Sie sind auf Seite 1von 18

Private School

Inspection Report

Al Sanawbar Private School

Academic Year 2015 2016

Page 1 of 18

Al Sanawbar Private School


Inspection Date

May 22, 2016

to

May 25, 2016

Date of previous inspection

May 19, 2014

to

May 22, 2014

General Information

Students

School ID

147

Total number of
students

1290

Opening year of
school

1983

Number of children
in KG

240

Principal

Rima Sarieddine

Number of students
in other phases

Primary:
Middle:
High:

School telephone

+971 (0)3 767 9889

Age range

3 years 8 months to 18
years

School Address

New Manseer Area, PO Box


1781, Al Ain.

Grades or Year
Groups

KG to Grade 12

Official email (ADEC)

alsanawbar.pvt@adec.ac.ae

Gender

Mixed

School website

Alsanawbarschool.com

% of Emirati
Students

57%

Fee ranges (per


annum)

Low to medium:
AED 12,500 AED 26,6000

Largest nationality
groups (%)

1. Jordanian: 9%
2. Syrian:
8%
3. Egyptian: 7%

Licensed Curriculum

686
190
174

Staff

Main Curriculum

American

Number of teachers

73

Other Curriculum

------------

Number of teaching
assistants (TAs)

27

External Exams/
Standardised tests

MAP; PSAT; TOEFL; IELTS;


CEPA; Ministry Of
Education (MOE)

Teacher-student
ratio

KG/ FS

1:24

Other phases

1:17

-------------

Teacher turnover

24%

Accreditation

Page 2 of 18

Introduction
Inspection activities
Number of inspectors
deployed

Number of inspection days

4
125

Number of lessons observed


Number of joint lesson
observations

Number of parents
questionnaires

Details of other inspection


activities

104; (response rate: 8.2%)


Inspectors held meetings with senior staff, teachers,
parents and students. They attended assemblies,
observed arrangements for arrival and departure, and
scrutinised students coursework. They reviewed a
range of school documentation including assessment
data.
School

School Aims

School vision and mission

--------------Vision: Our vision is to provide our students with a


quality education that allows them to achieve their
fullest potential. We strive to develop in students a
sense of responsibility towards the community, respect
and tolerance for those who are different from
themselves and a loyalty and respect for their heritage.
Mission: Our mission is to educate students to be
effective citizens of a global community. We endeavor
to equip them with the necessary skills, information
and virtues to make successful independent life
choices.

Page 3 of 18

Admission Policy

Admission arrangements are as per ADEC policy and


regulations. The school building is organised on several
levels and so the school does not presently accept
students with significant mobility disabilities.

Leadership structure
(ownership, governance and
management)

Leadership comprises an owner and a chairman of the


Board of Trustees who oversee the school, the principal,
two vice principals (one of whom was not present at the
time of the inspection), a head of faculty for the
secondary school, and a head of department for each
subject.

Page 4 of 18

SEN Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)


Number of students
identified through external
assessments

Number of other students


identified by the school

Intellectual disability

Specific Learning Disability

Emotional and Behaviour


Disorders (ED/ BD)

Autism Spectrum Disorder


(ASD)

Speech and Language


Disorders

Physical and health related


disabilities

Visually impaired

Hearing impaired

Multiple disabilities

SEN Category

G&T Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)


G&T Category

Number of students
identified

Intellectual ability

Subject-specific aptitude (e.g. in science, mathematics,


languages)

Social maturity and leadership

Mechanical/ technical/ technological ingenuity

Visual and performing arts (e.g. art, theatre, recitation)

Psychomotor ability (e.g. dance or sport)

0
Page 5 of 18

The overall performance of the school


Inspectors considered the school in relation to 3 performance categories
High performing (Outstanding, Very Good or Good)

Band B

Satisfactory (Acceptable)

Band C

In need of significant improvement (Weak or Very Weak)

(A)

Satisfactory

Good
Band C
In need of significant
improvement

Weak

High Performing

Acceptable

Band B

Good

Band A

Very Good

Performance Standards

BAND

Outstanding

School was judged to be:

Performance Standard 1:
Students achievement
Performance Standard 2:
Students personal and
social development, and
their innovation skills
Performance Standard 3:
Teaching and assessment
Performance Standard 4:
Curriculum
Performance Standard 5:
The protection, care,
guidance and support of
students
Performance Standard 6:
Leadership and
management

