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With nearly 9 of 10 Filipinos

suffering dental disease, DOH


steps up oral health drive in
schools
By: Jet Villa, InterAksyon.com
January 10, 2014 5:19 PM

MANILA Nearly nine of 10 Filipinos have dental caries, and worried health authorities are trying to
bring that down by focusing on the younger generation.
The Department of Healths National Capital Region office Friday unveiled plans to step up its oral
health campaign in Metro Manila, with the director for DOH-NCR, Dr. Eduardo Janairo, noting the
Philippines is far behind other countries in the Western Pacific Region concerning oral health.
The two most common oral health problems in the country are dental caries and periodontal
diseases. These two dental concerns can be avoided by improving oral health conditions among
pre-school children and inculcating a positive oral health behavior to children who will be entering
school age, added Janairo.
The DOH-NCR is leading the promotion of oral hygiene through the prevention of dental caries
among school-aged children, and providing dental sealants to children aged 12 and below who have
healthy but erupted permanent molars.
Government data show 87.4 percent of Filipinos have dental caries, also known as tooth decay and
cavity. The more advanced periodontal disease is a condition where the tissue gums, deeper
supporting tissue, and bone around a tooth or teeth become infected and swollen. The 2011
National Monitoring and Evaluation Dental Survey (NMEDS) says 48.3 percent of Filipinos have
periodontal disease.
Janairo said prevention is a very important strategy in the promotion of oral health especially among
school aged children, because, when children are initiated into healthy behaviour early enough, the
practice is more likely to become sustainable and will hopefully continue as a life-long habit that will
be passed on to their children.
Meanwhile, DOH-NCR is collecting data and information on dental health concerns in Metro Manila
in a bid to identify health facilities in the region where people with oral health concerns can be
helped.
There are plans as well to ask help from the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation to give special
attention to oral health and include it in their case rate identification, separate from all other
diseases, according to Janairo.
The DOH-NCR oral health campaign was piloted at Santiago Syjuco Elementary School, where 181
school children received given dental sealant--applying a plastic material to a tooth in order to
prevent dental caries or other forms of tooth decay.
Those who received the treatment will be monitored and documented every six months until they
reach 12 years old.
Janairo said early loss of milk teeth can lead to incorrect or imperfect alignment of the permanent
teeth. Untreated dental disease may bring inconvenient pain, which may affect a childs performance
in school, social interactions and health.

http://interaksyon.com/article/78433/with-nearly-9-of-10-filipinos-suffering-dentaldisease-doh-steps-up-oral-health-drive-in-schools

"SONA: State of the Ngipin Address"


With 9 in 10 suffering from tooth problems, bigger oral health care budget needed
With 9 in 10 Filipinos suffering tooth decay and only 1 in 10 of them can afford to see a
dentist once a year, budget for oral health care should be restored as a line item in the
national budget, Senator Ralph Recto said.
Despite national health allocations reaching almost P90 billion this year, the specified
budget for oral health "is no bigger than a small caries in a tooth," he said.
Recto also called for the hiring of more public dentists, especially in public schools, which
only have 300 dentists serving a combined student-teacher population of 21.5 million.
There's only 1 dentist for every 70,000 DepEd students and teachers, Recto lamented.
"Nationally, at 1,718, there are 18 public dentists per 1 million Filipinos. In contrast, there
are 3,556 elected public officials per million," the Senate President Pro-Tempore said.
"If every 1,000 days we hire thorough costly elections 12 senators, 292 congressmen, 81
governors, 143 city mayors, 1,491 town, 11,932 town councilors so why can't we hire more
dentists?" Recto said.
Compounding the lack of manpower is the scant resources dedicated to oral health care, the
senator pointed out.
"The National Center for Disease Prevention Control was allocated P23.6 million to push the
Oral Fit Child program in 2013. Last year, it was given P35 million to buy for dental sealants
and filling materials for pre-school kids," he said.
He estimated that at best DepEd spent a measly P9 million for dental supplies out of its
P37.5 million expenses for supplies in 2013.
This was equivalent to an annual budget of less than two pesos per student a year, Recto
said.
"P9 million is half the amount the DBM paid its janitors in 2013. Even the DND spent twice
more for the food and drugs of the dogs in its K-9 units in the same year," Recto said.
Recto said government can spend for less important things it can afford a higher dental
budget.
"Kung meron tayong 20 milyong istudyante sa DepEd at ang kalahati ay bibigyan mo ng tigkinse pesos na sepliyo, ang P150 mikyon ay katumbas lamang ng communication expenses
ng Department of Agriculture sa isang taon," Recto said.
"Or kung bibili ka ng P100 million worth of toothpaste, katumbas lang yan ng ginasta ng DAR
sa gasolina noong 2013," he said.
Cutting the national government's travel budget this year by just 5 percent could free P700
million for the purchase of dental equipment, Recto said.
He said oral health care will not get the attention it rightfully deserves for as long as oral
health spending will remain as a hidden account in the national budget.
"It is time to surface dental heath in the pages of the general appropriations bill," Recto said,
even as he called for the inclusion of more dental procedures as a covered item in the
national health insurance system.

