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Unit 2: Defining Freedom and Equality in the World

Overview
In this unit, students will analyze the ideological interdependence of the United States with the
international community in terms of global efforts for freedom and equality. Students should analyze
such documents as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Charter in
terms of their impact on multiple perceptions of freedom and equality. Students should also examine
the goals, purposes, and actions of non-governmental organizations and international organizations to
determine their influence on global freedom and equality. Students should analyze international crises
such as genocides, Rwanda, Bosnia, Cambodia, Tibet, Chinas one-child law, apartheid, human
trafficking, child soldiers, HIV/AIDS, and extreme poverty and industrialization, including forced
industrialization through international economic pressure, and they should identify historical examples
of scientific racism that contributed to and/or supported civil liberties/rights abuses. Students should
also examine the U.S. responses to international crises in order to determine the U.S. impact on global
issues concerning freedom and equality. Students should analyze a variety of primary sources in this
unit, including newspaper articles, photojournalism, diaries/letters, WHO documents, speeches,
poetry, songs, and art from within and without the crisis-stricken areas. Students should also examine
the role of communication, transportation, and technology in global awareness of and responses to
international crises.

Generalizations
1. Applying historical inquiry methods to a variety of texts, both primary and secondary, can shed
light on the global struggle for freedom and equality.
2. Various groups, individuals, and movements around the world have influenced the establishment,
beliefs, and actions of international civil rights groups that advocate for greater freedom and
equality for global populations.
3. Individuals and groups from around the world sometimes use strategy, power, and authority to
oppose greater freedom and equality.
4. Global perceptions of freedom and equality have been significantly influenced by the United States
involvement with the international community.
5. Technological innovationsparticularly in communication, transportation, and sciencesignificantly
impact the international development and advancement of freedom and equality.
6. Popular culture around the world reflects and impacts struggles and protests for freedom and
equality.
7. Segregation, discrimination, and stereotypes impact the development of identity and the
relationships among peoples, and literature, music, and the arts can be used to examine the
development of identities and relationships over time.
8. While there are ideological differences between the United States and other nations in terms of
defining freedom and equality, American documents and social movements have significantly
influenced international movements and interpretations and applications of freedom and equality.

21st Century Civil Liberties & Civil Rights, Unit 2

Essential Questions
1. How have various groups, individuals, and movements around the world influenced international
civil rights groups?
2. How have some individuals and groups from around the world used strategy, power, and authority
to oppose greater freedom and equality?
3. How have global perceptions of freedom and equality been influenced by the United States
involvement with the international community?
4. How have technological innovations (particularly in communication, transportation, and science)
impacted the international development and advancement of freedom and equality?
5. How does popular culture from around the world reflect and impact struggles and protests for
freedom and equality?
6. How do segregation, discrimination, and stereotypes impact the development of identity and
relationships among peoples in an increasingly globalized world?
7. How can literature, music, and the arts reveal the development of identities and relationships over
time?
8. What are some ideological differences between the United States and other nations in terms of
defining freedom and equality?
9. How have American documents and social movements influenced international movements and
interpretations and applications of freedom and equality?

Recommended Documents
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
United Nations Charter

International Covenant on Economic, Social


and Cultural Rights

Possible Topics for Human Rights Violations

My Lai

Abu Grait

Holocaust

Rwanda

Drone attacks

Genocide in Darfur

Religious intolerance in Afghanistan,


Algeria, Brazil, Burundi, Colombia,
Ethiopia, Indonesia, Liberia, Nigeria,
Middle East, Congo, Russia, Uganda,
China (ex, Muslims in Xingjiang)

21st Century Civil Liberties & Civil Rights, Unit 2

Godhra India (Feb. 2002)Muslims


attacked Hindus leading to 2,000 Muslim
deaths

Torture of prisoners in Brazilian prisons

LRA in Uganda / Invisible Children (child


solders)

Slavery in Albania, Saudi Arabia, Belarus,


Brazil, Cambodia, Colombia, George,
Kirghistan, Sudan, Sierra Leone, Turkey,
Uzbekistan, Vietnam

Vietnam detained 75,000 people deemed


high risk for contracting HIV (2002)

Other Online Resources

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml

Abbreviated Version of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:


http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/edumat/hreduseries/hereandnow/Part-5/8_udhr-abbr.htm