Summary Evaluation:
The schools overall
performance

Page 6 of 18

Very Weak

Band A

The Performance of the School


Evaluation of the schools overall performance
The overall performance of the school is good. Over an extended period, the
principal has sustained and developed the quality of education provided through
clear direction and vision for improvement. The quality of leadership has been
strengthened through the appointment of an academic vice-principal to the senior
leadership team. Children in the kindergarten (KG) flourish because of the care and
support provided. This is particularly true for students with special educational
needs (SEN). The school enjoys positive partnerships with parents. They are
encouraged to be involved in their childrens education. Students entering the
school from other countries are welcomed and made to feel part of the school
community. Teaching and learning in Arabic-medium subjects is good overall. As a
result, students display a pride in their nation and cultural heritage. Provision in
English-medium subjects is acceptable, though not yet as strong as in Arabic
subjects. Assessment is used generally well in most lessons to inform teaching.
Information about students achievement across all phases when measured against
external benchmarks is not consistently reliable.
Progress made since last inspection and capacity to improve
The school has addressed the recommendations from the last inspection. Individual
students are now involved in setting and reviewing targets for their learning with
their teachers. This helps them to make good progress in most subjects. Internal
assessment procedures are now used to track progress more effectively in the
Arabic-medium subjects, though less so elsewhere. Teachers now provide more
opportunities for students to apply critical thinking and to learn in real-life contexts.
The provision for different groups of students is now good, particularly for SEN.
The schools capacity to improve is good.
Development and promotion of innovation skills
The school is promoting innovation with many examples of innovative practice. The
eco-club takes responsibility for recycling by collecting litter at break times. The
house system encourages students to be leaders through initiating and leading
competitions between houses. Children in the KG take part in free zoning
activities. These are innovative, thematically-based activities which develop
learning skills in simulated real-world contexts. In Grade 11, students compete to
design and plant a garden in their own homes. They bring photographic evidence
to share their success and have raised money for charities through their initiatives.

Page 7 of 18

The inspection identified the following as key areas of strength:

vision and direction of the principal and senior leadership team


the quality of the provision in KG
the identification and support of students with special educational needs
the quality of teaching and learning in Arabic-medium subjects
parental involvement
students respect for Islamic values and UAE culture and heritage
the welcoming, positive ethos which unites all groups and nationalities.

The inspection identified the following as key areas for improvement:

inconsistency in teaching and learning in English, mathematics and science


subjects, particularly in primary and middle phases
further use of assessment to provide reliable information about students
progress across all phases.

Page 8 of 18

Performance Standard 1: Students Achievement


Students achievement Indicators

KG

Attainment

Islamic
Education

Arabic
(as a First Language)

Arabic
(as a Second
Language)

Primary

Middle

High

Good

Good

Good

Good

Progress

Good

Good

Good

Good

Attainment

Good

Good

Good

Good

Progress

Good

Good

Good

Good

Attainment

Good

Good

Good

Good

Progress

Good

Good

Good

Good

Attainment

Good

Good

Good

Good

Progress

Good

Good

Good

Good

Attainment

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Progress

Good

Good

Good

Good

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Progress

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Attainment

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Progress

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Attainment

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Progress

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Attainment

Good

Good

Good

Good

Progress

Good

Good

Good

Good

Good

Good

Good

Good

Social Studies

English

Mathematics

Science
Language of
instruction (if other
than English and
Arabic as First
Language)
Other subjects
(Art, Music, PE)
Learning Skills
(including innovation, creativity, critical
thinking, communication, problemsolving and collaboration)

