Sie sind auf Seite 1von 20

Private School

Inspection Report

The Model Private School

Academic Year 2015 2016

Page 1 of 20

The Model Private School


Inspection Date
Date of previous inspection

February 1, 2016

to

February 4, 2016

April 21, 2014

to

April 24, 2014

General Information

Students

School ID

122

Total number of
students

4,869

Opening year of
school

1987

Number of children
in KG

775

V V Abdul Kadar

Number of students
in other phases

Principal

Primary:

2,253

Middle:

1,360

High:

481

School telephone

+971 (0) 552 7200

Age range

4 to 20 years

School Address

ME12, Musaffah, Abu Dhabi

Grades or Year
Groups

KG - Grade 12

Official email (ADEC)

modelschoolmbz.pvt@ade
c.ac.ae

Gender

Mixed

School website

www.themodel.ae

% of Emirati
Students

0%

Fee ranges (per


annum)

Very Low:
AED 4,500 AED 6,200

Largest nationality
groups (%)

Licensed Curriculum

1. Indian: 95%
2. Pakistani: 3%
3. Bangladeshi: 1%

Staff

Main Curriculum

Indian

Number of teachers

267

Other Curriculum

--------

Number of teaching
assistants (TAs)

External Exams/
Standardised tests

Central Board of Secondary


Education (CBSE)
Kerala Board

Teacher-student
ratio

--------

Teacher turnover

Accreditation

KG/ FS

25:1

Other phases

30:1

5%

Page 2 of 20

Introduction
Inspection activities
Number of inspectors
deployed

Number of inspection days

4
192

Number of lessons observed


Number of joint lesson
observations

Number of parents
questionnaires

Details of other inspection


activities

399; (response rate: 8%)


The school runs two shifts (7.00 am to 12.15 pm - 12.20
to 17.40 pm) with different students taking classes at
different times in the school day. The range of
inspection activities, including lesson observations and
meetings with staff and students, work scrutiny and a
review of documentation focused on both shifts in the
school.
School

School Aims

The schools aim is to provide a modern education at an


affordable rate, developing skills and academic
excellence and supplementing classroom teaching with
modern technology, through blending the culture and
tradition of the home country and host country. In this
way, the aim is to create a new generation with 21st
century skills and future leaders who respect values and
can face challenges of the competitive world with
confidence.

School vision and mission

Vision: civilised new generation with 21st century skills


Mission: providing values based education for all at
affordable fees

Page 3 of 20

Admission Policy

Leadership structure
(ownership, governance and
management)

For Kindergarten classes, siblings are given first


priority.
Entrance examinations are in place for all other grades.

Principal and three vice-principals

Page 4 of 20

SEN Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)


Number of students
identified through external
assessments

Number of other students


identified by the school

Intellectual disability

Specific Learning Disability

Emotional and Behaviour


Disorders (ED/ BD)

Autism Spectrum Disorder


(ASD)

Visually impaired

Hearing impaired

Multiple disabilities

SEN Category

Speech and Language


Disorders
Physical and health related
disabilities

G&T Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)


G&T Category
Intellectual ability
Subject-specific aptitude (e.g. in science, mathematics,
languages)
Social maturity and leadership
Mechanical/ technical/ technological ingenuity
Visual and performing arts (e.g. art, theatre, recitation)
Psychomotor ability (e.g. dance or sport)

Number of students
identified
6
12
4
7
11
8

Page 5 of 20

The overall performance of the school


Inspectors considered the school in relation to 3 performance categories
Band A

High performing (Outstanding, Very Good or Good)

Band B

Satisfactory (Acceptable)

Band C

In need of significant improvement (Weak or Very Weak)

Acceptable

In need of significant
improvement

Performance Standard 1:
Students achievement
Performance Standard 2:
Students personal and
social development, and
their innovation skills
Performance Standard 3:
Teaching and assessment
Performance Standard 4:
Curriculum
Performance Standard 5:
The protection, care,
guidance and support of
students
Performance Standard 6:
Leadership and
management

Summary Evaluation:
The schools overall
performance

Page 6 of 20

Very Weak

Satisfactory

Band C

Weak

High Performing

Acceptable

Band B

Good

Band A

Very Good

Performance Standards

BAND (B)

Outstanding

School was judged to be:

The Performance of the School


Evaluation of the schools overall performance
The overall performance of the Model Private School is acceptable. The key
strengths are students exemplary attitudes and behaviour, their good
appreciation and understanding of Islamic values and the good provision for their
support and care.
Attainment and progress in Islamic education and UAE social studies are good in all
phases. Achievement is good in most subjects for the large minority of the schools
student body who are in the middle and higher phases. Attainment and progress
for the large majority who are in the Kindergarten (KG) and primary phase is
acceptable. The quality of learning skills is acceptable across the school and more
effectively developed in the middle and higher phases. Students speaking,
listening and reading skills in English are particularly strong.
There is inconsistency in the quality of teaching, particularly in the KG and primary
phases. The effective use of assessment to inform lesson planning in order to
challenge and support students of all abilities is limited. The schools curriculum is
adequately planned to ensure progression and continuity in knowledge and skills.
It is not adapted to ensure that students of all abilities make the progress that they
are capable of.
The principal sets a clear strategic direction and there is a strong ethos, which
supports the values based aims of the school. Senior leaders do not demonstrate
sufficient knowledge and understanding of how younger children learn most
effectively. They have not been able to identify ways of supporting teachers in the
primary and KG classes to improve the quality of learning.
Progress made since last inspection and capacity to improve
The school has successfully addressed a number of the recommendations from the
previous inspection. A great deal of continuous professional development (CPD)
has been provided for teachers to develop a wider range of strategies to support
learning. Most teachers now share the objective at the start of the lesson and many
return to it at the end of the lesson. Across the school, teachers have undertaken
multiple intelligence surveys of students learning styles and a minority are planning
lessons with these in mind. Many teachers have begun to introduce starter
activities to capture students interest. The role of subject leaders has developed
to include more regular monitoring of lessons. Resources have been increased
substantially, particularly for information and communications technology (ICT)
and physical education (PE). KG children now have more access to outdoor play
resources. The use of assessment data to plan lessons is less well established.
Page 7 of 20

There have been a number of initiatives that have been planned and developed
extensively, but there is limited monitoring of their impact on student learning. The
senior leadership team (SLT) is committed to improvement and are developing
better systems for analysing data and the trends that this information reflects.
Their detailed knowledge of the school indicates good capacity for improvement.
Development and promotion of innovation skills
There is a strong emphasis on the development of innovative practices but
students are not routinely given opportunities to develop innovation and critical
thinking skills in their lessons. Across the school, when given the opportunity,
students work well together and are able to take responsibility for their learning.
In the KG, children are given too few chances for enquiry-based learning. In the
primary phase, children have opportunities to present their independent projects
to whole school assemblies, explaining their motivation for their chosen topic.
There are greater opportunities in the middle and high school lessons for students
to develop their innovation skills. This is most evident in English where students are
encouraged on a regular basis to solve real life problems through discussions and
critical debate, reflection and by applying their communal knowledge of the issues
and coming up with the best solutions.
The school plans a range of extracurricular activities and events to enable students
to develop and share their innovation skills. For example, the annual science
exhibition challenges students in the KG and primary classes to devise static and
working models. Every high school class produces an annual class magazine,
showcasing their writing skills. There is a bi-annual innovation exhibition of
students design and problem solving skills, Innovex, where students share a
range of different investigative and creative skills. Last year, this included solarpowered cookers, clothing made from recycled materials and soap making. Most
of these projects, led by students and supported by parents and staff, demonstrate
the ability the students have to take the initiative, think critically, solve problems
and work independently to a very high standard.

Page 8 of 20

The inspection identified the following as key areas of strength:

the exemplary behaviour of students across the school and their positive
attitudes, commitment and enthusiasm for learning
students speaking and listening skills in English
students knowledge of and commitment to safe and healthy lifestyles
the successful development of students knowledge and understanding of
Islamic values and their respect and appreciation for the culture and
heritage of the UAE and their home countries
students confidence and enthusiasm for performing and sharing their skills
and talents through assemblies and special exhibitions
the positive and very strong relationships across the school
the principals strategic vision resulting in a strong school ethos which is
shared by the whole school community.

The inspection identified the following as key areas for improvement:

the effective use of assessment information to improve the quality of


teaching
the consistency of effective teaching and assessment particularly in the
primary and KG phases
the confident understanding of how young children learn best and the
effectiveness and impact of leadership in the KG and primary phases
the effective use of lesson observations to identify professional
development needs and appropriate training.

