use
When an operation mode has been switched you can see in the process overview whether the work process types have been changed correctly.

Procedure
To monitor the work processes on your current application server:
From the SAP Easy Access menu, choose Administration Monitor System Monitoring Process Overview. Alternatively, call Transaction SM50.
The system displays an overview of the work processes for the server you have logged onto.
The information for each work process is displayed in a row. The Ty. column shows the work process type: for example, DIA is a dialog process, BTC is a

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background process.
To monitor the work processes on a different application server:
From the SAP Easy Access menu, choose Administration Monitor System Monitoring Servers. Alternatively, call Transaction SM51.
The system displays a list of the SAP servers. To display the processes for a particular server, position the cursor on the line containing the server name, then
choose Processes.
See also:
Global Work Process Overview

3.10

Checking the Operation Mode with the Control Panel

Use
The primary function of the control panel is to start or stop instances. However, you can also use it to check whether instances were started correctly and whether
they are running in the correct operation mode; that is, whether automatic operation mode switching is possible.

Procedure
To display an overview of operation modes and instances:
1. Start the Control Panel by choosing CCMS Control/Monitoring Control Panel.
The control panel displays a list of the host systems and the instances in your system. The list contains:
Instance names
Status
Services running on your application server
Active operation mode
2. Select a server.
To find out the cause of a non-standard operation mode:
1. Choose Monitoring Status Details.
The system displays a dialog box showing the details of the server.
The most frequent reason for an operation mode switch failing is inconsistencies in the total number of work processes or in the profiles.
2. When you have solved the problem, switch the operation mode manually from the Control Panel.

3.11

Consistency Check

Use
You can run an error check of the profile definitions to avoid any system problems. This consistency check determines whether changes made to profiles are
valid, and recognizes any settings that will prevent the system from starting or operating properly.

Prerequisites
Consistency checks are only possible for profiles that were maintained using the profile maintenance tool. You cannot perform a consistency check if you have
maintained a profile in any other way, for example with an operating system editor.

Procedure
From the list of productive instances, choose Instance Consistency check.
All the start and instance profiles for the defined instances are checked. The profiles are compared with the current work process distribution. The check
determines, for example, whether the enqueue processes are started on more than one server, or whether the message server has been properly configured.
See also:
Rules for Work Process Distribution

Instances

Definition
SAP instances are defined during the installation of the SAP system.

Note
The term "instance" is often used synonymously with "server" or "application server" in the SAP system. This depends on the selected installation
environment. You can install multiple instances on one application server.
An SAP instance defines a group of resources such as memory, work processes and so on, usually in support of a single application server or database server
within a client/server environment. Application servers share the same memory areas and are controlled by the same dispatcher process.
An SAP instance is handled by CCMS as a unit. A user logs on to the SAP system using an instance.
An SAP system can consist of one or more instances, such as an SAP system with a single instance with only one central server or a client/server system with
two or more separate instances.

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For each SAP instance:


Separate directories are defined on the UNIX, AS/400, or Microsoft Windows NT server on which the instance is to run
Shared file systems can be used
Entries are created in operating system configuration files (/etc/services, /etc/sapconfig...)
Communication entries are created in the host
Start and system profiles are created
Operating system users are installed

Note
An SAP instance is not assigned automatically to an operation mode.
More Information:
Creating an Instance Definition for All Servers
Prerequisites for Starting Remote Instances
Creating an Instance Definition for One Server
Consistency Checks
Monitoring Servers and Work Processes

4.1 Creating an Instance Definition for One Server


Use
If you only want to create a new instance definition for one application server, it is useful to copy the instance definition for the server. Assigning an instance
definition to an operation mode makes it part of the operation mode. As a result, you can switch the instance, see if it is inactive and start and stop it using the
control panel (Transaction RZ03).
Prerequisites
You must define an operation mode before you can assign an instance definition to it.
Procedure
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Operation modes/instances. Alternatively, call Transaction RZ04.
1. Choose Instances/operation modes and then Instance Create new instance. The system displays the CCMS: Maintain Instance Data screen.
1. Enter the host name and choose Current settings. If the application server is already running, the system will display the current settings for that instance.
However, if the application server is not yet running, you should use the input help to display the possible entries and fill in the following fields:
Host name

Enter the name of the host running the instance.

SAP System Number

Enter the SAP System number that was specified when your SAP System was
installed.

Start Profile: Profile Name

The name of the start profile from Profiles to start the instance with.
Choose the input help to display a list of available start profiles. You can choose a profile
from the list.

Instance Profile: Profile Name

The name of the instance profile from Profiles to run the instance with.
Choose the input help to display a list of available instance profiles. You can choose a
profile from the list.

1. Choose Save. The system checks your configuration automatically when you save and informs you of any inconsistencies. Choose Continue. The result of
the check is displayed in the Display Check Log of Profile window.
UNIX systems only: So that you can start and stop instances from the control panel, you must enable a remote logon on the target UNIX server. See Prerequisites
for Starting Remote Instances
1. In the CCMS: Maintain distribution of work processes dialog box, assign the work processes to at least one operation mode.
2. In the Operation mode field, enter the name of the operation mode or select an operation mode from the list of possible entries. To set the same work process
distribution for all operation modes, enter * .
The system proposes the current work process distribution in the instance profile. However you can change the work process distribution (see Setting the
Work Process Distribution ).
3. Save your changes. To assign the work process distribution to additional operation modes, choose Yes when the system prompts you. Choose No if you do
not want to do this.
4. When you have finished, you can perform a consistency check . Save your changes. All the instance definitions for productive operation modes are then
saved in the database.
To change the assignment of work processes to the instance, see Setting the Work Process Distribution
See also:
Creating an Instance Definition for All Servers
Maintaining Instance Definitions

4.2

Creating an Instance Definition for All Servers

Use
You can generate the current instance definition for all the active servers. This procedure is helpful if you want to generate all instance descriptions for the first
time.

