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Key Themes in Media and Communication Studies (15 credits)

Course Guide

Part of Masters programmes in Media and Communication Studies:


Culture, Collaborative Media, and Creative Industries (One-Year and TwoYear)
Fall 2016

Table of Contents

Welcome ......................................................................................................................................................... 2
Learning outcomes .............................................................................................................................................. 3
Grading system ................................................................................................................................................... 3
Examination ........................................................................................................................................................ 3
Examination opportunities .................................................................................................................................. 4
Programme structure and study format ............................................................................................................... 4
MCS course sites: The tools we use ................................................................................................................... 5
Schedule .............................................................................................................................................................. 7
Reading list ......................................................................................................................................................... 9
Teaching staff.................................................................................................................................................... 11

Welcome
to the course Key Themes in Media and Communication Studies, 15 credits part of the Masters
Programmes Media and Communication Studies: Culture, Collaborative Media, and Creative
Industries (60 or 120 credits). This course guide will function as a complement to the syllabus that
exists for the course. You can find the syllabus here:
http://edu.mah.se/en/Course/KK640B?v=1.1#Syllabus.
In addition to the syllabus and this guide, do not forget to log into Its Learning every day. There you
will find all substantial information that you will need about the course, including the assignments you
will make. It is also there you will deliver your assignments. Its Learning is furthermore the place
where you can put questions to the staff, both questions regarding the content of the course, and
questions concerning technical issues.
The objective of the course guide is to give you a better insight into how the course is set up, but it
should also function as support for the planning of your studies and your learning. In other words, the
guide gives you the pre-conditions for your work during the following ten weeks, but it is you who are
responsible for your studies.

Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt
Course director
E-mail: pille.pruulmann.vengerfeldt@mah.se
Phone (46) 72 501 9570

Learning outcomes
Knowledge and understanding
After completing the course students shall:
1) demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the research field of media and communication
studies and its historical development
2) demonstrate advance knowledge of the field's present dominant theories and research questions
Competence and skills
After completing the course students shall:
1) demonstrate the ability verbally and in writing to report clearly and discuss the aspect of the
research field of media and communication studies, as well as its dominant theories and research
questions

Grading system
ECTS grading scale: A F. Read more about the grading scale, and the ECTS system, here:
http://www.mastersportal.eu/articles/388/all-you-need-to-know-about-the-european-credit-systemects.html.

Examination
This course will be examined through two individual assignments, five and ten credits. For the first
assignment, the possible grades are Pass or Fail. Possible grades for the second assignment range
from A to F. The final grade will be the grade awarded for the second assignment. In order to receive
a final grade, the first assignment must have been completed with the grade Pass.
For both assignment, during the year you will get three opportunities to be examined.
You are entitled to receive the result of your exam within fifteen working days after having taken the
exam, and at least ten days before re-exam.
The description and grading matrix to the assignments will be made available on Its Learning.

Examination opportunities
Assignment one (5 credits): October 24
Assignment two (10 credits):
Delivery of draft outline of paper: October 19
Delivery of final paper for review by other students: January 2
Reading and reviewing 2 papers by other students: January 5
Final discussion of your own and other peoples papers: January 9 and January 10 (includes 1 slide
poster presentation of the key findings of your paper)
Final submission of paper for grading January 11
Second attempt
Assignment one: December 12
Assignment two: February 27
Third attempt
Assignment one: January 30
Assignment two: April 3

Programme structure and study format


The flexible distance-learning format offered by MCS is a unique mixture of online learning and
possibilities for on-site seminars. Even though you are, for the most part, working from your
computer, this programme offers a high level of interaction through livestreamed lectures with
interactive chat options as well as various group assignments throughout the duration of the
programme. As the MCS programme is an online-based masters, we need different online platforms
to be able to communicate and interact with our students. For the daily coursework we use a learning
management system called Its Learning as the base and for our lectures and seminars we use a
livestreaming lecture-tool called Live Lecture. You will get a more detailed overview of the respective
platforms below.
All of our lectures are available online, both livestreamed and on-demand for viewing after the events.
In addition there are Skype based seminars in smaller groups. Presentations from long-distance are
facilitated by video enabled Skype, previously shared presentation files and Live Lecture.
As MCS is a web-based, distance-learning programme, the online environment plays a central role in
the learning process. While the main purpose of our online platforms is to inform and deliver learning
material, we regard them as living environments where lecturers and students interact with each
other, rather than static places of information. The content changes and develops with the activity and
engagement of the users and it is therefore highly important that you visit the respective websites on
a regular basis. We strongly recommend visiting the relevant course sites every day. Its Learning can
also be downloaded as an app on your phone, enabling you to keep track on the recent changes.