Page 9 of 20

Performance Standard 1: Students Achievement


Students achievement Indicators

KG

Attainment

Islamic
Education

Arabic
(as a First Language)

Arabic
(as a Second
Language)

Primary

Middle

High

Good

Good

Good

Good

Progress

Good

Good

Good

Good

Attainment

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Progress

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Attainment

N/A

Acceptable

Good

Good

Progress

N/A

Acceptable

Attainment

N/A

Good

Good

N/A

Progress

N/A

Good

Good

N/A

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Very Good

Progress

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Very Good

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Progress

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Good

Progress

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Good

Attainment

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Progress

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Progress

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Good

Good

Good

Social Studies

English

Mathematics

Science
Language of
instruction (if other
than English and
Arabic as First
Language)
Other subjects
(Art, Music, PE)
Learning Skills
(including innovation, creativity, critical
thinking, communication, problemsolving and collaboration)

Page 10 of 20

Students achievement is acceptable overall as attainment and progress for the large
majority of the schools students who are in the KG and primary phases is acceptable
in most subjects. Attainment and progress is more consistently good for the large
minority of the schools students who are in the middle and higher school. In the
middle and high school, most students achieve above curriculum expectations in most
subjects. In the Grade 12 Kerala Board examinations, almost all students achieve high
results in English, mathematics and science. Similarly, these students achievements
in MoE examinations in Arabic and Islamic education are also high.
Students attainment and progress in Arabic as a second language improves as the
students move into the middle and higher phases. From low starting points, most
make good progress and achieve well. Most students have well developed
handwriting skills and their reading is above expected levels by the time they reach
Grade 12. Their communication skills are less well developed. In Islamic education,
students achieve above curriculum expectations in all grades. Students memorise age
appropriate sections of the Holy Quran, relevant verses and apply recitation rules
accurately. Most are able to talk confidently about the impact of Islamic values on
their daily lives. This is evident in their contributions in assemblies and whole school
events.
In UAE social studies, the majority of students attain levels that are above the MoE
curriculum requirements. They display a good understanding of the culture and
heritage of the UAE. In lessons, most students make better than expected progress.
For example, Grade 9 students could locate different Arab countries in Asia on the
map and talk knowledgeably about the importance of Jerusalem for Muslims. There
are more limited opportunities for students to think critically and suggest solutions,
because teachers lead the lessons and tend to use closed questions.
In English, KG children are able to confidently retell a story with actions and expressive
use of focused vocabulary. By the time they reach upper primary classes, the majority
of attain levels that are above curriculum standards in listening, speaking and reading
skills. Writing skills are not as well developed. Throughout the primary phase,
students demonstrate good skills in speaking, listening and reading with
comprehension. They speak confidently, expressively and with accurate use of a
range of vocabulary and grammar. In the high school students make good progress
and achieve very good results at the end of Grade 12. They speak confidently when
presenting their ideas in assemblies or in classroom presentations. Most read age
appropriate texts fluently and with appropriate intonation. By Grade 12, most
students writing is generally neat with appropriate application of grammar rules;
their extended writing skills are less well developed, particularly for boys.

Page 11 of 20

Students mathematical understanding and skills develop in line with curriculum


expectations across the school. By the time they reach Grade 12, the majority of
students achieve above expectations in the Kerala Board examinations. By the end of
KG children are able to count confidently to 20 and apply their knowledge of numbers
to everyday situations. In the primary phase students numeracy skills develop well
but they are less able to use mathematical terminology and solve problems. Progress
in many lessons tends to be slow as many teachers rush through mathematical
concepts without checking for understanding. In the high sections, students are more
confident in applying their mathematical knowledge to unfamiliar contexts and in
solving problems.
Students attain age appropriate scientific knowledge and understanding in the KG
and primary sections. In Grade 4 students are able to analyse the effects of
deforestation and its impact on climate. Progress in many lessons is limited due to the
lack of scientific skills development. In the middle and high school sections, students
achieve well. Most students in Grade 12 are able to discuss the effects of bio
magnification and suggest ways to control water pollution. Older students make
slower progress in a minority of lessons as they are given too few opportunities to
plan their own investigations, hypothesise and reach conclusions. Progress is
restricted in many lessons, particularly for more able students, by low teacher
expectations.
Most students across the school are keen to learn and work well collaboratively. They
are able to listen well to one another and gather the relevant information to make
presentations. Opportunities to think critically and take responsibility for their own
learning in a meaningful way are limited in the KG and primary phases. In many lessons
in the high section, tasks enable students to apply their learning and skills to real life
situations. This is a particular feature of English lessons in the high school where
students are challenged to critically consider issues such as crime and punishment.
Many students in the high school demonstrate age appropriate research and
technological skills, as demonstrated by the many individual projects and tasks that
they complete independently.

