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Hopes, hoops,
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New Milfords Schechter
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2 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

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5/6/16 12:29 PM

Page 3
Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie split!
Four reasons its Jewish news

Israeli official:
Dont pray on graven image
l Dont touch the artwork.
Thats the message from Ramat Gan
Deputy Mayor Adva
Pollak, after a statue
in the citys art garden
started to draw young
religious women looking to get pregnant.
The statue, Birth,
by the late artist Menashe Kadishman, is
becoming a shrine,
and that makes municipal officials
unhappy.
We inform the public that this
statue has no special powers, and
is merely one of many works of art
on display in the park, Pollak was
quoted as telling Yediot Acharonot.
It would be wrong to attribute such
powers to the statue. We welcome
visitors who wish to enjoy the art, but
I call on them to refrain from lying on
it.
A Ramat Gan resident told Yediot
that he first noticed the pilgrimage to
Birth this summer, not long after it
was installed in the park.
They huddle around the statue
and then lie on it one after another,
he was quoted as saying. The women
were seen reading scripture, especially Psalms, around the statue.

l Just about the entire world uttered a


collective gasp this week, when it was
learned that Angelina Jolie filed for
divorce from Brad Pitt. The most A of
Hollywoods A-list had been a couple
since 2004 and married in 2014.
While neither are Jewish, Pitt and Jolie have made their way into many Jewish stories over the past 12 years. Here
are the highlights:

The metal statue features a rough


outline of a woman with large breasts
and a smiley face etched into her
stomach.
Kadishman died last year at 83.
While his acclaimed oeuvre featured
many religious symbols, including
sacrificial sheep, he was an avowed
secularist. He was eulogized by his
friend Haim Shtenger as the secular equivalent of a great rabbi and
a cultural icon associated with secularism of Tel Aviv.
Israel has seen a number of faddish
sites where women go to improve
their chances of conceiving, including
a cafe said to serve a salad with supernatural powers and a supermarket
in Ashdod where customers could sit
on a special throne-like fertility chair.
JTA Wire Service

Leonard Cohen says Hineni


l Back in 1974, Canadian
poet and singer Leonard
Cohen secured his place
at the top of our popular
High Holy Days playlist
when he released his Who
By Fire five weeks before
Rosh Hashanah. The song,
composed in response to
the 1973 Yom Kippur War,
drew its title and theme directly from
the High Holy Day liturgy.
Thats hardly the only Leonard Cohen song we put on repeat this time
of year. The new Reform Yom Kippur
machzor, for example, includes lyrics
from three of them.
Well, the old Jewish poet is back to
his old tricks.
On Wednesday, his 82nd birthday,
Mr. Cohen released the title song from
his forthcoming album, You Want it
Darker.
You Want it Darker features Cantor Gideon Zelermyer and the Shaar
Hashomayim Synagogue Choir from
his home town, Montreal.
Magnified and sanctified be Thy
holy name, the lyrics quote directly

from the Kaddish.


Hineni, hineni, Im
ready my Lord, Mr. Cohen
quotes in Hebrew and
English from the story of
the Binding of Isaac, one
of Rosh Hashanahs Torah
readings.
Typically, the song as a
whole is dark, even by the
standards of the liturgy of the Days of
Awe, looking head-on at mortality, the
approach of death, and the depths of
evil.
I struggled with some demons
They were middle class and tame
A million candles burning for the
love that never came
You want it darker
We killed the flame.
We immediately added the song
to our seasonal Spotify playlist, and
were still mulling over its meaning.
But this fresh reminder of how little
time we have in this mortal plane
prompts us to issue this seasonal
response: And a happy birthday and
New Year to you too, Mr. Cohen.

Their twins were brought into the


world by a Jewish doctor
on Shabbat in France!
This fact didnt escape Jolies Jewish
obstetrician.
The delivery was very emotional and
exceptional as Ms. Jolie is a superstar,
but I think that it happened on Shabbat
made it that much more moving, Dr.
Michel Sussman, a former vice president of Nices Jewish community, told
JTA after the happy day in 2008.
Jolies dad really loves
Chabad and Israel!
Jolies father, Jon Voight, is best known
as an Academy Award-winning actor
who has starred in movies such as Midnight Cowboy and Coming Home.
But Voight, a lifelong Catholic, also is
a big supporter of the Chabad movement so much so that hes hosted the
Chabad fundraising telethon at least 18
times since the 1980s.
The actor has studied the works of
the revered Lubavitcher rebbe, Rabbi
Menachem Mendel Schneerson. In addition, Voight is a staunch advocate
for the Jewish state, and appeared in a
campaign ad for Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu last year.
Jolie has raised awareness of the
Jewish breast cancer gene!
The actress made headlines in 2013 when

she revealed her decision to undergo a


preventative double mastectomy.
I have always told [my children]
not to worry, but the truth is I carry a
faulty gene, BRCA1, Jolie wrote in the
New York Times.
The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with Ashkenazi Jewish genetics about 1 in 40 people of Ashkenazi
descent (as opposed to about 1 in 500
in the general population) are carriers
of the gene, which increases their risk
of breast or ovarian cancer.
At the time, Jolie noted that Pitt was
supportive of the elective surgery, and
was a great help during her recovery.
Pitt is obsessed with the Nazis
and has killed them on screen!
Its safe to say that Pitt has an above-average fascination with the Nazi era. He
has starred in three World War II flicks
in the past seven years Inglourious
Basterds (2009), Fury (2014), and
Allied (set to come out in November).
After acting in Fury, he reportedly
became obsessed with wartime memorabilia, and bought a 1942 motorbike
that was used by Nazis during reconnaissance missions for approximately
$387,000.
At least Pitt has been the Nazis worst
nightmares in all three of the films.
Gabe Friedman/JTA Wire Service

Candlelighting: Friday, September 23, 6:33 p.m.


Shabbat ends: Saturday, September 24, 7:30 p.m.

For convenient home delivery,


call 201-837-8818 or bit.ly/jsubscribe

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rockland 24
extend an invitation.............. 28
oPINION 32
cover story 38
Dvar torah...........................................59
calendar60
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classifieds66
real estate 68

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Larry Yudelson

Jewish Standard September 23, 2016 3

Noshes

Learn to play the accordion.


Actors starve, but at least musicians can eke
out a living.
Leonard Nimoys fathers advice to his son, according to Tablet.

TENDER MOMENTS:

Jerry Lewis film


is worth a peek
It was hard not to
be charmed by
JERRY LEWIS, who
turned 90 in March,
when he appeared
recently on a few TV
shows to promote the
film Max Rose. While
Lewis cannot walk
anymore, mentally he is
completely there. I was
truly touched as he
poignantly discussed the
mutual bromance
between him and Dean
Martin, and why he
raised more than $1
billion for charity. Sadly,
the reviews of Max
Rose are mostly
negative. But the scenes
between him and his son,
played by KEVIN
POLLAK, 58, have been
singled out as the films
best. Lewis plays the title
character, a jazz musician
haunted by the recent
discovery that his wife
(CLAIRE BLOOM, 85)
may long have been
unfaithful. This film
opened in very limited
release last week. I think
its worth making a
mental note of it and
looking for it when its
released to streaming services.
Comedian MORT
SAHL, 89, has a largish
supporting role in Max
Rose. Yes, Sahl is still
alive. Every Thursday
he performs at a San
Francisco Bay area club
and the performance is
streamed live on Periscope, a free Twitter
App. Recently, I thought

of Sahl when I saw a


documentary on the
Nazi V-2 rocket program.
The V-2s, armed with
explosives, caused the
deaths of thousands of
British civilians. Most of
the work on launch sites
(tunnels, etc.) was done
by concentration camp
inmates. Thousands of
these slave laborers were
worked to death. Werner
Von Braun, later the face
of NASA in the late 1950s
and 60s, was critical to
the V-2s development.
But only gradually, and
mostly after his death,
was his knowledge of
the use and treatment
of slave laborers made
public. So I always will
love Sahl for breaking
with the almost total U.S.
media celebration of the
great Von Braun during
Von Brauns heyday and
deftly satirizing the title
of Von Brauns sanitized
autobiography, I Aim at
the Stars. Sahl said, circa
1960: Von Braun I aim
at the stars, but sometimes I hit London.
A recent issue of
Variety profiled
troubled actor SHIA
LABEOUF, 30.
LaBeouf is the son of
a Jewish mother and a
non-Jewish father. He
was mostly raised Jewish
and had a bar mitzvah.
His father had many
substance abuse problems, including alcoholism. His parents divorced
when he was he was 10.
Shia and his mother lived

Jerry Lewis

Kevin Pollak

Claire Bloom

Shia LaBeouf

a pretty hardscrabble
existence in a run-down
part of Los Angeles. He
went out, alone, at age
10 and got gigs performing stand-up comedy at
local clubs, and he got
himself an agent. He then
snared a starring role
on a hit Disney Channel
series (Even Stevens)
and became a tween
star. A series of hit films
followed from 2007 to
2013, including Holes,
Disturbia, an Indiana Jones movie, and
Transformers.
For a long time I was
amazed that LaBeouf
didnt act out. Most
child stars who have an
alcoholic parent and had
a rough childhood do
act out eventually. Then,
when LaBeouf turned
25, he began to screw

up big time. For the last


five years, theres been a
string of bizarre incidents, the worst perhaps
coming when he was
dragged out of a Broadway show for shouting
at the stage. LaBeouf
confessed to Variety
that he has a drinking
problem and he was
drunk during the Broadway show incident. He
told Variety that hes
been going to AA and
hes been sober for a
year. He said a romantic
view of famous screwups led him to drink, but
he never liked it. The
other good news: American Honey, an indie
film that stars LaBeouf,
just played the Toronto
film festival, and it got
rave reviews.

Storks delivers
a fresh storyline
Heres the publicity release about Storks, an animated film that opens on Friday, September 23: Storks
deliver babiesor at least they used to. Now they deliver
packages for [a] global internet giant. Junior (voiced
by ANDY SAMBERG, 30) the companys top delivery
stork, is about to be promoted when he accidentally activates the Baby Making Machine, producing an adorable
and wholly unauthorized baby girl. Desperate to deliver
this bundle of trouble before the boss gets wise, Junior
and his [human] friend Tuliprace to make their firstever baby drop in a wild and revealing journey that
could make more than one family whole and restore the
storks true mission in the world. Storks was directed
and written by NICHOLAS STOLLER, 40, who cowrote the two most recent Muppets movies and seems
to have a deft hand in crafting films that appeal to both
N.B.
adults and kids.

N.B.

Want to read more noshes? Visit facebook.com/jewishstandard

California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at


Middleoftheroad1@aol.com

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JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 5

Local
Students persistence pays off
Pet partner wins right to bring therapy dog on public transit without carrier
LOIS GOLDRICH

hana Horn, 20, and her 4-year-old


mini-labradoodle, Rosie, are quite
an impressive team.
Our residents are immediately excited when Rosie enters the room,
said Naomi McDermott, director of social
services for the Jewish Home Family. We
are talking pure joy. A nationally licensed
pet therapy team, Shana and Rosie volunteered with the Jewish Home at Rockleigh
over the summer.
Rosie is trained so well that she remembers people, Ms. McDermott said. For our
residents, the idea that they can touch and
hug an animal is something that is often lost
in an institutional setting. Rosie gives them
the companionship of a pet again.
Ms. Horn, lives in Teaneck and is a junior
at Yeshiva University, majoring in psychology, and Rosie also worked with the Friendship Circle of Bergen County and the New
York State Psychiatric Institute.
When we travel to NYSPI, we take public transit, Ms. Horn said. Because Rosie
is not a service dog, she was required to
travel in a carrier, which added extra stress
to both of us.
Realizing the irony of coming in to the
facility stressed when your job is to provide less stress to those you visit Ms. Horn
decided to do something about it.
There are many therapy dogs whose
work has been limited by these transit
laws entirely, she said. Larger therapy
dogs, such as golden retrievers, cant fit
in a carrier, and therefore cant use public transit at all.
I called New Jersey Transit and asked if
they could do something voluntarily, but
they said, Sorry, we cant help you, she
continued. I mentioned it to a Friendship
Circle family who knew someone related
to the mayor. Thats Teanecks mayor, Elie
Y. Katz. So I called the mayor, and he said,
Great, but I dont have the authority.
He did, however, give her contact
information for Loretta Weinberg, the
Teaneck Democrat who is the New Jersey State Senates majority leader. Not
expecting an immediate response and
even less confident that anything could
be done about the situation Ms. Horn
emailed Ms. Weinberg, writing and
rewriting the email to make sure I got my
point across.
I sent it out and she answered it positively, Ms. Horn said. This was right after
[the violence in] Orlando, she added, noting that therapy dogs were brought into
that city to work with victims families.
Ms. Weinberg got in touch with the

Shana Horn, a psychology major at Yeshiva Universiy, plays with her therapy dog, Rosie, a 4-year-old mini-labradoodle,
who works with her at the Jewish Home in Rockleigh.
transit authority on behalf of the therapy
team. They asked for information about
the dog, and then I received a letter saying that Im allowed on all New Jersey
transit buses without a carrier, Ms. Horn
said. While her case is considered exceptional, since anyone can claim that their
dog is a therapy dog, she noted that Ms.
Weinberg made it clear that if anybody
else has a registered therapy dog and
faces a similar problem, they should
reach out for her office, and they will be
glad to work it out for them as well.
That lovely young woman called my
office and made a good case for wanting
to change the rules, Ms. Weinberg wrote
in an email. And in this situation, NJ Transit agreed after we engaged them. It shows
the power of one voice raised.
I think the positive concept of therapy
dogs is pretty much accepted, she added.
In fact, I read one report that the act of
petting a dog can actually lower a persons
blood pressure. In any event, I think anyone who is confined in an institution of
any kind would be happily distracted by
a visit from a fun, cuddly, properly trained
animal. So lets help that to happen as easily as possible.
Ms. McDermott also clearly is pleased

6 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Shana Horn and Rosie bring comfort to a resident of the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh.

Local

with Ms. Horns success.