Page 9 of 18

The overall quality of students achievement is good. Most students make good
progress over time and in most lessons. Assessment data in all Arabic-medium
subjects is rigorous and shows good standards are being achieved. This is confirmed
by EMSA and MoE test results and by the good quality of students coursework. Data
from Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) and Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT)
assessments is more limited and does not provide a complete picture of attainment
in most English-medium subjects. Schools internal continuous assessments are not
standardised against curriculum standards and external benchmarks, for example
MAP tests, and therefore at times, present an inflated view of the attainment.
The results of diagnostic assessments, on entry to the KG, show that childrens skills
are below or well below expected levels, particularly in English, mathematics and
science. They then make good progress in KG and by the time they reach primary,
most are attaining in line with or above expected curriculum levels. Progress and
attainment are less strong at Grades 4 to 8 in mathematics and science, particularly
for a minority of boys. From Grades 9 to 12, most students make good progress and
the majority attain levels in coursework that are above curriculum levels in English,
and in line with in mathematics and science. In Grades 11 and 12, students are entered
for TOEFL and IELTS tests to provide a measure of their attainment against
international standards. These students perform well. Additionally, a range of
assessments is used by the school, including Common Educational Proficiency
Assessment (CEPA) and Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT), to enable
students to access universities locally and internationally. SEN students make
acceptable progress because of the effective support they receive.
The quality of achievement in Islamic education is good. Grade 12 MoE examination
results and internal assessments over time indicate that the majority of students
attain levels that are above average. For example, in Grade 3, the majority of students
are able to answer questions about the story of the Prophets marriage to Khadija his
first wife, and explain her role in Islam. They can give examples of Islamic values, for
example, tolerance and patience, and make links to their own lives. By Grade 11, the
majority of students who are non-natives of Arabic language, can recite verses of the
Holy Quran following correct Tajweed rules and explain the meaning of verses,
thereby demonstrating deep knowledge and understanding.
Students achievement in Arabic is good. Attainment in Grade 12 MoE examination is
good as a majority of students attain above curriculum standards. Majority of the
children in KG achieve above curriculum expectations. In KG2, for example, almost all
children can write their names. The majority can read and write short sentences
correctly. By Grade 6, the majority of students can read text fluently with expression,
discuss issues and express their opinions clearly using classic Arabic, thereby
Page 10 of 18

demonstrating good reading, understanding and speaking skills. By the time they
reach Grade 10, students can read classical poetry fluently with expression. They can
explain and analyse poems and be critical. The overall achievement of students
studying Arabic as a second language is also good. For example in Grade 9, the
majority of students can write about different topics using appropriate vocabulary
and correct language, then proof read their writing and produce a final, well-written
copy.
Achievement in social studies is good. Children in KG can sing the national anthem and
identify colours in the flag. The majority can make links between UAE culture and their
own. By Grade 6, most students can explain and discuss the concept of the state. The
majority can explain the meaning of democracy, compare between different types,
and make links to the UAE and Arab world. By Grade 9, most students can compare
the present and past of the UAE. They can discuss the reasons behind the significant
change of life in the UAE, give examples, and reflect on their own personal
experiences of change.
Attainment in English is acceptable overall for most students, and strengthens by high
school phase due to good progress throughout. Children make a strong start in KG
and by the time they enter primary, students are taking more responsibility for their
learning and can read simple books and write comprehensive sentences. They are
encouraged to be critical thinkers and to make decisions through the weekly free
zoning cross-curricular activities. Most students make secure progress in lessons and
over time, and by the time they leave the school, most have acquired good skills in
speaking, reading and writing.
Achievement in mathematics is acceptable overall though more variable at times in
primary and middle phases, and stronger consistently in KG and at high school phase.
Girls maintain a positive attitude though a few boys in Grades 4 to 6 can lose interest.
By the time they leave KG, children are using English language for mathematical
concepts with growing confidence, counting and writing numbers accurately.
Progress is acceptable for most students and they support each other using peer
assessment. SAT external benchmarks for Grade 12, over 3 years, indicate that boys
and girls attainment is in line with international averages. This is a good performance
overall when considering their low starting points.
The pattern is similar in science. Most students reach at least acceptable standards
and progress is generally good at KG and acceptable thereafter. Children in KG enjoy
investigating the world around them. They carry out simple investigations and use
symbols to record their predictions. Through the primary, middle and high school
phases, most students attainment is in line with curriculum expectations and leads to
Page 11 of 18

generally secure attainment by Grade 12. Boys and girls progress equally well from
their low starting points.
Attainment and progress for students in other subjects is good. In information and
communication technology (ICT), students are challenged according to their abilities
through well planned differentiated tasks. Competition is used effectively by teachers
and it motivates almost all students to do their best and meet the set challenges. In
music, art and drama, students are encouraged to be creative and apply their skills in
interesting cross-curricular settings.
Learning skills are developing well overall. Most students have the opportunity to be
challenged to think innovatively and critically. They collaborate on projects and are
keen to research independently. Students practise their leadership and mentoring
skills in innovative ways. For example, students in Grade 12 who take Calculus after
school have volunteered to use some of their time to assist teachers in the lower
grades by supporting the learning of younger students.

