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Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities

of virgin coconut oil


February 2010, Vol. 48, No. 2 , Pages 151-157 (doi:10.3109/13880200903062614)
S. Intahphuak1, P. Khonsung2, A. Panthong2
1
McCormick Faculty of Nursing, Payap University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
2
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Address for CorrespondenceSophaphan Intahphuak, McCormick Faculty of Nursing, Payap University, Chiang Mai
50000, Thailand. Tel: 668-1341-7342. Fax: 66-5343-1993. E-mail:: sophaphan_in@yahoo.com

This study investigated some pharmacological properties of virgin coconut oil (VCO), the natural pure oil
from coconut [Cocos nucifera Linn (Palmae)] milk, which was prepared without using chemical or highheat treatment. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of VCO were assessed. In acute
inflammatory models, VCO showed moderate anti-inflammatory effects on ethyl phenylpropiolateinduced ear edema in rats, and carrageenin- and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema. VCO exhibited an
inhibitory effect on chronic inflammation by reducing the transudative weight, granuloma formation, and
serum alkaline phosphatase activity. VCO also showed a moderate analgesic effect on the acetic acidinduced writhing response as well as an antipyretic effect in yeast-induced hyperthermia. The results
obtained suggest anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties of VCO.

Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/13880200903062614

In vivo antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of dried


and fermented processed virgin coconut oil.
Zakaria ZA1, Somchit MN, Mat Jais AM, Teh LK, Salleh MZ, Long K.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

The present study was carried out to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory
activities of virgin coconut oil (VCO) produced by the Malaysian Agriculture Research and
Development Institute (MARDI) using various in vivo models.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Two types of VCOs, produced via standard drying (VCOA) and fermentation (VCOB) processes
were used in this study. Both VCOA and VCOB were serially diluted using 1% Tween 80 to
concentrations (v/v) of 10, 50 and 100%. Antinociceptive and anti- inflammatory activities of
both VCOs were examined using various in vivo model systems. The antinociceptive activity of
the VCOs were compared to those of 1% Tween 80 (used as a negative control), morphine (5
mg/kg) and/or acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg).

RESULTS:

Both VCOA and VCOB exhibited significant (p < 0.05) dose-dependent antinociceptive activity
in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Both VCOs also exerted significant (p < 0.05)
antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin and hot-plate tests. Interestingly, the
VCOs exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in an acute (carrageenan-induced paw edema test),
but not in a chronic (cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test) model of inflammation.

CONCLUSION:

The MARDI-produced VCOs possessed antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Further


studies are needed to confirm these observations.