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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

South Carolina Midlands
Agritourism Community
Outreach Marketing
Handbook
Agritourism Marketing Strategies Focused
Around Richland and Lexington Counties
Amanda Bollinger
5/2/2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Why Agritourism? .........................................................................................................................................................3
Expected Outcomes and Goals..................................................................................................................................4
The Basics of Agritourism (Wolfe and Bullen n.d.) .......................................................................................................4
What Does Agritourism Offer Farmers? (Wolfe and Bullen n.d.)..............................................................................4
The Three Basics to Agritourism ...............................................................................................................................5
What Do Potential Customers Want Out of an Agritourism Experience?.................................................................5
Possible Advantages of Agritourism to Farmers .......................................................................................................5
Possible Disadvantages of Agritourism to Farmers ...................................................................................................5
Agritourism Marketing (Wolfe and Bullen n.d.) ...........................................................................................................5
Create a Marketing Plan ...............................................................................................................................................6
The Four P’s (Iowa State University 2007) ....................................................................................................................7
Promotion and Advertising (Iowa State University 2007) ............................................................................................7
Mailing List ................................................................................................................................................................8
Image and Partnerships in your Community .............................................................................................................8
Public Relations .........................................................................................................................................................8
Local Marketing Resources ...........................................................................................................................................8
All-Local Farmers’ Market (LocalHarvest 2012) ........................................................................................................8
South Carolina State Farmers Market (South Carolina Department of Agriculture 2012) .......................................9
Online Marketing Resources for Farmers ....................................................................................................................9
Market Maker (South Carolina Market Maker 2012)................................................................................................9
LocalHarvest.Org (Local Harvest, Inc. 2012)............................................................................................................10
“Agritourism, Your Way: A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises” Document (Wolfe and Bullen
n.d.) .........................................................................................................................................................................10
Local Case Studies .......................................................................................................................................................10
City Roots: An Urban Agritourism Farm (Columbia, SC) ..........................................................................................10
Koon Farm and Lumber: A Suburban Non-Agritourism Farm (Irmo, SC) ................................................................12
Lever Farms: A Rural Agritourism Farm (Pomaria, SC) ............................................................................................13
Big Moon Farm: A Rural Agritourism Farm (Leesville, SC) ......................................................................................14
Heritage Fields Farm: A Suburban Non-Agritourism Farm (Irmo, SC) .....................................................................16
Making Products More Marketable in South Carolina ..............................................................................................17
Certified South Carolina Grown ..............................................................................................................................17
Certified Organic .....................................................................................................................................................17
Green and Sustainable Marketing ...........................................................................................................................18

Urban Agritourism Vs. Rural Agritourism ................................................................................................................18
Common Agritourism Marketing Problems in the Richland/Lexington Counties area ............................................19
Works Cited .................................................................................................................................................................19
Appendix A: City Roots Documents............................................................................................................................21
City Roots Info-Promo .............................................................................................................................................21
City Roots Rental Contract Agreement ...................................................................................................................22
City Roots Internship Application ............................................................................................................................24
City Roots Urban Sustainable Farm and Event Venue.............................................................................................28
City Roots Training Manual (Work In Progress as of 4/15/12) ................................................................................34
City Roots School Tour Application .........................................................................................................................37
City Roots Pamphlet ................................................................................................................................................38
City Roots CSA 2011-2012 .......................................................................................................................................39
Appendix B: South Carolina State Science Standards (South Carolina Department of Education 2005) ..................40
KINDERGARTEN: Characteristics of Organisms ...................................................................................................40
GRADE 1 : Plants .................................................................................................................................................40
GRADE 2: Animals ...............................................................................................................................................40
GRADE 3: Habitats and Adaptations ...................................................................................................................41
GRADE 4: Organisms and Their Environments....................................................................................................41
GRADE 5: Ecosystems (Terrestrial and Aquatic) .................................................................................................42
GRADE 6: Structures, Processes, and Responses of Plants .................................................................................42
GRADE 7: Ecology: The Biotic and Abiotic Environment .....................................................................................43
Appendix C: Resources for Farm Lesson Plans ...........................................................................................................44

WHY AGRITOURISM?
“Agricultural tourism (often shortened to agritourism) refers to an enterprise at a working farm,
ranch or agricultural plant conducted for the enjoyment of visitors that generates income for the owner.
Agricultural tourism refers to the act of visiting a working farm or any horticultural or agricultural
operation for the purpose of enjoyment, education or active involvement in the activities of the farm or
operation that also adds to the economic viability of the site (Wolfe and Bullen n.d.).” Agritourism can
include farm stands or shops, farm tours, festivals, on-farm classes, etc. Agricultural tours are already
being used successfully in Europe and in states like California here in the United States. Agritourism is a
way to develop the local economy, craft trades, and educate visitors to current agriculture practices.
Agritourism also allows small farmers to share their environmental knowledge with their local
community. This knowledge-sharing could be great community outreach between rural and urban
areas.
People are now more interested in how their food is produced than in the past; this interest
leads to a want to meet the producers and talk with them about what goes into food production.
According to the 2007 Census of Agriculture, agritourism increased in value from $2.7 million in 2002 to
$8.2 million in 2007. The value per farm increased from $5,000 to $22,000 during that same time (Clark
2009). Agritourism plays an important role in this South Carolina’s agribusiness economy. Farms
engaged in agritourism and other recreational services generated an average income of $24,276 in 2007
on top of their traditional farm income, up more than 230 percent from 2002, according to the USDA
(Clark 2009).
The pressures driving farmers to consider alternative sources of income such as agritourism are
many, including competition from larger farms and overseas products, variable commodity prices, rising
production costs, and harsh weather conditions, such as the droughts that have plagued parts of the
southeastern United States in recent years. In addition to supplementing farm income, agritourism also
benefits the surrounding community, perhaps most importantly by bringing more tourists to rural areas.
The influx of tourists generates additional revenues for local restaurants, shops, and other businesses,
bringing a welcome infusion of outside dollars. These “imported” dollars often stay within the local
economy and are recirculated through additional purchases of goods and services or wages paid
(Somoza 2011).
A large problem with extending agritourism to the general public of South Carolina is the lack of
a centralized data about small farms, those that are offering agritourism opportunities and their product
offerings. Many farmers do not have websites or only maintain a social networking page such as a
Facebook™ page. If a South Carolinian is looking for an alternative food source, the current best way to
find one is word-of-mouth. Most South Carolinians are unaware of their options. There are currently
many farms in South Carolina that already participate in agritourism that merely need word spread
about their products.
Developing agritourism for small farms within the state of South Carolina would be beneficial to
both the small farmers and the surrounding community. Small farmers can offer their communities

environmental knowledge and greater understanding of agricultural processes. Demonstrate and showcase how producers protect and care for the land and natural resources.) 1.D. 5. Tours will allow local small farms to potentially gain new customers. The purpose of this handbook’s creation is to give small farmers the ability to replicate successful agritourism strategies on their own farms elsewhere in the state. Together. Increase revenue without increasing acreage. Outcomes for this project include greater knowledge about the state of agritourism in South Carolina.D. This South Carolina Midlands Agritourism marketing guide will show farmers how to maximize their agritourism potential using resources that they already have. 7. EXPECTED OUTCOMES AND GOALS Expected outcomes for this handbook include greater knowledge about the state of agritourism in South Carolina. Offer a way to educate the public on how their food is grown. the creation of greater outreach between small farms and the public. Agritourism will allow the small farms in our state to continue to compete against larger farm chains through further specialization of their products and public offerings. increase potential future income and present the public with healthy organic food options. 9. An opportunity to educate people about both historic and modern methods of farming and the risks involved in everyday agriculture. An opportunity to build new business with resources that already exist. 2. these measures will allow small South Carolina farmers to use agritourism as a means to educate the general public about the environment and the importance of sustainability. the greater ability of local small farmers to use agritourism to generate extra income. Compared to traditional commodity markets. a chance to sell their wares. 8. 3. allowing farmers to put a price on time and value. 6. agritourism offers a new way of marketing products and services. THE BASICS OF AGRITOURISM (WOLFE AND BULLEN N. An opportunity to diversify income. and the establishment of a larger agritourism presence in the Richland and Lexington counties of South Carolina. and a greater ability of local small farmers to use agritourism to generate extra income. A way to supplement retirement.) WHAT DOES AGRITOURISM OFFER FARMERS? (WOLFE AND BULLEN N. 4. Provides a way to include future generations on the farm or ranch and keep the land in the family. a useful agritourism handbook for small South Carolina farmers. . An environmental sustainability impact for the state of South Carolina would come from encouraging those small farmers who already use sustainable practices to continue and cause increased knowledge of sustainability for the public who interact with these farmers.

