Sie sind auf Seite 1von 30

Andr Nol Potvin

M.Sc., CES, CSCS

Andr Nol Potvin is a tness educator and


rehabilitation exercise specialist with 22
years of leadership experience and 13 years
of specialization in clinical exercise and postinjury rehabilitation. He is currently managing
partner of EnerChanges Medical, Health,
Wellness and Fitness Clinic in Vancouver.
Andr holds a M.Sc. in cardiac rehabilitation
from the University of British Columbia,
where he served for 4 years on the teaching
faculty of the School of Human Kinetics. He is a certied Clinical
Exercise Specialist (CES) of the American Council on Exercise and
an NSCA Certied Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS).
Andr is also founding president and owner of INFOFIT Educators
School for Fitness Professionals and a BCRPA Trainer of Leaders.
He is frequently invited to lecture at international certication and
continuing education seminars for personal trainers, chiropractors,
physiotherapists and registered kinesiologists.
Professional Accreditations & Experience
EnerChanges Medical, Health, Wellness & Fitness Clinic
(www.enerchanges.com)
managing partner, clinical exercise director (2004 - present )
INFOFIT Educators School for Fitness Professionals
founding president & owner (1988 present)
University of British Columbia School of Human Kinetics:
M.Sc. in cardiac rehabilitation (1998)
teaching faculty member 1997-2001
American Council on Exercise (ACE)
certied clinical exercise specialist
certied personal tness trainer (gold certicate)
National Strength & Conditioning Association (NSCA)
certied strength & conditioning specialist (CSCS)
British Columbia Recreation and Parks Association (BCRPA)
registered trainer of tness leaders
developer of provincial personal trainer exams (A and B)

The
Great
Medicine Ball
Handbook

Written By

Andre Noel Potvin


Michael Jespersen

Edited By

EXPERT: STRENGTH TRAINING, STRETCHING


& GENERAL FITNESS

Andre Noel Potvin



M.SC., C.S.C.S., CES

EXPERT: STRENGTH ANDCONDITIONING & FITNESS

Bill Luke

Ph.D., C.S.C.S., Registered Kinesiologist

EXPERT: STRENGTH TRAINING & GENERAL FITNESS

Bjorn Read-Friedmann

BHK., PFLC, CSCS
GENERAL EDITOR

Michael Jespersen
COPY EDITOR

Karl Thorson

Fifth Printing
( revised July 2007 )
Copyright

2002, 2003, 2004, 2007

by Productive Fitness Products Inc.

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook


Consult your physician before starting any exercise program.
This is of particular importance if you are over 35 and have been
inactive for a period of time. The author and publisher disclaim any
liability from loss, injury, or damage, personal or otherwise, resulting
from the procedures in this book.
Medicine Ball Exercises
Many of the exercises described in this book are difficult and
advanced. They require strong abdominal and back muscles
and should not be attempted unless the user is of an athlete
fitness level or under professional supervision.

We would like to thank Heavenly Bodies for supplying


women's clothing;

Published 2002
Productive Fitness Products Inc.
2289-135A St.
Surrey, B.C. V4A 9V2
For quantity discounts please call toll free:

1-800-994-9097
or write:
Productive Fitness Publishing Inc.
1645Jills Court, Suite 102
Bellingham, WA 98226
or e-mail
mike@productivefitness.com

Visit our Website: www.productivefitness.com


Jespersen, Michael, 1962The great medicine ball handbook

ISBN 0-9696773-9-1
1. Medicine-ball. 2. Exercise I. Potvin, Andr Nol, II.
Title.
GV496.J47 2000
613.714
C2001-911161-4

Table of

Contents
Introduction
General Guidelines
Body Diagrams
Medicine Balls & Accessories
Safe Exercise Flow Chart
Medicine Ball Technique & Safety
Aerobic Training
Sample Routine
Stretching

4
5
6-7
8
9
10
11
12
13-18

Medicine Ball Exercises


Core
Side to Side
Bent over Twist
Standing Twist
Crossover Twist
Reverse Crunch
V Bend
Crunch
Ball Rollout
Pelvic Thrust
Crunch with Ball Roll
Pullover Sit-up
High/LowPass
Sit-up Pass
Standing Side Bend
Bent Legged Deadlift
Lying Trunk Twist
Seated Twist
Over/Under Pass
Outside RotationPass
Inside Rotation Pass
Lying Extension

19
20
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

Lower Body
Squat and Jump
Under Leg Pass
Jump and 180 Twist
Knee Rotation
T Exercise
Split Squat
Penguin Waddle
Squat and Reach
Reverse Lunge
Side Lunge

