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Table of Contents

Type 1
Green Digest Stationery 5
Business Card, Letterhead, Envelope
Atmospheric Zones 6-9
3 One Font, One Size 6
3 Two Font, One Size 7
3 Two Fonts, Two Sizes 8
3 Two Fonts, Two Sizes, Images 9
Bradbury Thompson Designer Poster 10

Image Making and Meaning


University Pictograms 13-14
Pictogram Sheet 13
Pictogram Book 14
Science Magazine Covers 15-17
Salmonella in Peanut Butter 15
Nutrition in Octopus 16
Toxic Baby Bottles 17
Information Graphics 18
Obesity Books
How Often People Say They Lie

Type 2
Typography Map 21
18 Layouts of Typography Book 22
Olive Oil Packaging 23
Marketing Strategy
Labels and Bottle
Century Gothic Type Book 24

01
Lana Orin

Systems Design
Imaginations Built DVD 27
General Logo
Box, Single Cases, Inserts, DVDs
Norway Airplane Identity Manuel 28
General Logo
Identity Manuel

Experimental Type
Global Warming Poster 31
Brief caption
Typographic Installation 32
Closeups of each 7 Letters and Whole Word

Issues in Design
PeaceJam Northeast Conference 35-38
Public Talk Poster and Postcard 35
Commemorative Poster 36
Staff and Jammers T-Shirts 37
Public Talk and Conference Programs 38
iPhone App 39
Food Solutions
Diversity Archive 40
60 Food Solutions Cards

02
Type 1

Type 1
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Bronx, N.Y. 10463 Lana Orin
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Green Digest Stationery: Business Card, Letterhead, and Envelope. 05


Atmospheric Zones The Earth’s atmosphere is 78.08 percent nitrogen, 20.95 percent oxygen, 0.93 percent argon,
and 0.03 percent carbon dioxide.

ight (above
He
su
rth’s rface perature a t do
we kno
Layer E a ) Tem Wh
w?

Troposphere 5 miles at Drops 3.6°F Contains 75% of the total mass


poles; 7 miles every 1,000 ft of the atmosphere. This is where
at mid-latitudes; up; minimum life and almost all of our weather
10 miles reaches -70°F is found. The top of the
at Equator troposphere is called the
tropopause

Stratosphere 30 miles Stable at Contains 24% of the total mass


around -58°F of the atmosphere. At the bottom
of the stratrosphere is the
ozone layer

Mesosphere 50 miles Decreases from Meteors burn up in this zone to


20°F at give “shooting stars;” together
base to -166°F, with the thermosphere, this layer
before rising contains many ionized particles,
again at top and they are collectively termed
the ionosphere--this is the layer
off which radio signals bounce
to allow radio telecommunications

Thermospere 400 miles Variable; can Gets so hot because the thin
reach 441°F atmosphere reabsorbs a lot of
radiation that bounces back from
the lower layers

Exosphere: Up to 40,000 miles Falls to The atmospheric density at 6,000


together with near zero miles is the same as outer space.
thermosphere, Above this height, it is only the
makes up “atmosphere” in the sense that
“outer the Earth’s gravitational and
atmosphere” magnetic field exert some influence.
The exosphere contains the
magnetosphere, where the
aurorae appear
The Earth’s atmosphere is 78.08 percent nitrogen, 20. 95 percent
. oxygen,
0.93 percent argon, and 0.03 percent carbon dioxide.

A t m o s p h e r i c
Z o n e s
Layer Height (above Temperature What do we know?
Earth’s surface)

T r o p o s p h e r e
5 miles at poles; Drops 3.6 °F every Contains 75% of the total mass of the
7 miles at atmosphere. This is where life and almost
1,000 ft up;
mid-latitudes; minimum reaches all of our weather is found. The top of the
10 miles -70°F troposphere is called the tropopause
at Equator

S t r a t o s p h e r e

Stable at Contains 24% of the total mass of the atmosphere. At the


30 miles around -58°F bottom of the stratrosphere is the ozone layer
M e s o s p h e r e