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Procedure
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Operation Modes/Instances Instances/Operation modes, or call transaction RZ04.
2. The screen CCMS: Maintain Operation Modes and Instances appears. Choose Settings Based on current status New instances Generate. The
system now queries the current status of every active application server, and an instance definition is created.
For every configured operation mode, the system creates a work process distribution in accordance with the distribution of the respective instance profile.
3. Save the new instance.
4. Define the work process distribution for switching operation modes .

Note
If you want to start and stop servers from the control panel , you should maintain the instance startup user.
More information: Prerequisites for Starting Remote Instances
5. When you have finished defining the work process distribution, you can perform a consistency check .
It only makes sense to do this if you are maintaining profiles using the CCMS profile maintenance tool.
6. Save your changes. All the instance definitions for productive operation modes are then saved in the database.
See also:
Creating an Instance Definition for One Server
Maintaining Instance Definitions

4.3

Prerequisites for Starting Remote Instances

Starting an SAP Instance: Remote UNIX Server


To start an SAP instance on a remote UNIX server, the CCMS must log onto the remote UNIX server as a UNIX administrative user. To enable this remote logon,
you must maintain the . netrc file on the target UNIX system, on which an SAP instance is to be started or stopped.
The . netrc file contains the user and password for the remote logon. The file must therefore be protected with read permission only for the SAP administrator in
UNIX, no permissions for any other user. It should reside in the home directory of the administrative user for SAP on the target host.
See the documentation of your UNIX systems for exact information on maintaining . netrc .

Note
Prior to SAP R/3 4.5A, you could use transaction RZ04 (Tools CCMS Configuration Operation modes/instances) to store a UNIX user and password
for use in starting SAP instances on remote servers. The remote start-up capability (and the user and password) were used in the CCMS control panel
(Transaction RZ03) and in the CCMS system monitor (Transaction RZ02), for example.
The SAP system needs a stored user and password only for starting SAP instances on remote UNIX servers. Remote start-up of instances on AS/400 and
Microsoft Windows servers uses other mechanisms and requires no user and password.
It is no longer possible to store a user and password in the SAP system. You should therefore maintain the UNIX files listed above to enable remote startup
and shutdown of SAP instances.
Further, whenever Transaction RZ04 is started, the system checks whether a user and password have been stored. If so, the user (the system administrator)
is warned about the problem. If the user so wishes, the user and password are deleted automatically by the system.

Starting an SAP Instance: Remote Microsoft Windows Server


An SAP instance on a Microsoft Windows host is started with a message to the SAP Service Manager on the remote Microsoft Windows host. No remote user is
required. The Service Manager is set up for the communication that is necessary for remote operations during the installation of the SAP system or of an SAP
instance. No further maintenance should be necessary to enable remote start-up and shutdown from the CCMS control panel or system monitor.

Starting an SAP Instance: Remote AS/400 Server


An SAP instance on an AS/400 host is started using an AS/400 mechanism that is transparent to the system administrator. This mechanism is set up for the
communication that is necessary for remote operations during the installation of the SAP system or of an SAP instance. No further maintenance should be
necessary to enable remote start-up and shutdown from the CCMS control panel or system monitor.

4.4 Maintaining Instance Definitions


Use
Once you have defined the operation modes, you must maintain the instance definition.
It is also necessary to maintain instance definitions if, for example, server names or profiles were changed, or if new servers have been added.
Procedures
To change instance definitions:
1. Choose CCMS Configuration Operation modes/instances. Alternatively, call Transaction RZ04.
2. Choose Instances/operation mode. Select an entry from the list of productive instances and choose Choose.
3. You can then change the data for that instance.
To delete a server definition:
1. From the list of productive instances, position the cursor on a server.
2. Choose Instance Delete entry. All data for that server is then deleted.
To delete an assignment to a work process:

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1. From the list of productive instances, position the cursor on the line with the operation mode or work process.
2. Choose Instance Delete entry. Only the assignment to that work process is deleted.
To delete an operation mode:
1. From the list of productive operation modes, position the cursor on a line with the operation mode.
2. Choose Operation mode Delete. The operation mode, and all the instances and work process definitions assigned to it, are deleted.
The automatically configured DUMMY operation mode is no longer needed once you have defined your operation modes. Delete the DUMMY operation mode as
described above.
See also:
Creating an Instance Definition for All Servers
Creating an Instance Definition for One Server

Profiles

Purpose
SAP profiles are operating system files that contain instance configuration information. SAP systems can consist of one or more instances. Individual configuration
parameters can be customized to the requirements of each instance. These individual parameters allow you to configure:
The runtime environment of the instance (resources such as main memory size, shared memory, roll size)
Which services the instance itself provides (work processes)
Where other services can be found (database host)

Features
The profile file is structured as follows:
# This is a comment in an SAP profile:
Parametername1 = Value1
Parametername2 = Value2
Parameter names that logically belong together have a common root. For example, the root of parameters that control the dispatcher within an application server is:
rdisp/.

Tip
The parameter rdisp/wp_non_dia specifies how many dialog work processes are started by the dispatcher.
The SAP profiles are stored in a special file directory. This directory can be made accessible from all hosts, depending on current requirements.
UNIX systems:/usr/sap/<SID>/SYS/profile
Microsoft Windows systems:\\<SAPGLOBALHOST>\saploc\<SID>\SYS\profile\
<SID> is the system ID of the SAP system, and <SAPGLOBALHOST> is the name of the host on which the global profile directory physically exists.
saploc is the name of a share; by default, this is the directory [drive]:\usr\sap.
All host computers in an SAP System can access these profiles.