MCS course sites: The tools we use


Its Learning
To facilitate the programme and the coursework we use Its Learning, a learning management system
(LMS) at Malm University. Its Learning is not a public platform, and you need to login in each time in
order to access the course-sites. Each course in the programme has its own corresponding course
site in Its Learning and you will find them under the Course tab once you are logged into the system.
On Its Learning you will find all the information needed for you to complete your courses and all
course sites follow the same structure, meaning you will soon find your way around the system.
Check the settings of the Its Learning page, you can order alerts to be sent on your e-mail, note
however, that there are no alerts to some activities and those still need to be checked manually.
Below is a short description of the course site.
Bulletins/Billboard
At the top-centre is a billboard where the lecturers and course leaders publish important information
regarding the course. You must check this billboard regularly as it is your own responsibility to keep
yourself informed. You will see the billboard every time you go to the course site in Its learning.
To the left you will see a menu containing of the following tabs:
Status and Follow-up
This is where your results will be published. Under Assessment record youll find your grade as well
as examiners comments. Only you and the examiner are able to see this part.
Participants
Full list of all lecturers and students.
Links
Contains useful collections of links to resources outside Its Learning, provided by the lecturers
Course content
This is where you will find anything course-specific. This section changes between the different
courses while the Bulletins (the course name), Status and Follow-up, and Participant tabs are general
features that never change. The course-specific content tab does have a certain basic structure
where the seminar and modules folders have a repeated structure of information pages and
subfolders with tools for interaction and communication.
Guidance forum
In an online setting, it is not uncommon for you to have questions that are of relevance both for you
and other students. On Its Learning there is a forum dealing with the content of each specific course,
but also with any kind of other questions you might have. Whenever you have questions of general
interests, please place them in respective forum. Please use the forum to post questions that you
might consider generally interesting and we will answer them there.

Online lectures, seminars and Live Lecture


One of the cornerstones in the MCS programme is Live Lecture a tool for livestreaming of lectures.
The Live Lecture was developed by the staff at our fellow masters programme at K3, Communication
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for Development, and offers a unique platform for online and web-based learning. We will now share
this platform with their team and students.
Live Lecture is a streamed video combined with a text chat that has proven to work well in the nonhomogeneous computer environments of users all over the world. It is designed to work in the
educational context with mixed on-site and online participants attending the same lecture. We use
Live Lecture for our lectures and seminars, enabling our online students to participate and get the full
MCS experience wherever they might be located. To complement the livestreamed video, Live
Lecture has an integrated text chat feature, allowing students to pose questions to the lecturers, as
well as interact with the audience following the seminars and facilitators on-site.

Communication during Live Lecture sessions


As mentioned above, there is an integrated chat that facilitates the communication between the online
participants, the lecturers and the broadcaster. As the communication is a silent text based chat it
doesnt disturb the on-going lectures but appears on a big screen projection in the lecture room,
allowing the on-site followers and the lecturers to read and respond to comments and questions
whenever appropriate. The chat enables audience and speakers to see the online comments and
discussions. The lecturer may pick up questions directly from the chat or one of the facilitating staff
members in the room will read it back to the lecturer.

Technical requirements for Live Lecture


To be able to participate in Live Lecture you will need a Mac or PC with sound output and an internet
connection. If possible you should connect via broadband (high speed) as Live Lecture requires a
stable and fast connection to work at its best. When developing Live Lecture we took into account the
fact that depending on where in the world you sit, you might have different access to the Internet, and
this is why we have three different streams for you to choose between (low, good, fast). We
recommend the fast stream when possible, however, if you have trouble with the broadcast, try using
the good or low streams.
You will need speakers or headphones to be able to actively engage in the lectures and seminars.
Headphones are strongly recommended, especially if you are in a noisy environment. A microphone
or webcam is not required for the lectures as Live Lecture is a one-way webcast and students
communicate via chat. However, in oral presentations you will need at least a microphone, webcam is
a nice extra so that your fellow students can see you while you present.