Charter of the United Nations: http://www.un.org/en/documents/charter/

International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights:


http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/3ae6b36c0.html

Human Rights Watch: http://www.hrw.org/

Amnesty International: http://www.amnesty.org/

World Health Organization: http://www.who.int/en/

United Nations Refugee Agency: http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/home

United Nations Human Rights: Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (links to
documents): http://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/Pages/InternationalLaw.aspx

Monitoring the Core International Human Rights Treaties:


http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/Pages/TreatyBodies.aspx

Timeline of Human Rights: http://www.udhr.org/history/timeline.htm

A Chronology of the Global Human Rights Struggle: http://www.globalissues.org/article/154/achronology-of-the-global-human-rights-struggle

Popular Culture Resources

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: http://www.ushmm.org/

The Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute: http://www.genocide-museum.am/eng/index.php

Genocide Watch: http://www.genocidewatch.org/

United Human Rights Council: http://www.unitedhumanrights.org/

Senator William Proxmire Collection (pushed US to sign Universal Declaration of Human Rights,
speeches, documents): http://preview.wisconsinhistory.org/Content.aspx?dsNav=Ny:True,Nrc:id4294966726,N:4294961297&dsNavOnly=Ny:True,N:4294966724

Create Africa South (NGO dedicated to society, creativity, and identity, offers personal voices and
art): http://www.cas.org.za/home.htm

Muthal Naido poetry: http://www.muthalnaidoo.co.za/index.php?


option=com_content&task=view&id=80&Itemid=88

Poetry and Human Rights: Poems by Dennis Brutus: http://www.worcester.edu/dbrutus/Shared


%20Documents/PoemsDennisBrutus2010.pdf

So Just: A Primary Source History of Social Justice (contains poems, songs, literature, art,
declarations, acts, etc from around the world, although many relate to the US):
http://www.sojust.net/index.html

In Their Own Words (voices from Holocaust, genocide survivors):


http://www.keene.edu/cchs/ownwords.cfm

Keene State College Wallace Mason Library online digitized collection of primary sources and an
extensive number of links to podcasts, journals, websites, museums, collections, etc:
http://libguides.keene.edu/content.php?pid=107373&sid=809612

Georgetown University Library collection on Conflict: Genocide, Terrorism, War (links to websites,
collected primary source documents, truth commissions, institutes of peace):
http://guides.library.georgetown.edu/content.php?pid=212204&sid=1766389

Cambodian Primary Sources: http://resources.primarysource.org/content.php?


pid=161302&sid=1363677

Holocaust and Modern Genocides Primary Sources (many narratives):


http://guides.library.ipfw.edu/content.php?pid=122589&sid=1053573

Teaching Holocaust and Genocide Using Literature (good intro for teachers!):
http://www.slideshare.net/timothyhensley/teaching-holocaust-and-genocide-using-literaturepresentation

12 Great Songs About Genocide: http://www.genocidetext.net/gaci_songs.htm

Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies (has a virtual museum with primary source art, teacher
resources, educational materials, etc): http://chgs.umn.edu/museum/

Unit Goals

What do students need to KNOW?

What do students need to be able to DO?

How some international groups, individuals, and


movements that have influenced international civil
rights groups

Analyze the influence of some international groups,


individuals, and movements on international civil
rights groups

How some international individuals and groups have


used strategy, power, and authority to oppose greater
freedom and equality

Analyze how some international individuals and


groups have used strategy, power, and authority to
oppose greater freedom and equality

Influence of US involvement with the international


community on global perceptions of freedom and
equality

Analyze the influence of US involvement with the


international community on global perceptions of
freedom and equality

Impact of technological innovations in


communication, transportation, and science on the
international development and advancement of
freedom and equality

Analyze the impact of technological innovations in


communication, transportation, and science on the
international development and advancement of
freedom and equality

Popular culture from around the world that reflects


and impacts struggles and protests for freedom and
equality

Analyze how popular culture from around the world


reflects and impacts struggles and protests for
freedom and equality

Impact of segregation, discrimination, and


stereotypes on the development of identity and
relationships among peoples in an increasingly
globalized world

Analyze the impact of segregation, discrimination,


and stereotypes on the development of identity and
relationships among peoples in an increasingly
globalized world

The relationship between literature, music, and the


arts and the development of identities and
relationships over time

Analyze the relationship between literature, music,


and the arts and the development of identities and
relationships over time

Ideological differences between the US and other


nations in terms of defining freedom and equality

Influence of American documents and social


movements on international movements and
interpretations and applications of freedom and
equality

Explain ideological differences between the US and


other nations in terms of defining freedom and
equality

Analyze the influence of American documents and


social movements on international movements and
interpretations and applications of freedom and
equality

I Can Statements

I Can analyze the influence of some international groups, individuals, and movements on
international civil rights groups.