Decreases from Meteors burn up in this zone to give “shooting


20°F at base to stars;” together with the thermosphere, this layer contains
50 miles -166°F, before many ionized particles, and they are collectively termed the
rising again ionosphere--this is the layer off which radio signals bounce to
at top allow radio telecommunications
T h e r m o s p h e r e

Variable; can Gets so hot because the thin atmosphere reabsorbs a lot of
400 miles
reach 441°F radiation that bounces back from the lower layers

Layer
Layer
Troposphere Layer
Mesophe re
E x o p s p h e r e :

Stratosphe re
Layer
Height (above Earth’s surface) The atmospheric density at 6,000 miles is the same as outer
Height (ab ove Earth’s Thermosphere
5 miles at poles;su7rface)
miles at Height (ab ove Earth’s su rface) togehter with space. Above this height, it is only the “atmosphere” in the sense
50 miles10 miles at Equator
mid-latitudes; 30 miles thermosphere, Up to Fall to that the Earth’s gravitational and magnetic field exert some
Height (above Earth’s surface) makes up “outer 40,000 miles near zero influence. The exosphere contains the magnetosphere, where
TempeTemperature
ratu re 400 miles atmosphere” the aurorae appear
Tempe ratu re
Decreases f rom
Drops 20°F
3.6°F at base
every to ft up;
1,000 Stable at a round -58°F
-16 6°F, befominimum
re risingreaches
again at -70°F
top Temperature
Variable; can reach 441°F
What do we kn ow?
What do Whatwedo knweow?know? Contains 24% of the total mass of the
Meteors burn up in this zone What do we know?
Contains 75% of theto gi ve
total mass“shooting
of the atmosphere. At the bottom of the
Gets so hot because the thin atmosphere
stars;” togetheratmosphere.
with the thermosphe
This is wherere, this
lifelayer contains
and almost stratrosphere is the ozone layer
many ioni zedallpaofrticles, reabsorbs a lot of radiation that bounces
our weather is found. The top oftermed
and they are collecti vely the back from the lower layers
the ionosphe re--this is the lais called
troposphere y radio signals
the tropopause
bounce to all ow radio telecommunications

Layer
Mesophere Layer
percent nitrog Stratosphere
is 78.08 en, Layer
Height (aboveLayer
Earth’s surface) ere 20 Troposphe re
.95
Thermosphe
50 miles re sph p Height (above Earth’s surface)
t mo er
c 30 miles
Height (ab ove Earth’s su rface)
’s a

Height Temperature
(ab ove Earth’s su rface)
en
rth

5 miles at poles; 7 miles at


to

40020°F
milesat base to Temperature
xyg
Ea

Decreases from mid-latitudes; 10 miles at Equator


The

en,

-166°F, before rising again at top A t m o s p h e r ic Z o n e s Stable at around -58°F


Tempe ratu re
Variable; can Tempe ratu re
What do we reknow?
ach 4 41°F What do we know?
Drops 3 .6°Fevery 1 ,000 ft up;
Contains 24% of the total mass of the
.

Meteors burn up in this zone to give “shooting


ide

3 minimum reaches -70°F


0.9

What do we kn ow? pe di
ox

stars;” together with the thermosphere, this layer contains atmosphere. At the bottom of the
rce n
Gets so and
many ionized particles, hot because the thin
they are collectively termed nt a
ca rbo stratrosphere is the ozone layer
What do we kn ow?
atmosphere reabsorbs a lof of radiation rgo ent
the ionosphere--this is the layer off which radio signals n , a nd
that bounces back telecommunications
from the lower layers 0.03 perc Contains 75% of the total ma ss of the
bounce to allow radio atmosphe re. This is whe re life and almost
all of our weather is found. The top of the
troposphe re is called the t ropopause
Layer
Layer
Exosphere:
togetherExosphe re:
with thermosphere,
together
makes upwith thermosphe
“outer atmosphere” re,
ma kes up “outer atmosphe re”
Height (above Earth’s surface)
Height Up(abto ove
40,000Earth’s
miles su rface)
Up to 4 0,000 miles
Temperature
Tempe
Fall ratuzero
to near re
Fall to near zero
What do we know?
The atmospheric Whatdensitydoat we kn ow?
6,000 miles is the same as
The atmospheric
outer space. Abovedensity at 6 it is
this height, ,000
onlymiles is the same as
the “atmosphere”
outer
in the sense that the Earth’s gravitationalthe
space. Ab ove this height, it is only “atmosphe re”
and magnetic
in theexert
field sensesome
that the Ea rth’s
influence. Thegexosphere
ravitationalcontains
and magnetic
the
exer
magnetosphere, where the aurorae exospheappear
re contains the
magnetosphe re, whe re the au rorae appear