Planning can be tedious and frustrating.. AGRITOURISM MARKETING (WOLFE AND BULLEN N. 2. 6. To participate and see how their food is grown. Most individuals are three to five generations removed from the family farm. 6. May impact some family members negatively.D. 2.THE THREE BASICS TO AGRITOURISM: 1. May require additional money and time. 3.). 6. Relatively inexpensive. Attract the targeted audience to the farm. Additional facilities may require additional time and money. Have something for visitors to see. 2. Visitors represent a high-value. POSSIBLE DISADVANTAGES OF AGRITOURISM TO FARMERS 1. To experience the culture and heritage. local atmosphere. Unique and authentic experiences. Adding products and services is a long-term process.d. 4. 3. To get away from everyday stress. 1. 3. 5. Diversify and bolster income sources.) The primary focus of all marketing and promotion activities is straightforward. Identify a target audience and then identify their needs. Agritourism customers are looking for an overall farm experience which has a friendly.to inform potential visitors about the operation and its activities and to attract visitors to the farm (Wolfe and Bullen n. 3. Have something for visitors to do. Develop interpersonal and communication skills. grandparent or relative to visit on the farm anymore. 4. 5. They no longer have a parent. 5. Share challenges and satisfactions of your lifestyle with others. Agritourism activities may take place on a small scale. 2.. . POSSIBLE ADVANTAGES OF AGRITOURISM TO FARMERS 1. 2. WHAT DO POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS WANT OUT OF AN AGRITOURISM EXPERIENCE? 1. Have something for visitors to buy. Additional risks involved in allowing visitors on property. low-volume market. 4.

What changes and developments in the agritourism market might be expected in the foreseeable future? Your niche. Who is your target audience? 1.3. or local chamber of commerce and other outlets. Such information may be found through agritourism associations. 5. Excellence in customer service allows a farm to identify. 4. This should include: Who are your customers? • Identify customers coming to your area for similar attractions. Be specific in identifying the group of consumers you wish to target. How will customers benefit from your operation? CREATE A MARKETING PLAN (Iowa State University 2007) One of the most important aspects of marketing your business venture is the formulation of a marketing plan. 6. individuals or groups? What is the income range of your target customers? When are your target customers available for the services your Agritourism venue will offer? What are your target customers looking for (entertainment. 4. • What makes your agritourism business unique? What would set you apart from competitors? Some examples: a farm/ranch operated by your family for generations with unique heritage components. action. 5. regional tourism councils. specialized attributes of your . Where do the target customers live? What age or in which age range are your target customers? Are your target customers families. Is there another Agritourism venue in your area that already fulfills the needs and wants of your target customers? 9. Create an inviting environment that will cause the targeted audience to come back again. 2. Get the targeted audience to spend their money by selling to their needs and wants. 1. other)? 7. Become familiar with your market. • What types of agritourism activities are popular or increasing in popularity? Notice where growth is taking place in the industry and the types of activities and goods consumers are seeking. a unique location with attractive amenities. Develop customer service policies. attract and retain customers. Train employees to implement policies (and make sure they do). 4. Research your customers’ needs. Develop an effective set of metrics for your market plan and customer service policies. 2. 3. genuine farm experience. How far are your target customers willing to travel? 8. 3. Establish customer service goals and expectations. wants and expectations. education.

Budget.products or services. brochures. building. Advertising through various forms of media (websites. The popularity and usefulness of the internet can make it an effective place to market your business if used properly. Promotion. and expanding of your agritourism business. In your plan. Product. Make sure your plan is flexible. PROMOTION AND ADVERTISING (IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY 2007) All of the following may be appropriate forums for promoting and advertising your agritourism business: • Newspaper . raising exotic animals. • Is there a market for what you are selling? Is there some way to change your goods or services to more adequately address a consumer demand? The quality of your staff and their training is also an important consideration in agritourism. revenue and expenses.) can also be effective in getting the word out about your agritourism operation. such as organic produce or meat. THE FOUR P’S (IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY 2007) Throughout the planning. or unique activities available. Assess your success in meeting these goals over time. and the need for those sales to yield a profit. • Balance the price charged for your goods and services between the need to attract customers and maximize sales. • A rule of thumb for a beginning agritourism operation is that 10 to 30 percent of gross revenues should be invested in marketing. clearly state marketing goals with regard to the number of visitors. Advertising in agritourism and similar businesses has traditionally come mostly from customer to customer word-of-mouth communications. can help publicize your business and inform consumers specifically seeking the goods and services you offer. it is important to keep these fundamental aspects of marketing in mind. such as your local chamber of commerce. • Where and how to promote and advertise your business are important considerations. • Is your location one that is easily found by consumers? Will potential customers notice your agritourism business in passing? Are there other beneficial aspects to your location such as impressive natural scenery? Price. so you can adapt to changes in the marketplace or results that do not match expectations as you monitor your business’s progress. Membership in agritourism organizations and business associations. etc. etc. Place.

and publicity. community members. IMAGE AND PARTNERSHIPS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Creating a favorable public image is important both in attracting customers and in maintaining the ability to draw support from your community. PUBLIC RELATIONS Recognizing the strength of your own stories and communicating them to the media. Others in your community can provide goods and services needed for your operation. In addition to providing customers. promotion. your community can provide you with potential business partnerships. and others to efficiently and effectively market your business.• • • • • • Radio Brochures Internet Business Cards Direct Mailings Signs MAILING LIST As agritourism businesses generally depend on repeat customers. LOCAL MARKETING RESOURCES ALL-LOCAL FARMERS’ MARKET (LOCALHARVEST 2012) FIGURE 1 (LOCALHARVEST 2012) Address: 711 Whaley Street . visitors. building and maintaining a good mailing list and email list of your customers is important.

providing an important link between producers and consumers (South Carolina Market Maker 2012). West Columbia. Eleazer Farm. SC Hours: Monday – Saturday 6:00 AM – 9:00 PM Sunday 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM “Each section of the new market is designed to serve a particular purpose.B. SC 29201 Time: Every Saturday year-round from 8:00 AM . The Retail/Agribusiness section is user-friendly with 10-foot sidewalks. Wil-Moore Farms. This entire section is designed to be pedestrian. convenient onsite parking adjacent to each building.” ONLINE MARKETING RESOURCES FOR FARMERS MARKET MAKER (SOUTH CAROLINA MARKET MAKER 2012) The Market Maker program was put together by the University of Illinois and has since expanded to 20 states within the United States.12:00 noon Some vendors include: Caw Caw Creek Pastured Pork. Floral & Hardy Farm.friendly so that the entire family will be comfortable visiting the market. and a heavily-landscaped. The program is.. City Roots. Severt & Sons Produce Co. L&N Produce. etc. V. Wholesale vendors occupy their own section of the market. and Raybon Tomato (South Carolina Department of Agriculture 2012).” It provides lists of participating farms as well as demographic data about Richland and . keeping truck traffic separate from pedestrian areas. Low country design. Hook & Co. Ayer & Price Fruit Co.” It claims to be “Connecting willing markets and quality sources of food from farm and fisheries to fork (South Carolina Market Maker 2012). The major wholesale vendors present at the market include Senn Brothers.. “an interactive mapping system that locates businesses and markets of agricultural products in South Carolina. Asya's Organic Farm. SOUTH CAROLINA STATE FARMERS MARKET (SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 2012) Address: 3843 Charleston Hwy.Columbia.