"If that will not done millions will continue to suffer from dental problems and billions of
pesos will be lost to absences due to decayed tooth," he said.
Citing a government survey, Recto said 1 in 7 absent from work or school at least once a
month and 1 in 10 fail to go to school or work at least twice a year due to aching tooth or
gums.
Two disturbing findings of the survey are that 9 in 10 urban children have decayed tooth,
and women have more missing teeth than men.
"7 in 10 women have missing teeth, while it is 5 in 10 for men. Even the number of missing
teeth, women trump men: An average 8 missing teeth for females, while 4 for males."
He said officials should address the bleak SONA or State of the Ngipin Address delivered by
heads of dentists associations and public dentists during conferences.
"Without dentists, politicians will have no political careers. A candidate's first stop after he
had thrown his hat into the ring is the dental clinic - for that toothpaste commercial smile.
And if he wins, his first stop after his inaugural is again the dentist's chair because if he has
to lie through his teeth, then it better be through pearly whites," Recto said.

http://www.senate.gov.ph/press_release/2015/0302_recto1.asp

9 in 10 Filipinos Suffer from Tooth Decay

Posted by: Medical Observer March 10, 2015 0 633 Views


MANILA, PHILIPPINES There is quite decidedly more to a persons dental
integrity than his or her nutrition and health. Character, self-esteem, personality
are enhanced or diminished by one s state of dental condition.
With 9 in 10 Filipinos suffering tooth decay and only one in 10 of them willing and able to see
a dentist once a year, budget for oral health care should be restored as a line item in the
national budget, Senate President Pro Tempore Ralph Recto said.
Citing a government survey, Recto said one in seven absent from work or school at least
once a month and one in 10 fail to go to school or work at least twice a year due to aching
tooth or gums.

Two disturbing findings of the survey are that


nine in 10 urban children have decayed tooth, and women have more missing teeth than
men.

Seven in 10 women have missing teeth, while it is five in 10 for men. Even the number of
missing teeth, women trump men: An average eight missing teeth for females, while four for
males.
Despite national health allocations reaching almost P90 billion this year, Recto noted that
the specified budget for oral health is no bigger than a small caries in a tooth.
He also called for the hiring of more public dentists, especially in public schools, which only
have 300 dentists serving a combined student-teacher population of 21.5 million.
Theres only one dentist for every 70,000 DepEd students and teachers, the lawmaker
lamented.
Nationally, at 1,718, there are 18 public dentists per 1 million Filipinos. In contrast, there
are 3,556 elected public officials per million, he said.
If every 1,000 days we hire thorough costly elections 12 senators, 292 congressmen, 81
governors, 143 city mayors, 1,491 town, 11,932 town councilors so why cant we hire more
dentists? the former Socio-economic Planning chief said.
Compounding the lack of manpower is the scant resources dedicated to oral health care, he
pointed out.
The National Center for Disease Prevention Control was allocated P23.6 million to push the
Oral Fit Child program in 2013. Last year, it was given P35 million to buy for dental sealants
and filling materials for pre-school kids, he noted.
Recto estimated that at best DepEd spent a measly P9 million for dental supplies out of its
P37.5 million expenses for supplies in 2013.
This was equivalent to an annual budget of less than two pesos per student a year, he said.
Nine million pesos is half the amount the DBM (Department of Budget and Management)
paid its janitors in 2013. Even the DND (Department of National Defense) spent twice more
for the food and drugs of the dogs in its K-9 units in the same year, the lawmaker said.

He said government can spend for less


important things it can afford a higher dental budget.