Performance Standard 2: Students personal and social development,


and their innovation skills
Students personal and social
development, and their innovation skills
Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Personal development

Good

Good

Good

Good

Understanding of Islamic values and


awareness of Emirati and world cultures

Good

Good

Good

Good

Social responsibility and innovation skills

Good

Good

Good

Good

The overall quality of students personal and social development is good. Their
relations with staff are positive in and out of lessons. Students have leadership roles
keeping and supervising order during break times. Most students are aware of the
need to stay healthy and they understand important ways of doing so. For example,
they like playing different types of sports during break time. Students value the
opportunities they are given to show responsibility, for example by helping to
Page 12 of 18

supervise break times. Most students display positive attitudes to each other and to
learning. A few boys in primary and middle phases show less interest in learning at
times and become passive, especially when teaching becomes more contentdriven.
Attendance is good at 94%. A few students arrive late for morning assembly.
Students show respect for the Holy Quran during assemblies. Students from different
nationalities socialise well and see themselves as part of the same school community.
Students in Grade 4 show good knowledge of Islamic celebrations, such as Eid Al
Adha and Eid Al Fitr, and the special events that take place during them. They
compare Islamic Eid celebrations in different Arabic countries. They have pride in
their UAE identity and show this in the way they celebrate National Day and Flag Day.
Students, especially in the higher grades, link with the local community well through,
for example, arranging for senior citizens to receive gifts and by organising sports
events for local SEN centres. Students participate in innovation opportunities such as
making an air conditioning prototype. They show awareness of protecting nature by
planting trees. Students use ICT to create leaflets promoting water conservation.
These activities are building students awareness of their responsibility to sustain the
environment for future generations.

Performance Standard 3: Teaching and Assessment


Teaching and Assessment Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Teaching for effective learning

Good

Good

Good

Good

Assessment

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

The overall quality of teaching is good and assessment is broadly acceptable.


Teachers have secure subject knowledge and understand how students learn.
Lessons are mostly well paced and purposeful, and students find them relevant and
interesting. Teaching is most effective in the KG and at Grades 9 to 12 where it is
consistently at least good. It is generally good also in the primary and middle phases,
but on occasion not as consistently strong in English, science and mathematics where
there is more reliance upon textbooks and workbooks. Resources are used effectively
to enhance the learning experience. Effective questioning, dialogue and positive
interactions engage students in thoughtful discussions to meet learning objectives.

Page 13 of 18

Throughout the school, teachers are broadly effective in meeting the needs of
students. They offer challenge and support to all groups and individuals by planning
and organising lessons well in a way that enables almost all students to make
effective progress, particularly in Arabic, Islamic education and social studies subjects,
and for SEN students. Most teachers also provide opportunities for students to be
innovative, to think critically and to problem solve.
In KG, childrens academic and personal achievements are diagnosed effectively. In
particular for subjects taught in English, internal assessment procedures, are not
always consistent as they are not securely standardised and benchmarked against
external tests. In Arabic-medium subjects, assessment approaches provide accurate
measures of attainment and progress. The use of information from the outcomes of
MAP and SAT assessments for English, mathematics and science are less robust.
Information from students coursework gives teachers a broadly accurate view of
students progress to guide their lesson planning. This enables teaching to meet the
needs of all groups of students. In most subjects, teachers regularly involve students
in the assessment of their own learning.

Performance Standard 4: Curriculum


Curriculum Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Curriculum design and implementation

Good

Good

Good

Good

Curriculum adaptation

Good

Good

Good

Good

All aspects of the curriculum are good. It has a clear rational and meets the American
Californian Common Core Learning Standards and Ministry of Education
requirements. It prepares students well overall for their next educational stage. The
curriculum provides for the gradual acquisition of skills and knowledge in a wellsequenced way. This is promoted well by subject leaders who provide helpful
curriculum maps which show the steps that underpin continuity and progression, and
they monitor progress against these maps generally well, particularly at the middle
and high phases. At the KG and primary phases, the focus of monitoring tends to be
on the quality of curriculum activities and less so on progress against progression

Page 14 of 18

steps. In Grades 10 to 12, students choose from a wide range of electives. Teachers
support them effectively in their choices. The curriculum is reviewed annually.
The curriculum has been modified well to meet the needs of different learners. In KG,
for example, innovative learning zones promote childrens acquisition of a range of
important learning skills. The curriculum is adapted well to support SEN students, but
less so for those who may be gifted and talented because the school has yet to
identify them in a systematic way. Extracurricular and cross-curricular links are well
established and include, for example, science and innovation days. In Grade 12, the
school organises careers fairs and visits to and from international universities. The
house system is used well as part of the wider curriculum. The wider curriculum
enables students to lead writing competitions, and take part in debates and Arabicspeaking competitions. The eco club has planted sustainable trees around the school
and in the local community. Students raise funds for charities such as the Red
Crescent. Learning about Emirati culture and UAE society is promoted well in most
subjects.