Flash Player plugin!


Make sure that you have the latest Flash Player plug-in installed on your computer. You will get a
notification if you dont have it installed when you enter the Live Lecture application. Note that this
means that you cant use an iPad as it doesnt support Flash.

Skype
In order to participate in the seminars, you will need to have access to Skype. Register to Skype, pick
user-name that preferably matches the name that you have at the Its Learning and university
systems. Also, pick a profile picture that you would be happy to have shared with others. We prefer to
have video during the seminars, unless the connection quality is really bad, so investing to some sort
of webcam makes seminars easier for everyone involved.
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Schedule
Lecturer
Reading
Pille
Deuze (2011)
PruulmannMorley (2009)
Vengerfeldt
Michael
Krona
Theme 1: Media in the context of social developments
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Introduction
Michael
Chapters 1, 4, 5 in The Media Studies
Sept, globalized culture and
Krona
Reader
13-15 media
5
Sept,
13-16

Lecture theme
Introduction to Key
Themes

Comments-remarks

12
Sept,
15-17

A globalized world From the Marshall Plan


to a mediatised
industry. A brief
introduction to seven
decades of
'development'

Tobias
Denskus

Denskus and Esser (2013)


Potter (2014)
Schuurman (2014)

19
Sept,
10-12

Mediatization in
research and in
everyday life

Pille
PruulmannVengerfeldt

The special issue refers to


the whole
conceptualization of
mediatization debate
issue

19
Sept,
13-15
26-27
Sept

Gamification, control
and empowerment:
logics of a mediatized
world
Seminar on Theme 1
DOODLE, groups of 5-6

Raul Ferrer
Conill

Chapter 18 in The Media Studies


Reader
Deacon and Stanyer (2014)
Hepp et al. (2015)
Special issue of Communication
Theory (2013)
Deterding et al 2012
Conway 2014
All the above.

There will be altogether


ten groups of 5-6 people
and DOODLE will be used
for you to enrol to a
group.

Theme 2: Media production


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Radio in a digital age:
Oct,
evolving practices of
9-12
production and
consumption

Pille
PruulmannVengerfeldt
and
Michael
Krona

Hugo Boothby Before the radio production lecture


listen to at least one episode of the
podcast Serial (Season 1)
https://serialpodcast.org/season-one
Chapter 1 and 2 from Duber (2013)
Hilmes (2013)
Berry (2015)

When you listen to this radio


programme consider the
following
1) What is the content and how
does it sound? Who and what
do you hear? 2) How does this
programme compare with other
radio formats with which you
are familiar?
3) How did you access the
programme? What technologies
did you utilise and which

device(s) did you use for


listening?
4) Where and when did you
listen?

10
Oct,
13-16
17
Oct
13-15
17
Oct
15-17
19
Oct
24-25
Oct

Researching journalism

Margareta
Melin

Melin (2008)
Schudson (1989)

Media activism from


social movements to
extremist organizations
Prosumers, digital
labor and new
technologies

Michael
Krona

Chapters 12, 37, 38 in The Media


Studies Reader

Seminar on Theme 2
DOODLE, groups of 5-6

Michael
All the above.
Krona and
Hugo Boothby

Michael
Krona

Chapters 11, 12, 22, 24 in The Media


Studies Reader
van Dijck (2012)
Ritzer (2014)
Submit your proposal for the assignment two

24
Homework deadline for the first assignment
Oct
Theme 3: Media representations
31
Gender and
Bojana Romic Chapters 2, 14, 18 in The Media
Oct,
representation
Studies Reader
10-12
31
The Crooked Room:
Temitope
Hooks (1992)
Oct,
Media, Blackness and
Odumosu
Kilomba (2008)
13-15 Representation
7 Nov Introduction to
Jakob Dittmar
13-16 representation
14-15 Seminar on Theme 2
Michael
All the above.
Nov
DOODLE, groups of 5-6 Krona and
Bojana Romic
Theme 4: Media audiences
28
Media effects and uses
Nov
and gratification
9-12
studies

Bo Reimer

28
Nov
13-16

Audiences in everyday
life: changing
perspectives of
audience studies

Pille
PruulmannVengerfeldt

5 Dec
9-12

Cultural citizenship and


media practices among
migrant families

Ulrika Sjberg

There will be altogether


ten groups of 5-6 people
and DOODLE will be used
for you to enrol to a
group.