I Can analyze how some international individuals and groups have used strategy, power, and
authority to oppose greater freedom and equality.

I Can analyze the influence of US involvement with the international community on global
perceptions of freedom and equality.

I Can analyze the impact of technological innovations in communication, transportation, and


science on the international development and advancement of freedom and equality.

I Can analyze how popular culture from around the world reflects and impacts struggles and
protests for freedom and equality.

I Can analyze the impact of segregation, discrimination, and stereotypes on the development of
identity and relationships among peoples in an increasingly globalized world.

I Can analyze the relationship between literature, music, and the arts and the development of
identities and relationships over time.

I Can explain ideological differences between the US and other nations in terms of defining
freedom and equality.

I Can analyze the influence of American documents and social movements on international
movements and interpretations and applications of freedom and equality.

Aligned Course Essential Standards

H.1
Apply
historic
al
inquiry
and
method
s to
underst
and the
Americ
an
struggl
e for
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

H.3
Unders
tand
the
influen
ces,
develo
pment,
and
protest
s of
various
20th
century
civil
rights
groups
on
behalf
of
greater
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

H.4
Analyz
e how
individ
uals
and
groups
used
strateg
y,
power,
and
authori
ty to
oppose
greater
freedo
m and
equalit
y
during
the 20th
century
.

H.5
Analyz
e how
shared
sacrific
e and
hardshi
p by
Americ
ans
influen
ced
percept
ions of
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

H.6
Analyz
e
technol
ogical
innovat
ion in
terms
of its
impact
on
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

C.1
Evaluat
e the
challen
ges of
forming
an
identity
in a
diverse
society
founde
d on
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

C.2
Analyz
e the
ideolog
ical
interde
penden
ce of
the
United
States
with
the
world
in
terms
of
freedo
m and
equality
.

H.1.1
Evaluat
e
historic
al
interpr
etation
s and
narrati
ves on
freedo
m and
equalit
y in
terms
of
perspe
ctive,
logic,
use of
eviden
ce, and
possibl
e bias.

H.3.2
Explain
the
intellec
tual,
philoso
phical,
and
religiou
s
influen
ces on
the
establis
hment,
beliefs,
and
actions
of civil
rights
groups.

H.4.1
Analyz
e the
use of
intimid
ation,
coercio
n, and
violenc
e by
individ
uals
and
groups
in
impedi
ng the
develo
pment
of
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

H.5.1
Analyz
e the
relation
ship
betwee
n the
United
States
particip
ation in
various
world
wars
and
percept
ions of
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

H.6.1
Analyz
e how
industri
al
develo
pment
impact
ed both
the
freedo
m and
equalit
y of
worker
s and
consu
mers.

C.1.1
Evaluat
e the
effects
of
segreg
ation
and
discrim
ination
on the
identity
and
relation
ships of
people.

C.1.2
Evaluat
e the
impact
of
stereot
ypes
on the
identity
and
relation
ships of
people.

C.1.4
Use
exampl
es of
literatu
re and
the
arts to

C.2.1
Analyz
e
ideolog
ical
differen
ces
betwee
n the
United
States
and
other
nations
in
terms
of their
impact
on
multipl
e
perspe
ctives
and
underst
anding
s of
freedo
m and
equality
.

C.2.2
Analyz
e the
relation
ship
betwee
n

H.1.2
Analyz
e
multipl
e
perspe
ctives
of
freedo
m and
equalit
y
within
and

H.3.4
Analyz
e how
various
individ
uals
and/or
disadva
ntaged
groups
strategi
zed,
organiz
ed,
advoca
ted,
and

H.4.2
Analyz
e the
use of
power
and
authori
ty by
commu
nity,
busines
s, and
govern
ment

H.5.3
Analyz
e 20th
century
econo
mic
recessi
ons
and
depres
sions in
terms
of their
effects
on
Americ
an

H.6.2
Analyz
e how
the use
of
commu
nicatio
n and
transpo
rtation
technol
ogies
impact
ed the
advanc
ement
of
freedo
m and
equalit

betwee
n
various
leaders
and
groups
of the
momen
t.

