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Threads of bipolar Symbolism in Religion

Joannes Richter

Fig 1: Initial Ancient History (14th Century)


Introduction
The overwhelming number of bipolar symbols found in ancient
documents reveals a vast religious movement developing
parallel to the mainstream medieval religion.
In The Sky-God Dyaeus a chronological overview of bipolar
(androgynous) symbols has been listed. In this overview
additional information has been grouped according to regional
areas to allow the identification of historical threads in
European countries. These threads may allow to identify the
sequential steps in developing the bipolar symbols.
Initially bipolar symbolism seems to have dominated the
predecessor religious concept. The system however must have
been modified a few centuries before Christ.
The former concept of equal and symmetrical generation of
man and woman from a bisexual creature (Adam Cadmon) had
to be abandoned by promoting the male person to a first-born
image of God and simultaneously devaluing the second-born,
female partner to a servant.
The devaluation gravely disturbed the relation between man
and woman and it will take several decades to restore the
confidential link between the androgynous partners.
In the Middle Age the former concept obviously survived and
was to be tolerated more or less in parallel to the official
Catholic Religion.

2
Most of the medieval, bipolar concepts have been conserved by
several groups:
• The artists who were responsible for illuminating the
medieval Bibles. These artists have been spread all over
Europe. That's why these artists may be seen as the
major source for bipolar wisdom and concepts.
• Various sects such as the Adamites and the masons or
Freemasons, who transported the androgynous concept.
Several red-white-blue flags have been introduced by
Freemasons1.
• Alchemists, who needed androgyny to explain the
chemical forces between elements and substances.
Androgynous symbols predominated the arts of
alchemy, in which the intercourse and matrimony were
extremely popular in describing chemical reactions2.
• Authors like Dante who allowed to publish their works
using androgynous symbolism equivalent to the Bibles.
• Jewish Rabbis like Rashi3 and Rashbam4 and Jewish
authors like Moses de Leon, who documented the
Zohar. The Zohar first appeared in Spain in the 13th
century. The Zohar describes the Tetragrammaton's
(IHVH) androgynous symbolism in detail.
• Royals, who ordered paintings applying the bipolar
symbolism.
1:
The designing elements of the flag of the Philippines are broadly of
Masonic origin.
2:
See Patrism, Matrism and Androgyny
3:
Rabbi Rashi 1040-1105, northern Europe (chapter 27)
4:
Rasbam, Rashi's Great Grandson, 1085-1174, northern Europe (Ch. 27)

3
• Christian spiritualists, who searched purgation and
illumination in mysticism.
Although the Church rejected the androgynous concepts they
obviously tolerated the illumination of Bibles with red and blue
symbols and the symbolic colours in icons and other paintings.
The bipolar concept never seems to have provoked a schism
although some historical schisms have been based on rather
unimportant grounds. Probably the Church tolerated the
concepts to avoid discussions, which might have revealed
other available secret and powerful documents.
Especially alchemy became notable among German nobility,
who, on the eve of the German Renaissance, showed great
interest in alchemy as a fashionable subject while at the same
time rejecting occult magic as impious. Ulmannus' "Book of
the Holy Trinity" as an explicitly Christian treatment of
alchemy could resolve this dilemma and became a prestige
possession in 15th century libraries.
The most important of all ideas in alchemy has been
Mercurius, personified by an androgynous concept of Hermes.
As a remarkable name Hermes has been found in several stages
of European evolution:
• According to Julius Caesar5 Mercury (Greek:
“Hermes”) has been named as the most important Celtic
deity.
• According to Tacitus6 Mercury (Greek: “Hermes”) has
been named as the most important Germanic deity.

5:
De Bello Gallico - book VI, chapter XVII
6:
Germania - Chapter IX: “Deorum maxime Mercurium colunt, cui certis
diebus humanis quoque hostiis litare fas habent.”