36
37
38
39
39
40
41
42
43
44

Upper Body
Push-up
Front Raise
Standing Side Reach
Shoulder Twist
Tricep Extension
Giant Circles

45
46
47
48
49
50

Throws and Catches


Side Toss
Overhead Toss
Sit and Toss
Shot Put
Seated Side Toss
Overhead Side Pass
Kick Toss
Overhead Throw
Kneel and Throw
Sit-up and Throw
Quarterback Pass
Underhand Pass

51
52
53
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61

Rotator Cuff
Rotator
Rotator
Rotator
Rotator

Cuff
Cuff
Cuff
Cuff

1
2
3
4

Other Products

62
62
63
63
64

introduction
Whether you are training for a particular sport or for general
fitness, there are many benefits to using a medicine ball in your
routine. The medicine ball is a multi-purpose training tool that
can be used alone or with a partner for improving core strength,
functional movement, muscle coordination, and reaction time as
well as improving overall strength and flexibility. As long as you
are in good physical condition, with no lower back problems,
you will be able to take advantage of the many benefits of
training with medicine balls.
The trend in fitness and sport is toward core strength and
functional movement. The core muscles are the muscles
throughout your midsection including your abdominal, oblique,
hip, and lower back muscles. They are often associated with
bending and lifting motions and for the athlete are the initial
source of speed and power. Not only are these motions
important to the athlete in pursuit of better performance in his
or her sport, but are equally important to the average person
in their everyday tasks such as taking out the garbage, picking
up the kids or moving furniture. Medicine balls, because of their
versatility in size and weight, can be used to strengthen the
core muscles by replicating common sports movements under
controlled circumstances. This is especially important when
training for sports that require strong rotational movement such
as basketball, hockey, football, squash, and tennis. Weak core
muscles lead to poor posture and hence lower back pain.
Functional movements are similar to everyday movements in
that they involve either bending, lifting, reaching, pulling,
standing up or sitting down. The importance of being able to
perform functional movements with ease and confidence, as
well as having strong core muscles, is important to all.
Performing medicine ball exercises in a dynamic fashion, with
speed and power, builds muscle coordination and improves
reaction time. Many of the exercises, especially the throws and
catches, work the entire body at the same time. Unlike weight
training, there is no need to decelerate the exercise movement
as you complete the repetition. When throwing a medicine ball
you can go through a complete range of motion, with a
follow-through movement, after the ball has left your hands.
Good luck and congratulations on using this exceptional fitness
training tool!

General

Guidelines

Always warm up before you start a workout. Try to do a totalbody warm-up before you start training. A good example of a totalbody warm-up is a light jogging motion for lower body and modified
push-ups for upper body. It is especially important to warm up the
specific muscle groups you are going to be using.
Use proper posture. Maintaining proper posture will greatly reduce
chances of injury and maximize exercise benefit. When standing,
always keep your feet shoulder-width apart, unless otherwise
suggested. Do not lock your knees: it puts an unnecessary strain on
them. Keep your back flat and straight, making sure not to twist or
arch in order to complete an exercise.
Use proper exercise form. Focus on the proper motion of the
exercise, while concentrating on the specific muscles being used.
Do not sacrifice proper form to perform more repetitions. Keeping
proper form also means moving in a smooth fluid motion. Know
when your muscles are too tired to keep going.
Breathe properly. Never hold your breath during any part of an
exercise. Holding your breath may cause severe intra-thoracic
pressure and raise blood pressure leading to dizziness, blackout or
worse! The rule of thumb is to exhale slowly on exertion and inhale
on the return part of the exercise.
Stop training if you feel pain. If you feel pain during a specific
exercise, stop immediately. Any continuation may aggravate an
existing injury. Reevaluate your routine to make sure you are doing
a proper warm-up. Decrease the amount of resistance you are
using. Talk to a recognized health professional.
Torso Stabilization. Refers to the use of abdominal and back
muscles (called your anatomical girdle) to provide reinforcement
and protection of the spine during lifting, sport or any other
vigorous activity. In order to safely receive the maximum
benefits from the ball exercises in this book, torso stabilization
is essential. Torso stabilization is achieved through a contraction
of your anatomical girdle musculature (i.e. the transversus
abdominis, internal/external obliques and the deep spinal
muscles). It is easy to engage your anatomical girdle: simply
suck in your stomach while exhaling. Next, as you feel your
muscles contracting, lock them into this contracted state while
you breathe normally and perform any of the medicine ball
exercises in this book. Don't forget to breathe! It gets easier with
practice and provides you with excellent spinal support and
protection during your workouts.