There will be altogether


ten groups of 5-6 people
and DOODLE will be used
for you to enrol to a group

Bushman and Anderson (2015)


Potter (2011)
Blumler (1979)
Quan-Hase and Young (2010)
Chapters 31-36 in The Media Studies
Reader
Livingstone and Das (2009)
Livingstone (2015)
Special issue of the Communication
Review (2013)
Sjberg and Rydin (2014)

5 Dec
13-15

Media ecologies and


cross-media audiences

W50

Seminar on theme 4
DOODLE, groups of 5-6

2 Jan

Present papers for


peer-review
Finalise peer-reviews
Final presentations

5 Jan
9-10
Jan

Pille
PruulmannVengerfeldt
Pille
PruulmannVengerfeldt
and Bojana
Romic

Bolter (2000)
Scholari (2012)

Reading list
A comment to the list: It consists of one book that you will have to get hold of by yourself: The Media Studies Reader,
edited by Laurie Ouellette. All other texts are either available online through Malm Universitys library service (if you
are logged in), available as pdfs on Its Learning, or available through links to the Internet.
Berry, Richard (2015) A Golden Age of Podcasting? Evaluating Serial in the Context of Podcast Histories, Journal of Radio
& Audio Media, 22:2, 170-178, DOI:
10.1080/19376529.2015.1083363 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19376529.2015.1083363
Blumler, Jay G. (1979) The Role of Theory in Uses and Gratifications Studies, Communication Research 6(1): 9-36.
Bolter, Jay David (2000) Remediation and the Desire for Immediacy, Convergence 6(1): 62-71.
Bushman, Brad J. and Craig A. Anderson (2015) Understanding Causality in
the Effects of Media Violence, American Behavioral Scientist 59(14): 1807-1821.
Conway, S., 2014. Zombification?: Gamification, motivation, and the user. Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, 6(2),
pp.129-141.
Communication Review (Volume 16, Issue 1-2, 2013) Special Issue on: Audiences: A Cross-Generational Dialogue
(http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/gcrv20/16/1-2#.VdxbiqCqr1h).
Communication Theory (Volume 23, Issue 3, 2013): Special Issue on Conceptualizing Mediatization
(http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/comt.2013.23.issue-3/issuetoc).
Deacon, David and James Stanyer (2014) Mediatization: Key Concept or Conceptual Bandwagon?, Media, Culture &
Society 36(7): 10321044.
Denskus, Tobias and Daniel E. Esser (2013) Social Media and Global Development Rituals: a Content Analysis of Blogs
and Tweets on the 2010 MDG Summit, Third World Quarterly 34(3): 405-422.
Deterding, Sebastian, et al. "From game design elements to gamefulness: defining gamification." Proceedings of the 15th
international academic MindTrek conference: Envisioning future media environments. ACM, 2011.