4
• The most important alchemical concept is Hermes
Trismegistos
• The most important alchemical element is mercury.
Like the ancient Roman deity Janus Hermes has been depicted
as a bi-faced deity.
Alchemy needed androgyny to explain chemical reactions and
this idea probably inspired researchers, royals and monks to
stabilize their positions in society. Of course these ideas had to
be abandoned as soon as modern science arose at the Age of
Enlightenment .
Still these androgynous concepts may explain some historical
events such as the symbolism in various religious concepts.
This document will not be overloaded with graphical
information to improve loading access and the overview of the
topics. Please inspect the graphics in the linked documents or
the alternative web-sites.

5
Contents
Introduction.........................................................................2
1 Israel.......................................................................................8
850 b.C.: IHVH at the Mesha-Stele....................................8
450 b.C.: The Book Exodus................................................8
400 b.C.: The Second Book of Chronicles..........................9
200: Jeremiah ben Eleazar...................................................9
2 Germany...............................................................................10
530 b.C.: Hochdorf............................................................10
800: Charlemagne..............................................................11
1100: Rashi's Genesis........................................................11
1168: The purple robe of Svantevit...................................11
1170: Rashbam's Genesis..................................................12
1190: Barbarossa...............................................................12
1305: The Codex Manesse................................................12
1419: The Book of the Holy Trinity..................................13
1420: Aurora consurgens...................................................14
1550: The Rosary of the Philosophers .............................14
3 Italy......................................................................................15
50 b.C.: Cicero..................................................................15
1240: The Bolognese Bible...............................................16
1320: La divina Commedia...............................................16
1360: The Neapolitan Bible..............................................17
1498: The last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci....................17
4 Austria..................................................................................18
600: The Viennese Bible...................................................18
1333: The Kremser Bible..................................................18
1395: The Wenzel Bible....................................................18
1791: The Magic Flute – Mozart.......................................19

6
5 France...................................................................................20
1189: The tomb of Henry II Plantagenet...........................20
1199: The tomb of King Richard I, Lionheart ..................20
1247: Bible Initials in alternating Red & Blue..................20
1275: Bibles moralisées....................................................20
1328: Coat-of-arms of the House of Valois ......................21
1358: Colours of Paris.......................................................21
1794: Defining the French Tricolour.................................21
6 England................................................................................22
1189: The tomb of Henry II Plantagenet...........................22
1199: The tomb of King Richard I, Lionheart ..................22
1340: Coats of arms in England........................................22
1340: Royal Arms of England...........................................23
1399: The coronation of King Henry IV...........................23
1801: Union Jack...............................................................23
7 The Netherlands...................................................................25
1229: The tomb for Gerard of Gelre.................................25
1300: Spieghel Historiael..................................................25
1460: Utrechter “historical” Bible.....................................25
1510: The Garden of Delights...........................................26
1572: The Prince's Flag.....................................................26
1573: Letter #10317 (William of Orange)........................27
1672: Assembly hall for the peers (Leyden).....................28
1954: Red = male & Blue = female .................................28
2009: Publication of Dyaeus.............................................28
8 Appendix – Scribd-Publications..........................................29

7
1 Israel

850 b.C.: IHVH at the Mesha-Stele


The Mesha-Stele is notable because it is thought to be the
earliest known reference to the sacred Hebrew name of God -
YHWH. The inscription of 34 lines is written in the Moabite
language. It was set up by Mesha, about 850 BC, as a record
and memorial of his victories in his revolt against the Kingdom
of Israel during the reign of king Ahaziah after the death of
Israel's king Ahab.
The first characters I (or alternatively Y) and V in the name
IHVH respectively YHVH refer to the male and female
elements in symbolism.