Muscle

ANTERIOR

DIAGRAMS
Sternocleidomastoid
Anterior
Deltoid

Rotator Cuff

(includes muscles underneath)

Trapezius

Biceps

Brachioradialis
Brachialis

Anterior Deltoid

Triceps

Lateral Deltoid

Pectoralis Major
Latissimus Dorsi

Coracobrachialis
(hidden under)

Serratus Anterior

Biceps
Triceps

External Oblique

Brachioradialis

Rectus Abdominis

Wrist & Finger Flexors


Iliopsoas

Tensor Fasciae Latae

(hidden underneath)

Pectineus
Adductor Longus

Sartorius

Quadricep
Group

Gracilis

Vastus Lateralis

Rectus Femoris

Rectus Femoris

Vastus Medialis

Vastus Medialis

Vastus Intermedius
(hidden under)

Tibialis Anterior
Gastrocnemius

Gastrocnemius

Tibialis Anterior

Peroneals

(hidden under)

Neck Extensors

upper trapezius, illiocotalis cervicis, longissimus cervicis, spinalis


cervicis. Deep Extensors: semispinalis cervicis, spinalis cervicis

Neck Retractors

longus colli, longus capitus

Scapular Depressors

latissimus dorsi, low trapezius

Scapular Retractors

rhomboids, mid-low trapezius

Shoulder Stabilizers

pectoralis major, deltoid, triceps (long head), latissimus dorsi, teres


major, rotator cuff

Core (outer unit)

rectus abdominus, erector spinae, internal and external obliques

Core (inner unit)

pelvic floor muscles, diaphragm, multifidui, levator ani, transversus


abdominus

Wrist & Finger


Extensors
Biceps
Lateral
Deltoid

Wrist &
Finger
Flexors

POSTERIOR
Sternocleidomastoid
Levator Scapulae
(hidden under)

Trapezius
Posterior Deltoid

Brachioradialis
Triceps
Brachialis

Infraspinatus
Teres Minor

Posterior
Deltoid

Teres Major
Triceps

Latissimus Dorsi
Quadratus Lumborum

Brachioradialis
Wrist & Finger
Extensors

(hidden under)

External Oblique
Erector Spinae
(hidden under)

Gluteus Medius

Piriformis

(hidden
under)

Tensor Fasciae Latae


Adductor
Magnus

Gluteus Maximus

Biceps Femoris
Semitendinosus
Semimembranosus

Gastrocnemius

Gastrocnemius

Soleus

Soleus

Hamstring
Group

Calf
Group

Pelvis Stabilizers

rectus abdominus, obliques, quadratus lumborum, latissimus dorsi

Spinal Rotators

obliques, erector spinae (unilaterally), rectus abdominus


(unilaterally), deep spinal rotators

Hip Stabilizers

hip flexors, hip abductors, hip extensors, hip rotators

Hip Flexors

iliopsoas, sartorius, rectus femoris, tensor facia latae

Hip Adductors

adductor brevis, longus and magnus, gracilis, pectineus

Hip Extensors

gluteus maximus, hamstrings

Hip Abductors

gluteus medius and minimus, tensor fasciae latae, piriformis

Ankle Stabilizers

gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis posterior, tibialis anterior, peroneals,


extensor digitorum longus, brevis

What Youll Need

Medicine Balls &


Accessories

Medicine Balls

No longer just a heavy sand-filled leather ball, medicine balls


come in many different colors and varieties. Many also have
a textured surface for easier gripping. Some will float in water.
They come in different sizes, ideal for simulating sport activities
such as baseball, volleyball, soccer and basketball.
Solid Rubber
Has medium bounce. 1-7kg.
Water Filled
Has little bounce, designed to hold in one hand. .5-5kg.
Air Filled
Has medium bounce, variety of sizes and weights. .5-5kg.
Gel Filled
Has little bounce, designed to hold in one hand.5-5kg.
Super Heavy
Has no bounce. 20-35lbs.
Hollow core
Can be filled with water to adjust weight. Not filled they bounce
and float in water. 1-7kg
Ooof Ball (solid polyurethane)
Can be filled with water to adjust weight. Not filled they bounce
and float in water. 1-7kg

Accessories
Medicine Ball Rebounder

Medicine Ball Holder

Medicine Ball Exercises

Safe Exercise

flow chart
(Soreness Test)

Perform the
exercise

Determine if:

1. Pain exists
2. Stiffness/tightness
exists

None

Mild

0 - 1/10 No pain

2 - 4/10 Pain

If

pain
decreases:
monitor over
24 hours

Continue to
exercise and
stretch

If

pain increases
or persists:
monitor over
48 hours

Stop

Consult physician
or health
professional

Okay to
exercise

No
exercise

Do as
instructed

Do as
instructed

Pain Reference Scale


10
5
3
0

Moderate +

5 - 10/10 Pain

= Extreme pain
= Affects normal movement
= Does not affect normal movement
= No pain