Note
To edit configuration profiles in the SAP system, use transaction RZ10 (Edit Profiles). You should therefore not edit the active profiles directly at operating
system level.
See also:
Saving and Importing Profiles After Installation
Profile Files
Profile Maintenance

5.1

Saving and Importing Profiles After Installation

Use
After you have used the SAP installation program SAPINST to install a new system or a new instance, we recommend that you perform the following steps:
Back up all profiles in the profile directory at operating system level.
This provides you with additional security if you can no longer start the system due to incorrect changes to the profiles. In this case, you can copy the
original profiles back to the profile directory and ensure that the system can be started to analyze and correct the cause of the error.
Import all profiles.
During an initial installation of an SAP system, an upgrade to a new SAP release, or the addition of a new application server, the system automatically
generates or updates the profile files at operating system level. However, the installation program cannot store profiles directly in the database. Since we
recommend that you edit profiles exclusively using the profile maintenance tool, you need to ensure that the current version of the profiles exists in the
database. You can do this by importing the profiles.
You can import profiles at any time; however, if you consistently use only the profile maintenance tool to make changes to the profiles, you only need to do
so after installation and upgrade.

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Note
Make sure all application servers (instances) are active before you importing profiles.

Importing Profiles from All Active Application Servers


1. Call profile maintenance by choosing CCMS Configuration Profile Maintenance. Alternatively, use transaction code RZ10.
2. Choose Utilities Import profiles Of active servers. The system imports the default profile and all instance profiles. The system checks the profiles and
displays a log. The names of the profiles in the database are taken from the corresponding file names on the operating system.
3. To check the import, choose the input help for the Profile input field. The system displays the names of the imported profiles.

Importing Individual Profiles


Note
Use this function if you have installed a new application server, or you have changed a profile at operating system level. You must first create a new profile
using the profile maintenance function.
1. On the initial screen of transaction RZ10, enter the profile name (the version number is automatically assigned).
Profile type and status now appear on the screen for your information.
2. Choose Profile Create.
3. Maintain the administration data: short description, the name of the file in which the profile is to be activated later (specify a reference server and profile
type).
4. After you have copied the administration data, on the initial profile maintenance screen, choose Profile Import.
5. A dialog box appears, in which you need to specify the name of the operating system file from which the profile is to be imported. You can display all the
profile files in the global profile directory using the F4 key.
The system checks the imported profile for errors. You can now edit and/or import the profile into the database, as described above. After the import process
has been completed, decide whether you want to activate the profile .
Profiles start page

5.2

General Information About Profiles

5.2.1

Variables in Profile Values

Process Flow
Parameter values in instance profiles can contain the following variables:
$(parameter name) is replaced by the value of the parameter name specified in brackets.

Tip
Param1 = '/usr/sap/C11/D53/dbg'
Param2 = $(Param1)/stats
Therefore Param2 = /usr/sap/C11/D53/dbg/stats
$$is replaced by the SAP system number.

Tip
Param3 = logfile$$.
SAPSYSTEM = 29
Therefore Param3 = logfile29
You can also define local replacement variables. These values are not used by the SAP programs, they are only relevant within a profile. They contain
values used for setting up or filling parameter values. The names of these local replacement variables begin with an underscore ('_') .

Tip
_SAP_PROFILE_DEFAULT = /usr/sap/C11/SYS/profile/DEFAULT.PFL
Param4 = _SAP_PROFILE_DEFAULT.
This results in Param4 = /usr/sap/C11/SYS/profile/DEFAULT.PFL

Profiles start page

5.2.2

Where Do Profiles Come From?

Definition
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When an SAP instance is installed on a computer using the SAP installation program SAPINST, a start profile and an instance profile are automatically
generated. If it is the first instance of an SAP system, the system also creates a default profile. Otherwise, the existing default profile is simply updated.
The installation program assigns various profile settings, such as buffer sizes, important data directories, and the name of the database host.
The profiles are placed in a global file directory so as to have access from every client in the system.
See also:
Saving and Importing Profiles After Installation
Profiles start page

5.2.3

Valid Profile Parameter Values

Definition
Parameters can be in default profiles or instance profiles . Parameter values are configured as shown below:

The value that a profile parameter receives is determined by the following rules:
If the parameter is set in the instance profile, it always has this value.
If the parameter is set in the default profile, it receives this value only if it is not set in the relevant instance profile.
If the parameter is set in neither the instance profile nor the default profile, it receives the default value from the relevant coding.

Note
If possible, ensure that a particular parameter appears only in the default profile or in the instance profile.

Profiles start page

5.2.4
Profile

Starting SAP Services by Making an Entry in the Instance

Use
One of the tasks of the instance profile is to control which SAP services are started (for example, the message server, dialog, gateway, or enqueue process).

Note
Up NW2004s, there were standalone start profiles for this purpose. Their functions have now been integrated into the instance profiles.
You can start the following processes:
Application server
Message server
SNA gateway
System log send demon
System log receive demon
The following parameter names will are used for this:
Execute_xx (xx = 00-99): To start operating system commands that prepare the start of the SAP system. For example, you can use this parameter to start

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the database used with the SAP system or to set up links to executables on UNIX platforms.
Start_Program_xx(xx = 00-99): To start an SAP instance, for example on an application server.
Stop_Program_xx(xx = 00-99): To start an operating system command or SAP program after the SAP instance has been stopped. For example, the
stopping or removing of shared memory areas that were used by the SAP system.
The number xx defines the execution sequence. The programs specified in the Execute_ parameters are executed before the programs listed in the
Start_Program parameters. After the instance has been stopped, the programs specified in the Stop_Program parameters are started.