Deuze, Mark (2011) Media Life, Media, Culture & Society 33(1): 137148.
Dijck, Jos van (2012) Facebook and the Engineering of Connectivity: A Multi-Layered Approach to Social Media
Platforms, Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies 19(2): 141-155.
Duber, Andrew (2013) Radio in the digital age. Cambridge: Polity
Hall, Stuart and Alan OShea (2013) Common-Sense Neoliberalism, Soundings. A Journal of Politics and Culture. Issue
55: 8-24 (http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/soundings/pdfs/Manifesto_commonsense_neoliberalism.pdf).
Hepp, Andreas, Stig Hjarvard and Knut Lundby (2015) Mediatization: Theorizing the Interplay between Media, Culture
and Society, Media, Culture & Society 37(2): 314324.
Hilmes, Michele (2013) The New Materiality of Radio: Sound on Screens in Loviglio, Jason and Hilmes, Michele (ed.)
(2013) Radios New Wave: Global Sound in the Digital Era pp. 43-61
Hooks, Bell (1992) Introduction, and Eating the Other, pp. 1-8, 21-39 in Bell Hooks: Black Looks: Race and
Representation. Boston, MA: South End Press. (PDF available).
Kilomba, Grada (2008) Introduction, and chapters 1-3 in Grada Kilomba: Plantation Memories: Episodes of Everyday
Racism. Mnster: Unrast Verlag (https://schwarzemilch.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/kilomba-grada_2010_plantationmemories.pdf)
Livingstone, Sonia (2015) Active Audiences? The Debate progresses but it is Far from Resolved, Communication Theory
25: 439-446.
Livingstone, Sonia and Ranjana Das (2009) The End of Audiences? Theoretical Echoes of Reception Amidst the
Uncertainties of Use. In Transforming Audiences 2 conference, 3-4 September 2009, University of Westminster
(http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/25116/1/The_end_of_audiences_%28LSERO%29.pdf).
Melin, Margareta (2008) Expositions: The Field, the Position, the Concepts, pp. 17-76 in Margareta Melin: Gendered
Journalism Cultures. Strategies and Tactics in Britain and Sweden. Gothenburg: Gothenburg University
(http://dspace.mah.se/bitstream/handle/2043/12450/Inlaga%20final?sequence=2&isAllowed=y).
Morley, David (2009) For a Materialist, NonMedia-Centric Media Studies, Television & New Media, 10(1): 114-116.
Ouellette, Laurie (red.) (2013) The Media Studies Reader. New York: Routledge.
Potter, James W. (2011) Conceptualizing Mass Media Effect, Journal of Communication 61(5): 896915.
Potter, Robert B. (2014) The Nature of Development Studies, pp. 16-20 in Vandana Desai and Robert B. Potter (eds.),
The Companion to Development Studies, third edition. London: Routledge (available online from Malm University
library).
Quan-Haase, Anabel and Alyson L. Young (2010) Uses and Gratifications of Social Media: A Comparison of Facebook and
Instant Messaging, Bulletin of Science Technology Society 30(5): 350-361.
Ritzer, George (2014) Prosumption: Evolution, Revolution, or Eternal Return of the Same?, Journal of Consumer
Culture 14(1): 324.
Scolari, C.A., 2012. Media ecology: Exploring the metaphor to expand the theory. Communication Theory, 22(2), pp.204225.

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Schudson, Michael (1989) The Sociology of News Production, Media, Culture & Society, 11(3): 263-282.
Schuurman, Frans J. (2014) The Impasse in Development Studies, pp. 21-24 in Vandana Desai and Robert B. Potter
(eds.), The Companion to Development Studies, third edition. London: Routledge (available online from Malm
University library).

Sjberg, U. & Rydin, I. (2014). 'Talk on the media's role in creating otherness and exclusion: Discursive
identifications and public (dis)connections'. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, 4 (4): 201-209.

Teaching staff
Boothby, Hugo, lecturer in Media and Communication Studies (hugo.boothby@mah.se)
Denskus, Tobias, senior lecturer in Communication for Development (tobias.denskus@mah.se)
Dittmar, Jakob, senior lecturer in Media and Communication Studies (jakob.dittmar@mah.se)
Ferrer Conill, Raul, doctoral researcher in University of Karlstad (raul.ferrer@kau.se)
Krona, Michael, senior lecturer in Media and Communication Studies (michael.krona@mah.se)
Hennel, Martin, lecturer in K3, (martin.hennel@mah.se)
Melin, Margareta, senior lecturer in Media and Communication Studies (margareta.melin@mah.se)
Odumosu, Temitope, Post-doctoral researcher in Living Archives project (temi.odumosu@mah.se)
Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille, senior lecturer in Media and Communication Studies (pille.pruulmannvengerfeldt@mah.se)
Reimer, Bo, professor in Media and Communication Studies (bo.reimer@mah.se)
Romic, Bojana, lecturer in Media and Communication Studies and Communication for Development
(bojana_romic@yahoo.com)
Rundberg, Mikael, interaction designer (mikael.rundberg@mah.se)
Sjberg, Ulrika, Associate professor in Media and Communication Studies (ulrika.sjoberg@mah.se)

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