What makes Rosie so special is the
teamwork between her and Shana, she
said. By definition, a therapy dog is well
trained and follows commands and is
therefore very successful at traveling without a crate. We are proud of Shanas activism in this regard, and wish her great success in expanding the important work of
therapy dogs.
Ms. Horns path into pet therapy began
with a suggestion from her mother.
I love animals, and was dead set on
becoming a vet, she said. Then I went
to Israel for a year, hoping to intern for a
frum vet to learn the halakhot of being a
vet. She wanted to learn what Jewish law
would allow her to do. When she returned,
she no longer was sure that she wanted to
pursue that path.
Meanwhile, before leaving for Israel, her
great-grandmother, then 97, had moved in
with the family, and I became her caretaker, Ms. Horn said. My family wanted
me to go into geriatrics, but I really was not
so sure. I was afraid of loss, so I was pretty
much against it.
For her part, Rosie got on famously with

Ms. Horns great-grandmother.


My great-grandmother had to watch
the 12 oclock and 5 oclock news, Ms.
Horn said. Rosie figured out her schedule
and would go in at other times to play with

Ms. Horn trained


Rosie herself,
using criteria she
found online to
become certified
by Pet Partners.
her. Her mother, being an intelligent
woman, said I should work at a nursing
home and get Rosie certified as a therapy
dog. With Rosie at her side, it wouldnt be
as hard.
Ms. Horn trained Rosie herself, using
criteria she found online to become certified by Pet Partners, the nations largest national therapy animal registration

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organization. You have to pass a test,


she said, noting that the animals must
remain calm while testers play with their
tails or other parts of their bodies, and
they must not become agitated when their
human partners walk away. They instead
must remain in place until they are told to
come. They also have to follow their partners commands, walking past food and
toys when so instructed.
Ms. Horn pointed out that Pet Partners
registers a number of different species, in
addition to dogs. (According to the groups
website, these include cats, horses, rabbits, pigs, birds, llamas and alpacas, guinea
pigs, and even rats.) Their activities are
meant as chesed, Ms. Horn said, noting
that volunteers cannot accept money.
Ms. Horn, who plans to pursue a career
in pet therapy, put Rosies new skills into
action right away, starting at the Jewish
Home. They were very welcoming, she
said, adding that already she had gone
there with the youth group NCSY. Over
the summer, however, she not only did pet
therapy but also a social work internship.
Rosie and Shana were often invited into
the private space of residents rooms, like

any family member would be, Ms. McDermott said. After a birthday party we had
for Rosie, residents asked for days if she
had a good time at her party.
Ms. Horn also has started a new club at
Stern, an alternative therapy club, educating and increasing awareness of alternate means of therapy, whether dance,
sports, music, yoga, or pets. Depending
on the funding the club receives, I have
some ideas for events, she said, such as
bringing in professionals to talk about
their respective fields.
I hope to go to graduate school and get
a degree in counseling, Ms. Horn said.
From there, she might pursue a PsyD,
and from there incorporate animals into
my work. In the meantime, she will continue as a volunteer.
The work we do is amazing, and the
more we get out there, the better, she
said. Its becoming more widely known,
but not as much as it can be.
Pet Partners magazine soon will run
an article letting other therapy dog teams
know they can do what Ms. Horn did, to
encourage them. More therapy teams can
do this.

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JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 7

Local

Recovering Judeo-Arabic
Local scholar translates Karaite Bible commentary of Yefet ben Eli
LARRY YUDELSON

hen Dr. Ilana Sasson of Teaneck was growing up in Israel, the child of Iraqi immigrants, she was embarrassed by the Arabic
her parents would speak at home.
I wanted people to speak Hebrew, she said. Kids
who had Yiddish in their house felt the same. It was more
so for those of us coming from the Islamic world, since
Arabic was identified as the language of the enemy.
Her childhood self would be quite surprised, therefore, that Dr. Sasson wrote a dissertation on a JudeoArabic translation and commentary on the biblical book
of Proverbs. A revised version of the dissertation was
published this summer by Brill Publishers as The Arabic Translation and Commentary of Yefet ben Eli on the
Book of Proverbs.
Yefet ben Eli lived in the last decades of the first millennium. He was a native of Basra in present-day Iraq,
the same city Dr. Sassons parents came from a thousand
years later. Like them, he moved to Israel. Unlike them,
he was a Karaite rejecting the authority of the Talmud
and insisting on the right, and importance, of interpreting the Bible independently. His was the central Karaite
translation of the Tanach. It was popular among Karaite
Jews. At the same time, the Arabic commentary of Saadya Gaon, a staunch opponent of the Karaites from earlier in the 10th century, was becoming popular among
rabbinic Jews.
There are many copies of his books, Dr. Sasson said.
If you go to the institute of microfilmed Hebrew manuscripts at the National Library in Israel, you come up
with close to 800 manuscripts of his works.
Dr. Sasson worked from manuscripts not in Yefets
hand, but from as early as the 11th century to determine the best possible text for the work before she
began to translate it.
Her work on Arabic manuscripts reflect a shift in Dr.
Sassons attitude toward her parents native language as
she grew older. Before, it had felt like home something
to be outgrown. Later it still felt like home something
comforting to be returned to.
I felt I missed out on this beautiful language, she said.
Dr. Sasson moved to America 30 years ago. Her interest
in Arabic led her to study at Columbia University, where her
husband, Dr. Ron Prywes, is a professor of biology.
Then she discovered that Judeo-Arabic more about
what that exactly is momentarily was its own discipline, and that a professor at Princeton, Dr. Mark Cohen,
specialized in it. She signed up for a course.

8 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

My parents speak a
spoken language. The
topics they discuss are
more household stuff.
The commentary in a
way was academic.
Yefet was a sage. Its a
literary language.

Dr. Ilana Sasson of Teaneck learned to love her


parents native Arabic as she pursued her linguistic
studies.
A whole world was open to me, she said. He was
teaching medieval Judeo-Arabic texts that are amazing.
This led to her earning a Ph.D. from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.
So what is Judeo-Arabic?
Briefly, its the distinctive versions of Arabic used by Jews.
But its not so simple.
There is a big debate now, Dr. Sasson said. Theres
a scholar at New York University, Dr. Ella Habiba Shohat, who claims that we shouldnt say Judeo-Arabic, we
should just say Arabic.
Thats because Arabic has so many dialectics and so
many levels. Every ethnic group has its own. Yemenites
cannot understand Moroccans, their dialects are so far
apart from each other.
Jews, Dr. Shohat argues, may have spoken a different dialect than their Muslim neighbors. But still, it was
closer to their neighbors than that of distant Jews.
Yet in the traditional understanding of Judeo-Arabic
as a unique thing, there are two possible definitions, Dr.
Sasson said. One says that anything written or said by

a Jew in Arabic is by definition Judeo-Arabic. The other


says anything in Arabic written in Hebrew characters is
Judeo-Arabic. (As it happened, some of the manuscripts
she worked from were written in Arabic characters.)
Yefets written Arabic was very different from the language that Dr. Sasson grew up hearing.
My parents speak a spoken language, she said. The
topics they discuss are more household stuff. The commentary in a way was academic. Yefet was a sage. Its a
literary language.
He has his own vocabulary, that repeats itself because
hes talking of certain topics over and over again: wisdom, the wicked, the world to come. The jargon is specific to biblical commentary and the Book of Proverbs,
but it is still Arabic, she said.
Dr. Sasson said that Yefet, not surprisingly, uses his
commentary to promote his own agenda.
But the bulk of his polemics, at least in his commentary on the Book of Proverbs, are directed not at other
Jews but against Muslims and Christians.
He writes as a representative of the Jewish people,
she said. He feels connected to all Jews. He is secondarily a Karaite.
Dr. Sasson likes Yefets attitude toward women. He
attributes the passage of Proverbs about The woman
of valor Eishet chayil in Hebrew to Solomons
mother, Batsheva.
Dr. Sasson is part of a local group that gathers once a
month to practice conversational Judeo-Arabic. But she
cant try it out with her mother.
Even if I try to initiate a conversation in Arabic, she
will go into English, she said. The last native speakers
of the language, my parents generation, are dying. And
thats it.

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 9

Local

Attention!
Nahariya Air Force cadets stop off at Frisch during Bergen County visit
LARRY YUDELSON

hey lined up, shoulder to shoulder, in their tan uniforms. They


stood up straight. Hakshev, they
said in union. Listen.
They were nine teenagers from Nahariya,
Israel, cadets in the Israeli Air Force and
students at the Amal School in Nahariya.
On Monday morning, they re-enacted their
daily muster at the Frisch School in Paramus, before a room-full of ninth graders, just
slightly younger than they are.
They had arrived in Newark hours before,
on a weeklong visit to northern New Jersey.
By the end of the trip, they planned to meet
with teenagers at the Bergen Academies in
Hackensack and Teterboro; the Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades in Tenafly; the Wayne Y;
the Solomon Schechter day schools in Oakland and Bergenfield; and Temple Emanu-El
of Closter, Temple Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley in Woodcliff Lake, and Temple Avodat Shalom in River Edge. Their schedule
also included visits to two Paramus malls, an
afternoon and evening in New York City, and
miniature golf.
The visit was arranged by the Center for
Israel Engagement at the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey, which took several
Bergen County high school teachers to visit
Nahariya schools last school year.
At Frisch, the Israeli visitors joined engineering classes. They demonstrated a Lego
robotics invention they had brought with
them. In one classroom, they teamed up with
groups of Frisch students on an instant innovation project: Given 10 sheets of paper and
tape, how could they make the strongest or
tallest structure?
Their school combines a high school with
a two-year technical college. Its students are
both civilian and Air Force cadets. All of the

Israelis visiting New Jersey now are cadets.


Some of them are high school students and
others are in the technical college program,
deferring their army service for two years
while they study.
As the Israelis explained in an assembly
for Frischs ninth grade engineering students, as Air Force cadets they have sworn
an oath to the military, their country, and
their school. Their school day is an hour
longer than their civilian schoolmates
they begin and end their day with a military roll call in front of their commander.
When they are in school, they wear uniforms and follow a dress code.
Liza Gilgof, 17, explained how that works.
We have a shirt, we have pants, and we
have shoes. Girls shoes are smaller and very
light. Boys shoes are very big and heavy. The
shirt has to be tucked in. Girls pants have to
be outside the shoes. Boys pants have to be
inside the shoes.
Theres a nail polish code for girls. White,
pearl, pink pearl, or French tips, or natural.
Its the same for our toes, because we can
wear sandals, she said.
Boys must keep their hair short.
Each morning the boys put their hand
through their hair, she said. If the hair is
over their fingers its not according to code.
They get detention. They have to say after
school for an hour or two.
The Nahariya students were selected for
the trip after they were tested on their English and their ability to work together. Besides
English classes, we learn English from books
and movies and games, Liza said. My
9-year-old brother is a gamer. He has great
English from them.
Inbar Markowitz, 18, is student in the
schools mechanical engineering track. She
is a freshman college student.
She said that the cadet track really

Nahariya cadets and a Frisch School student confer on an engineering problem.


10 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

A Nahariya air force cadet poses with Frisch School students after a strength
and balance experiment using books and paper.
provided me a job and a major in life. Before
I didnt know what I wanted to do. Now I
know I want a military career as an Air
Force mechanic.
The Israelis also spoke about their interests, in the slightly formal style that a high
school presentation seems to demand.
Inbar is a national horseback riding
champion, the Frisch students learned.
Alexei Balbanov, 17, said he went on a
survival course this summer. We went
from Mount Meron to the Hermon Mountain, about 60 miles, with 30 pounds on
my back for five days, he said. It was an
intense course. I really enjoyed it.
Amit Peretz, 18, said she likes snowboarding, skiing, and skydiving.
The cadet program offers three majors:
Electronics, robotics, and mechanics. Amit
said shes in the electronics track, but that
wasnt her first inclination.
I thought it was weird for a girl to study
electronics, she said. Then she learned
that the army needed more engineers, so
I decided to try it. I was surprised to find
out I liked this major. Studying about binary
codes can be very interesting.
She told the Frisch students about a
program called Derech Isha, Her Way,

designed for girls in technical studies. We


studied powerful women, she said. We
understood we can do exactly what men
can do, even more.
The program, she said, made me understand I could do anything I want.
Ksenia Kolyakov, 18, is studying mechanics. She said when starts her military services, I want a big responsibility. To fix
planes, or submarines, or maybe be a pilot.
The country needs us, female and male
as one, she said.
As a child, she liked to play with Lego and
build things. Now she aspires to a job she
saw in class trip to an Air Force base: a technician able to take apart an entire engine
to the last screw and put it back together.
Ilia Zobov, 18, was born in Vladivostok,
near Russias eastern border. Hes decided
to stay on after 12th grade rather than going
directly to the army. He sees two years of
technical studies as a mechanic as a chance
for a high-ranking Air Force job like working on the new F-35 fighter jet.
He said that after three or more years in
the military, hell be in an excellent position
to start working at a high tech company.
The opportunities in front of me are
vast, he said.