Features
To run a program on the local host, place the word local in front of the relevant parameter value:
Execute_00 = local sapmsesa 53 remove
To execute a program on a remote host, place the host name in front of the parameter value:
Execute_00 = hs0011 sapmsesa 53 remove
Profiles start page

5.3

Profile Files

Definition
During installation, two profiles are created in the file system:
DEFAULT.PFL
<SID>_<instance>_<host name>
These profiles contain the parameters that determine the operating system resource usage of the instance, for example, the number of work processes, the
buffer sizes.
You import and activate these profiles using the profile maintenance tool. After that, you should simply maintain and activate the profiles using the profile
maintenance .
Profiles start page

5.3.1

Default Profile

Definition
To assign the same parameter value for all application servers, for example, the name of the database host or the computer on which the message server is
running, enter it in the default profile. In general, you can list any parameter you like here.
We recommend that you use the following values:
Parameter Definition

Parameter Name in Profile

Name of the database host

SAPDBHOST

Name of the update server

rdisp/vbname

Name of the Enqueue server

rdisp/enqname

Name of the server for processing background processing events

rdisp/btcname

Name of the computer on which the message server is running

rdisp/msname

Name of the TCP service under which the message server can be reached

rdisp/msserv

Name of the host on which the SNA Gateway is running

rdisp/sna_gateway

Name of the TCP Service under which the SNA Gateway can be reached

rdisp/sna_gw_service

Note
You cannot choose a name for the default profile. It is always called DEFAULT.PFL. The default profile is, like all other profiles, in the global profile directory of
the SAP system.

Tip
Example of a typical default profile for a double-stack system:
#.***********************************************************#.* *#.* Default profile DEFAULT *#.* *#.* Version = 000005 *#.* Generated by User = NAKE
*#.* Date of Generation = 04.01.2007 , 13:21:04 *#.* *#.*************************************************************SAPDBHOST =
WDFN00148651Aj2ee/dbtype = sapj2ee/dbname = PMNj2ee/dbhost = WDFN00148651Aj2ee/dbadminurl = http://WDFN00148651A:9999/webdbm?
Server=WDFN00148651A&Database=PMN&User=controlSAPSYSTEMNAME = PMNSAPGLOBALHOST = WDFN00148651A#------------------------------------------------------------# SAP Central Service Instance for J2EE#-------------------------------------------------------------j2ee/scs/host = WDFN00148651Aj2ee/scs/system =
01j2ee/ms/port = 3901rdisp/bufrefmode = sendoff,exeoff#-------------------------------------------------------------# SAP Messaging Service for ABAP#------------------------------------------------------------rdisp/mshost = WDFN00148651Ardisp/msserv = sapmsPMNrdisp/msserv_internal = 3900login/system_client = 001

Profiles start page

5.3.2

Instance Profiles

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5.3.2

Instance Profiles

Definition
Instance profiles provide an application server with additional configuration parameters that complement the settings in the default profile . Typically, these
parameter settings adapt the instance according to the desired resources. They also define the available instance resources (main memory, shared memory, roll
memory, and so on), and how to allocate memory to the SAP application buffers.

Tip
Example of a typical instance profile for a double-stack instance:
#.***************************************************************#.* *#.* Instance profile PMN_DVEBMGS00_WDFN00148651A *#.* *#.* Version = 000011
*#.* Generated by User = NAKE *#.* Date of Generation = 04.01.2007 , 13:31:26 *#.*
*#.***************************************************************SAPSYSTEMNAME = PMN#parameter created by: NAKE 27.12.2005
17:20:32rsdb/ntab/entrycount = 10000#parameter created by: NAKE 27.12.2005 17:20:04rsdb/ntab/ftabsize = 10000SAPGLOBALHOST =
WDFN00148651ASAPSYSTEM = 00INSTANCE_NAME = DVEBMGS00DIR_CT_RUN =
$(DIR_EXE_ROOT)\$(OS_UNICODE)\NTI386DIR_EXECUTABLE = $(DIR_INSTANCE)\exeDIR_PROFILE = $(DIR_INSTALL)\profile_PF =
$(DIR_PROFILE)\PMN_DVEBMGS00_WDFN00148651Ajstartup/trimming_properties = offjstartup/protocol = onjstartup/vm/home =
C:\j2sdk1.4.2_09jstartup/max_caches = 500#parameter created by: NAKE 27.12.2005 17:27:38alert/MONI_SEGM_SIZE = 20000000jstartup/release =
700jstartup/instance_properties = $(jstartup/j2ee_properties);$(jstartup/sdm_properties)j2ee/dbdriver =
C:\sapdb\programs\runtime\jar\sapdbc.jarPHYS_MEMSIZE = 128#old_value: 3 changed: KRIEGER 27.04.2006 15:59:26rdisp/wp_no_dia = 4#old_value: 2
changed: KRIEGER 19.12.2006 11:26:35rdisp/wp_no_btc = 3rdisp/j2ee_start_control = 1rdisp/j2ee_start = 1rdisp/j2ee_libpath =
$(DIR_EXECUTABLE)exe/j2ee = $(DIR_EXECUTABLE)\jcontrol$(FT_EXE)rdisp/j2ee_timeout = 600rdisp/frfc_fallback = onicm/HTTP/j2ee_0 =
PREFIX=/,HOST=localhost,CONN=0-500,PORT=5$$00icm/server_port_0 = PROT=HTTP,PORT=80$$#----------------------------------------------------------------#
SAP Messaging Service parameters are set in the DEFAULT.PFL#----------------------------------------------------------------ms/server_port_0 =
PROT=HTTP,PORT=81$$rdisp/wp_no_enq = 1rdisp/wp_no_vb = 1rdisp/wp_no_vb2 = 0rdisp/wp_no_spo = 1rsdb/dbid = PMNdbs/ada/schema =
SAPPMN#------------------------------------------------------------# Jcontrol: Migrated Profile Parameter# create at Wed Nov 30 16:29:57 2005#-----------------------------------------------------------j2ee/instance_id = ID0037994#------------------------------------------------------------alert/cache/size_MB = 10mpi/buffer_size =
32768mpi/total_size_MB = 20abap/buffersize = 100000alert/GREEN_ALERTS = 1icm/keep_alive_timeout = -1icm/host_name_full =
wdfn00148651a.wdf.sap.corp#------------------------------------------------------------------# Copy SAP Executables#-----------------------------------------------------------------Start_Program_00 = immediate $(DIR_CT_RUN)\sapcpe$(FT_EXE) pf=$(_PF)#------------------------------------------------------------------# Start ABAP database#-----------------------------------------------------------------_DB = $(DIR_CT_RUN)\strdbs.cmdStart_Program_01 = immediate $(_DB) PMN#-----------------------------------------------------------------# Start SAP messaging service#------------------------------------------------------------------_MS =
$(DIR_EXECUTABLE)\msg_server$(FT_EXE)Start_Program_02 = local $(_MS) pf=$(_PF)#------------------------------------------------------------------# Start application
server#------------------------------------------------------------------_DW = $(DIR_EXECUTABLE)\disp+work$(FT_EXE)Start_Program_03 = local $(_DW) pf=$(_PF)#-----------------------------------------------------------------# Start internet graphics server#------------------------------------------------------------------_IG =
$(DIR_EXECUTABLE)\igswd$(FT_EXE)Start_Program_04 = local $(_IG) -mode=profile pf=$(_PF)rsdb/dbid = PMNdbs/ada/schema = SAPPMN
You can choose any name for an instance profile. The SAP naming convention has the following structure: <SID>_<instance name>_<host name>.
Profiles start page