H.1.3
Analyz
e
primar
y
sources
in
terms
of the
creator
s
perspe
ctive,
purpos
e, the
overall
historic
al
context
in
which
each
was
produc
ed, and
their
signific
ance to
the
struggl
e for
freedo
m and
equalit
y.
H.1.4
Use
historic
al
inquiry
and
method
s to
genera
te
questio
ns,
theorie
s,
debate
s, and
narrati
ves
from a
variety
of

protest
ed
regardi
ng
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

leaders
to deny
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

percept
ions of
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

y.

H.6.3
Evaluat
e how
the
implem
entatio
n of
theorie
s and
progra
ms in
the
name
of
science
affecte
d the
develo
pment
of
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

examin
e the
parado
x of
identify
ing
ones
self
throug
h
cultural
differen
ces
and a
shared
belief
in
ideals
such as
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

Americ
an and
interna
tional
movem
ents for
freedo
m and
equalit
y in
terms
of their
origins,
factors,
and
influen
ces.

C.2.3
Analyz
e how
other
countri
es,
societie
s, and
interna
tional
leaders
and
groups
have
interpr
eted
and
used
the
values
express
ed in
the
Declara
tion of
Indepe
ndence
and the
United
States
Constit
ution.

C.2.4
Use
knowle
dge
gained
from a
study
of 20th
century
civil
libertie
s and
civil
rights
to
explain

H.6.4
Evaluat
e how
Americ
an
popular
culture
both
reflecte
d and
impact
ed the
struggl
es and
protest
s for
freedo
m and
equalit
y.

sources
.

contem
porary
global
issues
of
freedo
m and
equality
.

Common Core Standards for Literacy in History and Social Studies


READING

WRITING

CMS CCSS Power Standards:

CMS CCSS Power Standards:

R.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to


support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific
details to an understanding of the text as a
whole.

W.11-12.1 Write arguments focused on


discipline-specific content.

W.11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts,


including the narration of historical events,
scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical
processes.

R.11-12.10 Read and comprehend


history/social studies texts in the grade 11-CCR
text complexity band independently and
proficiently.

Additional Reading Standards:

Additional Writing Standards:

R.11-12.2. Determine the central ideas or


information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary that makes clear
the relationships among the key details and
ideas.

W.11-12.3 not applicable as a separate


requirement

W.11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in


which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting,
or trying a new approach, focusing on
addressing what is most significant for a specific
purpose and audience.

W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the


Internet, to produce, publish, and update
individual or shared writing products in response
to ongoing feedback, including new arguments
or information.

W.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more


sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self-generated question) or solve a
problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the
subject, demonstrating understanding of the
subject under investigation.

W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from


multiple authoritative print and digital sources,
using advanced searches effectively; assess the
strengths and limitations of each source in terms
of the specific task, purpose, and audience;
integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism
and overreliance on any one source and
following a standard format for citation.

W.11-12.9 Draw evidence from informational


texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.

W.11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time


frames (time for reflection and revision) and
shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or

R.11-12.3. Evaluate various explanations for


actions or events and determine which
explanation best accords with textual evidence,
acknowledging where the text leaves matters
uncertain.

R.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words


and phrases as they are used in a text, including
analyzing how an author uses and refines the
meaning of a key term over the course of a text
(e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist
No. 10).

R.11-12.5. Analyze in detail how a complex


primary source is structured, including how key
sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of
the text contribute to the whole.

R.11-12.6 Evaluate authors differing points of


view on the same historical event or issue by
assessing the authors claims, reasoning, and
evidence.

R.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple


sources of information presented in diverse
formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively,
as well as in words) in order to address a
question or solve a problem.

R.11-12.8 Evaluate an authors premises,


claims, and evidence by corroborating or
challenging them with other information.

R.11-12.9 Integrate information from diverse


sources, both primary and secondary, into a
coherent understanding of an idea or event,
noting discrepancies among sources.

two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks,


purposes, and audiences.