” “AGRITOURISM. Use this website to find farmers' markets. YOUR WAY: A HOW-TO GUIDE FOR SUCCESSFUL AGRITOURISM ENTERPRISES” DOCUMENT (WOLFE AND BULLEN N.500 tilapia are being raised for commercial production.ORG (LOCAL HARVEST. Crop rotation and cover cropping are practiced. No chemicals are sprayed on the farm as a result of its organic standing. The farm currently grows over forty types of vegetables including micro-greens. legal and business planning aspects of agritourism. More and more of these farmers are now selling their products directly to the public. where you can buy produce. and many other goodies. farm stands. The farm chickens are free range. LOCALHARVEST. This small farm helps prove that size and location do not matter when it comes to farming. It is a general guide to financial. INC. u-picks. 2012). Being an organic sustainable farm. About 80% of the farms in the United States are small farms. the use of worms in compost. “The best organic food is what's grown closest to you. Vermicomposting. and other direct marketing channels (Local Harvest.) This agritourism guide was compiled by The University of Georgia’s Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development and North Carolina State Cooperative Extension Service’s Business Side of Agritourism Program Series. is used to create worm castings . grass-fed meats.75 acres which houses vegetable fields. They do this via CSA programs. and has a 3. family farms.Lexington counties that could be useful to farmers looking to target their marketing to the demographics in their area. sells eggs from its chickens.D. Robbie McClam began City Roots in 2009 when he convinced the city of Columbia to change zoning for the farm site. Farmers' Markets. Food Coops. and other sources of sustainably grown food in your area. 2012) Local Harvest is a very popular direct selling website between small farmers and consumers. All soil used within the greenhouses are composted through 6 separate bins on-site. SC) City Roots is an urban. LOCAL CASE STUDIES CITY ROOTS: AN URBAN AGRITOURISM FARM (COLUMBIA. Inc.000 gallon tank in which 1. sustainable farm that can be found directly in the middle of the Rosewood neighborhood in downtown Columbia. City Roots is cautious about putting environmentally sound practices into place. two greenhouses and a small flock of chickens. The farm consists of 2. and a large percentage is family owned.

A working aquaponic system.and worm tea for use in potted plants and greenhouse plants. strawberries. City Roots participates in heavy agritourism through events. Due to being busy. However. They then receive a large bag or box of vegetables each week for an eight week period. City Roots also has a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program. Tables are set up in either the field or greenhouses depending on weather. beets. FIGURE 2 (CITY ROOTS 2012) Costs are kept low by the primary source of labor. these people are all brought together by their love of good food and the outdoors. arugula. arugula. planting and packaging of its products. The dinner menu is compiled from local organic produce into a wonderful dinner experience. In order to facilitate these unscheduled tours better. Volunteers come in shifts. Farm employees are currently in the process of putting together an introductory workshop for interns and volunteers in order to teach skills before they actually begin any farm work. . The public is also welcome to tour the farm during all business hours. volunteers and interns. The farm frequently hosts Harvest Dinners which are done in conjunction with 116 Espresso and Wine Bar. these unscheduled tours cannot always be guided. nasturtium and watercress) (City Roots 2012). radishes. An example of what a participant might receive during a spring growing season might include lettuce. laminated guides to the grounds with explanation about many of the farm’s features can be picked up from the office (City Roots 2012). mustard. City Roots takes on interns and volunteers in order to keep up with the demands of day to day harvesting. Participants pay a fee up front at the beginning of a growing season. carrots. snow pea. These interns and volunteers are often from the University of South Carolina nearby and often have majors or interests that have nothing to do with agriculture. The farm is also frequently rented out for events such as meetings and parties. is used to filter the water from the tilapia tank (City Roots 2012). for the farm’s day to day operations. This will allow helpers to maximize their time while allow farm managers extra time since they will not have to explain procedures multiple times. workshops and farm tours. kale. Farm tours for large groups can be scheduled. radish. however. filtering water through plants in order to clean it. This foray into culinary agritourism is very popular within the metropolitan downtown Columbia community. micro-greens (sunflower.

Koon Farm and Lumber currently does not have a website. However. The area is suburban with many surrounding neighborhoods and schools. The farm does have a Facebook site. There are a mixed breed of Angus and Charolais beef cattle on the farm as well as mixed breed meat goats. . There are two part-time employees that are both unpaid labor. this site is rarely updated. Lumber products are sold to on-site customers. There is currently no agritourism practiced on this farm. This farm attends no markets. however. The owner. All new customers are brought in word-of-mouth. David Koon is the only full-time paid employee.KOON FARM AND LUMBER: A SUBURBAN NON-AGRITOURISM FARM (IRMO. In terms of online marketing. Operating hours are Monday through Friday from 8:00-12:00 and 1:00-4:30. the owners are very interested in potentially beginning to do educational tours for school groups and open houses on some weekends. The farm has a lumber mill and two planers which can do custom planning and sawing. Cattle and goats are sold to small animal auctions. The farm specializes in wood products and beef cattle. South Carolina. SC) Koon Farm and Lumber is a Century Farm located in Irmo. C. 4 llamas and one donkey.

This farm has a website and Facebook site which are updated regularly. August o Participant Experience: curriculum based school activities. Lever believes that his best advertising is through word-of-mouth from field trips and that community support is key to his operation. Lever has done this full time.LEVER FARMS: A RURAL AGRITOURISM FARM (POMARIA. vegetables Hours of Operation o Monday through Saturday from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM Lever Farms is a 49 acre rural U-pick farm owned by Todd Lever. June. blueberries. school groups. Field trips to Lever Farms each year generally consist of 200-300 children. This farm has been in operation for ten years. blackberries. July. The family also makes strawberry jam. • Agritourism Profile o Special Event Space: parking o Completely handicapped accessible o Cash and checks accepted o Visitor Types: families. SC) • • Products: strawberries. This farm uses on-site sales and market sales to move its product. educational seminars o Direct Sales: farm stand . strawberry salsa. senior citizens. this is the first year that Mr. church groups o Months Open: April. however. This farm is limited by its workforce. Lever Farms participates in Newberry and Chapin markets. Mr. The farm currently practices agritourism and is Certified SC Grown. May. and strawberry cider.

Mr. Pork. he is a former Clemson Extension agent. The farm has approximately 500 visitors yearly. however. Turkeys. he uses crop protection and fertilizer as needed. . Chickens. The farm sells its goods through on-site sales and market sales. Location Only) o Tuesday (1:00 PM – 6:30 PM) o Thursday (1:00 PM – 6:30 PM) o Friday (1:00 PM – 6:30 PM) o Saturday (9:00 AM – 1:00 PM) o Meat – By Appointment Only John Oxner is the owner of Big Moon Farm. The family currently practices agritourism.BIG MOON FARM: A RURAL AGRITOURISM FARM (LEESVILLE. Oxner attempts to make his farm sustainable and organic. Lamb) o Eggs • Hours of Operation (Old Cherokee Rd. The farm’s location is in a rural area while their CSA program operates in a suburban area. They have a CSA program which they run by delivering to multiple locations for pick-up. SC) • Products o Vegetables (CSA and Stand) and Herbs o Meat (Beef. This 50 acre farm has been in operation for three years on family property.

school groups.org o Certified SC Grown Agritourism Profile o Amenities ( Level ground/clear pathways. wedding parties. guided tours. bathrooms) o Special Event Space (outdoor space. credit and debit cards accepted. parking) o Limited handicapped accessibility o Checks. corporate groups. cash. youth groups o Attractions: demonstrations. educational seminars. church groups. traditional farm operations Current Agritourism o Farm to Fork dinners o Classes o Day Camp . military discounts o Visitor Types: families. farm animals. greenhouse. tour groups.• • • Current Marketing Strategies o Facebook o Word-of-mouth o LocalHarvest. live entertainment o Participant Experience: cooking/food experiences. gardening experiences. hayrides. indoor space. seasonal farm activities. school tours.