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JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 13

Local

Traveling spiritually
Zalmen Mlotek and his sons sing together before Selichot services in Teaneck
JOANNE PALMER

almen Mlotek and his two sons,


Avram and Elisha, will sing
together on Saturday night before
Selichot services at the Jewish
Center of Teaneck.
Behind that simple sentence is a wellspring of musicality, history, love, and connection to each other, to the community,
to the present, the past, and the future, to
the year that is about to come and to the
year that is ebbing.
It makes sense that the three will sing
together at the Jewish Center. First, the
venue. I am a member of the Teaneck
Jewish Center, and the new rabbi, Daniel Fridman, asked me to do it, Zalmen
Mlotek of Teaneck said. I am a big fan of
his. So its logical.
Second, the personal. Thats logical too.
Its something singing together that we
have done all their lives, Mr. Mlotek, a pianist and classically trained musician who is
the artistic director of the National Yiddish
Theatre Folksbiene and the son of the late
Yiddishists and musicologists Chanah and
Joseph Mlotek, said. Its what made our
Shabbeses special.
Its what the chasidim say about singing and about connecting with God. And
for me, its an extra thrill to have my sons,
who are developing in their own ways,
going wherever their lives are taking them,
also having the same desire to perform
and to sing together.
My father, brother, and I will gather on
Saturday night to present a series of Yiddish songs, and also songs from the traditional liturgy and the songs we grew up
singing around our Shabbes table, Avrum
Mlotek said. Rabbi Mlotek, 29, graduated
from Yeshivat Chovevei Torah and now is a
founder of Base Hillel, funded in part by Hillel International and UJA Federation of New
York, which empowers pluralistic rabbinic
couples to open their homes and have them
serve as a convening point of Jewish life for
graduate students and young professionals.
Rabbi Mlotek and his wife, Yael Kornfeld, live
near Union Square in downtown Manhattan.
Music is vitally important to Rabbi
Mlotek. (He is a Mlotek!) Hes led High Holy
Day services in Melbourne, Australia, and
interned at the Carlebach Shul on West 79th

From left, Zalmen, Elisha, and Avram Mlotek will sing together before Selichot services Saturday night at the Jewish
Center of Teaneck.
Street, which has music as an essential part
of its DNA. Now, he leads holiday services
at the Isabella Freedman Retreat Center in
Canaan, Connecticut.
He thinks that singing with his family
before Selichot will put singers and listeners
into a different type of spiritual framework
and mindset. Its different from the workweek, and from the rest of the year.
It will offer a different entry into the Selichot experience, he added. We gather
before Rosh Hashanah for the penitential
prayers, but for many Jews, unless you have
a working understanding of Hebrew and
can navigate around the liturgy, a traditional
prayer service can be pretty alienating.
Our collective belief, as a family that has
grown up with a vibrant Yiddish culture, is
that song, poetry, music really allow a different entry into the Jewish experience.
We will sing songs from Eastern Europe,
from the chasidic movement, from the
shtetls, interspersed with traditional tunes
and melodies that people might know.
Well sing niggunim the wordless melodies that evoke emotion and Yiddish folk
songs of all types.
The mood will be reflective and transportative, either to a different place or to
a different time, or to both. Its a different
kind of energy than you might expect to
experience when walking into the Jewish
Center on a Saturday night.
What are the differences among the
three mens styles? My father has classical
training, Rabbi Mlotek said. He studied
with Bernstein, and at the leading musical conservatories. Elisha and I dont have

Who: Zalmen, Avram, and Elisha Mlotek


What: Will perform before Selichot services
Where: At the Jewish Center of Teaneck, 70 Sterling Place
When: Saturday, September 24. The concert, at 11 p.m., will be followed by a talk by
Rabbi Daniel Fridman at 12:30 a.m. and Selichot services at 12:50.
Why: To establish the proper mood reverence, awe, reflection, some sadness, much
joy, before the penitential prayers begin
For more information: Go to the shuls website, jcot.org, or call (201) 833-0515.

14 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

It is good to
do it as a family,
to perform and
also to teach
and sing and
share the
connection that
we feel through
this music.
that kind of talent, but we have an appreciation of it. And we all love and appreciate
each others musicality.
We did grow up singing on the Yiddish
stage, as well as at the Shabbes table. We
grew up with this music and these melodies.
But also, we are in our 20s, Rabbi
Mlotek said. I like hip hop and reggae
and jazz. I think that what we can offer is
a picture of what it might look like for a
younger generation to tap into the musical gifts of the past.
Elisha Mendl Mlotek is 26; he also lives
in downtown Manhattan. Hes one-third of
the group Zusha, which the Standard wrote
about this spring.
I think that the most profound part,
for me, is singing some of our favorite,
most precious songs with my father and
brother, Mr. Mlotek said. We sing some
of them at Shabbes. I sing a song about
Havdalah, when Jews say a lingering
goodbye to Shabbat with wine, spices,
and a flickering braided candle that casts
shadows before it ends and the lights are
turned on. The song was about a child
asking Bubbe not to make Havdalah yet,
so we can stay in Shabbes a little longer.
These are precious songs, he said. We
are used to singing at Holocaust commemorations. The songs we sing then draw from

the resilience and the pain and the tefillah,


the prayers. There is also a time to sing
other songs, to be able to connect, on leil
Selichot, the evening of Selichot, which is
a deep and reflective time.
It is good to do it as a family, to perform
and also to teach and sing and share the
connection that we feel through this music.
This is not a concert, he said. Or it is
not only a concert. We are going to teach
some things, and we will learn things
together, and we will touch new feelings and
reach new heights.
Yiddish music is often seen, if not actively
dismissed, as being associated either with
Broadway or with the Holocaust seen as
being either gimmicky and inauthentic or
as entirely mournful. That is not right, he
thinks. Yiddish music isnt always associated with Jewish spirituality, but it is
always precious. It is vitally important to
sing the music of the Holocaust, but also to
remember that Yiddish music channels and
inspires the full range of human emotions.
My family shares songs that illustrate life
and love and a time we have lost, he said.
We use Yiddish music at Holocaust commemorations because it is something we
have lost. But this Saturday night will not be
a sad evening.
It will be a precious evening of reflection
and beauty and harmony. And of joy. We
also have to serve Hashem, God, with joy.
That is the ultimate place we have to get to.
We have to be sad with Hashem, and joyous. We will touch all these emotions with
music. We are going to travel spiritually.
All three Mloteks talked about the connections they make through music, and
how they hope to make them real to others
as they sing.
We hope that it will be inspiring enough
so that people will sing, Zalmen Mlotek
said. The evening will be a concert some of
the time, but not all the time. People will
be encouraged to sing with us.
Oh, and one other thing. There will
be refreshments, too, he said. That
always helps.

ROSH HASHANA - YOM KIPPUR - SUKKOT 2016 / 5777


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JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 15

Local

Is the Lord my shepherd? Maybe yes, maybe no


Reform movements new High Holy Day prayer books offer many points of entry
JOANNE PALMER

ven though books are the most literal of objects


they are, after all, filled with words, which spell
out meanings explicitly they, like anything else,
can transmit nonverbal messages along with the
verbal ones.
The Reform movements machzor its High Holy Days
prayer book which made its debut last year, is full of messages; many are in the text and its translation, and the others are in the elements beyond the text the omissions and
additions, the design, the new emphases.
Mishkan Hanefesh, the Central Council of American
Rabbis new two-volume machzor, first was released late
last summer. This holiday season will be the first time that
most congregations will use it. It follows the Reform movements new siddur, Mishkan Tfilah, which came out
in 2007.
Mishkan Hanefesh is a logical continuation of the liturgical reform that our movement has been publishing for
the last decade or so, Rabbi Steven Sirbu of Temple Emeth
in Teaneck, who is president of the North Jersey Board of
Rabbis and of the New Jersey-West Hudson Valley Association of Reform Rabbis, said.
Rabbi Sirbu plans to use Mishkan Hanefesh for the
first time this year, beginning with Selichot on Saturday night.
Mishkan Hanefesh follows, refines, and in some
cases redefines the innovations of Mishkan Tfilah,
Rabbi Sirbu said. (Its editor was Rabbi Elyse Frishman of
Barnert Temple in Franklin Lakes.) It offered transliterations for every prayer on every page, gender-inclusive
language, and a variety of theologies expressed in different creative readings, he continued. The English readings express belief in God or some more questioning
about belief in different ways, as well as an emphasis on history and community. Theres a lot of modern
poetry, from poets like Yehuda Amichai. The idea was not just
to approach the same prayer with different styles of translation, but really to approach it with different styles and philosophies of interpretation.
Another of Mishkan Tfilahs innovations was a twopage layout, which is present in most of the book, Rabbi
Sirbu added. And there are notes at the bottom of each page,
which we never had in the Reform movement before. And on
the margin, there is a progression of the prayers in each section, so you can locate yourself in the service.
All of these stylistic, theological, and typographic innovations are included in Mishkan Hanefesh. But its different,
because this is a book that will be used only a few times each
year, and it will be used by many people who come to synagogue only those few times, two or three times, each year.
Those are two related but separate challenges.
Mishkan Hanefesh was in production for quite a few
years, and when I went to CCAR conventions, the most
interesting session of each one was to hear the philosophical
discussions of the new machzor, and the language they were
experimenting with, Rabbi Sirbu said.
They started with a blank-page philosophy, which was
their way of saying that we know Jews worship on the High
Holidays, and we know they need a book, but beyond that
we are not going to start with any preconceived notions. No
feeling of obligation to any specific prayer. They had a sense
that the book had to elevate the spirit of Reform Jews on the
holidays, and their challenge was to either find the prayers or
write the prayers that would accomplish this goal.
The things that Reform Jews have always resonated with
16 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Rabbi Steven Sirbu of Temple


Emeth in Teaneck will use
the Reform movements new
machzor during this High Holy
Day season.

are still in, and the things that stand out to most Reform
Jews are Avinu Malkeinu literally, Our Father, Our King.
How do you deal with that? We are looking for gender-inclusive language.
And the other one is Untaneh Tokef, which talks about
who shall live and who shall die. Thats a theology that does
not resonate with all Reform Jews. (Note that the transliterations, including Untaneh Tokef, are not always the conventional ones.)
The decision was made to keep both of those important
prayers in, but also at the same time to give them additional
context for the modern worshipper.
How did they do it? We use the words Avinu Malkeinu, but
they are not translated; they are in Hebrew and in transliteration. Theres an introductory reading that describes God as
both a loving father and a compassionate mother. Its a complicated reading, and the last paragraph says that of the metaphors it uses God as mother, father, and rock and redeemer
all of them are true and none of them are true.
Its a way of expanding and then shattering metaphors, all
on the same page.
What about Untaneh Tokef, the prayer that enumerates
various horrifying deaths before saying, in Mishkan Hanefeshs version, But through return to the right path, through
prayer and righteous giving, we can transcend the harshness
of the decree?
The section on Unetaneh Tokef begins with three study
texts, so if we have time we actually can study, Rabbi Sirbu
said. We can ask people in the congregation to turn to the
person next to them and read the text out loud. In their own

ways, each of the three study texts grapples with the difficulties of Untaneh Tokef,
which does not show God in a way that
resonates with most Reform Jews.
One of the three study texts is written
by Rabbi Edward Feinstein, a Conservative
rabbi in California. The next is by Rabbi
Margaret Moers Wenig, a New York Citybased Reform rabbi, and the third is by
singer/songwriter/iconic Montreal-born Jew
Leonard Cohen, who is represented by his
song Who Shall I Say Is Calling?
Other poets whose work is used to throw
light from new angles on familiar concepts
include Walt Whitman, Marge Piercy, Allen Ginsburg, Hannah Senesh, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and Pablo Neruda; other
thinkers include the scientist Richard Feynman and the social
activist Ruth Messinger.
The book is meant to welcome doubters by acknowledging them. Psalm 23 tells us that The Lord is my shepherd,
which comforts many Jews, just as we are told that Gods rod
and staff comfort them. But it doesnt work for everyone, so a
countertext tells us that My lord is not a shepherd and I am
not his sheep. Those are strong words, discomfiting for many
but water in the desert to others.
Mishkan Hanefesh does not use all the traditional Torah
and haftarah readings, Rabbi Sirbu said, nor does it use the
ones that earlier Reform machzorim had presented. In the
old book, on Rosh Hashanah morning, for example, the only
two choices were the akedah the binding of Isaac, a story
that Orthodox and Conservative services include on the second morning of Rosh Hashanah and the birthday of the
world, the beginning of Genesis, which Orthodox and Conservative Jews do not read on either day, although the birthday of the world is a traditional understanding of the holiday.
Now, we have more options, which the machzor places
both in the pages devoted to the Torah service as it falls during
the course of the day, and in a section of alternative readings
at the back. At Temple Emeth, we will read the story of Abraham arguing with God, because the key line of it is Shall not
the Judge of the whole earth do justice?
That is the core message of Rosh Hashanah, Rabbi
Sirbu said.

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18 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Scott Garrett

Josh Gottheimer

Iran becomes issue in local


House race even though both
candidates oppose the deal
RON KAMPEAS
The congressional race in New Jerseys
5th District is a bitter one, pitting a rarity a hardline conservative Republican congressman from the Northeast,
Scott Garrett against Josh Gottheimer,
a lawyer who was a speechwriter for
former President Bill Clinton and an
executive at Microsoft.
Now the Iran nuclear deal has
become a battleground issue, with Mr.
Garrett hoping to chip away at Jewish
support for his Democratic challenger
with an attack ad.
Thats odd, because both candidates
opposed the deal.
Not only that, the ads contention
that Mr. Gottheimer endorses the Iran
policies of the Obama administration
is unfounded. Even more bizarre,
when I asked the Garrett campaign
to substantiate the claim, it produced
evidence that Mr. Gottheimer favors a
tough-on-Iran policy.
Iran is getting play because of the
districts substantive Jewish constituency. Redistricting after the 2010 census added heavily Jewish suburbs like
Teaneck to what for decades had been
a rural GOP stronghold, but Mr. Garrett
still has won handily in the last elections.
Yet Democrats are optimistic about
change this election. In part, thats
because of the effect they hope an
unpopular Republican presidential
nominee, Donald Trump, will have
down-ticket.
Mr. Gottheimer, who is Jewish, is
running liberal-to-centrist on domestic
issues, but he is hawkish on Israel, which
gets its own section on his policy page.
Israel is a bastion of stability in a
region that is prone to radical, frequent
change, and Israels commitment to
equality, freedom of expression and

religion, and democratic values is unprecedented across the globe, across history,
and especially across the Middle East, he
writes on that page.
Mr. Gottheimer has not been shy about
opposing the deal, reached last year,
that provided sanctions relief to Iran in
exchange for that country rolling back its
nuclear development. In a column a year
ago in this newspaper, written before he
entered the congressional race, Mr. Gottheimer listed five myths that he said
the deals proponents propagated. Mr.
Gottheimer also made clear that had he
been in Congress at the time, he would
have been among the minority of Democrats who opposed it.
Myths cant change the unfortunate
reality that this deal simply is not good
enough, he said.
In March 2015, Mr. Gottheimer also
made clear whose side he was on after
Senator Robert Menendez, New Jerseys
senior senator and the lead Democrat
opposing the deal, came under investigation for alleged improprieties in his dealings with a donor. The more conspiratorial-minded observers suggested that the
inquiry was the Obama administrations
revenge on the senator. The New York
Times quoted Mr. Gottheimer as telling
Mr. Menendez at a Jewish event, We will
always have your back.
So ears perked up recently, when Mr.
Garrett released a radio ad in which a
woman, in a tough North Jersey accent,
pronounced that Mr. Gottheimer
endorses Obamas bad foreign policies, policies that pay Iran billions and
wont stop them from acquiring nuclear
weapons.
I asked Mr. Garretts campaign about
the ad, and its evidence in support of
its argument was tenuous at best: An
appearance on Fox News in September
2009, when Mr. Gottheimer, speaking as