450 b.C.: The Book Exodus


According to tradition, the Book Exodus and the other four
Books of the Torah were written by Moses in the latter half of
the 2nd millennium BC. Modern biblical scholarship sees it
reaching its final textual form around 450 BC. The symbolic
coding-system for the colours purple, red and blue and the
twining technology (Byssus) may refer to bipolar
(androgynous) religion, e.g.:

28: 5They shall take the gold, and the blue, and the
purple, and the scarlet, and the fine linen. 6“They shall
make the ephod of gold, of blue, and purple, scarlet,
and fine twined linen, the work of the skilful workman.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

8
400 b.C.: The Second Book of Chronicles
The symbolic coding-system for the colours purple, red and
blue and the twining technology (Byssus) in Solomon's temple
may refer to androgynous religion.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

Purple for Solomon


The Queen of Saba did send Solomon 6000 young children
(boys and girls), who obviously were born at the same time
(hour, month and year). They were all dressed in purple
garments7.
See the documentation at: Yellow for Judas

200: Jeremiah ben Eleazar


Jeremiah ben Eleazar8, a Palestinian scholar of the 2 nd century,
inferred that Adam was created with two faces, one of a man
and one of a woman, and that God afterwards cleft them
asunder.
See the documentation at: Secret Color Codings in the Bible

7:
source in German: "Gesammelte abhandlungen von Wilhelm Hertz"
8:
Info from the website: Jewish Encyclopedia

9
2 Germany

530 b.C.: Hochdorf


Purple has also be found at the garments for the Celtic
sovereign, discovered in an untouched grave at Hochdorf. The
weaving reveals extremely thin singular threads which may
only be identified as red and blue elements under a microscope.
Around 530 BC this weaving technology has been exported to
Italy and weaving red & blue tor produce purple must have
preceded the manufacturing of purple dye in the Mediterranean
area.

Fig 2: Dead body found wrapped in


red and blue towels

The Celtic sovereign had been wrapped in several alternating


coloured red and blue blankets. The grave has been erected
around 530 BC.
See the documentation at: Another Etymology for Purple

10
800: Charlemagne
Charlemagne (Carolus Magnus, meaning Charles the Great;
742 – 814) has been described and depicted wearing a light
purple robe in Spieghel Historiael by Jacob van Maerlant9.
The red & blue colors of his pairs and other nobles in the
painting are clearly visible in the miniatures.
See the documentation at: Yellow for Judas

1100: Rashi's Genesis


Rashi's Genesis (1040-1105) explains: “God created the human
being, being both male and female, which was subsequently
divided into two beings10.”
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

1168: The purple robe of Svantevit


Saxo Grammaticus11 describes the fortress Arcona at the cliffs
of the island of Rügen, where a wooden temple with a purple
roof did contain a four-headed divine sculpture wearing a
purple robe. The temple may only have existed 100 years and
has been destroyed at the 15th of June 1168 after a siege by
Danish Christians. The color purple may refer to the
androgynous character of the deity.
See the documentation at: Yellow for Judas

9:
Jacob van Maerlant. Spieghel Historiael. West-Flanders, 1325-1335.
Shelfnumber KA XX. Fol. 208r. Charlemagne at his court.
10:
Chapter. 27
11:
quoted from: Ingrid Schmidt ”Götter, Mythen und Bräuche von der Insel
Rügen”, Hinstorff Verlag Rostock 2002

11
1170: Rashbam's Genesis
Rasbam, Rashi's Great Grandson explains: “God created
humanity; God included the woman in the man and separated
them later12”.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

1190: Barbarossa
A painting illustrates the red & blue clothing of Barbarossa and
his sons. Obviously the king is wearing a blue overcoat over
red garments. His sons wear red overcoats with blue interior
colours over yellow garments. Barbarossa ruled the empire
between 1155 and 1190.
See the documentation at: A compact Overview of Bipolar
Symbolism

1305: The Codex Manesse


In the Codex Manesse13 emperor Henry has been depicted in a
purple-red overcoat and a blue undercoat. His kings have been
dressed in red and blue garments. The borderline decorations
consist of red and blue elements as well.
See the documentation at: A compact Overview of Bipolar
Symbolism