The former chief of the National Economic and Development Authority pointed out that
cutting the national governments travel budget this year by just five percent could free
P700 million for the purchase of dental equipment.
He said oral health care would not get the attention it rightfully deserves for as long as oral
health spending remains a hidden account in the national budget.
It is time to surface dental heath in the pages of the general appropriations bill, Recto
said, even as he called for the inclusion of more dental procedures as a covered item in the
national health insurance system.
If that will not done millions will continue to suffer from dental problems and billions of
pesos will be lost to absences due to decayed tooth, he said.
He said officials should address the bleak SONA or State of the Ngipin Address delivered by
heads of dentists associations and public dentists during conferences.
Without dentists, politicians will have no political careers. A candidates first stop after he
had thrown his hat into the ring is the dental clinic for that toothpaste commercial smile.
And if he wins, his first stop after his inaugural is again the dentists chair because if he has
to lie through his teeth, then it better be through pearly whites, Recto said.

DFF, Medical Observer

http://medicalobserverph.com/news-9-in-10-filipinos-suffer-from-tooth-decay/
Press Release
June 20, 2015

90 M Filipinos have tooth decay but no line-item


fund for oral care in P2.6 T budget
"Kung halos bawat Pilipino may sakit sa ngipin, bakit walang pondo para sa ngipin sa
national budget?"
With 9 in 10 Filipinos suffering from tooth decay but only 1 in 10 of them can afford to see a
dentist once a year, budget for oral health care should be restored as a line-item in the
national budget, Sen. Ralph Recto said.
"The national budget will remain a toothless instrument in promoting dental health if it does
not specifically set aside funds for this purpose," Recto said.
Recto urged the national government to reintroduce oral health care accounts in the
proposed 2016 national budget - said to reach almost P3 trillion - that it will submit to
Congress in six weeks.
He said oral health care will not get the attention it rightfully deserves for as long as oral
health spending will remain as a hidden account in the national budget.
"It is time to surface dental heath in the pages of the general appropriations bill," Recto said.
Citing a government survey, Recto said 1 in 7 absent from work or school at least once a
month and 1 in 10 fail to go to school or work at least twice a year due to aching tooth or
gums.

Nine in 10 urban schoolchildren have decayed tooth.


Yet, there's only 1 dentist for every 70,000 Department of Education (DepEd) students and
teachers, Recto lamented.
He called for the hiring of more public dentists, especially in public schools.
"At present, there are only 300 dentists in DepEd's employ to attend to the needs of a
combined student-teacher population of 21.5 million."
Recto said, "nationally, there are 18 government dentists per 1 million Filipinos. In contrast,
there are 3,556 elected public officials per 1 million families," the Senate President ProTempore said.
"If every 1,000 days we hire through costly elections 81 governors, 143 city mayors, 1,491
town mayors, 11,932 town councilors, so why can't we hire more dentists?" Recto said.
Compounding the lack of manpower is the scant resources dedicated to oral health care, the
senator pointed out.
"The National Center for Disease Prevention Control was allocated P23.6 million to push the
Oral Fit Child program in 2013. Last year, it was given P35 million to buy for dental sealants
and filling materials for pre-school kids," he said.
He estimates that at best, DepEd spent a measly P9 million for dental supplies out of its
P37.5 million expenses for supplies in 2013.
This was equivalent to an annual budget of less than two pesos per student a year, Recto
said.
"P9 million is half the amount the DBM paid its janitors in 2013. Even the DND spent twice
more for the food and drugs of the dogs in its K-9 units in the same year," Recto said.
Recto said if government can spend for less important things, it can afford a higher dental
budget.
"Kung meron tayong 20 milyong estudyante sa DepEd at ang kalahati ay bibigyan mo ng tigkinse pesos na sepliyo, ang P150 milyon ay katumbas lamang ng communication expenses
ng Department of Agriculture sa isang taon," Recto said.
"Or kung bibili ka ng P100 million worth of toothpaste, katumbas lang yan ng ginasta ng DAR
sa gasolina noong 2013," he said.
Cutting the national government's travel budget this year by just 5 percent could free P700
million for the purchase of dental equipment, Recto said.
Recto said the lack of funds for dental care also hit women hardest.
Two disturbing findings of the survey are that 9 in 10 urban children have decayed tooth,
and women have more missing teeth than men, the senator said.
"Seven in 10 women have missing teeth, while it is 5 in 10 for men. Even the number of
missing teeth, women trump men: an average 8 missing teeth for females, while 4 for
males."

http://www.senate.gov.ph/press_release/2015/0620_recto1.asp

Include dental health in


2016 budget Recto
One in 7 Filipinos miss work or school due to aching teeth or gums
HEALTHY SMILES FOR PINOYS. With the current dental problems faced by Filipinos, Senator
Ralph Recto wants to appropriate funds for oral health care in 2016. Graphics by Alejandro Edoria