Assessment Options
W1- Literacy Common Core Power Standard: Writing Arguments

After reading a variety of texts, write ____ that argues your position on ____. Support your position with
evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge competing views, and give examples from past
or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.
o

Example: After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that argues your position on the
American document that has had the most significant influence on international human rights.
Support your position with evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge competing
views, and give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your
position.

Example: After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that argues your position on the
international leader or group that has had the most significant impact on international human
rights. Support your position with evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge
competing views, and give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify
your position.

Example: After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that argues your position on the most
significant international event that sparked global interest in human rights issues. Support your
position with evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge competing views, and give
examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

Example: After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that argues your position which
contemporary international issue most needs to be addressed by the international community.
Support your position with evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge competing
views, and give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your
position.

[QUESTION] After reading a variety of texts, write ____ that addresses the question, and support your
position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. Give examples from
past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

Example: Which American document has had the most significant influence on international
human rights? After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that addresses the question, and
support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views.
Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

Example: Which international leader or group has had the most significant impact on
international human rights? After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that addresses the
question, and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge
competing views. Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify
your position.

Example: Which is the most significant international event that sparked global interest in human
rights issues? After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that addresses the question, and
support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views.
Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

Example: [QUESTION] After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that addresses the
question, and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge
competing views. Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify
your position.

W2- Literacy Common Core Power Standard: Writing Informative Texts


After reading a variety of texts, write a ____ that defines ____ and explains ____. Support your discussion
with evidence from your research. What conclusions or implications can you draw?
o

Example: After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that defines the most basic human
rights and explains how struggles for these rights are revealed through local and global popular
culture, literature, music, and the arts. Support your discussion with evidence from your
research. What conclusions or implications can you draw?

Example: After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that defines contemporary human
rights concerns and explains how the international community interacts with supports and
criticisms in addressing those concerns. Support your discussion with evidence from your
research. What conclusions or implications can you draw?

Example: After reading a variety of texts, write an essay that defines the most basic sense of
human identity and explains how varying definitions of identity are evident in popular culture,
literature, music, and the arts. Support your discussion with evidence from your research. What
conclusions or implications can you draw?

[QUESTION] After reading a variety of texts, write ____ that defines ____ and explains ____. Support your
discussion with evidence from the texts. What conclusions or implications can you draw?
o

Example: What are the most basic human rights, and how are struggles for these rights revealed
through local and global popular culture, literature, music, and the arts? After reading a variety
of texts, write an essay that defines the most basic human rights and explains how struggles for
these rights are revealed through local and global popular culture, literature, music, and the arts.
Support your discussion with evidence from the texts. What conclusions or implications can you
draw?

Example: What are some contemporary human rights concerns, and how is the international
community interacting with supports and criticisms in addressing those concerns? After reading
a variety of texts, write an essay that defines contemporary human rights concerns and explains
how the international community interacts with supports and criticisms in addressing those
concerns. Support your discussion with evidence from the texts. What conclusions or
implications can you draw?

Example: What is the most basic sense of human identity, and how are varying definitions of
identity evident in popular culture, literature, music, and the arts? After reading a variety of
texts, write an essay that defines the most basic sense of human identity and explains how
varying definitions of identity are evident in popular culture, literature, music, and the arts.
Support your discussion with evidence from the texts. What conclusions or implications can you
draw?

R1/R10- Literacy Common Core Power Standards: Reading Closely Over Time with a Variety of GradeLevel Texts

Historical texts (primary and secondary): speeches, diaries, memoirs, biographies, autobiographies,
primary and secondary accounts of events
Religious and/or philosophical texts
Legal documents: legislation, rulings, laws, appeals, etc
Literature: poetry, dramas, stories, novels, political cartoons
Artistic representations: pictures, paintings, drawings, photographs, lithographs, sculptures, political
cartoons, markers, monuments
Musical revolutions: jazz, hip hop, rock n roll, rap, etc.
Propaganda: print advertisements, posters, fliers, brochures, audio/visual commercials, etc.
Political platforms: presidential debates, election posters
Popular Culture (ideas, perspectives, attitudes, memes, images, and other phenomena within the
mainstream of a culture; often spread through mass media): music, art, radio, television programs and
commercials, internet resources