12:
Rasbam, Rashi's Great Grandson, 1085-1174, northern Europe (Ch. 27)
13:
Cod. Pal. germ. 848, Codex Manesse, Zurich, 1305 bis 1340

12
1419: The Book of the Holy Trinity
The Buch der heiligen Dreifaltigkeit ("Book of the Holy
Trinity") is an early 15th century alchemical treatise, attributed
to one Frater Ulmannus14, a German Franciscan.
The following explanation has been given in Wikipedia "Book
of the Holy Trinity":
The text survives in at least four 15th-century manuscripts, the
archetype Cod. 78 A 11 (Berlin), dated to between 1410-1419 .
“The treatise describes the alchemical process in terms of
Christian mythology. The theme of the book is the analogy of
the passion, death and resurrection of the Christ with the
alchemical process leading to the lapis philosophorum. The
text is one of the most important alchemical works of late
medieval Germany. It is not untypically a combination of
alchemy and Christian mysticism. Ganzenmüller (1956)
speculated that the book may have been known to Jacob
Boehme. The Berlin manuscript contains drawings, some of
which re-appear in later (16th century) alchemical works such
as the 1550 Rosarium philosophorum.
The work became notable among German nobility, who, on the
eve of the German Renaissance, showed great interest in
alchemy as a fashionable subject while at the same time
rejecting occult magic as impious. Ulmannus' work as an
explicitly Christian treatment of alchemy could resolve this
dilemma and became a prestige possession in 15th century
libraries.”
See the documentation at: Patrism, Matrism and Androgyny

14:
latinization of the German given name Ulmann, from OHG uodal-man

13
1420: Aurora consurgens
The Aurora consurgens is an illuminated manuscript of the 15th
century in the Zurich Zentralbibliothek (MS. Rhenoviensis
172). It contains a medieval alchemical treatise, in the past
sometimes attributed to Thomas Aquinas, now to a writer
called the "Pseudo-Aquinas". Unusually for a work of this type,
the manuscript contains thirty-eight fine miniatures in
watercolour.
See the documentation at: Patrism, Matrism and Androgyny

1550: The Rosary of the Philosophers


The Rosary of the Philosophers (Rosarium philosophorum sive
pretiosissimum donum Dei) is a 16th century alchemical
treatise. It was published in 1550 as part II of De Alchimia
Opuscula complura veterum philosophorum (Frankfurt).

14
3 Italy

50 b.C.: Cicero
According to Macrobius and Cicero, Janus15 and Jana are a pair
of divinities, worshipped as the sun and moon. For this reasons
they were regarded as the main gods and received their
sacrifices before all other deities. Janus and Janua are variant
forms of Dianus and Diana. Both refer to the root of dies "day",
deus "god" (see also “Dyæus ”, the Indo-European Sky-God).
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus
Purple stripes (named clavi) were reserved for the knights and
senators. As a divine emperor Nero reserved purple clothing for
the imperial family. Claviger is the attribute for the ancient
Roman deity Janus as a key-bearer. Originally the keys to be
carried by Janus may not have been the standard metal keys.
Instead they must have been religious keys to be stored in the
purple Clavi-keys at the tunic. These symbols are as old as
Janus him- respectively herself.
The original gender of Janus is quite obscure. As most of the
most ancient gods he or she is reported to have been an
androgynous deity and predecessor of the androgynous sky-
god Jupiter. The androgynous character would explain the male
and female attributes in the symbolic color purple.
See the documentation at: Yellow for Judas

15:
Information from: Wikipedia-entry (Janus)

15
1240: The Bolognese Bible
The header-lines in the Bolognese Bible (1240) apply
alternating red and blue letters.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

1320: La divina Commedia


The Vatican's illuminated manuscript of La divina Commedia
starts with a coloured line in gold, red and blue: La Divina
Commedia:
See the documentation at: Paint It Purple - A short History of
painting Red and Blue