5.4

Maintaining Profiles

Use
With non-production systems, you can often make changes to system profiles. In the case of production SAP systems, changes to the system profiles are only
rarely required. In both cases, you should use the profile maintenance to maintain the profiles.
The profile maintenance tool has the following advantages:
Convenience of use
Extensive profile checks
Testing of (several) individual profiles for consistency
No inconvenient profile editing at operating system level
Changes to profiles are logged
Profile data is held in the SAP database (security, consistency)
Provision of basic data for operation mode switching

Note
You should no longer edit profiles with an editor at operating system level. It only makes sense to do this if the SAP system cannot be started in any
other way.

Integration
You can edit profiles using basic maintenance or extended maintenance.
In basic maintenance, general data bout the profile and the parameters for buffer sizes, the number of work processes, and swap requirements is
displayed.
In extended maintenance, the individual parameter values for the profile are displayed.

Note
Detailed documentation is available for every parameter in the profile. To display the documentation, place the cursor on the parameter and choose F1.

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Prerequisites
Set Authorizations
To use the profile maintenance, assign authorization values to the authorization object S_RZL_ADM in accordance with the desired processing mode:
Processing Mode

Value of 'Activity' Field of the S_RZL_ADM Object

Edit and display profiles

01, 03

Display profiles

03

Import Profiles
Since you are working with profile data from the SAP database in the profile maintenance, you need to ensure that this data matches the corresponding active
profiles in the file systems of the instances. You do this by importing the profiles. To import the profiles for all active servers, choose Utilities Import Profiles
Of Active Servers. More information: Saving and Importing Profiles After Installation .
Ensure that you import the profiles in the following situations:
Before you first use the profile maintenance
After installing a new application server
After changing a profile at operating system level
To check whether the profile in the database matches the active profile in the file system, you can compare these profiles at any time. To do this, select the
desired profile in the profile maintenance and choose Profile Compare Profile in Database Against Active Profile.
Profiles start page

5.4.1

Changing and Switching Profile Parameters

Use
You can use profile maintenance to change and switch profile parameters.

Procedure
1.
2.
3.
4.

Call profile maintenance by choosing CCMS Configuration Profile Maintenance. Alternatively, call transaction RZ10.
In the Profile field, specify the name of the profile for which you want to change parameters.
To maintain the most important profile parameters, select Basic maintenance and choose Change. Once you have made the changes, choose Copy.
In Extended maintenance, you can create, change, or delete all parameters in a profile. Once you have made the changes, choose Copy.

Note
You can switch between Basic and Extended maintenance at any time. Changes are only copied when you save them to the database .
5. Changes to the profile parameters only become active when the relevant instance is next restarted. An exception to this are dynamically-switchable profile
parameters. To determine which profile parameters can be switched dynamically, choose Profile Dyn. Switching Display Parameters.
6. To switch the values of these profile parameters immediately (rather than only after the next start of the instance), change the profile parameters as
describes above, and then choose Profile Dyn. Switching Execute. Specify the instance for which the dynamic switching is to be performed.
Profiles start page

5.4.2

Determining a Change to a Profile

Use
When you change and save a profile, the old status in the database is not overwritten. Instead, a separate version with the changed values is created. The SAP
system allocates an individual number for each profile version. For example, when you create a new profile, it has the version number 1. All additional versions
are then numbered sequentially.
The associated profile file at operating system level is only overwritten if you explicitly specify this within the profile maintenance transaction (the system prompts
you accordingly when you save a profile). You can only activate the most recent version of a profile. However, you can also reactivate older versions by copying
them.
For each parameter that you change, a corresponding comment is stored in that same profile.