This farm enjoys approximately 900-1000 visitors during the summer.5 acres Area: Suburban Products: vegetables and flowers Hours of Operation: from “sun up to sun down” David Derrick is the owner of Heritage Fields Farm. Heritage Fields boasts a greenhouse with a hydroponic system. Mr. This suburban farm does on-site sales through a farm stand on the “honor system”.HERITAGE FIELDS FARM: A SUBURBAN NON-AGRITOURISM FARM (IRMO. Derrick has no current interests in agritourism on his farm. However. they are not touring the farm. There is only one other paid employee besides himself. SC) • • • • Size: 10. . these visitors are only there to buy produce and flowers. He is able to sell over ninety percent of what he produces at his farm stand. Most of the farm’s irrigation is done through drip irrigation which conserves water by delivering only the needed amount of water directly to the plant.

overcome obstacles and keep agriculture profitable. farm facilities that already exist and a small amount of planning can produce income from things that a farm already produces or does. In tougher economic times. Using old products. find and buy South Carolina products. Our goal is for consumers to be able to easily identify. regulations all have an impact on the sustainability and growth of agribusiness. “a new. In order to tackle these issues. CERTIFIED ORGANIC Organic is defined by the United States Department of Agriculture as. Proper marketing is essential to keeping agritourism costs down. “a labeling term that indicates that the food or other agricultural product has been produced through approved methods that integrate cultural. retailers and the South Carolina Department of Agriculture (SCDA) to brand and promote South Carolina products. CERTIFIED SOUTH CAROLINA GROWN FIGURE 3 (SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 2012) The Certified South Carolina program is. This new product is agritourism. Many farms in South Carolina proudly display this signage. Agritourism should help a farmer diversify the offerings of their farm through creating a new product. and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources.” This program gives farmers and farm product sellers signs and placards to label their products as grown solely in South Carolina. distribution. keeping costs low is essential. Public interest and perceptions.MAKING PRODUCTS MORE MARKETABLE IN SOUTH CAROLINA Implementing agritourism on a small farm should not cost large amounts of money. biological. legislation. exciting cooperative effort among producers. wholesalers. Creativity is key. promote . the South Carolina Department of Agriculture in cooperation with public and private partners has implemented the Certified South Carolina program (South Carolina Department of Agriculture 2012). processors. image and awareness.

these terms can be used to effectively market agritourism. leading to periodic shortages of organic products (Dimitri and Oberholtzer 2009). URBAN AGRITOURISM VS. farmers should be careful when claiming that its practices or products are “green” or “sustainable”. irradiation. GREEN AND SUSTAINABLE MARKETING Using the terms “green” and “sustainable to help market agritourism can be difficult. therefore. who purchase products from farmers and often supply them to retailers. organic-industry growth is evident in an expanding number of retailers selling a wider variety of foods. Rural farms lack dense surrounding population to attract. and genetic engineering may not be used (United States Department of Agriculture 2012). what really matters is how a farmer uses what the area has to offer. these farms are ideally set up to market families and schools. however. sell more organic products to conventional retailers and club stores than ever before. Organic handlers. U. RURAL AGRITOURISM The Richland and Lexington county areas are an interesting mix of urban. suburban and rural regions. Suburban farms also deal with some space constraints.S. and conserve biodiversity.6 billion in 1997. the development of private-label product lines by many supermarkets. .S. The marketing boom has pushed retail sales of organic foods up to $21. however. Urban agritourism has the benefit of being centrally located within places where there are large densities of people. however. food retailers. Synthetic fertilizers.ecological balance.” According to the United States Department of Agriculture. urban farms tend to be smaller due to space constraints. there is a certain current appeal to the term.” While the term organic can be a bit loosely defined in the minds of the public. If a farm can claim this or other similar labels. larger farm space allows for more activities which in turn allow these farms to draw customers across distances.1 billion in 2008 from $3. The exact definition of these terms is very loose and nebulous. Only one segment has not kept pace—organic farms have struggled at times to produce sufficient supply to keep up with the rapid growth in demand. There are benefits and drawbacks to each type of area. Many food providers and producers now employ this term as means of suggesting to the public that their food offering is of higher quality and therefore should command a higher price. and the widespread introduction of new products. however. this should be used to help market the farm’s agritourism program. “Organic foods now occupy prominent shelf space in the produce and dairy aisles of most mainstream U. sewage sludge. A broader range of consumers has been buying more varieties of organic food. However.

" Economic Information Bulletin No. 2012). Iowa State University.pdf (accessed April 3. 2009." United States Deparment of Agriculture.Z. October 2007. Local Harvest. most members of the public will never know that they exist. farmers can handle agritourism even they are only a single person.usda. No visible road signs. Agritourism may feel like simply another burden. http://cityroots. 2012). http://www. 2012.localharvest. A lack of visible road signs keeps the public from knowing about the presence of a farm in their community. Clark. . 2012. "Agritourism Marketing. 2009. Local Harvest. Washington. However. http://www. Limited staff can keep farmers from thinking that they can have agritourism on their farm. Organic Foods: Recent Trends From Farms to Consumers.agcensus. 2007. Stenberg and Susan Lipman Austin. http://www.org/media/cms/AgritourismMarketing_1A2F86FF3811E. Dimitri. if a farm has no web presence. 157-179. by Carl W. Keeping up a web presence can be crucial to bringing in new customers and promoting agritourism on a farm in this technology driven world. Limited staff. with careful planning and thought. Facebook™ or web presence. WORKS CITED City Roots. Often farmers feel overwhelmed by the producing and harvesting that they are already doing on their farm. 2012.C.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/usv1. 2012).org/all-local-farmers-market-M18104 (accessed March 14. "Marketing U. 3." Agricultural Marketing Resource Center. C. (EIB-58) (United States Department of Agriculture).agmrc.S.org/ (accessed February 6. Carolyn. Often.: International City/County Management Association.org/ (accessed March 16. City Roots: Your In-Town Sustainable Farm.pdf (accessed March 22. D. LocalHarvest. "2007 Census of Agriculture. No website. "Economic Development. 2012). 2012). Donald T. http://www. Lack of a sign hurts public awareness as well as hindering visitors from being able to find the farm easily. Inc. No website. Iannone. and Lydia Oberholtzer.COMMON AGRITOURISM MARKETING PROBLEMS IN THE RICHLAND/LEXINGTON COUNTIES AREA 1. All-Local Farmers' Market. Facebook™ or web presence can hurt a farm when the public is searching for farms in their area online. Often farms can be off the main road with no visible sign such as a cattle pasture or barns to indicate a farm’s presence." In Managing local government services: a practical guide. 2.localharvest.

Somoza. "Agritourism. K.gov/AMSv1. .gov/agency/pr/standards-and-curriculum/documents/sciencestandardsnov182005_001.clemson. n. Certified South Carolina. 2012. 2012).certifiedscgrown. 2012). 2012). "South Carolina Science Academic Standards. —. United States Department of Agriculture. South Carolina Department of Agriculture.edu/ (accessed January 31. http://scstatefarmersmarket.usda.marketmaker. The Board of Trustees of http://sc. 2012. http://www. South Carolina Department of Education. 2011..ams." University of Georgia's Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development and North Carolina State Cooperative Extension Service's Business Side of Agritourism Program Series. the University of Illinois. 2012.com/ (accessed April 15. South Carolina State Farmers Market. http://www. Bullen. L.frbatlanta.org/documents/pubs/econsouth/11q1_agritourism.0/nop (accessed April 4. your way: A how-to guide for successful agritourism enterprises.com/ (accessed March 30. https://www." November 2005.sc.pdf (accessed March 3. and G. Agritourism Takes Root in Southeast. 2012).pdf (accessed 2012).uiuc. South Carolina Market Maker. Agricultural Marketing Service: National Organic Program. 2012.edu/public/ciecd/focus_areas/agribusiness/programs/agritourism/agritourismresou rces/agritourismyourway.d. http://ed. http://www. 2012).pdf (accessed 2012). Wolfe.