Local
a commentator, praised Obama as being more proactive on the global stage than his predecessor, President
George W. Bush, and included Iran as an example.
When it came to Iran and talking about the global
economy, he showed a serious difference from his predecessor, which was, Were here to reach out to you, to
work together and to actually bring change a different
way to the world, was the Gottheimer quote provided
by the Garrett campaign.
Mr. Gottheimer, speaking on September 27, 2009,
was talking about Mr. Obamas revelation, days earlier,
that Iran had hidden a uranium enrichment facility at
Fordow. Mr. Obama was furious, and appeared with
then-French President Nicolas Sarkozy and then-British
Prime Minister Gordon Brown to say that he would hold
Iran accountable under international law.
Mr. Obama made good on that threat, and the subsequent U.N. resolutions were the predicate for toughened
sanctions which were, in fact, stronger than the sanctions approved under President Bush. It was a moment
when Mr. Obama, Israel, and the pro-Israel community
were aligned on Iran policy.
In the same segment, Mr. Gottheimer said, What we
saw differently was instead of going it alone, immediately when we knew there was a problem this week, he
was standing next to Sarkozy and Brown, and the leaders together said, Heres our strategy, applying serious
pressure on Iran.
Otherwise Sarah Neibart, the Garrett campaign
manager who replied to me, cited support for Mr. Gottheimer from leading Democrats, who did support the
Iran nuclear deal. Support by Democrats for a Democrat
is hardly exceptional, however.
There is a twist: The Gottheimer supporter who
alerted me to the radio ad also dug up a 2006 letter
signed by 12 members of Congress, urging Mr. Bush to
renew direct talks with Iran, without preconditions.
Although we are all familiar with the inflammatory
rhetoric of President Ahmadinejad, there are certainly
other significant governmental bodies in Iran that have
demonstrated moderation and eagerness for dialogue,
the letter said.
One of the signatories for the strategy, which came to
define how Obama approached Iran seeking out the
moderates for direct talks was Scott Garrett.
Ms. Neibarts rejoinder: I just want to confirm that
you are contacting us about a 10-year-old letter.
Touch!
But not so much from a campaign basing its accusations against Gottheimer on a seven-year-old TV segment and one in which he favored a tough approach
JTA WIRE SERVICE
on Iran.
EDITORS NOTE:
Since this JTA piece came out, Mr. Garretts office
has responded to it by saying that he has been
against the Iran deal ever since it was announced,
that other Republicans denounced it as well. On
the other hand, it charged, Mr. Gottheimer waited
until after a series of scheduled fundraisers with
Democratic stalwarts, most of whom favored
the deal, were completed before he came out
against it. The offices spokesperson pointed out
that other prominent Democrats, including New
Yorks Senator Charles Schumer, Representative
Eliot Engel of the Bronx, and Representative Brad
Sherman of California all rejected the deal before
Mr. Gottheimer did so publicly.
According to the Garrett offices timeline,
those three Democrats, all of whom are in office,
came out against the deal between August 6 and
August 7 last year, while Mr. Gottheimers antideal column in this newspaper was published on
August 18.
JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 19

Briefly Local

Bnai Jacob alumni, from left, Dean Brody, Lauren Weinberg, Phyllis and
Mark Harris, Beth Chananie, Sherrie Levine Staszewski, Jane Canter, and
Lynn Millinger.

MS patients enjoy therapy


as NCJW resumes swim-ins
Members of the Swim-In Program, a
community service project the Bergen
County Section of the National Council
for Jewish Women offers to people with
multiple sclerosis, shared an end-of-summer afternoon together. Dedicated volunteers and swimmers with MS got to
socialize and have a pizza lunch.
Since 1976, the local NCJW section, in
collaboration with the NJ Metro chapter
of the National MS Society, has provided
a once-a-week water program where
people with MS have an opportunity for
therapeutic exercise.
Swim-In resumed on September 14

at the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in


Tenafly. The free therapeutic program
runs through May on Wednesdays from 1
to 3 p.m. and is supervised by a licensed
physical therapist. Volunteers assist clients in the locker room and with wheelchairs in the pool area. Clients are fitted
with a buoyancy belt and helped into the
pool, where they swim or exercise with a
trained volunteer.
Volunteers are sought for the program
and a short training program is provided. For information, call (201) 3854847 or go to www.ncjwbcs.org.

Plaques dedicated to Janoffs


Congregation Bnai Jacob in Jersey
City held a dedication ceremony for
the late Ruth and Morris Janoff, the
founder of the Jewish Standard, on
September 18. The shuls new rabbi,
Aaron Katz, led the ceremony.
Speakers included Dean Brody of
Tenafly, a member of the shuls presidium, and the Janoffs children,
James of Teaneck and Beth Chananie of Paramus.
The synagogue, celebrating its
58th year, is recovering from a
major robbery a few weeks ago.
The dedication, the rabbis inaugural event, marked a kick-off for the
shuls rebuilding campaign.
For information, call (201) 4355725 or go to www.bnaijacobjc.com.

James Janoff and Beth Chananie

Carol Silver Elliott, presiSeniorHaven is one of


dent and CEO of the Jew14 shelters nationwide
ish Home Family, has
and is part of the SPRiNG
been appointed to the
Alliance, a network of
New Jersey Task Force on
regional elder abuse
Abuse of Persons Who
shelters with close working relationships.
Are Elderly or Disabled.
Elder abuse is an
Ms. Silver Elliott ,
under-recognized and
named to the post by
under-reported probGovernor Chris Christie, looks forward to
lem in our society and
Carol Silver Elliott
continuing to be active
it effects millions every

COURTESY JHF
in promoting awareyear, Ms. Silver Elliott
ness of elder abuse and
said. To be able to help
the importance of providing shelters
the most vulnerable, to work to assure
for victims.
that every individual has the ability to
The Jewish Home Family opened
live a life that is safe and dignified is a
New Jerseys first elder abuse shelter
vital effort. It is truly wonderful that the
in 2015, under Ms. Silver Elliotts leadstate of New Jersey is taking this imporership. SeniorHaven for Elder Abuse
tant leadership step, and I am honored
Prevention, in addition to offering 90
to be a part of it.
to 120 days of shelter to victims of elder
For information on SeniorHaven or
abuse, has convened professionals from
elder abuse, or to bring a speaker free
various sectors to educate others on the
of charge to address any audience, email
signs of abuse and best practices to help
seniorhaven@jewishhomefamily.org or
victims seek shelter.
call (855) 455-0555.

20 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

COURTESY YU

Jewish Home Family chief named


to state task force on elder abuse

YU undergrads help with flood relief


Over the Labor Day weekend, 12 undergraduates from Yeshiva University traveled to flood-ravaged Baton Rouge, La., to
help with cleanup efforts in partnership
with Nechama, a Jewish disaster-relief
organization. For three days, the students
ripped up wooden floorboards and moldy
carpets, took rotting doors off hinges, and

carried ruined countertops and dressers


to the curb. On Shabbat, they worked with
the local Chabad to coordinate Torah readings, prayer services, and youth groups.
Among those pictured are Yoni Mintz of
Fair Lawn, third from right, and Danielle
Orenshein of Teaneck, fifth from left.

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JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 21

Briefly Local
Israeli pilot-hero will address
local IDF event to aid wounded
Wounded Israeli hero and paralympics
gold medalist Noam Gershony will speak
at the Hilton Woodcliff Lake on Wednesday, September 28, to raise awareness
and support for Friends of the Israel
Defense Forces and its well-being programs for wounded soldiers. Valley
Chabads Eternal Flame, in partnership
with Friends of the IDF, sponsors the
event. Doors open at 7 p.m.; program is
at 7:30.
Six years before winning the gold
medal for wheelchair tennis at the
2012 London Paralympics, Mr. Gershonys Israeli Air Force Apache helicopter crashed in Lebanon. His copilot was killed, and Mr. Gershony was
Noam Gershony ROMY MODLIN PHOTOGRAPHY
severely injured.
After my injury I wondered, why did I
survive? Mr. Gershony said. I used to be
Gershony risked and nearly lost his
able to fly an Apache and now I can barely
life to protect the State of Israel and Jews
walk up four steps. Thats when I decided
worldwide, the FIDFs New Jersey direcnever to let myself become depressed no
tor, Howard Gases, said. The least we
matter what the situation
can do is support programs for wounded
Now I know that Im a very lucky guy:
soldiers and veterans like him, to help
I fell 6,000 feet to what should have been
these resilient and inspirational men and
my death, and I rose again.
women return to a sense of normalcy.
Woodcliff Lake native Sgt. Gideon, a forWe are excited to be partnering with
mer lone soldier who served in the IDFs
the FIDF to bring this hero to our comParatroopers Brigade, also will speak.
munity for our annual lecture, said
The evening benefits and raises awareRabbi Yosef Orenstein, director of Valley
ness for FIDF well-being programs for
Chabads Eternal Flame program. Noams
wounded Israeli soldiers. The programs
story is the story of our land and the story
aid wounded IDF soldiers during and
of our people for millennia: overcoming
after their rehabilitation and provide a
challenges and thriving through adversity.
chance for them to live without limitations
For information or to reserve tickets
through well being, rehabilitative, and reccall (646) 274-9646 or go to www.fidf.org/
reational activities.
noamgershonynj.

COURTESY YU

Bris Avrohom dinner and wedding


On Sunday, Bris Avrohom
the keynote speaker. The
of Hillside will hold its 37th
Community Service award
annual dinner and 31st gala
will be presented to repwedding at the Sheraton
resentatives of New Jersey
Parsipanny. A commemoTransit, who have served
rative ad journal will be
the Jewish community
published in conjunction
with dedication in facilitatwith it.
ing the placement of ChaNew Jersey couples who
nukah menorahs in many
were denied a religious
locations. Guests of honor
ceremony in their native
are two dentists, Drs. Ilya
Kim Guadagno
countries will be able to
and Polina Lipkin. The
COURTESY BRIS AVROHOM
have religious marriages
Woman of Valor award will
and reaffirm their vows.
be presented to Bella VolfSo far, Bris Avrohom has performed 850
man, Bris Avrohoms coordinator of Rusof these religious marriages.
sian projects for the past 30 years.
Kim Guadagno, New Jerseys lieutenFor information, call (908) 289-0770 or
ant governor and secretary of state, is
email office@brisavrohom.org.

Tapping into appreciation


for Israels border patrol
Congregation Bnai Yeshurun of Teaneck
aided Yashar LaChayal in Maale Adumim, Israel, by sending water backpacks
to Israels Border Patrol soldiers. The soldiers are often on the frontlines dealing
with IDF anti-terror activities.
Yashar LaChayal, a nonprofit organization providing humanitarian support
to Israeli combat soldiers, recently has

stepped up its support of the Border


Patrol. A donor family pays for all of
Yashar LaChayals operating expenses,
allowing all donations and grants to the
organization to be used for the benefit of
Israeli soldiers.
For information on Yashar LaChayal,
go to www.yasharlachayal.org.

Student joins the paratroops


Yakir Greenberg of Teaneck recently made aliyah to
Israel, following two years of yeshiva study there. A
member of Congregation Rinat Yisrael and graduate
of SAR Academy and High School, he began his military service in the Israel Defense Forces in Chativat
HaTzanchanim, the Paratroopers Brigade. On September 13, after six weeks of basic training, he was sworn
in during a ceremony at the Western Wall, with the
rest of the paratroopers drafted in August. In about
five months, he will complete training and take part
in another ceremony, where he will be awarded the
traditional red beret of the paratroopers, after finishing a 70-plus kilometer march.

Adam and Dana Sasouness flank Senator Tim Scott.

Yakir Greenberg

COURTESY NORPAC

Senator Tim Scott at Norpac gathering


More than 385000 likes

Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
22 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Earlier this month, Dana and Adam


Sasouness of Englewood hosted an outdoor Norpac reception for Senator Tim

Scott (R-S.C.) at their home. Scott is running for re-election in November.

LShanah Tovah

Fresh Fish

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represent items on sale; it is for display purposes only. Copyright Wakefern Food Corp., 2016. All rights reserved.

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 23

Rockland
A Torah travels

L Shana
L Shana
Tovah!
Tovah!

From the Bronx to Odessa, through Wesley Hills,


a sefer scroll finds its newest home
As is true with so many things in the Jewish community,
everything, it turns out, is connected.
The Torah scroll belonged to Eddy and Sidney Z. Bowman, who were very active congregants at the Kingsbridge
Heights Jewish Center in the Bronx. The shul was a prominent modern Orthodox institution, and its rabbi, Israel
Miller, was well known and highly respected. A one-time
president of the Rabbinical Council of America and a senior

Joanne Palmer

ow did a Torah, crafted and written in Europe,


well before the war, whose exact provenance
and passage to the United States is unclear,
but whose decades in the Bronx are well documented, end up on its way to Odessa?
And what does it have to do with Montebello?