Performance Standard 5: The protection, care, guidance and support


of students
The protection, care, guidance and
support of students Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Health
and
safety,
including
arrangements for child protection/
safeguarding

Good

Good

Good

Good

Care and support

Good

Good

Good

Good

The protection, care, guidance and support of students are good. Safeguarding
procedures are rigorous. Staff have been trained in child protection procedures.
Students are supervised well. Effective measures are taken to protect them from all
forms of abuse, including bullying. Provision for first aid is effective and the bus
supervision is organised safely. The clinic is adequately equipped with one male and
one female nurse. They run courses to raise students awareness of healthy living.
Physical education lessons and break time activities also support healthy living. The
storage and delivery of medicines and medical waste is effective. The school
environment is safe, hygienic and secure. Toilets are well maintained and clean. There
are three canteens that serve healthy choices.. The school does not have a lift to the
Page 15 of 18

first floor and this would limit access if the school was to enrol any students with
significant mobility difficulties. Maintenance records are kept up to date and there is
a safety committee. The school has regular fire drills and evacuations.
The welcoming, inclusive ethos unites all groups and nationalities and underpins the
care staff provide. The school encourages students to attend effectively and this is
reflected in attendance levels. Behaviour management approaches promote positive
and respectful relationships. The identification and support of students with special
educational needs is good. The school does not yet have a register of gifted and
talented students though staff have been trained in challenging high-achieving
students and they do this well in lessons. Support for non-native students in special
classes is good. Appropriate career guidance is given to older students.

Performance Standard 6: Leadership and management


Leadership and management Indicators
The effectiveness of leadership

Good

Self-evaluation and improvement planning

Good

Partnerships with parents and the community

Good

Governance

Good

Management, staffing, facilities and resources

Good

The leadership and management of the school are good. The principal and school
leaders promote a vision which aligns to UAE priorities. The vision is shared with all
stakeholders. Leaders are committed to inclusion and demonstrate an understanding
of best educational practice. The school is improving its systems to moderate
assessments and to benchmark its performance more effectively. School leaders
delegate responsibilities appropriately and the schools middle leaders play an
important role. The present absence of a senior member of staff has resulted in
aspects of academic leadership being more limited in the primary phase. This situation
is likely to be resolved shortly. Relationships within the school are positive,
professional and morale is high. Leaders show good capacity to improve and to
sustain improvement.
The schools approaches to monitoring and evaluating the quality of learning and
teaching have had a positive impact over time. Improvement planning is
Page 16 of 18

comprehensive. The self-evaluation form is very detailed and cross references to


action plans and the evidence of improvements made. The school development plan
(SDP) has targets and timescales with success criteria against which outcomes are
measured. These documents are regularly reviewed. Goals are aligned to UAE and
positively affect students achievements.
The school seeks and values parents views. Members of the active parents council
are knowledgeable and support the drive to raise standards. Parents are well
informed about their childrens progress. Parents of SEN students make a valuable
contribution to planning and reviewing their childrens progress. The school enjoys
effective relationships with local, national and international organisations. It links with
charities and community organisations such as Civil Defence, and has good links with
universities. The Board of Trustees represents all stakeholders, meets regularly, has a
detailed knowledge of the school and has a positive impact on performance. The
school is well-organised and runs smoothly. Members of staff are suitably qualified
and benefit from regular professional development.

Page 17 of 18

What the school should do to improve further:


1. Build on existing strengths to further improve the consistency of teaching and
learning, particularly in English-medium subjects at primary and middle, by:
i. identifying and sharing the most effective practice with all staff through
arranging for them to make class visits and share mentoring approaches
ii. ensuring all teachers are given precise and accurate targets for
improving practice, which are monitored through focused observations
iii. ensuring feedback to teachers has a stronger focus on the quality of
student outcomes
iv.
focusing training more directly on developing all teachers
understanding of how to challenge and support students in learning.
2. Improve the current assessment systems, notably in the non-Arabic subjects,
by:
i. ensuring they provide more robust information about students
progress across all grades
ii. ensuring moderation is rigorous and realistic and judgements made are
used to set clear priorities for raising standards in attainment against
national and international benchmarks
iii. using the full set of available benchmarking measures systematically at
all appropriate grades
iv.
ensuring self-evaluation processes make robust and accurate use of
assessment information in all subjects to set clear priorities for
improvement planning.

Page 18 of 18