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Name __________________________________________

Date ________________________
4.NBT.1
Sarah wrote the number 13,285.
Caryn wrote a five-digit number that has only one 3 in it. The 3 in
Caryns number is worth 10 times as much as the 3 in Sarahs number.
Write three different numbers that Caryn could have written.
________________________
_______________________
_______________________
Circle one of the numbers you wrote above. Use pictures, numbers, or
words to show how you know that the 3 in that number is worth ten
times as much as the 3 in Sarahs number.

Name __________________________________________
Date ________________________
4.NBT.1
Sarah wrote the number 13,285.
Caryn wrote a five-digit number that has only one 3 in it. The 3 in
Caryns number is worth 10 times as much as the 3 in Sarahs number.
Write three different numbers that Caryn could have written.
________________________
_______________________
_______________________

Circle one of the numbers you wrote above. Use pictures, numbers, or
words to show how you know that the 3 in that number is worth ten
times as much as the 3 in Sarahs number.
Elementary Mathematics Office Howard County Public School System 2013-2014

Teacher notes:
Students may do calculations on the paper, either to solve or to check
their work. You may also choose to give students extra paper on which they
can do their work.
The target concept of this task is described in 4.NBT.1: Recognize that in a
multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it
represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 70 =
10 by applying concepts of place value and division.
For this first part of this task, students should identify three numbers in
which the 3 is in the ten thousands place. They may write numbers that are
not five-digit numbers. While this does not meet the constraints of the
directions, if the students number has a 3 in the ten thousands place, the
placement of the 3 will indicate that the student got the target concept.
For the second part, the student should circle one of the numbers he or
she wrote and then show work that demonstrates an understanding that the
3 in Caryns number is worth 30,000 and the 3 in Sarahs number is worth
3,000, and 30,000 is ten times the size of 3,000.
When scoring this task, you may choose to use the level of student work to
distinguish between a 3 and a 2 or a 2 and a 1. If you decide to account for
the students work when grading, it is important to make sure the students
know in advance of working that the task will be graded based on the
correct answers and their work.

Got It: Student essentially understands the


target concept.

The task is attempted


and some
mathematical effort is
made. There may be
fragments of
accomplishment but
little or no success.
Further teaching is
required.

Student could work to


full accomplishment
with minimal feedback
from teacher. Errors
are minor. Teacher is
confident that
understanding is
adequate to
accomplish the
objective with minimal
assistance.

Not yet: Student shows evidence of


misunderstanding, incorrect concept or
procedure.
0 Unsatisfactory:
1 Marginal:
Little
Partial
Accomplishment
Accomplishment
Part of the task is
accomplished, but
there is lack of
evidence of
understanding or
evidence of not
understanding. Further
teaching is required.

2 Proficient:
Substantial
Accomplishment

Elementary Mathematics Office Howard County Public School System 2013-2014

3 Excellent:
Full Accomplishment
Strategy and execution
meet the content,
process, and
qualitative demands of
the task or concept.
Student can
communicate ideas.
May have minor errors
that do not impact the
mathematics.

Adapted from Van de Walle, J. (2004) Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. Boston: Pearson Education, 65

Elementary Mathematics Office Howard County Public School System 2013-2014