06 Atmospheric Zones: One Font, One Size.


Layer
es Troposphere
Zo n
e ric
Height (above earthís surface)
h

5 miles at poles; 7 miles at Layer


sp

Stratosphere
Atmo

mid-latitudes; 10 miles at Equator

Temperature Height (above earthís surface)


Drops 3.6°F every 1,000 ft up; 30 miles
minimum reaches -70°F
Temperature
What do we know? Stable at around -58°F
Contains 75% of the total mass of the
atmosphere. This is where life and almost What do we know?
all of our weather is found. The top of the Contains 24% of the total mass of the atmosphere.
troposphere is called the tropopause At the bottom of the stratrosphere is the ozone layer
Layer
Mesophere

Height (above earthís surface)


50 miles

Temperature Layer
Decreases from 20°F at base to Thermosphere
-166°F, before rising again at top
Height (above earthís surface)
What do we know? 400 miles
Meteors burn up in this zone to give “shooting
stars;” together with the thermosphere, this layer Temperature
contains many ionized particles, and they are Variable; can reach 441°F
collectively termed the ionosphere--this is the
layer off which radio signals bounce to allow What do we know?
radio telecommunications Gets so hot because the thin atmosphere
reabsorbs a lot of radiation that bounces back
from the lower layers

rcent oxygen,
Layer
Exosphere:
together with thermosphere,
makes up “outer atmosphere”

ide.
5 pe
Height (above earthís surface)

diox
Up to 40,000 miles

0.9
on
,2
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arb
en
Fall to near zero Atmospheric Zones The Earth’s atmosphere is 78.08 percent nitrogen, 20 95 percent oxygen, 0 93 percent argon, and 0.03 percent carbon dioxide.

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The atmospheric density at 6,000 miles is the
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Troposphere
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k n o w ?

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E a r t h ’ s

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T e m p e r a t u r e
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with thermosphere, outer space. Above this height, it is only the “atmosphere”
makes up “outer atmosphere” in the sense that the Earth’s gravitational and magnetic
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Atmospheric Zones: Two Fonts, One Size. 07


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Type: Type:
Exophere:
Tropophere
togehter with
Height (above thermosphere,
earth’s surface): makes up “outer
5 miles at poles; 7 atmosphere”
miles at mid-latitudes; 10 Height (above earth’s
surface):
miles at Equator
Up to 40,000 miles
Temperature: Temperature:
Drops 3.6 °F every 1,000 ft up; Fall to near zero
minimum reaches -70°F What do we know?:
What do we know?: The atmospheric density at 6,000 miles
is the same as outer space. Above this
Contains 75% of the total mass of the height, it is only the “atmosphere” in the sense
atmosphere. This is where life and almost that the Earth’s gravitational and magnetic field
all of our weather is found. The top of the exert some influence. The exosphere contains the
troposphere is called the tropopause magnetosphere, where the aurorae appear

Type: Type:
Stratosphere Thermosphere
Height (above earth’s surface): Height (above earth’s surface):
30 miles Type: 400 miles
Mesosphere
Temperature: Temperature:
Height (above
Stable at around -58°F earth’s surface): Variable; can reach 441°F
What do we know?: 50 miles What do we know?:
Contains 24% of the Temperature: Gets so hot because the
total mass of the Decreases from 20°F at thin atmosphere
base to -166°F,
atmosphere. reabsorbs a lot
before rising again at top
At the bottom of the What do we know?: of radiation
stratrosphere Meteors burn up in this zone to give that bounces
is the ozone “shooting stars;” together with the back from
layer thermosphere, this layer contains many the lower
ionized particles, and they are
layers
collectively termed the ionosphere--this is the
layer off which radio signals bounce to allow radio
telecommunications