4. and operate an aquaponic system which is the combination of aquaculture. print publications and periodicals and have won the following awards: the 2010 International Downtown Association Pinnacle Award. and hydroponics. We do extensive crop rotations and cover cropping for soil fertility and pest management. 2. raise chickens not only for eggs but for the fertility they add to our soil. the production of commercial fish (tilapia). and employ five people. Although we have not taken the time and expense to be certified as “Organic” we follow the organic guidelines throughout our operation. we have had over 10. 400 volunteers. keep bees not only for honey but for pollination.5 years in existence and on only 3 acres.org for more information and visuals and/or friend us on facebook for regular updates. 100 CSA members.APPENDIX A: CITY ROOTS DOCUMENTS CITY ROOTS INFO-PROMO City Roots. We produce microgreens year round. We have been in numerous TV spots. grow culinary mushrooms. We grow approximately 75 varieties of fruits and vegetables. In our brief 2. the 2010 / 2011 Free Times Best of Columbia – Best New Green Business and the 2010 Farm City Award – Richland County. radio.500 students on tours. We operate our farm in a holistic fashion with each part playing an integral role in the overall system. We create worm casting and worm tea via vermicomposting to use as a fertilizer. all on 3 acres. at the All Local Market. 3. the growing of plants in a water medium. is located on a three acre urban site in the Rosewood Neighborhood. We have a large scale composting operation which we use to amend our soil and by doing so have diverted dozens of tons of material destined for the land fill into rich. . numerous restaurants here in Columbia. Please visit our web site at Cityroots.000 volunteer hours.000 event attendees. We sell our products on site. fertile soil. Columbia’s and in fact South Carolina's first and only urban sustainable farm. 12 interns.000 self guided tours. and our year round CSA. the 2010 Columbia Choice Award. at several health food retail grocery stores. that mimics a stream and pond ecosystem. as well as Charleston.

__________________________ (name). Confirmation will be complete when the signed contract has been returned along with the disclosed deposit amount. hereafter referred to as the Renter. . All Reservations are on a First. does contract with City Roots. Photographer. for the use of City Roots Venue on _____________________(date of event) for the purpose of ______________________________________ (type of event). Cake.Served Basis. First.Come. hereafter may be referred to as the Owner. etc…)  By this agreement.CITY ROOTS RENTAL CONTRACT AGREEMENT For Office Use Only Contact Ref: ______________________________________ Date of Event: ______________________________________ City Roots Rental Contract Agreement Today’s Date: ________________________________ Renter’s Name(s): _____________________________________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip:_________________________________________________________________________ Telephone: (preferred)_______________________ (other)_____________________________________ Email: ______________________________________ (Alt contacts)_____________________________ Number of expected Guests______________________ Additional Contacts for Event: Coordinator: (name) ____________________________ contact: ___________________ phone: _______________ Caterer: (name) _______________________________ contact: ____________________ phone: _______________ Dj or Band: (name) ____________________________ contact: ____________________ phone: _______________ Bartender/ Bar Service: _________________________ contact: ____________________ phone: _______________ Other Contacts: (name) _________________________ contact: ____________________ phone: _______________ (could include Florist.

The rental fee is due 21 days before the event: Due on or before (Date): ___________________________ How did you hear about us?? Website________________________ Friend/Word of Mouth (name?)________________ Farmers Market__________________ Online Search (site?) ________________________ Previous Event___________________ Previous Customer (name?)___________________ .

While no prior experience is required. the intern will be a part of all aspects of the farm. This application consists of three parts (but we promise it’s not as scary as it looks!):  Part One—General contact information  Part Two—General and internship-specific experience and skills questions  Part Three—References Part One First Name: Current Contact Information Address City. State. and agritourism. from field planning. to sales and marketing. Zip Phone Cell phone Email address Permanent Contact Information Last Name: .CITY ROOTS INTERNSHIP APPLICATION City Roots Internship Application City Roots internships are for those individuals who are serious about farming. or regular mail. Those who are accepted as interns will be welcomed into the inner workings of the farm. genuine interest in sustainable farming and a willingness to learn are required. In addition to daily chores and seasonal activities. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Please complete the following application and send it along with your cover letter and resume to us via email. While the start and end dates are flexible. we require that each internship last at least 10 weeks and that interns commit to at least 18 hours a week on the farm. There are two shifts for interns 9:00am-12:00pm and 1:30pm-4:30pm Monday – Friday. fax.

volunteering. Experience. Why are you interested in interning at City Roots? What do you wish to accomplish? 3. Zip Phone Cell phone Email address Availability: Requested Start Date: ______________________________________________________ Please list below the days and times you would be available to work. State. . What previous farming experiences you have (gardening. How would you describe yourself to someone who didn’t know you? What are your strengths? Your weaknesses? 2. Monday: ________________________________________ Tuesday: ________________________________________ Wednesday: ______________________________________ Thursday: _______________________________________ Friday: __________________________________________ Saturday: ________________________________________ Sunday: _________________________________________ Part Two About You… Yourself. ect).(if different from above) Address City. Include details of any physical labor you’ve done in these positions. If you are accepted as an intern. and Skills Using concise thoughts. please tell us: 1. farm work. you will be required to commit to a formalized work schedule.

Any false statements. Please avoid using more than one friend or family member. How many lettuces are you worth? What is the equivalent in Tomatoes? 8. ect). Signed: . or inaccuracies of this application will be cause for my disqualification.4. Optional extra credit questions: 7. What are your long-term agricultural goals? 6. One reference should be a previous employer or supervisor. If you have one pocket of sprouts and your friend has another pocket of sprouts. omissions. or take frequent breaks? Do you prefer lots of guidance or to observe and figure out tasks on your own? What has been your favorite kind of job? 5. How would you define your work style? Do you prefer to work alone or in groups? Start early and end early. Reference 1 Name Phone Email Address Relationship to you Reference 2 Name Phone Email Address Relationship to you I certify that all statements and information on this application are accurate and complete. Is there anything that might affect your work on the farm (physical disabilities. other commitments. will they arrive in Detroit at the same time? Part Three References Please list two references and their current information.

Name ______________________________________________________ (print) Signature_______________________________________________________ Date_____________________________ .

first and only urban sustainable farm.<150 banquette style seating in field . ___________________________________________ Deposits are on a percentage of the rental fee** Monday – Wednesday Evening Rental Only: 4 hr rental $400 ($50/ additional hr) Thursday – Friday Evening Rental Only: 4 hr rental $600 ($50/ additional hr) Saturday – Sunday 4 hours: $600 6 hours: $800 8 hours: $1000 All Day: $1500 Weekend: $2000 (rates are subject to change due to complexity of event) Payment is due three weeks (21 days) prior to the event date. Payment not received by event date will result in cancellation of event and release of facility. Discounts on rental are available for: • Non-Profit Organizations • Academic Groups Post-Event Fees may occur if contract regulations are not abided by and can include: • Damages to the fields. or greenhouse(s) beyond deposit amount • Event hours extend beyond agreed allotment of time incurred at a rate of $50 per hour Venue Features and Specifications: Venue Capacity: • Indoors -• Outdoor – . and in fact South Carolina's. barn.<3000 standing using the facility in its entirety .CITY ROOTS URBAN SUSTAINABLE FARM AND EVENT VENUE City Roots Urban Sustainable Farm and Event Venue City Roots can make any special event into an unforgettable occasion. With its charming indoor setting and spacious fields this unique venue creates and fun inimitable experience for all occasions.<60 banquette style seating in greenhouse . Located on a three acre urban site in the Rosewood Neighborhood 5 minutes from Downtown.<50 banquette style seating . is Columbia’s.