Tip
If user BATCHMAN changes the number of update work processes in an instance profile from 0 to 1. The following entry is made:
# old value: 0 changed by: BATCHMAN, 9.8.1995, 16:45:38rdisp/wp_no_vb = 1
Using the versions of the profile and the associated modification comments, you should be able to trace the history of all changes.
In particular, you can confirm whether a profile file has been changed manually at operating system level by comparing the profile information in the database with
the active profile in the operating system. If the profile data is not identical, the operating system files have been manually changed. The system writes all
differences in a log, and triggers an alert in the Alert Monitor .

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Procedure
1. Call profile maintenance by choosing CCMS Configuration Profile Maintenance.
2. Specify the name and version of the profile that you want to examine, and choose Profile Comparisons Profile in database With active profile. If the
system finds differences, it displays these in a log.
Profiles start page

5.4.3 Checking, Saving, and Activating Profiles


Use
Once you have finished maintaining a profile, you can check it for errors or inconsistencies, save it in the database, and then activate it.
The profile maintenance tool stores the profiles as operating system files and stores a copy of each profile in the database. The database copy is used to create
the profiles at database level. This process is known as activating a profile.

Note
The profile maintenance tool ensures that changes to profiles are activated when the corresponding SAP instance is restarted. You cannot make changes to
an SAP instance during active operation.

Procedure
1. Call profile maintenance by choosing
Administration
CCMS
Configuration
Profile Maintenance
2. To call the individual functions in the table, execute the relevant commands specified:

. Alternatively, call transaction RZ10.

Function

Command

Save profiles

Enter a profile name in the Profile field and choose

Check individual profiles

Specify the name and version of the profile. Then choose

Check all profiles of the active server

Choose

Check all profiles used in operation modes

Choose Utilities

Activate profiles

Enter a profile name in the Profile field and choose

Utilities

Check all profiles


l

Profile

the active server

Check all profiles

Save

Profile

Check

In operation modes
Profile

Activate

Note
Stop the instance(s) in which you want the profile changes to take effect, and
restart them.

Background Information About Profile Checks


If a profile has been changed, you can perform extensive checks for it. You can check the semantics, syntax, and the parameter names of the profile. The
system displays the result of the profile checks as a log that contains either warnings or error messages.
The parameters in a profile are divided into classes. For each class, there is a separate check rule. The table below shows these rules and includes an example
for each:
Parameter Class

Check Rule

Example

Integer value

Value smaller than default value: Error


Value larger than default by a factor of 10: Warning

rdisp/TRACE

Time value

Value smaller than 0: Error


Permissible characters: 0-9

rdisp/btctime

Boolean value

Legal values:
0, 1ON, OFFYES, NOTRUE, FALSE

gw/accept_remote_trace_level

Other values: Error


File Directory

Directory does not exist: Warning


No write authorization: Warning

rdisp/workdir

File name

File does not exist: Error

abap/rsyn

TCP computer name

Host is not known to TCP: Error

rdisp/mshost

TCP service name

Service name is not known to TCP: Error

rdisp/msserv

SAP server name

Server name is not known to SAP system: Error

rdisp/vbname

File mask

Check is not possible

enque/log_file

Strings

Check is not possible

abap/locale_ctype

Cannot be changed by customer

If particular parameters are changed by the customer: Error transport/systemtype

Special parameters

If value does not contain a particular character string: Error rdisp/bufrefmode

Start Parameters

If at least one program is not started: Error

More Information
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Profiles start page

5.4.4

Checking Active Parameters

Use
You can use transaction RSPFPAR to determine which parameters are active for a particular instance.

Procedure
1. Call transaction RSPFPAR.
2. Start this program on the instance that has the parameter values you are interested in.
The system displays a list that consists of two parts:
The first part shows the parameter values in unsubstituted form, that is, before the substitute variables were replaced.
The second part displays the actual values of the individual parameters.
See also:
Variables in Profile Values
Profiles start page

5.4.5

Deleting Profiles

Use
You can either delete single profiles or all versions of a profile as follows:

Procedure
1. Call profile maintenance by choosing CCMS Configuration Profile Maintenance. Alternatively, call transaction RZ10.
2. To delete a single profile, choose Profile Delete Individual Profile.
3. To delete all versions of a profile, choose Profile Delete All versions Of a profile.

Note
Initially, the profiles are deleted from the database. However, you can also delete the corresponding profile files at operating system level.

Profiles start page

6 External Operating System Command: Contents


External Operating System Command: Contents

External Commands: Overview


Authorizations for External Commands
Executing External Commands
Maintaining External Commands
Security Checks

6.1 Executing External Commands


Executing External Commands
Procedure
To call an external command:
Choose CCMS, Jobs External Commands.
Alternatively, call Transaction SM49.
The system displays the Operating system commands dialog box, which lists all of the commands that are defined in the system.
To execute a command:
Select the line containing the command and choose Execute.
The command is then displayed along with its parameters. Before you execute the command from here, you can specify additional parameters (if this is allowed)
as well as the name of a target computer. The default entry for target computer is the name of the application server ( SY-HOST ).
You can currently only execute commands synchronously in dialog mode.

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To maintain an external command


You can also maintain commands from this window.
Choose Display Change.
However, you may not execute changed commands until their changes have been saved.

See also:
What Information is Displayed?
Additional Parameters
Maintaining External Commands

6.2

Maintaining External Commands

Use
You can create, display, change, delete, rename, and copy external commands. SAP commands cannot, however, be changed in customer systems.
External commands can only be processed individually. For example, you cannot delete several external commands at the same time. External commands
cannot be used by multiple users simultaneously.