Fig. 3: La Divina Commedia

16
1360: The Neapolitan Bible
The numbering system will also follow the same colouring
system as the header lines, e.g. the following number (for line
#49) of Genesis in the Neapolitan Bible:
Line 17 starts with a blue letter and line 18 with a red letter. In
contrast both Line #49 and #50 start with a red letter.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

1498: The last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci


A great number of Last Supper-paintings have been created in
the Middle Age. These artworks represent the scene of The
Last Supper from the final days of Jesus as narrated in the
Gospel of John 13:21, when Jesus announces that one of his
Twelve Apostles would betray him. The majority of these
paintings are applying similar codes for colouring the
garments.
As in The last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci Jesus will usually
be depicted in red and blue. In contrast Judas will often wear
yellow, green or black (or combinations of these medieval
“evil” colours). Sometimes the artist will dress Judas in “good”
colours (blue and red) and applies “evil” colours for other
disciples, in order to trigger the attention of the observers.
See the documentation at: Colour Codings in the Last Supper
(Overview) and Yellow for Judas

17
4 Austria

600: The Viennese Bible


The following painting depicts a red sun and a blue moon from
the Viennese Bible (sixth century AD).
See the documentation at: Another Etymology for Purple

Fig. 4: Joseph observing a red sun


and a blue moon
1333: The Kremser Bible
The initial lines and the headerlines of the Kremser Bible apply
the standard colouring code in alternating red and blue letters.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

1395: The Wenzel Bible


In the Wenzel Bible the Creator God is wearing garments
combining red and blue colors.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

18
1791: The Magic Flute – Mozart
The Magic Flute (German: Die Zauberflöte, K. 620) is an opera
in two acts composed in 1791 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to
a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. The work is in the
form of a Singspiel, a popular form that included both singing
and spoken dialogue.
The Magic Flute is noted for its prominent Masonic elements;
Schikaneder and Mozart were Masons and lodge brothers (see:
(see: Mozart and Freemasonry). For the last seven years of his
life Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was a Mason. The Masonic
order played an important role in his life and work.
The story itself portrays the education of mankind, progressing
from chaos through religious superstition to rationalistic
enlightenment, by means of trial (Tamino) and error
(Papageno), ultimately to make "the Earth a heavenly kingdom,
and mortals like the gods".
Male and female elements in the androgynous couple are
animus and anima, Tamino - Pamina, Papageno - Papagena.

19
5 France

1189: The tomb of Henry II Plantagenet


At his tomb in the abbey Fontevrault Henry II Plantagenet -
King of England has been dressed in red and blue.
See the documentation at: Red and Blue in the Middle Age

1199: The tomb of King Richard I, Lionheart


At their tombs in the abbey Fontevrault King Richard I,
Lionheart and Isabella of Angouleme have been dressed in red
and blue.
See the documentation at: Red and Blue in the Middle Age

1247: Bible Initials in alternating Red & Blue


Johannes Grusch Workshop publishes a medieval manuscript folio
Bible with illuminations. Latin gothic script, hand-written in brown ink, on
animal vellum. Rubricated chapter numbers, initials and marginalia in red
and blue. 48 lines of text in double columns. France: Paris, c. 1247.

1275: Bibles moralisées


The Creator God in the illuminated manuscript “Bibles
moralisées” (dated 1275) has been dressed in red and blue
garments. Please also note the upper line in alternating blue
and red letters illustrating the Creator God.
See the documentation at: The Sky-God Dyaeus

20
1328: Coat-of-arms of the House of Valois
In 1328, the coat-of-arms of the House of Valois was blue with
gold fleurs-de-lis bordered in red. During the Middle Ages
these colours red, blue and gold came to be associated with the
reigning house of France.
From this time on, the kings of France were represented in
vignettes and manuscripts wearing a red gown under a blue
coat decorated with gold fleurs-de-lis.
See the documentation at: A compact Overview of Bipolar
Symbolism