Page 12 of 20

Performance Standard 2: Students personal and social development,


and their innovation skills
Students personal and social
development, and their innovation skills
Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Personal development

Very Good

Very Good

Very Good

Very Good

Understanding of Islamic values and


awareness of Emirati and world cultures

Very Good

Very Good

Very Good

Very Good

Social responsibility and innovation skills

Good

Good

Good

Good

Students work ethic and their attitudes towards learning are exemplary. They are
keen to work hard and achieve the best they can for themselves and their school.
Students behaviour is outstanding. They are very respectful of one another and value
each others opinions. This is evident throughout the day in the way that students
support and praise individuals for their work and their successful performances.
Relationships across the school community are excellent. Almost all students show
empathy and consideration when dealing with their peers. They are respectful of
others cultures and traditions. Students demonstrate a good awareness of how to
lead healthy lifestyles. This is encouraged through lessons and whole school activities.
Students are punctual at the start of the day and they move around school very
effectively and rapidly to enable swift starts to their next lesson. Their attendance at
94% is good.
Most students have a very good understanding of their Islamic values, as
demonstrated by their commitment to attendance at the daily prayer session and in
their supportive behaviour of one another. Students show great respect for Emirati
culture and traditions. They also have a good understanding of their home countries
and cultures. Many students are able to talk confidently about the similarities and
differences between their home and host cultures.
Most students participate in a wide range of projects and social and community
activities that enable them to develop their individual talents to a high standard. The
student council for the grades 11 and 12 is very effective. Students speak positively
about the degrees of autonomy, the opportunities to express ideas and opinions and
the responsibility for planning large-scale events and activities. There are limited
opportunities for younger students to develop the same leadership skills. Most
Page 13 of 20

students are aware of the environmental issues and ensure that their own school is
well looked after. This is a tremendous achievement taking into consideration the
shared classrooms between morning and afternoon shifts. Students regularly
organise events to support the needs of those less fortunate than themselves. For
example, a very successful campaign was run to raise funds to support those affected
by the floods in Chennai. There are fewer planned opportunities for all students to
participate in entrepreneurship activities beyond the school.

Performance Standard 3: Teaching and Assessment


Teaching and Assessment Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Teaching for effective learning

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Assessment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Teaching and assessment is acceptable. The quality of teaching across the school is
inconsistent. Lessons observed by inspectors ranged from outstanding to a minority
that were graded weak, which were mainly in mathematics. Most lessons were
deemed to be acceptable or better. The most effective teaching was in the high
school, particularly grades 11 and 12, and mainly in the Arabic subjects and English.
Almost all teachers develop respectful relationships with their students and
occasionally an encouraging rapport with them. Most teachers demonstrate secure
knowledge of their subjects. Explanations are usually accurate and tasks promote
progress. Teachers in younger classes have insufficient expertise and knowledge of
how younger children learn. This results in lower levels of progress in many lessons in
these phases. Teachers use a common planning format, which identifies learning
objectives as well as a range of activities. In a minority of lessons, the learning
objectives are too general and do not identify key knowledge or skills. In the majority
of lessons, planning does not take sufficient account of students prior knowledge or
give enough attention to meeting the learning needs of high achievers and students
who find learning difficult. A few teachers promote understanding and progress
through the use of challenging worksheets. In the KG and primary classes, many
lessons are overly teacher led and directed. In primary classes, many teachers use
group work as an organisational strategy. Groups are often too large or the task
inappropriate and it does not support the learning of all in the group.
Page 14 of 20