10

Medicine Ball

Technique & Safety


Safety
If you are new to exercise, dont start with medicine ball
training. First, master flexibility training, then weight training,
with a focus on core strength, gradually moving to medicine
ball training much later.
Warm up before starting any medicine ball exercises
Initially, all exercises should be performed slowly, with control
and proper form. Increase speed only when you have
developed your technique. Always maintain proper form and
control.
Wear proper exercise footwear. Proper exercise shoes will
help prevent slipping, allowing you to focus on the correct
motion of the exercise. Exercising in bare feet or socks is not
recommended.
Work out in an open space, away from furniture and other
fixtures or structures that may cause injury.
Maintain control of the ball at all times. Loss of control may
result in injury.
Start with little or no weight and gradually build up as your
ability to perform the exercise improves.
Do not exercise on slippery surfaces.
Keep the ball away from sources of heat including heaters,
fireplaces, etc.
When doing partner activities try to match partners with similar
size, strength and ability.
Wear proper exercise clothing that allows a full range of motion.
Drink plenty of water when exercising.
Passing Technique
Grip the ball from the top and the bottom when accepting the
ball.
Grip the ball from the sides when passing the ball.
Catching Technique
Reach out to meet the ball as it comes toward you.
Have your hands slightly apart and open wide.
When catching a long throw, dont stand in the travel path of the
ball.

11

Aerobic

Training
Aerobic exercise can be any type of activity that causes your heart rate
to increase and makes you breathe harder than normal. By
definition, aerobic means with oxygen.
If you attend a ball class, youll likely experience a series of ball
exercises with little rest between each exercise. After 45 minutes to
an hour of training at this pace, you have a routine that is comparable
to any other aerobic workout. As in all aerobic activity, you want to
calculate your target heart rate range and then make sure your heart
rate falls within the range when you are exercising.
You can take your pulse
at the wrist by placing
the index and middle
finger on the underside
of your wrist. Youll have
to stop exercising while
you do this. Count the
number of beats for 15
seconds and multiply by
4 to give you the heart
beats per minute.

Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE)



Rating
Description

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Nothing at all
Very light
Light
Somewhat moderate
Moderate
Somewhat hard
Hard
Somewhat intense
Intense
Almost maximal
Maximal

Another good
measurement is the Rate
of Perceived Exertion.
While not as accurate as
taking your pulse, this
method is much easier to do while exercising. You should be between
5 (somewhat hard) and 8 (intense) when exercising.

The Formula for Calculating Target Heart Rate Range


Start by calculating your Maximal Heart Rate (MHR). Multiply your MHR by
upper and lower percentages to calculate your Target Heart Rate (THR) range.
1) Calculate your approximate Maximal Heart Rate (MHR) by subtracting your
age from 220. Example: 220-25 (age) =195 (MHR of a 25 year old)
2) Then to calculate your Target Heart Rate (THR) range, multiply the MHR by
60% and 90%.
Example: 195 x.60 = 117

195 x .90 = 176

Therefore the THR range for a 25 year old is between 117 and 176 beats per
minute.

12

Sample

Routine
RepETITIONS, SEts, and WORKLOAD
Repetitions, also known as reps, are the number of
times an exercise movement is done consecutively
without rest. One complete series of continuous,
consecutive repetitions is called a Set. Workload refers
to the amount of resistance used in working a particular
muscle or muscle group. Ball training is usually
working against body weight (BW).
Exercise
Bodypart
Shoulder Twist
Shoulders, Abdominals
Push-Up
Chest
Giant Circles
Whole Body
Tricep Extension
Triceps
Partner Squats
Legs, Buttocks
Reverse Lunge
Quadriceps
Penguin Waddle
Inner Thigh
Standing Twist
Obliques
Lying Extension
Lower Back
Pelvic Thrust
Gluteal, Hamstring
Crunch
Abdominals

Reps*
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15
12-15

Sets Workload
1-2
Light
1-2
BW
1-2
Light
1-2 Medium
1-2
Heavy
1-2
Light
1-2
Light
1-2
Light
1-2
Light
1-2 Medium
1-2 Medium

BW= Body Weight


Workload:Depends on ability, strength level, size of person. Start with a

light weight and work up.
Pace: To get the best results from a ball routine, try to maintain
a steady pace throughout all the exercises. Allow only 15-20
seconds rest between sets and move quickly from one exercise
to the next.
Stop once or twice during the routine to make sure you are
training in your target heart rate range**.
How often: work out 3-4 days a week, alternating workout and
rest days, ( i.e. one day on, one day off).
If you are unable to complete the suggested number of
repetitions with perfect form, do as many as you can.