• 4 six-foot long tables • 7 eight-foot long tables • 1 ten-foot long high buffet table on rolling casters in barn hall • 20+ metal folding chairs • 8-10 plastic lawn chairs Additional Rental Equipment • • 50 blonde wood folding chairs owned by City Roots . Kitchen Availability The indoor facility includes a prep kitchen only (three well stainless steel sink). Rental Coordinators will decide on the refund amount after reviewing post event status.$2. just warming. • Failure to abide by Contract Rules will result in forfeiting the deposit and may include additional fines and fees. Refer to our “Preferred List” for party rental equipment. • No more than (6) 8ft. • Set up and cleanup must be included in total rental hours. City Roots does not have a fully functioning kitchen. must be provided by renter. . bathroom and porches broom-clean. linens. etc. • Refund will be reimbursed within thirty (30) days of the event. with a cold storage unit (limited storing space). Greenhouse should be left as it was found. chairs.75 each Any additional tables. The deposit is refundable as long as the renter complies with the stated rules of the Contract. • All events must end at midnight • All bands and other music must stop at 10:00pm or 30 minutes prior the end of the event • All bars must close 30 min prior to the end of the event Additional Charges incurred by the renter will be billed after event. or placed in compost bin. • Set up for weekday evening events will not be allowed to set up before 4:00pm • Set up and breakdown does not include event clean up. with event debris removed. There is no guarantee on the exact number or condition of the equipment available.Included Rental Equipment: A number of folding tables and chairs are available at no extra charge. Set up and breakdown of this equipment is also included in the rental. NO Cooking is allowed inside the facility. All reservations are confirmed with a completed and signed City Roots Rental Contract and deposit. • Renters requiring all day set up will be charged for a full day event. trash can or recycle bin. All cooking must be done outside. Deposit: Reservations are on a first come first serve basis. Charges begin when the first person arrives and end when clean-up is complete and everyone has departed. tents. long tables in the Greenhouse. Renter is responsible for leaving the barn hall. Event Hours/ Set Up and Clean Up: Estimated event times set in the Contract may be changed by renter before final rental payment is due. • The Deposit is not included in the rent of the facility.

must be delivered and removed on the day of the event. Decoration Rules: . Anything additional must be provided by caterers and others or by the Renter. • A No Show will forfeit the deposit. • Use of table and chairs and the set-up and breakdown of City Roots equipment is included in rental price. The Renter or the contact person must be present for the entire rental to ensure rules are followed. including: • Renter guest should not be left unattended • Children are welcome. including decorations and equipment. • Payment not received by the due date. the deposit will be refunded. Cancellation Policy: Cancellations must be in writing (email) and submitted to the Rental Coordinator. Children are not allowed to run into the fields. Contact Person: In the circumstance the Renter is unable to be present for the event. Children may not feed chickens or tilapia unless supervised by an employee of City Roots.• Use of prohibited or illegal items on the premise will result in a forfeit of the deposit. • The Owner will provide a Rental Coordinator and/or Rental Assistant who will be on-site throughout the event. Owner has the right to cancel • If Renter cancels the event before the rental fee is paid. for set up plans and cleaning responsibilities. The rental fee will not be refunded. a contact person must be assigned by the Renter to the Rental Coordinator. • Enforcement of rules by caterer and others under contract to Renter is the responsibility of the Renter. bands. • Deciding what needs to be cleaned at the end of the event. • All items for event. Should the event be cancelled due to weather and or other Act of God. both parties are relieved of responsibility on the assigned date and arrangements will be made to reschedule the event. but must be supervised by an adult at all times. • If Renter cancels the event after the rental fee is paid. or other gated off area(s) including Greenhouse(s). Rental Coordinator and Rental Assistant: The Rental Coordinator and/or Rental Assistant will be available for the duration of the event. etc. but will be there to check behind you before your departure. unless other arrangements are made with the Rental Coordinator. One or both is responsible for the security of the facility and to ensure rules are followed. The Coordinator or Assistant is not responsible for: • The set up or break down equipment for Renter’s event nor the loading or unloading of Renter supplies. the deposit will not be refunded. • Renter must provide all Audio-Visual equipment and must contact the Rental Coordinator with power requirements. Renter Responsibilities: It is the responsibility of the Renter to make arrangements with caterers.

Renter and caterers must abide by all alcoholic beverage control laws. If alcoholic beverages are to be served and any of the following conditions apply. • Use of fire barrel and/or Tiki Torches in woodchips must be pre-approved by Rental coordinator. • Owner cannot guarantee the conditions of the fields during any season. Bartenders must display a copy of their SC Liquor Permit. unless previously discussed with the Rental Coordinator. and ice. confetti No Fireworks All decorations and equipment left after an event. regulations and conditions of this contract. • Absolutely nothing is to be discarded into the fields. driveway or on the grounds. the Renter or caterer must have an appropriate license or permit from the SC Department of Revenue. Any use of treatment for pests during your rental will result in an immediate loss of your deposit. • The indoor facility at City Roots is a smoke-free facility. ribbon or tape – other methods of attachment possible with rental coordinators consent. will become property of City Roots. vendor. Event Rules: • City Rules must be contacted prior to the event with any specific caterer. Not in the potted planters. Smoking is confined to outside areas beyond the covered porches. must be collected and removed to the appropriate trash containers. • All trash and litter from inside and out. and/or band set up requirements. driveway or woodchips. Ice from coolers may be dumped in interior/exterior sinks. Absolutely no pesticides are to be used for an event. Items displayed on walls must not be moved unless discusses with the Rental Coordinator Decorations and equipment can not impede the flow of traffic including access to fire exits No Glitter. Any existing decorations removed that belong to City Roots and are not replaced will be deducted from your Deposit. This includes food scraps. excessive cleanup charges will result. Cost to repair damages to any surface from the use of decorations will be the responsibility of the Renter.• • • • • • • Decorations can be attached via sting. Alcoholic Beverage Licensing: • If tickets are sold . • City Roots is an organic farm and uses no sprays for bugs. City Roots discourages carrying any alcoholic drinks away from the premise and has no tolerance for drinking under the legal age. • Produce contained in the cold storage and front cooler(s) are off limit to Renter and contacts. Bars are to be closed 30 minutes prior to the scheduled end of the event. • Office area is off limits to Renter and contacts unless otherwise authorized by Rental Coordinator • User must provide linens for tables used. drinks. • Wiring running on floors must be secured and must not be a tripping hazard. including cigarette butts in receptacles and on the ground. Discarded cigarettes must be placed in proper receptacles provided.

• Renter is responsible for cleaning tables. • The Owner reserves the right to deny usage to any persons or groups for any other program. including lack of sweeping. but not limited to one or more of the following  Garbage left behind in rental areas. then deductions will be taken from your Deposit. bands. • All decorations must be removed the day of the event. glitter. with prior consent of the Rental Coordinator. Items left will become property of City Roots • Renter is responsible for leaving the grounds of the venue in the conditions they were prior to the event. • It is the Renter responsibility to arrange all clean-up arrangements with musicians. bartenders. recycling and compost from inside and outside rental areas are to be collected and disposed of in appropriate containers. must be organized and set aside in agreed upon area. . Deposit Deductions: If damages occur or cleaning is not executed in the way specified in this contract. The Renter or Contact Person must see this is completed at end of event. recycling and compost must be sorted and placed in appropriate receptacles. Parking: Parking is available in the driveway. and floors of the indoor facility. chairs.-$50-$500. • Caterers must leave all food preparation and serving areas clean. sinks and service areas.  Garbage was not disposed in the appropriate containers.  Minor Fees $25 . Unscheduled Overtime will be charged in accordance. sinks. Owner is not responsible for any items left at the facility. • To ensure the event will end in an organized efficient manner.• • At the door. if a cash bar is provided If donations are accepted by or on behalf of a sponsor or other entity. All trash. and caterers. • All trash. special arrangements must be made with the Rental Coordinator. other party litter on grounds  Prep Cooking Area .  Excessive amounts of cigarette butts.Includes. and bars must shut down 30 minutes prior the end of the event. but not limited to the following  Floors not swept  Sink left unclean  Food left on countertops and in cold storage unit  Tables and Prep Areas left dirty  Grounds . and along the road in the front of the venue. • All food items are to be removed from the cold storage unit. Renter Departure/ Cleaner Responsibilities: All events must end at 12:00 Midnight. Includes.$25. • Decorations or equipment that is left behind after an event. Includes but not limited to  Damage to field beyond gated enclosure. All events must be deemed appropriate to the facility and cannot interfere with normal business operations. Miscellaneous: • If you are open to the public. which is inconsistent with its purpose or reputation.