Wishing you
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newa sweet
year. new year.
Wishing

Jamie and Steven Dranow Larry A. Model Harvey Schwartz


Jamie
and Steven
Dranow General
Larry A.Manager
Model Harvey Schwartz
L. Rosenthal,
Gregg Brunwasser
Michael
Gregg Brunwasser Michael L. Rosenthal, General Manager
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vice president at Yeshiva University, Rabbi Miller,


who held many other positions as well, was best
known for his work advocating for Holocaust survivors at the Conference on Jewish Material Claims
Against Germany.
When the Bowmans died, they left the Torah scroll
to their daughter and son-in-law, Lillian and Richard
Weinberger. Soon, the demographics of the Bronx
changed, Rabbi Miller left the shul, and the Weinbergers moved the scroll to Kittay House, a complex
that offers assisted and independent living, just a few
blocks from the shul.
Kittay House started as a haven for Jews, but as time
passed and the demographics continued to change,
fewer and fewer Jews lived there. Eventually, the
Torah scroll no longer was used, and sat abandoned
in its ark, waiting for its next life.
Meanwhile, Lillian and Richard Weinberger moved
to Wesley Hills more than 50 years ago, Mr. Weinberger said. They were active members of the Pomona
Jewish Center; when that merged into the Montebello
Jewish Center, they switched their allegiance to Montebello, and have been active there ever since.
Its not so easy figuring out what to do with an extra
sefer Torah, particularly a heavy one, as this one is.
And there was another specification that made it
even harder.
See torah travels page 26

845-356-8600

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On Any 2
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RETAILER: We will reimburse you for the face value of this coupon plus 8 handling, provided you
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FRAUD). Mail to: The Manischewitz Company, CMS Dept. #72700, 1 Fawcett Drive, Del Rio, TX
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Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 25

Rockland
Torah travels
from page 24

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26 Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

How do you find a home for a Torah


that has come from Europe and was
used in a modern Orthodox synagogue
but is owned by a Conservative couple
who are proud of being members of an
egalitarian synagogue? Montebellos
interim rabbi, Richard Hammerman,
asked rhetorically. (Rabbi Hammerman
replaced Rabbi Adam Baldachin, who
has moved across the river to Scarsdale.)
Rabbi Baldachin tried to find a good
home for the scroll, but couldnt. He
contacted the Masorti movement
thats the Conservative movement outside North America but they couldnt
find anything, Rabbi Hammerman said.
So he inherited the problem.
Thats where connections came in.
My friend Ron Hoffberg has been the
Masorti rabbi in Prague for 15 years,
Rabbi Hammerman said. He needed
another sefer Torah for his congregation,
so he told me about this group, which is,
of all places, in Westchester County. Its
called Project Kesher.
To be specific, its in Harrison. Richard
Hammermans son, Eytan Hammerman,
coincidentally is the rabbi of the Harrison Jewish Center.
Projec t Kesher works to help
empower Jewish women, mainly in
Eastern Europe. Among its other
work, it introduces Jewish women to
each other, and brings Torah scrolls to
their communities.
And thats how, within days, we made
the shidduch, Rabbi Hammerman said.
The Torah was matched with a congregation in Ukraine. Project Kesher picked
up the scroll, took it to a scribe, Dan

Project Keshers associate director of development and marketing,


Kimmie Braunthal, and Kesher volunteer Ben Orenstein prepare Torah
scrolls for their trip to new homes in
Eastern Europe.

Wigodsky of White Plains, who checked


and repaired it and then certified it as
kosher and ready for use.
For three years, the Weinbergers were looking for a home for their
sefer Torah, and because of my connection with Ron Hoffberg, we could
make it in three days, Rabbi Hammerman continued.
So from the Bronx to Montebello
to Prague to Harrison to Odessa. Its all
about connections.
Everything is a circle, Rabbi Hammerman summed up. And now, the
Torah scroll is going back home to
Europe, where it will be welcomed this
week by Jews in Odessa.

Rockland Federation to host


community update meetings
The Jewish Federation
future of the Jewish
& Foundation of Rockcommunit y in Rockland County will offer
land and worldwide. Dr.
a community update
Ralph Nurnberger, international affairs profeson September 28, at 7
sor at Georgetown Unip.m., in the Schwartz
versity, is the keynote
Family Social Hall of
speaker. A government
the Rockland Jewish
affairs and international
Communit y Campus
relations specialist, he
in West Nyack. The
will di scuss current
meeting will be the
U.S.-Israel relations and
organizations largest
Dr. Ralph Nurnberger
speculate about how the
communit y convening this year and it will
relationship between
mark the launch of Federations 2017
the two countries could change under
Annual Campaign. Registration for the
a Clinton or Trump administration.
evening is open at www.jewishrockFederation donors of 18 years or
land.org/events.
more will be honored at the evening,
At the update, attendees will hear
which includes a dessert reception.
from Rocklands Jewish leadership
Register at www.jewishrockland.org/
about community weaving and the
events or call (845) 362-4200.

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High Holiday tickets are free, but reservations are required. Call (201) 816-1611 or
e-mail Info@KHNJ.org. Shabbat morning and holiday services are held weekly
on the premises of St Pauls Episcopal
Church, 113 Engle St., Englewood. Services
begin at 9:45 a.m. Childrens services at
10:30 a.m. Visit our website at: www.KHNJ.
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Fort Lee
The Sephardic Congregation
of Fort Lee
Your Sephardic home
Come and join us at 313 Tom Hunter Ave.
for the only Sephardic Selihot service in
Fort Lee, get familiar with the High Holidays tunes, sing in unison, and connect
to your rich Sephardic past.
Weekday Selichot Monday to Friday 6
a.m.; Sunday 7 a.m.
Join us also for an uplifting experience of
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur Services
as well as the rest of the year with our new
Rabbi, Ilan Acoca.
We are a warm Sephardic Congregation
where everyone feels at home. Come experience the feeling with us!
For more information, please call us at
201-543-9459 or email us at betyosef18@
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The Sephardic Congregation of Fort Lee invites


you for an inspirational uplifting High Holidays
Services led by our new Spiritual Leader, Rabbi
Ilan Acoca.
Located twenty minutes from Manhattan, the
Sephardic Congregation of Fort Lee is open all
year round and offers daily services, weekly
classes, social events, weekly kiddushim, kids club
and much more in a safe and warm environment
where everyone is treated equally.
For more information about the High Holidays or if
youd like to spend a Shabbat with us, please call
201-543-9459 or email betyosef18@gmail.com
313 Tom Hunter Rd., Fort Lee, NJ

Tizku Leshanim Rabot!


JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 29

You Are Cordially Invited


Franklin Lakes
Temple Emanuel
of North Jersey
Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
welcomes participants of all backgrounds and ages. We value individual spiritual growth, Jewish learning,
the Zionist dream, and acting in the
world to make it a better place. Our
prayer services are traditional, egalitarian, and Conservative, and men
and women participate equally. We
encourage interfaith families to join
us and become a part of our community. Our close-knit membership
includes people and families from
Bergen and Passaic counties, New
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Our synagogue is at 558 High Mountain Road in Franklin Lakes, overlooking the beautiful Franklin Lakes Nature
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New Milford
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which people can enter and establish
Jewish connections. Each revolves
around a different mode of engagement prayer, study, travel, youth
adventures, lifecycle, or social action.
Our communities offer an innovative,
affordable and pluralistic model of

30 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Jewish identity-building and affiliation. Shaar is in the singular to convey the sacredness and authenticity
of each gate.
Meaningful Jewish learning, conscious spiritual development, social
responsibility, and creative programming distinguish each gate. Of note:
The Gate of Discovery offers excit-

ing trips to explore different cultures


through a Jewish lens. Destinations
have included Israel, Argentina, Montreal, Cuba, Panama, Berlin, Krakow,
Sicily, Croatia, as well as a Jewish
journey into the civil rights story in
Atlanta, Selma, and Birmingham and
a Mother/Daughter Spa Shabbat. New
initiatives include day excursions into
NYCs bustling culture of material art,
food, music and theater, as well as
plans for fall hikes in the Hudson Valley. Elishas Gate of Wholeness and
Healing invites people confronting
illness, transition, or loss into Jewish
life through creative ritual and spiritual fellowship. An Israeli/Jewish film
series will take place over the coming
months, too. Rabbi Adina Lewittes
provides caring and thought-provoking spiritual leadership for an innovative, compelling and inspiring approach to 21st century Jewish life.
We welcome people of all backgrounds, and especially seek to create inviting entrances into Jewish life
for those historically on the margins
including singles, Jews by choice,
interfaith families, Jews of color, and
LGBTQ Jews.
www.shaarcommunities.org
Rabbi Adina Lewittes, founder
rabbi@shaarcommunities.org
201-220-6743

You Are Cordially Invited


Teaneck
Jewish Center of Teaneck
The Jewish High Holy Day period is a time of new
beginnings for both individuals and groups. The
Jewish Center of Teaneck, 70 Sterling Place, also
will have a new beginning this Rosh Hashanah as
it greets its new rabbi, Daniel Fridman.
Rabbi Fridman was raised in Teaneck and educated in the Frisch School, Yeshivat Har Etzion,
and Columbia University. He was ordained by the
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) of Yeshiva University. He currently teaches
at the Torah Academy of Bergen County and
serves on the faculty of Lamdeinu, a local Jewish
program for adult learners.
Rabbi Fridman will conduct services with the
assistance of Reb Yitz Cohen, the centers ritual
director, and Joshua Levine, the centers Torah
reader, both of whom led High Holy Day services
so ably last year.
Prices for the holiday tickets are as follows: for
members, two free tickets per family with additional tickets costing $150 each; for associate
members, $150 per ticket; for nonmembers, $250
per ticket, but if they join as full members this
amount counts towards annual dues.
The center will offer free child care for those
who register.
For further information please call the office at
(201) 833-0515.

Tenafly
Temple Sinai of Bergen County
Temple Sinai of Bergen County strives to be
the center of a vibrant, caring community. Our
members celebrate Jewish living through their
religious, educational, and social experiences.
We nurture a warm and stimulating environment
in which each member engages in a meaningful
Jewish life. Blending traditional and progressive
aspects of Judaism, our clergy, staff, and leaders collaborate to foster inspiring worship, festive
holiday celebrations, lifelong learning, and a commitment to community outreach.
With varied backgrounds, we come together
to discover our connection to prayer, spiritual
renewal, and the establishment of a progressive
Jewish community in eastern Bergen County.
Join with us to deepen each journey and our
shared experience. We affirm the central tenets
of Judaism God, Torah, and Israel and,
consistent with the principles of Reform Judaism, we accept diversity within our beliefs
and prayers.
Feel our moving worship. Discover our weekly
Torah study. Listen to a guest speaker. Work with
us to help repair our communities. Come discover meaningful Jewish experiences in a place
where people join together to celebrate and
find strength. We are an inclusive and dynamic
Temple family engaged in strengthening a Jewish
legacy for todays generation and those of the
future; come visit us!
Temple Sinai is located at 1 Engle St.
Call (201) 568-3035 or visit www.templesinaibc.
org.

start the next chapter in Temple Beth Tikvahs 60year story. Rabbi Simerly, who was recently ordained
as a rabbi after 10 years as a cantor in California,
brings not only a genuine warm personality and fantastic musical talent, but also a wealth of knowledge
and a deep love for Judaism, the Jewish people, and
Israel, her country of birth. Cantor Romalis, who has
been the cantor of Temple Beth Tikvah for more than
50 years, is now cantor emeritus and will be staying
on during this transitional year. The services, jointly
led by Rabbi Simerly and Cantor Romalis, will certainly be conducted in perfect harmony, and this years
High Holiday Services are sure to be very special.
Our Religious School offers a one-day-a-week pro-

gram for grades one to nine, a monthly confirmation


and post-confirmation academy for grades 10 through
12, a weekly Jewish Story Hour for 18-months to
3-year-olds, and a Pre-K/K Family Workshop Series, all
in-house. Family education on Sundays is also a central
part of our curriculum.
Temple Beth Tikvah is a warm and welcoming community and offers various membership packages,
customized for everyone young families, singles,
religious school families, seniors, snowbirds, and more.
For information about joining the Temple or on how
to obtain tickets for our High Holiday services, call our
membership chair at (973) 694-1616 or email tbtmembers@aol.com.

Temple Emanuel of North Jersey


What Will You Do Better This Year?
Join Us for the Holidays!
(201) 560-0200
www.tenjfl.org

www.facebook.com/tenjfl

Our synagogue is located at 558 High Mountain Road


in Franklin Lakes, overlooking the beautiful Franklin Lakes
Nature Preserve.Our community is boundless!

The Holidays are just the beginning

Wayne
Temple Beth Tikvah
Temple Beth Tikvah (House of Hope) is a Reform
Jewish congregation, which has conducted its
worship, study, and celebrations since its founding in 1956 in a religiously traditional way. The
Temple is thrilled to welcome Rabbi/Cantor
Meeka Simerly as its new spiritual leader and to
JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 31

Editorial
On immigration
Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe
free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming
shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed,
to me:
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.
Emma Lazarus
The New Colossus
If I had a bowl of skittles and I told you
just three would kill you. Would you take
a handful? Thats our Syrian refugee
problem.
Donald Trump Jr., in a tweet

his is not an editorial about


any Trumps, or for that matter any Lazaruses. It is an editorial about dehumanization.
Because in 50-some-odd days, the election will be over, one candidate will win
and another will lose, the world will
or will not continue to spin on its axis,
the sun will or will not continue on its
appointed route.
But we do have to stop and consider
what we think about immigrants.
Yes, certainly, some immigrants are
bad people. They seem to have the same
percentage of minor criminals as other
people in similar socioeconomic categories, and the same percentage of psychopaths as anyone else. Some have dysfunctional families, some come from cultures
we find distasteful, some have not gotten
or have not retained any moral education.
But some immigrants are good people,
and most immigrants are just regular
people.
Whether or not we think that we
should be welcoming more immigrants,
or detaining and deporting them, we
must realize that basic fact.
I am the granddaughter of immigrants.
Just about everyone I know is a child,
grandchild, or great grandchild of immigrants except for those of my friends
who are immigrants themselves. Everyone came here from somewhere else,
with a story, with fear, with hope, often
fleeing trauma, sometimes with great

Jewish
Standard
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666
(201) 837-8818
Fax 201-833-4959
Publisher
James L. Janoff
Associate Publisher Emerita
Marcia Garfinkle

KEEPING THE FAITH

expectations, sometimes with no expectations at all.


I remember, when I was a child, standing with my great aunt Edna as she looked
at a postcard shed pinned on the wall in
her Brooklyn kitchen. It was an impossibly colored scene, a so-green meadow
topped by a so-blue sky dappled by sowhite clouds. She looked wistful. That was
Hungary, she said. That was home. She
had left well before the war, I knew, so her
memories were not clouded with horror,
just with the sadness of leaving somewhere
shed loved and been loved forever.
Had she ever gone back? I asked. No,
she said, in her delectably thick accent,
an accent I always thought of as plummy
and for some reason associated with
Laurence Olivier, although in my imagination I meant plummy as in a great
dark gloppy sweet fruit, dripping sweet
rich vowels, the way he dripped cutglass ones. (Perhaps I was an odd child,
but that is a digression.) Would she ever
go back? No, she said. Could she ever go
back? No, she said.
I thought a lot about what it would be
like being an immigrant. Saying goodbye
forever to your home, to its colors, to its
smells, to everything about it, down to
the nails on the floor that you stared at as
you waited for sleep every night. Saying
goodbye forever to your friends. Saying
goodbye forever to your parents.
How could anyone survive that, I
wondered.
Now I know that people do survive that.
They survive far worse. I know that not all
immigrants can be let into this country,
that they must be vetted, that they eventually must be able support themselves,
that they need a great deal of help and
patience if they are to assimilate into a
new world.
But I also know that they are not Skittles. They are not interchangeable pieces
of non-nutritious candy. They are not
throwaways.
They are people.
I am so very grateful that when my
grandparents came to this country, the
Lady in the harbor was able to shine her
JP
torch on them.