In the large majority of KG and primary lessons, teachers predominantly use


questioning to check for accuracy. In more effective lessons, mainly in the high
school, teachers use open-ended questioning to check for understanding and to
challenge students to think more widely about the concept and respond in more
depth. A few teachers make use of probing questions to support the development of
thinking skills. In the most effective lessons, teachers employ a range of different
strategies to engage students interests, such as the challenging starter activities in
primary mathematics lessons that reviewed previous learning.
In many English lessons in the high school, teachers enable students to work in groups
to discuss issues independently and produce reflective presentations that
demonstrated their problem solving, critical thinking and planning skills. In an interclass debate in grades 10 to 12 students demonstrated high level research skills as well
as linguistic skills, as they synthesised and commented on current and historical
international political data. These skills are underdeveloped in many lessons across
the school, particularly in younger classes.
As part of the CBSE and Kerala Board examinations systems, teachers implement a
range of internal assessment tests. These are conducted regularly, the data
meticulously recorded and the information shared with parents and students.
Students in grades 10 and 12 are also entered for Kerala Board and CBSE examinations.
The data is used to identify and celebrate successful students achievements. It is not
used to identify or track academic progress in a robust way which leads to inaccurate
judgements of students overall achievements. The school compares attainment with
similar local schools but has insufficient systems for comparing it with those of
students internationally. The use of data analysis of all assessments in order to track
progress is underdeveloped. Data analysis and tracking is not used consistently by all
teachers to plan and deliver lessons that support individual needs.
Most teachers demonstrate limited understanding of the use of assessment for
learning during lessons. Assessment is not used sufficiently well to take note of
students prior knowledge and understanding and inform planning and interventions
during lessons. Differentiation is often by group or through the use of single level
worksheets that fail to provide adequate meaningful information about students
needs that could be used for further planning. The quality of feedback to students
through marking is weak. It consists mostly of ticks and students are not provided
with sufficient information about how to improve their work.

Page 15 of 20

Performance Standard 4: Curriculum


Curriculum Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Curriculum design and implementation

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Curriculum adaptation

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

The schools curriculum is acceptable. It offers a Kerala Board and CBSE curriculum,
including a KG curriculum based on CBSE and Early Years Foundation Stage guidelines.
The school year is lengthened by several days, including regular weekend sessions, to
ensure that all curriculum expectations are met. The school offers a range of
additional Indian languages as students routinely return to their home countries for
further studies. Students in the high school are offered a range of subjects within the
science and commerce streams. Continuity and progression of knowledge and skills
across the curriculum are ensured through thorough planning for each phase building
upon previous content. Adequate cross-curricular links are well established within
overall curriculum planning. Systems for curriculum review are well established as the
school is part of a group of UAE based schools.
The KG curriculum does not offer sufficient opportunities for children to play,
investigate and gain knowledge and an understanding of the world around them
beyond what their teachers tell them. Children have limited opportunities to play,
explore and experience different media, develop links between ideas and subjects
and develop their own strategies for learning.
The curriculum is adequately adapted to meet the academic needs of all students.
Less able students are not sufficiently well supported through tasks being made more
accessible for them. More able students are not routinely challenged in lessons. The
Arabic curriculum is not adequately adapted to meet the needs of the many students
who arrive in the school at different ages and are often new to learning Arabic as a
second language.
Opportunities for students to develop their creative and innovation skills are planned
as regular projects, special displays and exhibitions. A recent science and innovation
exhibition enabled the majority of students to work independently to plan and
showcase their scientific designs and skills. Particular emphasis is placed on
developing a deeper understanding of the UAE in these projects. During the
inspection week, a display of creative dance reflected students understanding and
Page 16 of 20

awareness of dance forms from around the world. This extensive programme of
additional experiences significantly enhances students personal development.

Performance Standard 5: The protection, care, guidance and support


of students
The protection, care, guidance and
support of students Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Health
and
safety,
including
arrangements for child protection/
safeguarding

Good

Good

Good

Good

Care and support

Good

Good

Good

Good

The school has effective policies for the protection, care and support of all students.
Staff, students and parents are aware of these. There is a strong, caring ethos that
permeates the school. Very good relationships prevail and there are almost no
incidents of bullying or bad behaviour. There is adequate supervision at all times and
students report feeling safe in school. The school has established good systems for
managing attendance, including systems for contacting parents as soon as an
absence without notification is recorded on the first day.
The building, though worn, is clean and well maintained. Arrangements for ensuring
security are robust. Bus procedures are very effective. Despite the large numbers of
students and staff involved, the schools transition in the middle of the day between
morning and afternoon shifts is well organised, efficient and appears seamless.
School records indicate that routine electrical checks are made regularly and
evacuation procedures are well established.
The school actively promotes safe and healthy lifestyles, with support from the
parents. The counsellor and nurse keep secure records of all incidents relating to the
health and well being of students. This is emphasised through science lessons. The
school premises have been adapted with a number of ramps to support students with
physical development needs.
Systems for identifying students with special educational needs (SEN) are developing
through the recent appointment of SEN coordinators who liaise with parents and
professional medical staff to identify specific needs and create individual educational
plans. Support for students with special learning needs is limited. Students with
specific creative, sporting and academic talents are supported through participation
Page 17 of 20