Stretching
By Andre Noel Potvin, MSc, CSCS, CES
Why Stretch?
Regular stretching helps maintain and improve flexibility. The definition
of flexibility is a joints ability to move through a normal range of motion
(ROM). Each joint has its own degree of flexibility; therefore, its
possible to be very flexible in one joint and stiff in another. The primary
limitation in joint ROM is due to the tough connective tissue running
through the muscle belly. Other factors that influence flexibility include:
age
genetics
activity (previous exercise experience)
joint structure (injury
or no injury)
gender (women are generally more flexible than men)
body temperature (slightly warmer than normal is more effective)
opposing muscle tightness (opposing muscles are responsible for
returning limbs to their original position).
Stretching is the practice of tissue elongation, or lengthening muscle
and connective tissue for the purpose of reducing tension around a
specific joint. Stretching allows the joint to move more freely. Some
benefits of stretching include:
increased joint range of motion
reduced joint stress due to muscular imbalances
reduced chronic soft-tissue pain (i.e., neck, back, knees, etc.)
increased relaxation
enhanced well-being
When stretching, keep the following points in mind.
Stretch to a mild-intensity (30%-40% of maximum intensity). The
stretch should feel like a comfortable pull.
Hold stretches for 30-60 seconds, until the muscle relaxes. When
you begin a stretch, your muscles will feel tight; this feeling
subsides as the muscle relaxes, then elongates.
Stretch when your muscles are warm, ideally after physical activity,
such as resistance training or aerobics. Stretching with warm
muscles enhances results. Avoid stretching cold muscles.
Pay extra attention to your tightest joints. Flexibility is joint-specific;
focus on all joints with restricted ROM.
Proper body alignment is critical for getting maximum results.
Carefully study and follow the stretch positions and explanations in
this handbook.
Repeat each stretch 2-3 times.
Breathe deeply as you stretch; this enhances relaxation by
stimulating the Central Nervous System (CNS).

13

14

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook


IMPORTANT SAFETY TIPS
STOP stretching if you feel pain.
NEVER push against or force a joint beyond its limit.
NEVER hold a stretch longer than 90 seconds. Doing so could
weaken the tissue and increase the risk of injury and/or irritation.
If you feel pain during any of these stretches, STOP IMMEDIATELY
and see your physician.

Flexibility Training Guidelines


Intensity

Using a scale of 1-10, stretch at about a


3-4 intensity level (1=very mild stretch,
and 10=extreme stretch). You should
feel a comfortable pulling sensation,
never pain.
1 out of 10=very very mild
10 out of 10=extremely intense

Time

Hold each stretch for 30-60 seconds.


Perform each stretch 2-3 times.

Other Variables

For optimal results, stretch after a warmup or aerobic activity when the muscles
are warm.

Stretch Routine
1

Neck Retractions/Chin Tucks


(Stretches: neck extensors)

In a standing position, poke your chin


and head forward, then draw your
chin backward, flattening the back of
your neck.
2
(Stretches: scalenes, upper
Keeping neck retracted (chin in), tuck
trapezius)
chin down, toward your chest.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3
Tilt head to the right
times. Repeat often during the day.
and lower your left
shoulder.
Place right hand on
left side of head
to gently intensify
stretch.
Hold for 30-60
seconds; repeat
2-3 times. Switch
sides.
Caution: Be very
gentle when
intensifying this
stretch.

Head Tilts

Stretching

Head Turn

(Stretches: neck rotators)

15

Place right index and middle finger on left side


of jaw.
Place left hand on back of head, on the right side.
Gently rotate head to the right, using hands to
intensify stretch.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Switch sides.

Ball Arch
(Stretches: chest, ribs, shoulders, abs, spine)

Lie face-up on a stability ball.


Place hands behind head, holding abs tight.
Squeeze shoulder blades together, opening elbows to the side.
Arch your back over the ball with feet flat on floor, keeping neck
neutral as you slightly look up toward ceiling.
Breathe deeply, expanding the chest.
Start by holding for 5 seconds,
then releasing. Gradually
increase over time to hold for
30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3
times.

Handcuff Towel

(Stretches: anterior deltoid, chest, biceps)


Hold a towel behind your back with
palms facing body.
Squeeze shoulder blades together
and pull arms backward.
Keep abs tight and dont arch lower
back.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3
times.
Note: Avoid leaning forward, rolling
shoulders forward or poking your
neck forward.
Advanced: Grip fingers together
and repeat as above without the
towel.