_________________________________________________ User signature ______________ Date . Garbage or Ice dumped into the field  No Overall Cleaning $100-$500 based on severity  Cracked glass in doors/windows or interior damage: minimum $50 over cost of repairs and damage  Broken equipment – Cost of repair I HAVE READ AND AGREE TO FOLLOW ALL RENTAL GUIDELINES. I UNDERSTAND THAT WHERE I DO NOT FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES. THERE IS A POSSIBILITY MY DEPOSIT WILL BE REDUCED OR NOT REFUNDED AT ALL.

The goal of this manual is more than just to teach you about what time to arrive and making sure that you put your tools away. The negative scenario in mineral dollar transactions is that future generations will no longer be able to use those resources.000. We are different from most businesses in two important ways. everyone is a winner when we succeed. and solar dollars. water. growing food can be a challenge. A vision with a task is the hope of the world. if I buy a car for $10. I make $2. and to work with excellent people. . For the past half century or so. and then turn around and sell it to you for $12. First of all. In a purely financial transaction. we build REAL wealth. A task without a vision is drudgery. and possibly even inspire you to start growing some food for yourself and your family and community. Like most work worth doing. Here's how: An illuminating way of thinking about the economy has been devised by a school of thought called Holistic Management. we offer connection and healing. And second. Growing food is a basic skill almost forgotten in modern society. We believe that our business model and methods are ultimately more suited to the future than conventional agriculture. out of mind. and to benefit ourselves.000 strictly from flipping the car.Anonymous Welcome! Volunteering at City Root offers an opportunity to get involved in the community. to produce clean water and air. yet I produced nothing new and added nothing of value to the economy. Our ultimate goal is to grow healthy food while building topsoil. economic transactions fall into three basic categories: financial dollars. According to Holistic Management. steel.CITY ROOTS TRAINING MANUAL (WORK IN PROGRESS AS OF 4/15/12) City Roots Training Manual “A vision without a task is but a dream. a much greater appreciation of farming. sun. at the very least. there is generally a winner and a loser. It grounds us in reality in an increasingly virtual world. our immediate community. farming has been out of sight. Take a minute to think about why you would like to work with us. however once the resource is consumed. raw materials are extracted from the environment and turned into products such as aluminum. Our desire is that your working with us will give you. One of these films or books may be what inspired you to come and work with us. There is value added to the economy in that resources are now available for use. Where they offer destruction and alienation. and seeds can be a powerful way for people to connect with a deeper sense of being. A groundswell of media exposing the horrors of industrial agriculture has transformed how we think about food. or gasoline. or even worse. Perhaps write it down so that you can compare it to your thoughts after working with us a while. We want to emphasize why we believe that growing healthy food for our community is one of the most important jobs that there is. and the world." . mineral dollars. soil. We believe that we offer solutions to many pressing problems in today's world. I believe that the way we do things at City Roots could be the answer to many of the challenges that the world is facing. Knowledge of producing food with basic tools. it is no longer useful or degrades over time. to get your hands dirty while learning about food. Culture as we know it can't exist without agriculture. those mineral resources will become pollutants that threaten the well-being of future generations. In the case of mineral dollars.000. To give a very simplified example.

Americans' health can attest to this fact. is a kind of blindness. the second stonecutter misses the fundamental interconnectedness of human kind. between a legacy of stewardship and care. A lifetime of work may make only a small contribution to a structure that unites past and future. he measures himself against the “whole county” as the story has it—even the whole world. The second stonecutter is an unshakable individualist. “I am making a living. Consumed with individual ambition. Testimony in part. to the antiquity of the tale. This project aspires to the heavens. connects humans across generations and joins their efforts to purposes they see as far larger than themselves. can produce wealth from the ability of plants to capture incoming solar energy and grow into products for use in the economy. He wants to be the best. and one of destruction and waste. The substance of his work. It means the difference between a bountiful future and an impoverished one. His world is competitive and meritocratic. transcending the earthbound—and indeed transcending the timebound as well. and in the usefulness of reducing complex reality to a simple equation. -Paraphrased from the work of Peter Drucker In order for us to build our cathedral. Not only do we just "do no harm. Competition for consumers' food dollars is stiff. fiber." we have an opportunity to restore the environment by how well we do our jobs as farmers. The focus on the task. He believes in the power of the human mind. It has been noted before that Americans directly pay the least for food and the most for healthcare among the developed nations. or medicine. of societies and of economies. for cathedrals are built not in months or even years. and customers often make purchasing decisions based purely on price. the virtuosity. I think. we need to reach out beyond those who buy our products merely because they believe in what we are doing. to name a few. The second stonecutter has higher aspirations. The first replied.” The second kept on hammering while he said. timber. “I am doing the best job of stonecutting in the entire county.Solar dollars. so to speak. fuel. and its capacity for reason.” The third looked up with a visionary gleam in his eye and said.” The first stonecutter is simply doing a day’s work for a day’s pay. a spiritual as well as a physical construction. that the parable has him building a cathedral—not a castle or a railway station or a skyscraper. we have to remain viable in the present. Much of the American food system is subsidized. on the other hand. Yet somehow the vision of the second stonecutter is also incomplete. the purpose of his work. in the drive for quality and results. This stonecutter fails to see that there would be no stones to cut if there were not a community building a cathedral. the context of his work do not matter. The inspiring part of the farmer in this equation is that he or she uses her skills to build real wealth that adds to the economy while benefitting society and assuring the opportunities of future generations. The very menial work of stonecutting becomes part of a far larger undertaking. If we want . The Parable of the Stonecutters A man came across three stonecutters and asked them what they were doing. But revealing in other ways as well. It is cosmopolitan. To fulfill our objectives and grow to our full potential. for the material reward he receives in exchange for his labor. be it food. but over centuries. the competition. Interesting. The third stonecutter embraces a broader vision. “I am building a cathedral. of course.

fresher. Positive references for successfully completed program. and yes. keep track of your stuff. Inform us of changes to your schedule. we have reason to believe that we will come out on top. Transportation costs. As demographics change. Arrive on time. more nutritious.them to choose our offerings over others. "Work is love made visible. more interesting. Access to surplus vegetables. fertilizers.. hazards. we even strive to make our food more affordable. INCLUDE FOOD SAFTEY DOCUMENTS OTHERS? . the profession of farming the temptation of getting right to work. more diverse. precautions: clothing. higher quality. weather. and energy in general will see a ratchet effect in prices over time. power equipment Organization: the job is not done until the tools are put away. We think that these potential negatives will work in our favor to help us become more competitive with the commercial food system. Better taste. fuel. training: Our expectations of you: Attendance: provide us with a planned schedule for your attendance." Kalhil Gibran So now that you have a philosophical understanding of our business.think before you act. What you can expect from us: clear descriptions of the work to be done and how it fits into the larger goals courteous but direct guidance. if current trends hold. water. pesticides. The surprising complexity of farm work. the choice must be clear: We strive to make what we offer superior IN EVERY WAY to what is available commercially. we can introduce you to the "nuts and bolts" side of how things work at City Roots. While this point of view may sound downright naive right now. food subsidies will eventually be curtailed or eliminated. sharp tools.

We are open to tailoring these tours to any special interests your group may have. or fax using the information above. especially children! We think it’s important that they learn principles of good farming and land use while they are young. or through PayPal on our website. *All Tours Must Be Scheduled At Least Two Weeks In Advance* School / Organization Name: Address: City: State: Zip: Name of Group Leader: Phone Number: Email: Number of Participants: Approximate Age or Grade Level: Date/Time of Tour: Specific Notes: Warning! Under South Carolina Law. beekeeping. aquaponics. (Chapter 53. and composting. greenhouse microgreens. check. credit. an agritourism professional is not liable for an injury to or death of a participant in an agritourism activity resulting from an inherent risk associated with the agritourism activity. as well as including hands-on activity time (with a possible extra set-up fee). Title 46. The cost is $5/person (or a minimum of $50). vermicomposting. SC 29205 Phone: 803-254-2302 Fax: eric@cityroots. email attachment. 1976 . The tour will consist of a one hour tour conducted personally by one of the farm staff. Code of Laws of South Carolina.CITY ROOTS SCHOOL TOUR APPLICATION City Roots School Tour Application City Roots 1005 Airport Blvd Columbia. The tour highlights each area of what we do. mushroom production. and we love sharing it with people. Please fill out the information below and return this form via mail. You may pay with cash. including: field crops.org We at City Roots are excited about what we do. animal and fish husbandry.