Editor
Joanne Palmer
Associate Editor
Larry Yudelson
Guide/Gallery Editor
Beth Janoff Chananie
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Heidi Mae Bratt

thejewishstandard.com
32 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

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Warren Boroson
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Terror as an election tool

ombings and attempted bombSaid the Paris newspaper Le Monde in


ings in New York and New Jer- an editorial: If this war takes a form
sey and multiple stabbings
that affronts moderate Arab opinion, if
in Minnesota dominated the
it has the air of a clash of civilizations,
news last weekend. Fear and uncertainty
there is a strong risk that it will contribspread throughout the United States, ute to Osama bin Ladens goal: a conflict
between the Arab-Muslim world and the
mainly because these cowardly acts were
influenced by radical Islamic extremists, West.
The three crusades of the 11th, 12th
and especially by the so-called Islamic
and 13th centuries were
State.
launched by Christians
These acts of terror may
bent on wresting the Holy
be just the beginning; more
Land from the Muslims
such acts may occur, God
who controlled it, but Jews,
forbid, before Americans
too, were its targets. To
go to the polls on Election
this day, the aftershocks of
Day. Beginning at least in the
the Crusades are felt in the
early 1990s, radical Islamic
Jewish world, particularly
organizations have used terrorism to sway democratic
in certain prayers, including the Av Harachamim
countries into electing right- Shammai
Engelmayer
dirge recited in many synawing politicians, preferably
gogues on Shabbat mornof the saber-rattling variety.
ings before the Torah scroll
In the context of the
is returned to the Ark.
2016 presidential election, the Islamic
Muslims, however, always have had a
State would prefer to see Donald Trump
much more visceral reaction.
elected. His Islamaphobic campaign
In the words of Dr. Abdullah Mohamrhetoric fits perfectly into its recruitment
mad Sindi, a Saudi-born American proefforts because the Islamic State sees the
fessor of international relations (and no
rhetoric as confirming its argument that
friend of Israel), Of all the religious wars
the West is out to destroy Islam.
There is one word that can inflame Mus- in human history waged by any religion,
lim passions: crusade.
at any place, and at any time, none have
President George W. Bush used the
been bloodier, more genocidal, more
word in the days after 9/11. This cru- barbaric, and more protracted than the
sade, this war on terrorism, is going to
200-year holy wars by the Western Crutake awhile, he said on September 16, sades against the Arabs and Islam.The
objective of the Crusades was simple, to
2001. Even Christian Europe cringed at
destroy the Arabs (whether Muslim or
his use of crusade. As an article in the
Jew) in the Holy Land of Palestine and
Christian Science Monitor explained it
its environs.
three days later:
The Islamic State plays on that fear.
President Bushs reference to a crusade against terrorism, which passed
In a broadcast statement following the
almost unnoticed by Americans, rang
March 22 Brussels bombings, it said,
alarm bells in Europe. It raised fears that We promise the Crusader states allied
the terrorist attacks could spark a clash
against the Islamic State with dark days,
of civilizations between Christians and
in response to their aggression against
Muslims, sowing fresh winds of hatred
the Islamic State, and what is coming is
and mistrust.
worse and more bitter, Allah permitting.
The only way this group of bloodShammai Engelmayer is the rabbi of
thirsty terrorists, or any of its like (such
Congregation Beth Israel of the Palisades
as al Qaeda, Islamic Jihad, Hezbollah, or
in Cliffside Park.
Hamas), can turn moderate Muslims into

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Founder
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f
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Opinion
radical murderers is to convince them the West
plans yet another crusade. Electing politicians
who threaten just that plays right into their hands.
They also want to expose democracy as hypocritical. The more acts of terrorism there are
against ordinary people, they believe, the greater
the likelihood that there will be a voluntary diminution of civil rights. In this, as we have seen over
time, they are not totally wrong. People prefer
security over illegal searches and seizures, for
example. There was little outcry over the U.S.
Supreme Court decision in June in the case of
Utah v. Strieff that ruled some illegally obtained
evidence to be admissible.
For the Palestinian terrorist groups, there is
yet another motive. If peace ever broke out in
the Middle East, they would quickly lose their
support among the average Palestinian.
And so terror is used to keep the death engine
running.
Yitzhak Rabin was making headway, or seemed
to be doing so, when he was assassinated by a
Jewish terrorist. Three months later, Acting
Prime Minister Shimon Peres called for new
Knesset elections, hoping to ride the sympathy
for Rabin to a stronger Labor government. Peres
had a 30-point lead over the Likuds Benjamin
Netanyahu at the time.
Four bombings over two months, with 50
Israeli dead, pushed the election to Netanyahu.
In 2000, Labors Ehud Barak, Israels most
decorated war hero, was prime minister and was
making yet another push for peace. In September
2000, the so-called Second Intifada broke out.
Less than five months later, Likuds Ariel Sharon
was elected to replace him.
In the United States, President Bushs approval
rating was below 50 percent in 2004, but a video
from the 9/11 mastermind, Osama bin Laden,
gave Bush the election over his rival, then-Senator John Kerry.
A new study by an Arab journalist, Burhan
Wazir, published in the Columbia Journalism
Review, explains what happened next:
Issued just four days before polls opened, bin
Ladens video was intended to hold up other
recent events like the terrorist bombings in
Madrid and violence in Iraq as warnings of what
might happen in America.
The effect was immediate. Overnight, terrorism command centers throughout America
were put on high alert. An initial poll from Newsweek magazine claimed that Bush jumped to a
six-point lead as a result of the reaction to bin
Ladens message.
There are other examples elsewhere in Europe
and Asia. Terror is the tool of choice to use to
influence the outcome of Western elections. It
may yet be the tool to influence this one.
Certainly, we must confront the terrorists
where they live. Yet we also must develop ways
to demonstrate to their true targets the Arab
street that the terrorists are the ones to fear,
not the West, and not western democracy.

The opinions expressed in this section are


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the newspapers editors, publishers, or other
staffers. We welcome letters to the editor. Send
them to jstandardletters@gmail.com.

A vision for a new year


If we are to stay together as a people, we cannot forget who we are

s we approach Rosh Hashanah, I am reflecting on


unto the nations, we are content with the small light of our
the Jewish year that is about to end.
cell phones. We confuse our social interactions on Facebook
Since the holiday comes late this year
with real interactions, and we no longer have the empathy
because the High Holidays never come on time,
and compassion that is needed to be a real community.
only early or late I have had some extra time to reflect. PerI dont think that it is an accident that there is rising antisonally, as with most years, this year had some extraordinary
Semitism in the world. Nor do I think that the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement is an outlier.
highs as well as some sad lows.
As Jewish people, we have a lot to be thankful for and a lot
The highlights started for me last summer, when I became
of which to be proud. Israel is a strong nation, respected for
a member of the Berrie Fellows Leadership program. Thus
its contributions in many areas. We are proud members of
began an 18-month journey of learning and evolving with 20
American society, and we treated most of the time just like
amazing Jewish leaders from northern New Jersey, who are
all others (except for that Christmas thing each
committed to making positive changes in our
December, which gives us a little in-our-faces
community.
reminder that we are not entirely assimilated).
This Jewish year ended with two amazing trips
We have the choice to observe Shabbat or not,
to Israel this summer. The first trip was with my
to eat kosher or not, and to live a Jewish life or
family; it was the first time my two children had
not. These choices, however, come with ramifiever been there. I was able to experience the
cations, and we all should think long and hard
wonder of Israel through the eyes of first-time
about what kind of a Jewish future we are leavvisitors, who were exposed to its beauty and
ing for our children and grandchildren.
also awed by its history and its importance to
As a member of the Berrie Fellows, we are
the Jewish people.
Daniel
thinking about all of this. But we are only 20
The second trip to Israel was with the Berrie
Shlufman
people 80 people altogether, if you include
Fellows. On that trip, we studied at the Shalom
the other three Berrie cohorts and we cannot
Hartman Institute. While we were there, and
do it alone.
through visits we made to various Israeli organizations and institutions, including the Knesset, we learned
As Jews, we need to be just as diligent about preventing
more about Israel as a first-world democracy, with remarkable
anti-Semitism as we are about preventing racism or bullying.
achievements in technology, business, and science. But these
They all are important. But we cannot use our successes, our
achievements were juxtaposed against the daily conflicts that
assimilation, or our open-mindedness to allow us to forget
Israelis must navigate through in order to live there. These
who we are.
include conflicts between Jews and Israeli Arabs, conflicts
If Jewish people do not defend Israel nobody else will. When
between Jews and Palestinians, and conflicts between the
it comes to Israel, the world takes its cues from us. When Jewish people care more about the Palestinian narrative (which
large and growing charedi population and the secular Jews.
is valid and needs to be addressed) than they do about the
But despite these changes, there are inspiring leaders whom
survival of our country, we need to reevaluate our priorities
we met political, business, and secular leaders who are
and philosophy.
working every day to improve their country and make Israel a
The greatest threat now to Israel and to the survival of the
better place for all who live there.
Jewish people is not an external one. It is an internal one.
I also experienced professional highs this year, as the resurging real estate market helped to improve business prospects
While supporting every other worthy cause, both financially
both for my mortgage brokerage business and for my real
and otherwise, Jewish people must remember that if they care
estate law practice. Low interest rates, coupled with improvabout the survival of our peoplehood, there must also be a
ing job prospects, led to a housing market recovery that is now
place for Jewish charity, action, and support. The BDS movement is not just about Israel. It is about the destruction of the
at or near pre-economic-crisis levels in northern New Jersey.
Jewish people. It needs to be addressed and destroyed, along
The saddest personal note for me was the death of my
with anti-Semitism everywhere, whenever it rears its head.
father-in-law, Herman Schnipper, last month. He was 92 years
In this regard, we should learn from our African-American
old. Another member of the Greatest Generation, who fought
friends, who never let any issue of possible racism go unanfor our freedom in World War II, is gone. Every day, we are left
swered. We need to do the same. We must understand and
with fewer and fewer of this generation, who sacrificed for all
internalize the understanding that if the only occupation
that we have today. Much of this we take for granted and some
someone cares about is the one in Israel, than they are not
of this we are losing as we spiral downward in such important
anti-occupation. They are unequivocally anti-Israel, and
virtues as civility, generosity, and kindness.
most likely they are anti-Semitic as well.
I see this loss every time that we at the Jewish Federation
This Rosh Hashanah, while we are in synagogue, looking forof Northern New Jersey struggle to fund our campaign. Every
ward to a new year, we all should take the time to think about
year, we try to reach ever-more-affluent younger Jewish people, who have plenty of money to spend to join fancy clubs,
the future of our people. And if this future matters to you, then
go on exotic vacations, and buy homes larger than they can
you should think about what you can do to help insure that our
ever fully use. However, remarkably, they never have a few
future is as bright as our present is and our past was.
As one of the speakers at the Hartman Institute told us, this
extra dollars available to help those who are less fortunate,
is the greatest time to be a Jewish person in the history of our
such as the now elderly survivors from the Greatest Generation, including Holocaust survivors, or to support programs
people. I hope that we continue to believe that and make sure
for families in crisis.
that this holds true for those who come after us.
I think that the biggest loss we are facing as a Jewish people
Shana tova.
this Rosh Hashanah is the loss of the sense of Jewish peoplehood. As it has become easier to be a Jew in America, as Jews
Daniel Shlufman of Tenafly is a member of the board of
in America become more and more accepted, as evidenced
the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey and one of its
by the intermarriage numbers, we are forgetting about what
current cohort of Berrie Fellows. He is an attorney and a
has kept us connected. No longer looking to be the a light
mortgage broker.
JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 33

Opinion
THE CLIMATE ON CAMPUS

Student Zionists need self-confidence, not safe spaces

heyre all true, all


those stories youve
heard.
The Jewish student questioned about whether
her Judaism and involvement
in the Jewish community would
disqualify her from serving in
student government. The Israel
Seffi
bashers who besieged a movie
Kogen
night put on by a pro-Israel
group, forcing Jewish students
to escape under police protection. The man from Students for Justice in Palestine who
stood up at a rally of campus rape survivors and their
allies and used his time at the microphone to attack Israel.
And, of course, the swastikas oh, the swastikas
scrawled in dorm rooms, scratched into elevators, spraypainted on fraternity houses.
Its all true. And its become so bad that some suggest
that first-year students be warned to brace yourselves for
insane anti-Semitism.
Respectfully, I beg to differ.
In fact, there has never been a better time to be a Jewish
college student. That is fact, not opinion.
Jews were not fully accepted into American higher education until the 1950s, when the quota system finally came
to an end. In the 1960s and 70s, civil rights and antiwar
activism often led to contentious relations between Jewish students and campus administrations. And how could
anyone argue that life was better for young Jews before the
turn-of-the-century advent of Birthright Israel?
No, theres no disputing that recent years with Hillel active at over 500 colleges and universities, Birthright
bringing 40,000 people to Israel each year and hundreds
of millions of dollars pouring in to support Jewish life on

Anti-Israel students at Columbia University erected a mock apartheid wall in front of the iconic Low
Library steps during Israel Apartheid Week in March this year.
URIEL HEILMAN

campus have afforded Jewish students across the country a set of opportunities never before imagined.
And yet: the swastikas. The suspicions of Jewish dual
loyalty that we had all thought long buried. And the
hatred directed at Jewish students (but only, were assured

unreassuringly, because they are Zionists, as if it were possible to cleave Zionism from Jewish identity).
Facing different but not entirely dissimilar challenges,
many other oppressed and marginalized groups have
called for trigger warnings, altered curricula, and safe