Procedure
1. Choose CCMS Configuration External Commands, or call transaction SM69.
2. You can then display or change the external commands. To display a list of all external commands defined in the system, choose Display Change.
External commands are uniquely identified by a user-definable logical name and an operating system.
You can specify the name of an ABAP function module which, at the time of execution, decides whether the specific command should be executed or not. The
interface to this check module must be the same as for the check module SXPG_DUMMY_COMMAND_CHECK delivered by SAP.

Caution
SAP recommends that you copy SXPG_DUMMY_COMMAND_CHECK before using it. Do not change this function module in your system.

Note
Command names beginning with 'X' or 'Z' are reserved for customer commands.
See also:
What Information Is Displayed?
Additional Parameters
Executing External Commands

6.3

External Commands: Overview

Definition
An external command is a pre-defined operating system command that can be executed within the SAP system.
Both the maintenance and execution of external commands is protected with SAP authorizations. You can maintain and execute external commands in dialog
(from the CCMS menu) or in ABAP programs, using special function modules. External commands can also be executed as a step in a background job.
As the CCMS administrator, you can modify commands and activate additional security mechanisms without having to change the program.
You can add your own commands and parameters to the variety of (pre-defined) commands delivered by SAP.
See also:
Authorizations for External Commands
Executing External Commands
Maintaining External Commands
Security Checks

6.4

Authorizations for External Commands

Use
To create or change external commands, you require appropriate authorization.

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Procedure
Define the authorizations for executing external commands in the SAP system and assign them to users through authorization profiles. Authorizations can be given
for all external commands, for groups of external commands, or for individual commands. They can also be restricted to specific computers.
The system does not differentiate between capital and lowercase letters in authorizations.
Table: Purpose of SAP Authorizations
SAP Authorization

Purpose

S_RZL_ADM
with activity '01'

Maintenance of external commands


The authorization should be queried in the ABAP program
with the function module
'SXPG_MAINTENANCE_PERMISSION', instead of with
AUTHORITY_CHECK.

S_LOG_COM

Execution of external commands has three fields:


COMMAND

Name of the external command

OPSYSTEM

Operating systems for which the command was defined


(does not have to be identical to the operating system of the
target computer)

HOST

Symbolic computer name of the target system

The fields COMMAND and OPSYSTEM are used to


uniquely identify the external command, while HOST
defines the authorizations for executing commands on
certain target computers.

The authorization S_LOGCOM_ALL, which enables the execution of all external commands, is delivered as standard in the profiles S_A.SYSTEM and
S_A.ADMIN.
See also:
Security Checks

6.5

What Information is Displayed?

Definition
When you execute or maintain external commands, a list of the commands is displayed. Each line in the list contains a brief summary of the most important
information about an individual command.
The first two columns contain the name of the external command and an operating system on which the external command should be executed.

Operating System Type


An external command is uniquely identified by its name and operating system. These two key fields therefore also have to be passed when an external command
is executed. (No difference is made between capital and lowercase letters.)

Note
The operating system does not have to be the same as the specific operating system. However, we recommend that you adapt the type to the ABAP runtime
variable SY OPSYS where possible, since the default for operating system is SY OPSYS when an external command is executed.
You can also enter the name of the syntax group belonging to SY OPSYS or the name ANYOS, provided the corresponding command can be used
universally.
See also: documentation for SXPG_CALL_SYSTEM.

Type
There are two different identifiers in the column Type: SAP and Customer.
External commands of the type SAP are delivered by SAP and cannot be changed in customer systems. Customers can create commands of the type Customer.
These commands are not changed during release upgrades.
We recommend that you only use commands of the type Customer for in-house developments (that is, in your own ABAP sources).

Note
Commands are automatically created with the type Customer in customer systems.

OS Command
In the fourth and fifth columns, you can see the specific operating system command and the predefined parameters with which it should be executed. These two
values are not shown in their entirety in this list, but can be defined with up to 128 characters each.
See also:

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Displaying Detailed Information


Additional Parameters
Profile Parameters in External Commands

6.5.1

Displaying Detailed Information

Procedure
You can display detailed information on a command by double-clicking it.
The system displays the operating system command and the predefined parameters in full, as well as whether or not additional parameters can be included when
the command is executed.

Note
For security reasons, information relevant to system security is only displayed in 'Display mode' if the user has CCMS administrator authorization. This
information includes, for example, the name of the check module and whether an entry is made in the system log when the command is executed.
See also:
Additional Parameters
Profile Parameters in External Commands

6.5.2

Additional Parameters

Definition
When executing an external command, you can include a character string of up to 128 characters containing additional parameters.
Prerequisites:
The use of additional parameters must be allowed for this command (standard).
Maintaining External Commands
The total length of all parameters (predefined and passed at runtime) cannot exceed the maximum length of 128 characters.
Placeholder
These additional parameters are generally added to the end of pre-defined parameters following a blank space. You can, however, also define placeholders for
these additional parameters within the pre-defined parameters.

Table: Placeholders for Parameters


Placeholder

Purpose

'?'

used for required parameters

'&'

used for optional parameters

If no parameter values (or a blank character string) is passed at runtime for a required parameter, then the exception PARAMETER_EXPECTED is triggered. The
placeholder '&' for optional parameters is removed in this case. Otherwise, the characters '?' and '&' are replaced with the parameter character string passed.
See also:
Displaying Detailed Information
Profile Parameters in External Commands

6.6

Profile Parameters in External Commands

Definition
You can decide whether the value of a profile parameter is entered in the command text at runtime (for operating system commands and the predefined
parameters). A placeholder for a profile parameter must have the following syntax:
$-SAPSYSTEMNAMEThe first place must always contain a '$', followed by a separator which does not appear in the names of any profile parameters. The subsequent text is
interpreted as the name of a profile parameter until the separator appears again. The complete character string, from '$' up to and including the second separator,
is replaced by a value defined for the profile parameter before the operating system command is executed. The value of the profile parameter is used as defined
in the target system, provided an application server was started there.