CITY ROOTS PAMPHLET .

CITY ROOTS CSA 2011-2012 .

leaves. leaves.1 Recognize what organisms need to stay alive (including air. roots. roots. flowers. GRADE 1 : PLANTS Standard 1-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the special characteristics and needs of plants that allow them to survive in their own distinct environments. 1-2.3 Classify plants according to their characteristics (including what specific type of environment they live in. water. K-2. fruits. 1-2. space.4 Compare individual examples of a particular type of plant or animal to determine that there are differences among individuals.4 Summarize the life cycle of plants (including germination. K-2. flowers.6 Identify characteristics of plants (including types of stems. K-2. K-2. and seeds). and seeds) that help them survive in their own distinct environments.3 Match parents with their offspring to show that plants and animals closely resemble their parents. nutrients.5 Recognize that all organisms go through stages of growth and change called life cycles. and what particular kinds of physical traits they have).2 Illustrate the major structures of plants (including stems. (Life Science) Indicators 1-2.APPENDIX B: SOUTH CAROLINA STATE SCIENCE STANDARDS (SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 2005) KINDERGARTEN: CHARACTERISTICS OF ORGANISMS Standard K-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of organisms. and light) for energy and growth. food. (Life Science) Indicators K-2. (Life Science) Indicators . 1-2.2 Identify examples of organisms and nonliving things. and the production of flowers and seeds). growth. whether they have edible parts. 1-2.1 Recall the basic needs of plants (including air. water. 1-2. and shelter). GRADE 2: ANIMALS Standard 2-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the needs and characteristics of animals as they interact in their own distinct environments.5 Explain how distinct environments throughout the world support the life of different types of plants.

2-2.1 Illustrate the life cycles of seed plants and various animals and summarize how they grow and are adapted to conditions within their habitats. reptiles. food. and adaptations of organisms that allow them to function and survive within their habitats. reptiles. deserts. movement.5 Summarize the organization of simple food chains (including the roles of producers. birds.2 Explain how physical and behavioral adaptations allow organisms to survive (including hibernation.4 Distinguish between the characteristics of an organism that are inherited and those that are acquired over time.3 Recall the characteristics of an organism’s habitat that allow the organism to survive there. rivers and streams. color. amphibians. 3-2. 2-2. water. 4-2. 4-2. and mammals] or invertebrates) according to their physical characteristics. (Life Science) Indicators 3-2. 2-2. consumers.1 Classify organisms into major groups (including plants or animals.4 Explain how changes in the habitats of plants and animals affect their survival. locomotion. 2-2. 4-2. and insects) according to their physical characteristics. GRADE 4: ORGANISMS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTS Standard 4-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics and patterns of behavior that allow organisms to survive in their own distinct environments. fish. . amphibians. flowering or nonflowering plants. food obtainment. and vertebrates [fish. 3-2. tropical rain forests. and camouflage for animals and seed dispersal. 3-2. characteristics. and decomposers). birds. GRADE 3: HABITATS AND ADAPTATIONS Standard 3-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the structures. growth. and response to light for plants). defense. and the polar regions) influence the variety of organisms in each.2 Classify animals (including mammals.4 Summarize the interdependence between animals and plants as sources of food and shelter.3 Explain how distinct environments throughout the world support the life of different types of animals. (Life Science) Indicators 4-2. 3-2.2 Explain how the characteristics of distinct environments (including swamps.1 Recall the basic needs of animals (including air.5 Illustrate the various life cycles of animals (including birth and the stages of development). and protection.3 Explain how humans and other animals use their senses and sensory organs to detect signals from the environment and how their behaviors are influenced by these signals.2-2. and shelter) for energy.

the response to stimuli.1 Summarize the characteristics that all organisms share (including the obtainment and use of resources for energy. and omnivores).4 Identify the roles of organisms as they interact and depend on one another through food chains and food webs in an ecosystem.2 Summarize the composition of an ecosystem. AND RESPONSES OF PLANTS Standard 6-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of structures. family. survival. and process of physical growth and development). kingdom. lakes and ponds. and seed production). 6-2. .5 Explain how limiting factors (including food. genus. (Life Science) Indicators 5-2. 5-2.3 Compare the characteristics of different ecosystems (including estuaries/salt marshes. decomposers (microorganisms.6 Explain how organisms cause changes in their environment. 6-2. 5-2. 6-2. 5-2. and monocot or dicot).5 Summarize each process in the life cycle of flowering plants (including germination.4-2. GRADE 6: STRUCTURES. flowering or cone-bearing.4 Summarize the basic functions of the structures of a flowering plant for defense. and reproduction. cytoplasm. 4-2. considering both biotic factors (including populations to the level of microorganisms and communities) and abiotic factors. PROCESSES. fertilization. the availability of food and other resources.2 Recognize the hierarchical structure of the classification (taxonomy) of organisms (including the seven major levels or categories of living things—namely. predators and prey. carnivores. and shelter) affect populations in ecosystems. 5-2. phylum. plant development. and vacuole). GRADE 5: ECOSYSTEMS (TERRESTRIAL AND AQUATIC) Standard 5-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of relationships among biotic and abiotic factors within terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. nucleus. and grasslands). class. water.1 Recall the cell as the smallest unit of life and identify its major structures (including cell membrane. oceans. considering producers and consumers (herbivores. (Life Science) Indicators 6-2. and species). forests. and responses of plants that allow them to survive and reproduce. seed or spore-producing. the ability to reproduce. and the physical characteristics of the environment). termites.3 Compare the characteristic structures of various groups of plants (including vascular or nonvascular. order. processes. space. worms.5 Explain how an organism’s patterns of behavior are related to its environment (including the kinds and the number of other organisms present. 6-2. and parasites and hosts. and fungi).

(Earth Science.6-2.9 Explain how disease-causing fungi can affect plants. . and biomes). and limiting factors (including climate and the availability of food and water. 6-2.7 Summarize the processes required for plant survival (including photosynthesis. and energy pyramids 7-4. 7-4. and thigmotropism). hydrotropism.6 Classify resources as renewable or nonrenewable and explain the implications of their depletion and the importance of conservation. 7-4.8 Explain how plants respond to external stimuli (including dormancy and the forms of tropism known as phototropism. gravitropism. and floods). and transpiration). 7-4. are important to ecosystems and to human activities. changes in populations. called watersheds. wildfires. 6-2. 7-4. habitats. and shelter).5 Summarize how the location and movement of water on Earth’s surface through groundwater zones and surface-water drainage basins.4 Explain the effects of soil quality on the characteristics of an ecosystem. Life Science) Indicators 7-4.2 Illustrate energy flow in food chains.3 Explain the interaction among changes in the environment due to natural hazards (including landslides. GRADE 7: ECOLOGY: THE BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC ENVIRONMENT Standard 7-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of how organisms interact with and respond to the biotic and abiotic components of their environment.6 Differentiate between the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction of flowering plants. respiration. food webs.1 Summarize the characteristics of the levels of organization within ecosystems (including populations. niches. 6-2. communities. space.

) Kiddy House Link: http://kiddyhouse.com/federation/program-links/ag-in-the-classroom/classroom-lesson-plans/ 2.kyfb.campsilos.com/Farm/ .) Camp Silos Link: http://www.) Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project Link: http://growing-minds.) Kentucky Farm Bureau: Classroom Lesson Plans Link: https://www.org/gradelevel.php 3.org/mod4/teachers/index.APPENDIX C: RESOURCES FOR FARM LESSON PLANS 1.shtml 4.