08 Atmospheric Zones: Two Fonts, Two Sizes.


Type:
Thermosphere
Height (above earth’s surface):
400 miles
Temperature:
Variable; can reach 441°F
What do we know?:
Gets so hot because the
thin atmosphere
Type: reabsorbs a lot
Tropophere of radiation
Height (above earth’s surface): that bounces Type:
5 miles at poles; 7 miles at mid-latitudes; 10 miles at Equator back from Stratosphere
Temperature: the lower Height (above earth’s surface):
Drops 3.6 °F every 1,000 ft up; layers 30 miles
minimum reaches -70°F
Temperature:
What do we know?:
Stable at around -58°F
Contains 75% of the total mass of the
What do we know?:
atmosphere. This is where life and
Contains 24% of the total mass of the
almost all of our weather is
atmosphere. At the bottom of
found. The top of the
the stratrosphere is
troposphere is
the ozone
called the
layer
tropopause

Atmospheric
Type:
Mesosphere
Zones
Height (above earth’s surface):
50 miles
Temperature:
Decreases from 20°F at base to -166°F,
before rising again at top
What do we know?:
Meteors burn up in this zone to give “shooting stars;”
together with the thermosphere, this layer
contains many ionized particles, and
they are collectively termed the
ionosphere--this is the layer
off which radio signals
Type:
bounce to allow radio
Exophere: togehter with thermosphere,
telecommunications
makes up “outer atmosphere”
Height (above earth’s surface):
Up to 40,000 miles
Temperature:
Fall to near zero
What do we know?:
The Earth’s atmosphere is 78.08 percent nitrogen, 20 95 percent oxygen, 0 93 percent argon, and 0.03 percent carbon dioxide.

Atmospheric Zones
The atmospheric density at 6,000 miles is the
same as outer space. Above this height, it is The Earth’s atmosphere is
only the “atmosphere” in the sense that 78.08 percent nitrogen,
the Earth’s gravitational and magnetic 20.95 percent oxygen,
field exert some influence. The 0.93 percent argon,
exosphere contains the and 0.03 percent
magnetosphere, where carbon dioxide.
the aurorae
appear
Layer
Height (above
Earth’s surface)
Troposphere Temperature
5 miles at poles; 7 miles at
mid-latitudes; 10 miles What do we know?
at Equator
Drops 3.6 °F every 1,000 ft up;
minimum reaches -70°F
Contains 75% of the total mass of the
Stratosphere atmosphere. This is where life and almost
all of our weather is found. The top of the
30 miles troposphere is called the tropopause
Stable at around -58°F

Mesosphere Contains 24% of the total mass of the atmosphere.


At the bottom of the stratrosphere is the ozone layer
50 miles
Decreases from 20°F at base to -166°F,
before rising again at top

Meteors burn up in this zone to give “shooting stars;”


together with the thermosphere, this layer contains
Thermosphere many ionized particles, and they are collectively termed
the ionosphere--this is the layer off which radio signals
400 miles bounce to allow radio telecommunications

Exophere: Variable; can reach 441°F


togehter with thermosphere,
makes up “outer atmosphere” Gets so hot because the thin atmosphere reabsorbs a
lot of radiation that bounces back from the lower layers
Up to 40,000 miles
Fall to near zero
The atmospheric density at 6,000 miles is the same as

Zones
outer space. Above this height, it is only the “atmosphere”

Atmospheric
in the sense that the Earth’s gravitational and magnetic
field exert some influence. The exosphere contains the
magnetosphere, where the aurorae appear
Troposphere

Contains 75% of the total mass of the atmosphere. 5 miles at poles; 7 miles at
Layer