1358: Colours of Paris


The blue and red of the flag have been the colours of Paris
since 1358 when they were used by the followers of Etienne
Marcel, then leader of a Parisian revolt against the King of
France and the Dauphin.
See the documentation at: A compact Overview of Bipolar
Symbolism

1794: Defining the French Tricolour


In 1794, the Convention officially adopted the tricolour, the
Commander of the Guard, Lafayette, having reputedly added
the royal white between the blue and the red.
See the documentation at: A compact Overview of Bipolar
Symbolism

21
6 England

1189: The tomb of Henry II Plantagenet


At his tomb in the abbey Fontevrault Henry II Plantagenet -
King of England has been dressed in red and blue.
See the documentation at: Red and Blue in the Middle Age

1199: The tomb of King Richard I, Lionheart


At their tombs in the abbey Fontevrault King Richard I,
Lionheart and Isabella of Angouleme have been dressed in red
and blue.
See the documentation at: Red and Blue in the Middle Age

1340: Coats of arms in England 16


The first known English Royal arms, a golden lion, rampant,
on a red field was first used by King Henry. The first arms of
King Richard I "The Lionheart", revealed two golden lions,
combatant, on a red field.
However King Henry and King Richard I "The Lionheart" had
previously been buried in red and blue robes at the Fontevraud
Abbey. Please check the colours for the tombs of Henry II,
Richard I and Eleanor of Aquitaine in Fontevraud Abbey.

16:
See the overview in: Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom

22
1340: Royal Arms of England
In 1340 King Edward III quartered the Royal Arms of England
with the ancient arms of France, the fleurs-de-lis on a blue
field, to signal his claim to the French throne.
King Henry IV updated the French arms to the modern version,
three fleurs-de-lis on a blue field. Starting from 1340 the red-
and -blue-combination has been used in the coats of arms up
till today.
See the documentation at: Red and Blue in the Middle Age

1399: The coronation of King Henry IV


In 1399 Henry Bolingbroke was crowned King Henry IV. But
he had taken the crown by force and this wrongful seizure was
to haunt the Lancastrians throughout their reigns.
All attendants at the coronation ceremony are dressed in
purple, red and/or blue robes. Henry IV reveals a coat of arms
in Red and Blue.
See the documentation at: Red and Blue in the Middle Age

1801: Union Jack


The current design of the Union Flag dates from the union of
Ireland and Great Britain in 1801. It consists of the red cross of
Saint George (patron saint of England), edged in white,
superimposed on the Cross of St Patrick (patron saint of
Ireland), which are superimposed on the Saltire of Saint
Andrew (patron saint of Scotland).

23
Wales, however, is not represented in the Union Flag by Wales'
patron saint, Saint David.
Info from the Wikipedia entry Union Jack

24
7 The Netherlands

1229: The tomb for Gerard of Gelre


The sculptured body of Gerard of Gelre at the tomb in the
Munsterkerk at Roermond has been created as dressed in blue
and red coloured garments. The dynasties of Gelre have been
related to the Plantagenet dynasties.
See the documentation at: Red and Blue in the Middle Age

1300: Spieghel Historiael


A miniature painting reveals the Flemish-Dutch author Jacob
van Maerlant sitting at his desk, at which an open book may be
identified. The author is wearing a light purple robe over a red
dress. The initial applies exclusively red & blue signifying the
author as a truthful religious guide for the divine path to
heaven.
See the documentation at: Yellow for Judas

1460: Utrechter “historical” Bible


Around 1460 Evert van Soudenbalch illuminates the Utrechter
“historical” Bible17 (in Dutch language) which does contain a
great number of initials applying alternating blue and red
coloured letters.
See the documentation at: Genesis - Weaving the Words in Red
and in Blue
17:
Codex 2772, fol. 198v (III Maccabeorum = Josephus Flavius,
Antiquitates XIII-XVI)