MANILA, Philippines Senate President Pro-Tempore Ralph Recto has


suggested that part of the 2016 national budget should be allocated for oral
health care.
Kung halos bawat Pilipino [ay] may sakit sa ngipin, bakit walang pondo para sa
ngipin sa national budget? (If almost every Filipino suffers from tooth decay, how
come there is no allocation for dental health in the national budget?) asked
Recto in a press statement on Saturday, June 20.
According to him, 9 out of 10 Filipinos suffer from tooth decay but only one in 10
of them can afford to see a dentist at least once a year.
Recto thus wants a line-item fund for dental care to be included in next years
budget, which Congress will submit in 6 weeks.
The national budget will remain a toothless instrument in promoting dental health
if it does not specifically set aside funds for this purpose, Recto said.
It is time to surface dental heath in the pages of the general appropriations bill,"
he added.

More dentists, oral health care resources


Recto outlined some of the dental care-related problems faced by the country
today. (READ: How important is oral health to Filipinos?)
Citing a government survey, the senator said aching teeth or gums causes one in
7 Filipinos to miss work or school at least once a month. Nine out of 10 urban
school children have tooth decay as well.

Recto previously said that there is only one dentist for every 70,000 students and
teachers. He reiterated his call for the government to hire more dentists,
especially for public schools.
Nationally, there are 18 government dentists per one million Filipinos. In
contrast, there are 3,556 elected public officials per one million families, said the
senator.
He ased, If every 1,000 days we hire through costly elections 81 governors, 143
city mayors, 1,491 town mayors, 11,932 town councilors, so why can't we hire
more dentists?
Aside from the lack of manpower, there are few resources dedicated to oral
health care too.
The National Center for Disease Prevention Control was allocated P23.6 million
to push the Oral Fit Child program in 2013. Last year, it was given P35 million to
buy for dental sealants and filling materials for pre-school kids, Recto said.
He estimates that the Department of Education (DepEd) only spent P9 million for
dental supplies out of its P37.5-million supply expenses in 2013. This was
equivalent to an annual budget of less than P2 per student a year."

Budget allocation possible


If the government can spend for less important things, said Recto, it can afford a
higher budget for dental health.
Kung meron tayong 20 milyong estudyante sa DepEd at ang kalahati ay bibigyan
mo ng tig-P15 na sepilyo, ang P150 milyon ay katumbas lamang ng
communication expenses ng Department of Agriculture (DAR) sa isang taon,
Recto said.
(If we have 20 million students and you give each of them a toothbrush worth
P15, the P150 million that will be used will only be equal to the communication
expenses of the Department of Agriculture in one year.)
Or kung bibili ka ng P100-million worth of toothpaste, katumbas lang yan ng
ginasta ng DAR sa gasolina noong 2013 (Or if you buy P100-million worth of
toothpaste, that will be equal to the amount DAR spent for gasoline in 2013), he
said. (READ: DAR's budget cut in half, but 'enough' to meet targets)
He added that P700 million can be used to purchase dental equipment if the
national government's 2015 travel budget was cut by 5%. Rappler.com

http://www.rappler.com/nation/96956-dental-health-2016-budget-recto

Why oral health needs


more attention in PH
Oral-B and the UP Dental Alumni Association come together to promote oral
wellness in the country with the launch of Smile Pilipinas last February 6, 2015
MANILA, Philippines (UPDATE) When you think about overall health, do you
also consider oral health? Filipinos are known for their smiles despite tragedy and
disaster, but what many do not know is that not all Filipinos are aware of how they
can better take care of their teeth.
Oral health is simply not a priority in the Philippines, said Vic Medina, Dean of
the UP College of Dentistry, during the launch of Smile Pilipinas last February 6
in UP Manila.
He added that according to the National Monitoring and Evaluation Dental Survey
conducted by DOH in 2011, 87% of Filipinos suffer from tooth decay, or 83 million
people in the Philippines based on the population of that year. Statistics show
that 77% or more than 7 out of 10 [of Filipinos] have never even been to a
dentist.
But another growing issue on oral health in the country is the lack of oral care
among the youth. Studies show that 98% of children aged three to five have
dental caries or cavities and that 20% of six-year-olds have never been to a
dentist.
All of these can be prevented if only proper information and services are made
available and more accessible to those who are not aware of how important oral
health is.