Tip
/usr/sap/$-SAPSYSTEMNAME-/SYS/exe/run/sapgui
If the profile parameter SAPSYSTEMNAME had the value 'ABC', then the character string above would look like this:

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/usr/sap/ABC/SYS/exe/run/sapgui

Special Characters
Use the following special characters:
$ To identify profile parameters
? Placeholder for required parameters
& Placeholder for optional parameters
# Escape character
If you want to use '$' as a regular character, then you need to precede it with '#' as an escape character. You must enter the escape character '#' twice if you
want to use it in the text.
See also:
Displaying Detailed Information
Additional Parameters

6.6.1 Security Checks


Security Checks
Use
Before external commands are executed, the additional parameters passed are checked. If "illegal" characters are found in the process, the command is not
executed and the exception SECURITY_RISK is triggered. These illegal characters have been defined specific to operating systems, as displayed below:
Table: Illegal Characters for Parameters
Operating System

Illegal Characters

AIX

| &; ^ \ < > `

HP-UX

| &; ^ \ < > `

Windows NT

| & < > ()

VMS
other

| &; ^ \ < > `

If you want to prohibit the use of other characters, SAP recommends that you use check modules. If you want to avoid these restrictions, you should use shell
scripts or in-house C programs.

See also:
Check Modules
Illegal Changes to External Commands
Syslog Trace and System Alert Monitor

6.6.1.1

Check Modules

Definition
When maintaining an external command, you can specify the name of a check module. A check module is a function module that is executed immediately before
the command, and can decide whether the command will be executed or not.
Your system already contains the prototype of such a check module:
SXPG_DUMMY_COMMAND_CHECK
The check module contains an ABAP comment with an example of how it is used.
Do not change the check module SXPG_DUMMY_COMMAND_CHECK, but instead work with a copy. You can freely define the name of the check module.
Only the interface has to be the same as for the check module SXPG_DUMMY_COMMAND_CHECK. The check module can only stop the execution of the command
by triggering the exception NO_PERMISSION.
See also:
Processing Illegal Changes to External Commands
Syslog Trace and System Alert Monitor

6.7

Processing Illegal Changes to External Commands

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Use
When a CCMS administrator calls the command maintenance transaction, he or she is informed of any changes that were made to external commands by means
other than the maintenance transaction.
The administrator can then decide whether or not to accept these changes or to restore the old status. It is not possible to execute an illegally created or changed
external command. A corresponding entry is written in the system log.

Procedure
To accept or reset changes:
Illegal changes are displayed in two lists. You can switch between these two lists by selecting Show original values and Show changed values.
1. Select (in the appropriate list) the command that you want to accept or reset.
2. Choose Reset to orig. value or Accept ill. changes.

Caution
Note the list in which you are currently working:
If you are in the list of original commands, the changes will be reset in all of the commands selected.
If you are in the list of changed commands, the changes will be accepted.
In both cases, the corresponding commands are then removed from the lists of changed commands.

Comparing Old and New Commands


As a CCMS administrator, you can use the function for comparing "old" and "new" external commands. You can also see a note that states the nature of each
change in the second column of the lists of the "old" and "new" commands, immediately after the checkbox:
C

Command was newly created

Command was deleted

Command was modified

As soon as you exit the list, the system displays the list of all external commands defined in this system.
See also:
Check Modules
Syslog Trace and System Alert Monitor

6.7.1

Syslog Trace and System Alert Monitor

Use
If a user tries to execute a command that was created or changed illegally, an entry is automatically made in the system log.
The syslog area 'LC' is reserved for external commands.
You can decide whether these events are displayed in the alert monitor.
To maintain the alert thresholds:
From the SAP Easy Access menu, choose Tools CCMS, Configuration Alert Monitor Threshold Values (3.x).
Alternatively, call Transaction RZ06.
See also:
Check Modules
Processing Illegal Changes to External Commands

Maintaining Database Connection Information

Use
Use DB connection maintenance to maintain the SAP table DBCON. This table contains information about additional non-standard database connections (such as
database system, password, and so on).

Procedure
To call DB connection maintenance, choose Administration CCMS DB administration DB connections. Alternatively, use Transaction DBCO.
A table for DB connection maintenance appears. The table includes the following columns:
Name of connection
Logical name of database connection
DBS

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Database system
Database user name
Database user
Database password
Password to create the connection to the database
Connection information
Database system-dependent information about the database connection.
Displaying Details about the Database Connection
1. Select the entry
2. Choose Details.
Adding New Information to Database Connections
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

To switch to change mode, choose Table view Display -> Change


Choose New entries. Alternatively, choose Copy as... to use an existing data connection as a template
In the Connection namefield, enter a name you choose for the logical database connection
In the DBMS field enter the code for the database system (for example, ORA for Oracle)
In the User name field enter the name of the database user
In the DB Password field enter the password twice
In the Conn.info field enter the database-dependent information for the database connection
In the Reconnect type field enter the type of availability for an open database connection
Choose Save

Maintaining Existing Database Connection Information


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

To switch to change mode, choose Table view Display Change.


Select the entry
Choose Details.
Change the existing information
In the DB Password field enter the password twice
Choose Save.

Deleting Existing Database Connection Information


1. To switch to change mode, choose Table view Display Change.
2. Select the entry
3. Choose Delete.

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