Overhead Reach

(Stretches: latissimus dorsi)


Standing or kneeling, interlace fingers and
reach arms overhead, palms down.
Keep neck neutral; avoid poking head
forward.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Variation: Clasp the left wrist, pulling arm up
and to the right. Repeat on left.

Variation

16

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook

Seated Arm Cross-Over Hug


(Stretches: rhomboids, middle and lower trapezius, erector spinae)
Sit with legs slightly bent in front of
you.
Cross arms, keeping them straight;
hold right thigh with left hand and left
thigh with right hand.
Sit back, using your abs.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3
times.

Shoulder Towel Stretch


(Bottom arm stretch external rotators, anterior deltoid)


(Top arm stretch - posterior deltoid, triceps)

Hold one end of towel in right hand, raising


right arm overhead.
With towel hanging behind back, grab other
end with left hand.
Pull up on towel with right hand, straightening
arm, to stretch left (bottom) shoulder.
Pull down on towel with left hand,
straightening arm, to stretch right (top)
shoulder.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Switch sides.
Note: Keep shoulder blades squeezed
together.

Single-Knee Corkscrew

Bottom arm
stretch

Top arm
stretch

(Stretches: gluteus maximus, obliques, erector spinae, piriformis)


Sit with left leg straight and right leg bent, knee
close to chest and right foot on opposite side
of left knee.
Place right hand on floor behind you for
support.
Wrap left arm around right knee, pulling up into
left shoulder.
Rotate torso until you feel a comfortable
stretch.
Breathe deeply. As you exhale, twist a little
more.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Switch sides.
Note: This stretch works best when you sit up as
straight as possible.

Stretching

10

Runners Hip Stretch


(Stretches: tensor fasciae latae, iliopsoas, rectus
femoris, obliques, erector spinae, spine)

Take a large step forward with right leg.


Place a stability ball under right buttock for
support, keeping most of your weight on
legs.
Bend left knee down and toward front leg.
Twist torso to the right, placing right hand
on ball (or right buttock), and left hand on
right side of right thigh.
Squeeze buttocks and tilt pelvis forward.
(Imagine pelvis is a bucket tilting to pour
water behind you.)
You should feel the stretch in the left hip
and thigh.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Switch sides.
Note: Avoid arching lower back
Advanced: Cross left foot behind you and to
the right; repeat as above.

Variation

11

Seated Towel Stretch


(Stretches: hamstrings, gastrocnemius)
Sit with both legs slightly bent in front of
you.
Wrap a towel or rope around left foot.
Gently straighten left leg until you feel a
comfortable stretch.
Pull left toes and foot toward you.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Switch sides.
Note: Lift chest and straighten back by
arching through lower back; retract
shoulder blades (avoid rounding them
forward) and keep neck neutral, or look
slightly down.

12

Bent-Knee Stretch
(Stretches: quadriceps, hip flexors)

Hold left ankle while standing.


Pull left heel to buttocks, or until you reach
a comfortable stretch.
Point left knee toward floor.
Tilt pelvis. (Imagine pelvis is a
bucket tilting to pour water
behind you.)
Keep spine straight and upright,
chest lifted and head neutral.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Switch sides.
Modification: For a stiff knee or quadriceps,
place left foot on a bench or chair.

Variation

17

18

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook

Cross-Leg Stretch

13

(Stretches: gluteus medius and minimus)

Sit on a chair or bench and cross left leg so left ankle


rests on right knee.
Sit straight with chest lifted and shoulder blades slightly
squeezed together.
Gently press on left knee with left hand until you feel a
comfortable stretch.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times. Switch sides.

14

Inner Thigh Stretch


(Stretches: adductors)

Stand with feet wide apart, both hands on left


thigh.
Perform a slight squat, leading with buttocks
and keeping chest lifted.
Shift your weight to the left until you feel a
comfortable stretch.
Angle left foot a little toward the left, with left
knee aligned over second toe.
Point right foot forward, keeping sole flat on
floor.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times.
Switch sides.

15

Bent-Knee Calf Stretch

(Stretches: soleus)
Step forward with right foot, placing right heel on floor,
toes up and both hands on left thigh.
Slowly squat with left leg until you feel a comfortable
stretch in left calf. Keep left heel on floor.
Pull left toes toward your shin to intensify.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times. Switch sides.
Note: Keep heels down and weight on back leg; lift chest
and slightly arch lower back.

16

Straight-knee Calf Stretch


(Stretches: gastrocnemius)

Step forward with right foot.