25
1510: The Garden of Delights
The Triptych by Hieronymos Bosch (Madrid, Prado) has been
dated 1510, or even earlier 1503-1504. Philip II had the
Garden of Delights in his collection. The first owner of the
triptych may have been Henry III, Count of Nassau (by 1517),
inheriting the work 1538 to William I, Prince of Orange. In this
triptych Bosch has extensively been applying the androgynous
colours red and blue for the fountains, towers, birds and fruits.
The triptych also reveals two kingfishers in red and blue (The
kingfishers are the favourite birds for the Prince of Orange).
Bosch may have been a member of a sect (the Adamites ?) and
as a member he may have been forced to hide some of the
secret codes of the sect's message. Particularly as the
androgyny of the Adamites may have influenced the painter's
symbolism and his work. The secret colour code for androgyny
has been: red (as a male symbol), blue (as a female symbol)
and purple (as a divine or androgynous symbol).
See the documentation at: Symbolism in the Garden of
Delights by Hieronymos Bosch

1572: The Prince's Flag


The kingfishers (in orange-red & blue) are the favourite birds
for the Prince of Orange.
Around 1572 the provinces of the Low Countries, rose in revolt
against King Philip II of Spain, and the Prince of Orange
placed himself at the head of the rebels.

26
The Watergeuzen (pro-independence privateers), acting on his
instructions, harassed the enemy everywhere they could and
they did this under a tricolour Orange White Blue (in Dutch:
Oranje, Wit, Blauw or Oranje, Blanje, Bleu, from French
Orange, Blanche, Bleu), the colours of the Prince's coat of
arms. It was thus a flag easily associated with the leader of the
rebellion, and the association was also expressed in the name:
"the Prince's Flag."
See the documentation at: Symbolism in the Garden of
Delights by Hieronymos Bosch

1573: Letter #10317 (William of Orange)


In a letter18 sent from Delft, Thursday, 26 February 1573 to the
Dutch Churches in England. prince William (Prince) of Orange
applies the majestic singular in writing
• the 1st person-pronouns "Ic", "Ick" in (preferred)
majuscule letters and
• the 2nd person pronouns “U”, “u”, "Ulieder19", "ulieden"
– mixing majuscules & minuscules for the letter “u”.
See the documentation at: The Majestic Singular in William of
Orange's Letter

18:
Letter #10317 (William of Orange) in archaic Dutch language
19:
U has been written as V; U-lieden has been written as Vlieden, in which
the letter V generally is identical to U (you)

27
1672: Assembly hall for the peers (Leyden)
Two documents from 167220 and 174221 reveal references to the
words „Paars“ respectively „Pers“. Both documents describe an
assembly hall for the peers of Leiden, called „Paars“ or
„Pers“. Basically these words have been derived from Latin
„Pares“, the “Pairs” or the “equals”.
See the documentation at: Another Etymology for Purple

1954: Red = male & Blue = female


At elementary school in Eindhoven a Catholic teacher orders
the children to draw male persons (Jesus, Adam & God) in red
colours and female persons (Eve and the virgin Mary) in blue.
After the Fall of Man the couple is to be drawn in purple.
See the documentation in German at: Religionsunterricht 1954-
1955 and in Dutch language at: Godsdienstles 1954-1955.

2009: Publication of Dyaeus


At the 15th of may 2009 I publish the thesis of a common
androgynous religion in a Scribd-document: The Sky-God
Dyaeus to be detailed in a number of other documents (see
appendix for an overview).