This is where life and almost all of our weather mid-latitudes; 10 miles
Drops 3.6 °F every 1,000 ft up;

is found. The top of the troposphere at Equator


minimum reaches -70°F

is called the tropopause


What do we know? Height (above Earthʼs surface)
Temperature
Stratosphere

Contains 24% of the total mass of the atmosphere. At 30 miles


the bottom of the stratrosphere is the ozone layer
Stable at around -58°F

Mesosphere

Meteors burn up in this zone to give “shooting stars;” together with 50 miles
the thermosphere, this layer contains many ionized particles,
Decreases from 20°F at base to

and they are collectively termed the ionosphere--this


is the layer off which radio signals bounce
-166°F, before rising

to allow radio telecommunications


again at top
The Earthʼs atmosphere is 78.08 percent nitrogen, 20.95 percent oxygen,

Thermosphere

Exophere: togehter with thermosphere,


makes up “outer atmosphere”

Gets so hot because the thin atmosphere reabsorbs a lot 400 miles
of radiation that bounces back from the lower layers
Variable; can reach 441°F

The atmospheric density at 6,000 miles is the same as outer space. Above Up to 40,000 miles
this height, it is only the “atmosphere” in the sense that the Earthʼs
Fall to near zero

gravitational and magnetic field exert some influence.


The exosphere contains the magnetosphere,
where the aurorae appear

0.93 percent argon, and 0.03 percent carbon dioxide.

Atmospheric Zones: Two Fonts, Two Sizes, Images. 09


OIOIO
OIOIOIOIOIO
OIOIOIO
OIOIOIOIOIOIOIOIO

OIOIO
OIOIOIOIOIOIOIOIO
OIOIOIO
OIOIOIOIOIO
OIOIO

Bradbury Thompson was a graphic designer from Kansas


whose career began in 1938, but ended when he passed away in
1995. Thompson got his jump start when he helped design the arts
innovative journal of the West Viriginia Pulp and paper Company,
well known as Westvaco Inspirations for Printers. From working with the
arts journal, Thompson began to develop his own individual style
that incorporated the effects of typography, color, and photo
manipulation.
In many of his designs, Thompson combines photography,
font, and color. The photos in his layouts appear high in contrast, to
the point where it is hard to distinguish details and lacks gradients.
Most commonly, there will be one black and white photo image
along with three solid color photo images. Each of the solid images
were created using only primary colors: red, blue, and yellow.
However, Thompson chooses to use a pink instead of red.
The typography found in Thompson’s work sometimes is
manipulated to represent an image. He will use individual letters to
create faces or objects. Thompson also was known for creating his
own version of the alphabet. He felt that it was confusing for the
same letter to have two separate designs and thought it would be
more logical to combine the lowercases and uppercases into one
alphabet. The letters a, e, m, and n would remain lowercase letters,
while the rest are uppercase. This alphabet was called “Alphabet
26” and font used was Baskerville, which was Thompson’s
preferred font.
Aside from Westvaco, Thompson additionally was art
director of Mademoiselle, design director of Art News and Art News
Annual, and has designed formats for a magazine called
Smithonian. Most of his work can be found in his book
The Art of Graphic Design (Yale University Press, 1988).

10 Designer Poster: Poster of Bradbury Thompson using his design style.


Image Making

Image Making
and Meaning
and Meaning
Pictograms

Freshman Success Flip-Flop Free Zone.


Center.

Girl Watching Please Recycle.


Zone.

Skinny Jeans Zone. Crazy Hair Area.

Hazardous Cafeteria
Keg Stand Zone.
Food.

Wireless Zone. Kite Flying Area.

University Pictograms: Sheet of all the pictograms and their usage. 13


14 University Pictograms: Created a book with metal covers of pictograms and their usages
on campus.
foodtechnology
01

03

Food Technology | March 2009


09

www.ift.org Advancing Food & Health Through Sound Science

SALMONELLA
In Peanut Butter

.
Vol.64 No.1
| Salmonella in Peanut Butter |
peanut butter and

www.ift.org
jelly sandwiches
may be a thing of
A Publication of the Institute of Food Technology
the past
nhm

Science Magazine Covers: Food Technology, Salmonella in Peanut Butter. 15


foodtechnology
02

03

Food Technology | March 2009


09

www.ift.org Advancing Food & Health Through Sound Science

NUTRITION

.
Vol.64 No.2
In Octopus

| Nutrition in Octopus|
these creatures

www.ift.org
may be more
appealing then
A Publication of the Institute of Food Technology
they look
nhm