Straighten left leg, gradually pressing left heel to floor.
Stop when you feel a comfortable stretch in left calf.
To intensify, pull left toes toward shin.
Hold for 30-60 seconds; repeat 2-3 times. Switch
sides.
Note: Keep your heels down and weight on back leg; lift
chest and slightly arch lower back.

Exercises

Side to Side

Purpose
This exercise strengthens
your legs, trunk muscles and
improves your range of motion.

1. Start with your feet spaced slightly


wider than shoulder width apart
and your knees slightly bent.
2. Hold the ball in both hands, directly
in front of your upper chest. Your
elbows should be at your sides in
the start position.
3. Hold your stomach in and focus on
stabilizing your torso. (see torso
stabilization, pg. 5)
4. Bend forward at the waist as you
turn your shoulders to the left.
5. Slowly straighten your arms,
bringing the ball toward the floor.
6. Try to touch the floor to the left of,
and in front of your left foot.
7. Pause briefly and a bring yourself
back to the start position.
8. Increase your speed as you
develop your confidence with
this exercise. Repeat with the
other side.

As with all exercises, start with little or no weight


and gradually increase as your ability to perform
the exercise improves.

Core

Medicine Ball

19

20

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook

Core

Bent Over Twist


Purpose
This exercise strengthens your
legs, trunk muscles and improves
your range of motion.

4
1. Start with your feet spaced about shoulder width apart and
knees slightly bent. You should be leaning slightly forward
from the waist, being careful to maintain your balance.
Stabilize your torso. (see torso stabilization, pg. 5)
2. Hold the ball, in both hands, directly in front of your upper
chest. Your elbows should be slightly out from your sides in
the start position.
3. Keeping your back straight, slowly bend forward at the waist
as you bring your right elbow toward your left knee.
4. Stop the twist when you feel a comfortable stretch.
5. Pause briefly and a bring yourself back to the start position.
6. Repeat with the other side.
7. Increase your speed as you develop your confidence with
this exercise.

Medicine Ball Exercises

1.

2.

3.

4.
5.
6.

Purpose

This exercise improves sense


of balance, muscle coordination,
Start with your feet
range of motion and works your
spaced about shoulder
obliques and hip flexors.
width apart and
knees slightly bent.
Stabilize your torso.
(see torso
stabilization, pg. 5)
With your elbows
at your sides, hold
the ball in front of
your chest.
Slowly move the ball
to the right and down
as you bring up your
right knee.
Pause when you feel a comfortable twist.
Slowly return to the start position and repeat with the left side.
Increase your speed as you develop your confidence.

Core

Standing Twist

21

Purpose
Crossover Twist

This exercise works your


abdominals, obliques and hip flexors.

3
4
1. Lie face up on the floor with your knees slightly bent.
2. Hold the medicine ball in both hands just above your chest.
3. Simultaneously, bring your right elbow up to your left knee as
you contract your abdominals, bringing your shoulders off the
ground.
4. Hold in the contracted position for two seconds then return to
the start position.
5. Repeat with the other side.
6. Try to maintain a constant contraction, not releasing the
tension, throughout this exercise.
7. Remember to breathe normally. Dont hold your breath.

22

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook


Purpose

Core

Reverse Crunch

This exercise works


the abdominal and hip
flexor muscles.

1. Start by sitting on the floor with a medicine ball between your


bent knees. Squeeze your knees together to hold it in place.
2. Place your hands behind you for support; then lean back
slightly bringing your feet off the floor. Stabilize your torso.
(see torso stabilization, pg. 5)
3. Slowly bring your knees toward your upper chest. Keep your
chin tucked in.
4. Hold in the upper position for two seconds then return to the
start position.
5. Try to maintain the abdominal contraction, not releasing the
tension, throughout this exercise.
6. Remember to breathe normally. Dont hold your breath.
Purpose
V-Bend

This exercise improves balance and


muscle coordination while working
the abdominals and hip flexors.

1. Start by lying face up on the floor.


2. Grip a medicine ball, placed on the
floor, directly above the top of your
head. Stabilize your torso. (see
torso stabilization, pg. 5)
3. Pull the ball straight up and overhead at the same time as
you raise your legs straight up off the floor.
4. Concentrate on using your abdominals to complete this
motion.
5. Try to bring the ball all the way up to meet your legs.
6. Pause briefly when you feel a good contraction in the
abdominals, then slowly return to the start position.
THISISANADVANCEDEXERCISE.
ITREQUIRES STRONG TORSO STABILITY

Crunch

Purpose
This exercise improves muscle
coordination, works the
abdominals, hip flexors and
adductors.