20:
Korte besgryving van het Lugdunum Batavorum nu Leyden by Simon
van Leeuwen – 1672 (in Dutch language)
21:
Hedendaegsche historie... - Seite 523 by Thomas Salmon, Jan Wagenaar,
Matthias Van Goch – 1742 (in Dutch language)

28
8 Appendix – Scribd-Publications
Publications have been sorted according to publishing date.
The applied colouring code is:
• Yellow = English
• Blue = German
• Pink = Dutch

1. The Sky-God Dyaeus


2. Der Himmelsgott Dyaeus
3. Laus Fragilitatis - Lob der Gebrechlichkeit
4. Castra Doloris - Auf Den Punkt Gebracht
5. Nederlands Voor Gevorderden
6. Die Heathrow Tagebücher
7. The Heathrow Hassle - and the Heathrow Hysteria
8. Der Brenner Codex - die Bernsteinstraße
9. Meine Erfahrungen Mit Lulu
10. Heathrow's Dagboeken
11. Der Hellweg nach Holland
12. The Hellweg to Holland
13. Woordenlijst Brabants
14. The Brabantian Dictionary
15. Hochdorf Revisited - A reconstructed Celtic Site
16. The Fundamental Color Symbols Blue and Red
17. De boekenfluisteraar
18. Randnotizen eines Buchflüsterers
19. Kanttekeningen van een boekfluisteraar
20. Core Dump (Nederlandse versie)
21. Core Dump (English version)
22. Notizen zu "Die Heiligen Symbole Von Mu"
23. Notes to the Sacred Symbols of Mu

29
24. Secret Colour Codes in the Bible
25. Dyaeus - über die Farbcodes der Prachtbibeln
26. Overview of my manuscripts in a Nutshell
27. The inflationary use of the verb "love"
28. Ich liebe Dich
29. A Book of Art
30. Genesis - Weaving the Words in Red and in Blue
31. Paint It Purple - A short History of painting Red and
Blue
32. Die Kaisertracht in Rot und Blau
33. De Bijbelse Kleuren Purper, Rood en Blauw
34. Etymologie van het woord "Paars"
35. Another Etymology for Purple
36. Eine neue Etymologie für Purpur
37. Etymology for Flags
38. Gender References for Purple, Red and Blue
39. Tractatus der Unwörter - zur Etymologie unseres
Wortschatzes
40. A compact Overview of Bipolar Symbolism
41. Kurzübersicht der bipolaren Symbolik
42. Der Symbolverlust in der Kommunikation
43. Godsdienstles 1954-1955
44. A Loss of Symbolism in Communications
45. Religionsunterricht 1954-1955
46. The Symbolic Colour Green in Islam
47. Täuschung und Enttäuschung
48. Illusion and Disillusion
49. Eine Qualitätsanzeige für Webdokumente
50. Patrism, Matrism and Androgyny
51. Dies Fasti - Understanding the Fastened Sculptures
52. Dies Fasti - Das Entfesseln der Götter
53. Cross-references for Deities and Man

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54. Technologie Oder Evolution - Von der Suche nach
einem Schöpfe
55. Gedankensplitter über die Täuschungsgewalt
56. The Power of Deceit - an essay on violence and deceit
57. Summary of some religious Colour Codes
58. Übersicht der religiösen Farbcodes
59. Afleiding van de Religieuze Kleurcodes
60. Body Mirroring at Burials
61. Die Verwebung als religiöses Symbol
62. Blue and Red in Medieval Garments
63. Blau und Rot Im Mittelalter
64. Language and Religion
65. Paars
66. Yellow for Judas
67. Die Farbcodierung in Leonardos Abendmahl
68. Color Coding in the Last Supper (by Leonardo Da
Vinci)
69. Color Codings in the Last Supper (Overview)
70. Rood en Blauw in Roermond
71. Dagboekfragmenten (Roermond)
72. Blue and Red in Roermond
73. The Kingfisher
74. Dagboekfragmenten (1960-1972)
75. Red and Blue in the Middle Age
76. The Majestic Singular in William of Orange's Letter
77. Symbolism in the Garden of Delights by Hieronymos
Bosch
78. Threads of Bipolar Symbolism in Religion
79. Een Kleine Legende Van Rood, Wit en Blauw

31