16 Science Magazine Covers: Food Technology, Nutrition in Octopus.


foodtechnology
03

03

Food Technology | March 2009


09

www.ift.org Advancing Food & Health Through Sound Science

TOXIC
Baby Bottles

.
Vol.64 No.3
| Toxic Baby Bottles |
you’re baby is

www.ift.org
injesting more
then just her
A Publication of the Institute of Food Technology
formula
nhm

Science Magazine Covers: Food Technology, Toxic Baby Bottles. 17


Year Published
Robust time for
Obesity
1999

2000 2001 Books


25
Number of books
about obesity

2003
29

34

So far this year,


40 books about 2002
obesity have been
published or are
announced for
publication.
The trend:

37 55
Source: Compiled by Andrew Cracola, R. R. Bowker Co.

How often people


say they lie
Nearly 90% of adults say its hard for them to tell a lie,
although 24% say lying is sometimes justified.

68% - Hardly Ever

17% - Occasionally

11% - Never

3% - Frequently

18 Information Graphics: ”Robust Time for Obesity Books,” “How Often People Say They Lie.”
Type 2

Type 2

ON
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SH

PE
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SU

S
B AR

ogs
UTI

T
O

D
HO
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AL

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ers
O

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H

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acy
N&
SCLE
ÕS

BER

ats
T
k

M
urri
NI S
IRO

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ITCHE
LLI

store names.
LERS
ICH

KIM

K
ler F
MAX

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ails
ing
pHI

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Zel
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MAX

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si

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’s
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DALE STREET
59

HIC
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A V E N U E AR U
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M I N G T ha
DA
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M L TH be olo
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H &A ED s ty AG sp
a
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air RT
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E

Established Type of Sign


1950s

LA SALLE ROA
Neon
1970s

1980s
Metal
1992-95 Vinyl
1996-99 Acrylic
2003-05 Glass
2006-09 Handpainted
2000s
MAP of FARMINGTON AVE.

Typography Map: A map of Farmington Ave. emphasizing the history of type used in the
21
One Color (Black)
1 font, 1 size, 1 weight, consistent leading
1 font, 2 sizes, unlimited weights
1 font, 3 sizes, unlimited weights
2 fonts, 1 size, 1 weight, consistent leading
2 fonts, 2 sizes, unlimited weights
2 fonts, 3 sizes, unlimited weights

Adding Rules
1 font, 2 sizes, unlimited weights
1 font, 3 sizes, unlimited weights
2 fonts, 1 size, 1 weight, consistent leading
2 fonts, 2 sizes, unlimited weights

Two Colors
1 font, 1 size, 1 weight, consistent leading
1 font, 2 sizes, unlimited weights
1 font, 3 sizes, unlimited weights
2 fonts, 1 size, 1 weight, consistent leading
2 fonts, 2 sizes, unlimited weights
2 fonts, 3 sizes, unlimited weights

Adding Images
2 fonts, 3 sizes with diagrammatic image or il ustration
2 fonts, 3 sizes with Photographic image

22 18 Layouts of Typography Book: Book of 18 different arrangements of typography.


live www.maussanelesalphilles.com

Nutrition Facts
live
il
il
Serving Size: 1 Tbsp (15ml)
Serving Per Container (67)

Amount/Serving
Maussane is a beautiful
Calories 120 . Calories From Fat 120
village situated in the
%Daily Value*
foothills of the Alphilles.
Total Fat 14g 22%
which is surrounded by
Saturated Fat 3g 10% olive plantations. They
Trans Fat 0g
use a perfect blend of five
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.5g
olives that are gently
Monounsaturated Fat 10g crushed under old granite
Cholesterol 0mg 0% mills. The oil is naturally
Sodium 0mg 0% sweet and fruity with a
Total Carbohydrate 0mg 0% golden green color.
Protein 0mg

Not a significant source of dietary fiber,


sugars, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and
iron. Percent Daily Values are based on a
2000 calorie diet. PRODUCT
OF FRANCE
Ingredients: 100% French Extra
Virgin Cold Pressed Olive Oil

Net Contents 25 FL. OZ.