in extra clubs and events. Well-organised and high quality Holy Quran recitation
classes ensure that those students who wish to enhance these skills are well
supported. The personal development of individual students is well monitored by
phase coordinators. Career orientation programmes, arranged in partnership with a
range of professional and academic organisations from the region and India, support
students in grades 11 and 12 in choosing the appropriate course of action for the next
phase of their lives.

Performance Standard 6: Leadership and management


Leadership and management Indicators
The effectiveness of leadership

Good

Self-evaluation and improvement planning

Acceptable

Partnerships with parents and the community

Acceptable

Governance

Acceptable

Management, staffing, facilities and resources

Acceptable

The quality of leadership and management is acceptable. The principal, along with the
schools manager and a large senior leadership team, sets a strong strategic direction
and vision for improvement. This is shared and valued by the large school community.
It is firmly embedded into the schools aims for providing an affordable quality
education. Staff morale is generally high.
Most of the senior leadership team demonstrate a satisfactory knowledge of the best
practices in teaching and learning for older high phase students. They have a weaker
knowledge of effective primary and KG practices.
Relationships across the school are strong. Communication is effective but too often
focused on day-to-day administration issues instead of student learning. The role of
subject leaders has developed since the previous inspection; it is still not sufficiently
focused on academic standards or effectively monitoring the quality of teaching and
learning.
The schools self evaluation is generous and is not sufficiently founded in the analysis
of assessment data, monitoring information or take into account the different phases
in the school. School development planning is detailed and includes a focus on
recommendations from the previous report. Systems for the monitoring of teaching
Page 18 of 20

are complex and have not accurately identified weaknesses in practice, particularly in
the KG and primary school. The information gathered from the many observations is
not used effectively to support improvements in classroom practices. In all of the
schools monitoring processes there is insufficient emphasis on student learning.
The school has strong respectful partnerships with the parents and the community.
Most parents are very supportive of the school, its ethos and its aims. Communication
with parents is regular and includes opportunities to discuss students progress and
attainment. Reports are restricted to grades and examination results and do not
include sufficient information about how the students can improve their
performance. The school has developed strong links with the local Malayalam
speaking community and students are regularly invited to make presentations at
community events.
Arrangements for governance are adequate. The governing body includes
representation from parents and local business experts as well as the owners. The
body meets regularly to support the principals agenda for improvement. It is less
diligent in holding the senior team accountable for the quality of the schools
performance.
The school is well organised and its routine operations are efficient and effective. Staff
and students effectively follow the complex routines and procedures to ensure
smooth transition times in this very large organisation. Teachers are sufficient in
number. There are insufficient KG and primary teachers with an in depth
understanding of early years and primary education pedagogy.
Professional development of teachers has been a high priority since the last
inspection. Regular training has been provided for all teachers. There has been
insufficient monitoring of the impact of the training on student learning. The schools
premises are adequate. Despite the increase in resources, there are too few
technological resources to support teaching and learning. There are insufficient
resources to support the delivery of an activity-based early years curriculum for the
KG.

Page 19 of 20

What the school should do to improve further:


1. Improve the consistency and quality of teaching and learning, particularly in
KG and primary phases so that the majority of students achieve above
curriculum and international standards by ensuring that all teachers:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.

build effectively on students prior knowledge


plan age appropriate activities, matched to curriculum expectations
provide targeted support for the less able students and appropriate
challenge for the more able in every lesson
plan learning activities that allow students to work independently
and collaboratively
monitor closely what students are learning and provide specific
guidance on how to improve.

2. Strengthen the impact of leadership by ensuring that:


i. all departments and teachers make effective use of assessment data
to accurately identify gaps in students achievement and use this to
plan and deliver lessons to meet the needs of all students
ii. there are sufficient senior leaders and teachers with sufficient
primary and early years knowledge and experience to support
teachers effectively in those phases
iii. the impact of performance management is improved by focusing to
a greater extent, especially during lesson observations, on the
quality of learning.

Page 20 of 20