23

Core

Medicine Ball Exercises

1. Lie on the floor with your knees bent and place a medicine ball
between your bent knees. Squeeze your knees together to hold it
in place. Stabilize your torso. (see torso stabilization, pg. 5)
2. Place your hands behind your head.
3. Keep your chin tucked in throughout the exercise.
4. Slowly begin to lift your shoulders off the mat, at the same
time bringing your knees up to meet your elbows. Focus on
contracting your abdominal muscles to complete this motion.
5. Pause briefly when you feel a good contraction in the
abdominals, then slowly return to the start position.
6. Repeat the exercise in a slow and controlled fashion until you
have completed the set.
Purpose
Ball Rollout

This exercise improves sense of


balance, muscle coordination, works
the back and hamstring muscles.

Variation

1. Lying on your back, place your heels on the ball.


2. Spread your arms out to the sides for extra stability; palms
up or hands in a fist is better for balance training. Stabilize
your torso. (see torso stabilization, pg. 5)
3. Maintaining control of the ball, lift your buttocks off the floor,
then slowly draw your feet in toward your buttocks.
4. Hold this position for 5 seconds, then slowly return to the
start position.
5. For a slightly more intense exercise, requiring better balance,
try it with your hands off the floor and/or with your legs
straight and the ball closer to your heels.

24

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook


Purpose
This exercise works the
glute, hamstring, back
and adductor muscles.
1. Start by lying face up on the floor.
2. Place your arms alongside your body with palms facing the floor.
3. Flex your hips so that knees are up
and feet are flat on the floor.
4. Place a small medicine ball
between your knees. Stabilize
your torso. (see torso
stabilization, pg. 5)
5. Squeeze the ball with your knees as you lift your hips off the floor.
6. Hold the upper position for 10 seconds.
7. Maintain your body in a straight line from knees to shoulders
as you squeeze your glutes.
8. Slowly lower your hips back to floor.
9. Remember to breathe normally.
Dont hold your breath
TIP: Lift your toes off the floor to
increase the gluteal workout.

Core

Pelvic Thrust

Crunch with
Ball Roll
1.
2.

3.

4.
5.
6.

Purpose

This exercise works the


abdominal muscles.
Start by lying face up on the floor,
with a small medicine ball pressed
against your upper thighs.
Bring your knees up so that your feet
are flat on the floor. Hold your stomach
in and focus on stabilizing your torso.
(see torso stabilization, pg. 5)
Slowly begin to lift your shoulders off
the mat, at the same time rolling the ball
up your thighs. Focus on contracting
your abdominal muscles to complete
this motion.
Keep your chin tucked in throughout the
exercise; dont lead with your head.
Pause briefly when you feel a good
contraction in the abdominals, then
slowly return to the start position.
Repeat the exercise in a slow and
controlled fashion until you have
completed the set.

Medicine Ball Exercises


Purpose
This exercise works
the abdominal and
shoulder muscles.

1. Start by lying face up on the


floor with your knees bent
and feet flat on the floor.
2. Grip a small medicine ball in
both hands, holding the ball
near the top of your head.
3. Grip the ball firmly between
your hands. Stabilize your
torso. (see torso
stabilization, pg. 5)
4. Keeping your arms straight,
slowly raise the ball up over
your head.
5. Contract your abdominals,
raising your head and
shoulders up off the floor,
simultaneously bringing the
ball down on the right side
of your body.
6. Continue lowering the ball
until it is as close to the
floor as is comfortable.
7. Pause briefly, then in a
reverse motion slowly bring
the ball back over your
head, returning to the start
position.
8. Repeat the motion on
the other side. Continue
alternating sides.
As with all exercises, start with little or no weight
and gradually increase as your ability to perform
the exercise improves.

Core

Pullover Sit-up

25

www.infofit.ca

Promotional Copy Only


Pages 26 to 63 removed for this sample publication

Please review our


incredible collection
of handbooks and posters
on the next page

64

Other Products by

Productive Fitness Products Inc.

A series of medicine ball exercise


to work the whole body
Individual as well as partner
exercises
A section on rotator cuff exercises
Medicine Ball safety
Sample routine
A complete stretching section
Training tips
Muscle anatomy diagrams

The Great Medicine Ball Handbook

The Great
Medicine Ball
Handbook

ISBN 0-9696773-9-1

80% Bookland EAN 13 Code


Productive Fitness Products Lt
Book Title:
The Great Medicine Ball Handb

80% UPC Code


The Great Medicine
Ball Handbook

Productive
Fitness Products
inc.

Specialty Fitness Books & Charts

Printed in Canada