(750 mL) 3 73956 93458 7

Olive Oil Packaging: Packaging for the French Olive Oil Company Maussane. 23
24 Century Gothic Font Book: A hardcover book about the history of the font Century Gothic.
Design Systems
Design Systems
Imaginations Built DVD Series: A box set of three DVDs of Imaginations Built: Pyramids. 27
28 Norway Airplane Identity Manuel: Airplane Identity Manuel on Norway, number one most
peaceful country six years in a row.
Experimental Type
Experimental Type
Global Warming Poster: ”Out of sight, Out of mind?” Picture taken at a metal waste 31
management facility.
32 Typographic Installation: “Do yu fit in?” Made the word “CONFORM” using plaster cloth and
auluminum foil. The letters within “CONFORM” spell “YURSELF.”
Issues In Design

Issues In Design
PeaceJam Northeast Public Talk

ADOLFO PÉREZ ESQUIVEL


March 26, 2010 Lincoln Theater
7:00 PM University of Hartford
Adolfo Pérez Esquivel was one of thousands of Desaparecidos, imprisoned and
tortured for 14 months by the Argentine military junta during “the Dirty War.” His life was
saved when Amnesty International declared him the 1978 International Political Prisoner
of the Year. In 1980, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his leadership in promoting
fundamental human rights and true democracy for the peoples of Latin America.

NOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNER

NOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNER


PeaceJam Northeast Public Talk
PeaceJam Northeast Public Talk ADOLFO PÉREZ ESQUIVEL

ADOLFO PÉREZ ESQUIVEL March 26, 2010, 7:00 PM


200 Bloomfield Ave, West Hartford, CT 06119
Lincoln Theater, University of Hartford

Adolfo Pérez Esquivel was one of


thousands of Desaparecidos, imprisoned and

March 26, 2010 tortured for 14 months by the Argentine military


junta during “the Dirty War.” His life was saved

7:00 PM when Amnesty International declared him the


1978 International Political Prisoner of the Year.
In 1980, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for
his leadership in promoting fundamental human
200 Bloomfield Ave rights and true democracy for the peoples of
West Hartford, CT 06119 Latin America.
Lincoln Theater
University of Hartford

PeaceJam Northeast Conference: The Public Talk Postcard and Poster. 35


Lana Orin

2010 PeaceJam Northeast


Youth Conference

36 PeaceJam Northeast Conference: The Commemorative Poster.


Jammers

Staff

PeaceJam Northeast Conference: The Jammers and Staff t-shirts. 37


38 PeaceJam Northeast Conference: The Public Talk and Conference programs.
CARRIER

Back

On

Or

Pe
CARRIER 4:20 PM CARRIER 4:20 PM CARRIER 4:20 PM CARRIER 4:20 PM

Back Food Next Back Problem Next Back Problem Next


Pe
Onion Medicinal Household
Medicinal Household
Po
Select: Oranges
Buffer Bruises
Food Peanut Butter
Car Parts Cancer
H
Pepper
Problem
Potatoes
Carpet Stain Chest
M
Cat Litter Cholesterol
Fix a problem using household foods!
Household Crayon Cut
Medicinal
SOLVE SOLVE
FIX

CARRIER 4:20 PM
CARRIER 4:20 PM CARRIER 4:20 PM CARRIER 4:20 PM
Back Food Next Back Household Next Back Crayon Next Back Crayon Next

Onion Peanut Butter Peanut Butter

Oranges Ants Chrome

Peanut Butter
Crayon Furniture
Pepper
Gum Leather
Potatoes
Lubricant Pen
Household
Plexiglas Price Tag
Medicinal
Stainless Steel Tar

FIX Vaseline
Harmful Alternatives

iPhone App: Food Solutions, a lookup application to discover how to solve a problem 39
using food instead of using harmful chemicals.
40 Diversity Archive Project: Food Solutions, cards that give household and medicinal tips to
solve problems using food.