THE CLIMATE ON CAMPUS

How the BDS challenge helped one Hillel prosper

EWARK, Del.
My social media
exploded earlier
this month with
dozens of Facebook notifications, texts and group messages from across the country.
JTA had published one of
my favorite photos, with our
Donna
University of Delaware HilSchwartz
lel students dressed in blue
and yellow, their hands outstretched to form the Star of
David.
The photo illustrated an article, an op-ed by Arnold
Eisen, the chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, titled Jewish pride on campus is under siege.
Heres what your kids can do to fight back.
While Chancellor Eisen focused on what Jewish students can do to fight anti-Semitism and anti-Israel bias
on campus, the headline could have led readers to the
false inference that the University of Delaware is an
example of a campus under siege.
We certainly dont see our campus that way, and I
34 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

doubt many of my colleagues at Hillels across the country and around the world believe they are under siege.
In fact, the number of anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment
and Sanctions activities on campus declined in the past
academic year.
Because Hillel directors are on campuses every day,
and have been for years, they have the relationships to
mitigate these incidents effectively and minimize their
effect on the daily experiences of Jewish students. My
colleagues and I regularly meet with university administrators, student life deans, local law enforcement officials, and our Jewish community partners to prepare for
these incidents and respond proactively when needed.
While protests against Israel and anti-Semitic incidents certainly are unwelcome on campus, they have
an unintended consequence of building and strengthening the Jewish community, and fortifying the resolve
of students and community members to advocate for
their beliefs.
Two years ago, when Students for Justice in Palestine
promoted their Israel Apartheid Week on our campus, we heard from students, alumni, and parents with
whom wed never had contact before. Many wanted
to know what they could do to help, how they could

get involved, and what our plan was. Our local federation, Hillel International, and other Israel partners all
stepped in to make sure we and our students felt supported. They saw the help our campus was getting, and
rallied around engaging their peers in conversations
about Israel.
The challenge of anti-Israel activities also can be an
opportunity to revisit how Hillels discuss, debate, and
program around Israel. We have hired an Israel engagement associate, who specifically focuses on building
bridges with students individually as well as with other
organizations on campus. We now have a stronger commitment to what we believe and to be heard, so that no
one perceives theirs as the only side of the debate.
The results speak for themselves. More than half of the
University of Delawares Jewish students are involved in
Jewish life on campus. Between Hillel and Chabad, we
send more than 200 students to Israel each year. We
have more than 150 students in leadership positions
or interning at Hillel, and more than 20 of those are
focused on Israel.
While anti-Semitic and anti-Israel activities do occur,
many of the same campuses that experience these
negative moments also are places where Jewish life is

Opinion

spaces to congregate and convalesce. This is certainly understandable. We want college students to
feel secure as they enter this pivotal time in their lives.
Yet no matter how nobly intentioned, these measures do more harm than good. Jews spent decades
demanding entre into the academy, and academic
freedom and the marketplace of ideas have allowed
Jews to thrive on the American college campus. We
as a community would be poorly served by efforts to
diminish those values.
The University of Chicago made headlines recently
for sending its incoming students a note that read, in
part: Our commitment to academic freedom means
that we do not support so called trigger warnings,
we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual safe spaces where
individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives
at odds with their own.
The university is right. As Supreme Court Justice
Louis Brandeis wrote so many years ago, Fear of
serious injury cannot alone justify suppression of
free speech. Men feared witches and burnt women.
It is the function of speech to free men from the
bondage of irrational fears.
Anti-Zionism is a liberal orthodoxy very much in
vogue in progressive activist circles today. It is commonplace to find anti-Zionism enforced in groups
concerned with LGBT rights, sexual assault prevention, climate justice and more. But anti-Zionism is
deeply offensive to the majority of Jewish students
who are moved as Jews to support the Jewish state
if for no other reason than because half the worlds
Jews live there.
Yet students need not be sheltered from anti-Zionist opinions. We have nothing to fear from them. We

thriving, and Jewish students are educated, engaged,


and taking pride in who they are and the community
in which they associate.
Take Hannah Greenberg. When she came to U.D.
as a freshman last year, one of her biggest fears was
facing anti-Semitism on campus. Now she proudly
displays a mezuzah on her dorm room door. Other
students use it as an opportunity to ask questions
and to learn more about different beliefs, not to bash
Jews or Israel.
Being a Jew on campus has not lessened my pride,
she told me. It has caused it to grow. Being faced with
different ideas than your own does not cause pride to
disappear. It gives you a reason to feel that pride, and to
be proud of your beliefs and traditions.
Jewish students at the University of Delaware
are proud to stand up for what they believe in. The
strong Jewish community we have built is palpable
from that photo. And that is the best defense for any
attacks on our community and our homeland that
JTA WIRE SERVICE
are to come.
Donna Schwartz is the executive director of the
University of Delaware Hillel.

must have confidence that the arguments for Zionism are


compelling enough to survive even thrive under intellectual scrutiny.
So, entering college freshmen and returning students,
dont brace yourself for insane anti-Semitism. Prepare
yourself, instead, to encounter ideas at odds with your
own. Dont simply accept those ideas. Examine them carefully and critically before determining whether they are
worth incorporating into your worldview.
And while you shouldnt be overly concerned about
insane anti-Semitism, you should take care to look after

your own Judaism. Get involved in Hillel. Enroll in a Jewish studies course. Educate yourself about modern Israel.
The best defense of the Jewish state is not ratcheting up
the rhetoric, its seeking out a strong Jewish community,
enhancing your knowledge and identity, going on a Birthright trip.
Experiencing the marketplace of ideas at a university is
JTA WIRE SERVICE
a great privilege. Dont waste it.
Seffi Kogen is the American Jewish Committees assistant
director for campus affairs.

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An argument against the left

he Jewish community is
important to them than the Chicken
majority progressive. There
Littles who claimed two decades ago
may be Jews who are promithat Manhattan would be beneath the
nent in conservative poliocean by today, are the hundreds of
tics and thought, and
millions of people whose
they may punch above
lives can be lifted out of
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abject povert y across
of the right are a definite
the developing world by
minority.
using modern technology
B o t h l e f t -w i n g a n d
to build economies.
right-wing Jews claim the
Jewish political conJewish history and tradiservatives are aghast at
tion as their anchor and
the abortion extremism
foundation but who is
in todays cultural landJoshua
correct?
scape, which views lateSotomayorThe modern progressive
term abortion as normal
Einstein
Jew claims a biblical manand parental consent for
date to fight anthropocenan operation for a minor
tric global climate change,
as a criminal infringeto fight against efforts to protect the
ment of basic human rights. They
unborn, and to fight for limiting someobject to the mythology that police
ones right to self-defense. Modern proare hunting African Americans and
remember that a different leadership
within that same community has often
called for more police presence. They
have been among the loudest voices
against the accumulation of extraconstitutional power by the imperial
presidency.
Both groups claim they are the
authentic political expression of the
Jewish tradition. Both often trot out
textual evidence to support their
claims. But which fits better into the
history of abuse Jews have suffered
at the hands of big intrusive governments, or of Jewish success in regimes
more prone to what now is called classically liberal values? Which better fits
with the biblical admonishments to
gressive Jews often make up a disprorespect life, private property, to honor
portionate high number of allies in a
thy mother and father, and to estabnumber of struggles from the contemlish a court system?
porary anti-police crusade to the effort
to allow biologically male students into
Joshua Sotomayor-Einstein is
girls locker rooms, and more. They
originally from Teaneck and has
have, in recent history, been the vanlived in Hoboken for nine years. He
guard of protests against former Presifounded Moishe House Hoboken in
dent Bushs expansion of presidential
January 2007, is the chairman of
power, and were silent when President
both the Hudson County Republican
Obama has continued doing so.
Club and the Hudson County Young
Jews of the right believe that human
Republicans, and enjoys reading and
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36 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

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Letters
Please get out of the street

I am a card-carrying member of the Tribe,


and I live in a predominately Orthodox
Jewish neighborhood in Teaneck.
Yes, I do drive on Shabbat and on holidays, and I do not pretend otherwise. My
neighborhood has many young families,
but I have become one of those people
who already have raised my children
and are astounded by the attitudes of
my neighbors.
We are living in an area with several
parks in walking distance of our homes.
One is just a block away.
My children never played in the street.
They did not ride bicycles in the streets
until they were at least 12. They did not
have soccer games in the street or walk in
the center of the road. That was a given.
Young children should be forbidden to
play in the road. This is not the country.
This is a busy town with traffic coming
from all sides. Leaving a 6- or 7-year-old
to watch toddlers is not OK. There is the
threat of drivers turning corners without
looking, in their large vans and cars. No
young child should be expected to watch
out for toddlers and smaller youngsters.
That having been said, I simply do not
understand the concept of parents staying
inside their homes or even schmoozing

on their lawns when their children are


playing in the road. There is no excuse for
it. It is irresponsible of all of you and disrespectful to those who are not Jews, or
those who must drive through the neighborhood. Pretending that everything is
safe is not a good idea. It is not.
Walking four and five abreast on the
street also is not OK, even for adults or
those walking with elders or children. It
is disruptive to those who use the streets
for vehicles. We have sidewalks. And if
there happens to be none on a particular
block, call the municipality.
Sandra Steuer Cohen, Teaneck

spread of debris would cover the entire


neighborhood, including the street where I
was standing. I hurried back to my office to
retrieve some personal belongings and my
packaged lunch, and proceeded to head to
the 38th Street telephone building.
While I was walking uptown, a wartime
recollection came to mind: a German airplane flying overhead, looking for FFI partisans, in the country village of Ardeche,
France, where I was living at the time with
Mme Chifflet, who was hiding me. Her son,
Mr. Marcel Chifflet, had arranged to have a

A Holocaust survivor
remembers 9/11

That morning, I was working at my


desk, in the telephone building, across
the street from the World Trade Center
North Tower. Thats when it happened.
My building shook twice.
Several years earlier, a bomb had
exploded in the North Tower basement,
and my building shook only once.
This time, I took the elevator down to
the ground floor. In the street, I looked
up and saw the tail of the plane protruding from the North Tower. I then feared
an explosion would follow, and a large

trench dug outside our house, just it case it


should be damaged by bombing. I remember Mme Chifflet watching the plane and
screaming: Attention. Il pique! In the end,
nothing happened to the house, nor to us.
Mme Chifflets name is at Yad Vashem.
I continued walking north, while all traffic
was headed south. By the time I reached the
38th St office, the World Towers were no longer. The expected building explosion never
happened.
Marcel Kozuch, Paramus

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JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 37

Cover Story

u
k

Cover Story

On the
Map
Documentary to be screened at
Schechter school shows miracle
basketball team; panel includes a player

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38 Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Joanne Palmer
ts hard to overstate how
important it was to Israelis
and to the Jewish world that
an Israeli team, Maccabi Tel
Aviv, won a basketball game
against a Russian team in
April 1977.
It does seem a little bit
unlikely. Israelis play basketball? Who
knew? They beat Russia? Big deal!
But it was a huge big deal. It took a
small, scrappy country, still shaken from
the Yom Kippur War, on the cusp of the big
changes that were to come when Egypts
president, Anwar Sadat, landed in Israel,
shook Prime Minister Menachem Begins
hand, and began a cold peace.
In April 1977 in fact on April 8, 1977,
the day after the game was won Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, whose murder,
also 20 years later, shook the country in
ways that still reverberate today, 21 years
on, resigned from office. (He became
prime minister again in 1992.) And the
Israelis didnt beat any old Russian team,
and the game wasnt any old game.
The Israelis beat the Red Armys official
team, CSKA Moscow, in the semi-finals for
the European Cup (and later went on to
win the whole thing, in a game against an
Italian team, Mobilgirgi Varese).
David and Goliath, yes. Rocky and
Apollo Creed. The Mets and the Orioles.
All underdogs, each pitted against highly
favored bullies, each eventually victorious.
Back in 1977, the Cold War had not yet
ended. The Soviet Union, as it then was
called, had broken off official relations
with Israel it was allied with the young
countrys sworn enemies in the Arab
world. The Russians refused to come to
Israel, and they refused to let the Israelis into Russia. The game was played in
Virton, a small town in Belgium.
When the game was over, the teams star,
the Trenton-born Tal Brody, now 73, said, in
heavily English-accented Hebrew, We are
on the map! And we are staying on the map
not only in sports, but in everything!

Above, a home game in Yad Eliyahu; below, victory!

That euphoric declaration has become


part of Israeli culture (and so has its coiner,
Mr. Brody, who made aliyah and has lived
in Israel ever since, and now is the countrys goodwill ambassador).
On the Map is now also the title of a
documentary, filmed first in Hebrew and
then slightly redone in English, that tells
the teams story, puts it in context, and

carries it forward, looking at the impact


its had on Israel.
The film will be screened next Monday night, September 26, at the Solomon
Schechter Day School of Bergen County
in New Milford. (See the box for more
information.)
A panel two people who know a great
deal about Israeli basketball firsthand,

moderated by someone who knows a


great deal about sports in general and the
business of sports in particular will talk
about the movie. Dr. Lee Igel of Haworth, a
clinical associate professor at NYUs Tisch
Institute and co-director of NYUs sports
and society (and yes, the name of the
program ends there, just sports and society) will lead a discussion between Penny
Amodai, who comes from a rabid Maccabi
family, played basketball herself, and now
works for the NBA in New York, and Dr.
Bob Griffin, who now teaches English literature but was a point guard for Maccabi
and played on the 1977 team.
On the surface, On the Map is a classic
sports story, Dr. Igel said. Its the story of
an upstart team that beats the mighty giant
and goes on to win it all. Its a miracle story
in a way really, in every way you can
imagine. A spiritual way, a religious way.
In a larger perspective, just a few years
later, there was the Miracle on Ice, the U.S.
ice hockey team beating the Soviets in the
1980 Olympics. Thats on the surface.
Below the surface, the question is why
we paid attention to it, and why we should
pay attention to it.
Its a nice story, but why should it
matter?
To me, Dr. Igel continued, its a Tel
Aviv story, an Israel story, a Jewish story.
Tel Aviv because it reflects Tel Aviv today,
its start-up nature. Its about excitement,
innovation, entrepreneurship.
You need a villain in a story like this,
and its the Soviets. One thing we tend to
forget about the Soviets is that they were
human beings. The propaganda about
the Soviet Union as being the Evil Empire
came from around that time. But they
were human beings.
Soviet teams were organized and
trained in a very systematic way, so when
they took to the court or the ice or whatever, they appeared almost robotic. But
really they were very fluid, because they
had trained together so intensely. So you
have this big, organized, established institution playing and then here comes Maccabi Tel Aviv.

Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 39

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Its not a patchwork of players. Not


really. There had been a concerted effort
to put together a team. But they were at
nowhere near the level of the Soviets.
The organization was well managed, but
the funding was so totally different. So
youd have to grab at this start-up mentality in order to win.
Where to start?
Youve got to have an idea. In this
case, that you can build a basketball
team, made up of people from all over,
who have to be willing somehow to figure out how to make it all work, because
they want to badly enough, because they
are not cogs in a machine but somehow
instead they are its engineers. Youve
got the elements, you know how to put
it together.

So there was this build-up, and then


they start to win, and it all started to
come together. And then everyone starts
to notice, and thats when interesting
things start to happen but now its
make it or break it. The team can continue to win, or it can start to panic at its
own success.
Remember, sometimes even the best
ideas fail. But this one didnt.
Its a great story arc, and below it are
what we now see and know as a Tel Aviv
story, this start-up mentality. And the
idea that you can do it thats a very
Israeli and a very Jewish idea.
Ms. Amodai is from Tel Aviv. Her connection to the panel is through Dr. Igel;
she was his student at NYU, and earned
a masters degree in sports business

We want to thank everyone who came to


the dedication ceremony in memory of our parents,

Ruth and Morris Janoff


at Congregation Bnai Jacob in Jersey City on Sunday.
And we also thank you for the multitude of
notes, calls, and generous donations to the
synagogues rebuilding fund in our parents honor.
We wish the best of luck to
Rabbi Aaron Katz on his new pulpit.
May the shul continue to grow.
James Janoff
Beth Chananie
and family

40 Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Israels prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin, congratulates a player; thats Tal Brody
beaming above the clasped hands.

there. But her ties to Maccabi Tel Aviv


go far deeper.
To explain it, first she must explain
how sports are structured in Israel.
There are basically two sports organizations, she said; although other,
smaller ones exist, the main ones are
Maccabi and Hapoel. They function
like overarching camps, she said, spanning both sports and geography, and
even entering politics.
There are Maccabi and Hapoel teams
representing most major Israeli cities
Tal Brody
Dr. Lee Igel
and towns, and they span a range of
sports; that means that there is, say,
grandfather to help them.
a Maccabi Tel Aviv basketball team and a
The family was devoted to the organiHapoel Jerusalem soccer team and a Maccabi Haifa youth league and Hapoel Jerusazation. My family went to every single
lem swimming club.
game, she said. We went to away games,
Maccabi largely represents Likud, the
which were abroad, and to finals tournaments, which also were abroad. To today,
right-of-center Israeli political party, and
we all have season tickets.
Hapoel generally supports Avodah. Labor.
My grandfathers family launched one
Going to a game together was like going
of Israels most famous shoe stores, Mikuto another Shabbat dinner, she said. The
linskys, in 1925, and my grandfather,
entire family got together to cheer for
Aryeh, was a hardcore Maccabi fan, Ms.
Maccabi.
She was born on April 7, 1986, nine
Amodai said. My grandfather even volunteers to pick up players and drive them
years to the day after the huge win that
to games. To this day, I carry a letter from
put Israel on the map. I know a lot about
the Maccabi Association formally thanking
it, like every Maccabi fan no, like every
my grandmother, Bianca, for allowing my
Israeli sports fan. We all know about it

Shore, in Port Washington, and


went to Columbia in 1968, a basketball player who planned on majoring
in English literature. He sat on the
bench while some soon-to-be-famous
players were on court most prominently Jim Baron, who went on to be
a college coach but dropped out
after two years. Mr. Griffin drifted to
Europe, floated around for a while
it was 1970, and that was in vogue just
then and then fetched up in Israel,
at the invitation of a friend, Stanley
Felsinger, who was playing in Israel
then and had a spare bed.
Mr. Griffin played for three teams in
Israel, ending up with Maccabi Tel Aviv.
During that time, I went back to school
at Tel Aviv University and I finished up my
B.A. in English literature, he said. Once
that heart-stopping season was over, I
retired from basketball and went to graduate school at Yale, he said, casually, as if of
course thats what he did.
Mr. Griffin really Dr. Griffin, but he
asked that we not use the title; although
we know that most certainly we should,
we will accede to his wishes wrote his
doctoral dissertation on Samuel Johnson.
Thats the 18th-century essayist, poet, philosopher, lexicographer, wit, melancholic,

Penny Amodai

because sports and politics are so tied


together in Israel.
The game shaped the team, and the
team represented the country all around
the world.
Israel is not only about soldiers and
wars, she said. It is about so much
more.
Oh, and one more question. What was
the magic that led the team to victory?
For that, you should ask Mr. Griffin, who
played on the team, she said. If anyone
knows, it would be him.
Mr. Griffin has led an unexpected life.
Basketball is only part of it.
He was born on Long Islands North

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Cover Story
and all-around character who commonly
is called Dr. Johnson, although his right to
that title is less clear than Mr. Griffins. It
is Dr. Johnson who undertook to compile
the first modern English-language dictionary, a monumental effort that resulted in
a compelling and frequently eye-opening
work; it is also Dr. Johnson whose life was
chronicled astonishingly by James Boswell.
Mr. Griffins dissertation focused on the
idea of reflection, a key concept for Dr.
Johnson, he said.
It is highly unlikely to find someone who
segued as effortlessly as Mr. Griffin from
basketball to Johnson. It is possible that the
miracle of the team echoed itself forward.
Dr. Griffin taught English literature at
Bowdoin College in Maine for a few years,
and then he went back to Israel, where he
taught at Tel Aviv University for another 18.
Now he teaches at Texas A & M, but when
he retires, he plans to move back home to
Tel Aviv, where his wife and children live.
I moved to Texas only for professional
reasons, he said. Israels his home.
There were many lessons he learned
playing basketball that he transferred to
his academic career, Mr. Griffin said. If
you are a graduate student, it is highly
competitive. You have to publish.

What they looked like when they won.

I made my living for seven years by


playing basketball, so I was used to competition. If youre not used to it, that kind
of competitiveness may be a shock. Some
people may know that they like literature,
but theyre not sure that they like the professionalization of it, so they drop out.
But to me, the professionalization
also was another version of something
Id already experienced. Hed gone from
being a child, playing basketball for fun, to
being a student, playing it for his schools
status and bragging rights, to being a

professional, playing it for money. It


really was another version of exactly the
same thing, he said.
He also feels that he benefitted as a
teacher from having done something
entirely different, Mr. Griffin said. I didnt
go straight through as an academic, but I
also had other experiences. It meant that
I wasnt a typical academic, and I could
relate to students differently.
So why did the team win? What was
the secret?
I think we won because we had a group

of people whose abilities meshed and balanced each other, but also because, to a
person, we had high basketball IQs, and
because we were fighters, he said.
For example, I only found out after the
game against the Russians and its in the
movie that our management was hoping
we would lose by less than 40 points. The
Russian team had beaten Real Madrid in
Madrid the week before by 20 points. But
something like that never occurred to me
or the rest of the players.
Our attitude was who cares what they
did in Madrid last week? They still have to
beat us tonight.
In short, we were not intimidated. We
saw it as an opportunity to beat a team
from Russia.
There was one other, smaller thing,
he added. It also helped, I have to say,
that, for security reasons, the game was
played in a small high school gymnasium
in a small town in Belgium near the border
with Luxembourg. That meant there were
no Russian spectators; the gym was filled
with Israelis who lived in Europe or flew
in from Israel.
The team was made up of different,
strong personalities, but there was something that united them. Its not that there

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were not internal rivalries over scoring
and playing time, Mr. Griffin said. But no
one undermined the team effort.
Everyone was there to win the game
every night.
So Mr. Griffin was an active part of a
miracle, one that put him and the rest of
the team, as well as the country they represented, on the map.
Who: Former Maccabi Tel Aviv 1977
player Bob Griffin will be part of a
panel discussing
What: On the Map, a documentary
about the crucial basketball game
Where: At the Solomon Schechter Day
School of Bergen County, 275 McKinley
Ave., in New Milford
When: On Sunday, September 25; the
film starts at 7 and the panel discussion
will follow.
Why: Part of the schools annual Israel
Night, benefiting the Stephanie Prezant
zl Israel Scholarship Fund
How much: $18; reservations are necessary.
For reservations or more information:
Call Alyssa Wolf at (201) 262-9898, ext.
275, or email awolf@ssdsbergen.org.

Moshe Dayan, at the height of his fame, was a constant at Maccabi games; here he greets the team.

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Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 43

Jewish World

Bombing suspects Orthodox


neighbors seem resigned
to more backyard terror
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man who police say planted four bombs
in Manhattan and New Jersey including one in the train station here used
to come to the One Stop Kosher Market
to buy snacks.
The market is a couple minutes walk
down Elmora Avenue from First American Fried Chicken, the fast food restaurant run by Rahamis family. Rahami
stopped by a couple of times, employees told Yaakov Weiss, who manages the
market and works at the adjacent kosher
restaurant, Avenue Grill and Sushi.
Another employee recognized him from
the picture in the news.
Weiss thought nothing of a Muslim
man frequenting the market and restaurant. A 20-mile drive from New York City,
this New Jersey bedroom community of
some 125,000 residents is home to large
communities of Muslims and Jews. Muslim men, Weiss said, often come in for a
taste of Middle Eastern cuisine.
We are a shawarma, Middle Eastern
place, so we have some different people
coming in, he said. Most of the time
theyre here to shop, get their Middle
Eastern food shawarma, lafa, falafel.
On Monday, Rahami, an Afghani
American, was shot and arrested by
police in Linden, one town over. He is
accused of planting two bombs in Chelsea, on Manhattans West Side, as well as

the one at the train station and another


in Seaside Park. The Seaside Park bomb
and one of the Chelsea bombs detonated
one Saturday; 29 people were injured in
the Manhattan explosion, but none had
lengthy hospital stays.

We are a
shawarma,
Middle Eastern
place, so we
have some
different people
coming in.
YAAKOV WEISS

Members of the Orthodox Jewish


community in Elizabeth, which has four
Orthodox synagogues, were shaken but
not surprised by the attacks. And while
some said the bombings make the case
for limiting the number of Muslim refugees entering the United States, they
did not blame the local Muslim community for the attacks or suggest that their
attitude toward their Muslim neighbors
would change.
Because it happened so close to
home, I feel more vulnerable, just with

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44 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

In Elizabeth, First American Fried Chicken, which is owned by the family of


alleged bomber Ahmad Khan Rahami, was closed and cordoned off a day
after he was arrested for a series of bombings in New Jersey and New York.

n
e

Jewish World

a yeshiva and synagogue and another yeshiva and


another school down the block, said June Fooksman,
whose 10-year-old daughter attends the Jewish Educational Center, a network of Orthodox day schools
also on Elmora Avenue. Im just going to believe that
were going to be watched over. Gods gonna watch,
and what is meant to be is going to be.
Elmora is a quiet but busy commercial street, featuring Jewish storefronts mixed in among shops with
Spanish signs in the windows. On Tuesday, the day
after Rahamis arrest, First American Fried Chicken
was closed, its entrance cordoned off with police tape.
A bevy of news photographers sat chatting on a brick
berm across the street.
Some Jewish residents suggested that the size of the
Muslim community here, as well as in nearby North
Jersey towns, means that another attack is not far off.
Some compared the situation to the recurring waves
of terror attacks in Israel.
Theres plenty of them around here, said Benayau Berez, 29, an Israeli employee at Avenue Grill and
Sushi, referring to local Muslims. Its something you
know is coming. You know how it is in Israel. Its something thats beginning. I dont feel anything, but I see
the panic that was here yesterday. I think its just the
tip of the iceberg.
But Weiss and others stressed that they dont intend
to change their relationships with Muslim friends and
neighbors because of the attacks. Becky Sternglass, a
receptionist at the Jewish Educational Center, sympathized with Rahamis family but said if there are any
further attacks, everybodys not going to like all the
Muslims.
The restaurant, I hear, was really good, but how
many people are not going to go there anymore? she
asked. I feel bad for his family. Theyre going to lose
out. Theyre going to lose their business probably.
Several people called for an increased police presence in Elizabeth. Berez and Weiss, who have children
at the JEC, were upset that the school had not bolstered security. (Like many Jewish institutions in New
Jersey, the school has received federal grants over the
years to improve its security.) Weiss complained that
New Jersey law did not allow him to carry a handgun.
Gabe, 22, the manager of Jerusalem Restaurant, a
pizza place across from Avenue Grill and Sushi, said
that being a Jewish establishment on Elmora Avenue
puts a big red target on the window.
Weiss said it just shows that there are dangerous
people out there.
Theyre running around, throwing pipe bombs,
he said. God forbid, if someone comes in here, what
do we have for our protection besides God? What are
we going to do, throw plastic forks at them?
But Ezra Cowan, a psychology graduate student at
nearby Kean University, urged against additional security measures.
What can you do? he said. You can get a policeman to stand by the shul. You could get everyone trained with arms for self-defense. You could
do all those measures, which are probably a little
outlandish.
Instead, he said, its just time for us to realize God
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Judith Goldsmith, Admissions Coordinator
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Register at: www.frisch.org/openhouse

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 45

Jewish World

Even Israel doesnt do ethnic profiling


the way Donald Trump thinks it does
RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON Donald Trump wants to
profile likely terrorists the way Israel does it.
The problem is, Israel and the United
States already profile in similar ways and
neither does it in the way Trump prefers.
The Republican presidential nominees
proposal to blanket-profile entire communities would be unwieldy and pose thorny
ethical problems, according to professionals who are familiar with law enforcement
in both countries.
Trumps formula reverses the way that law
enforcement in the United States and Israel
tackle terrorism prevention. Both first identify suspicious behavior patterns, then narrow the range of suspects by considering a
number of demographic factors, including
ethnicity or religion.
Trump, however, would start with a
blanket profile of a huge religious or ethnic

group, and then use the hammer of the state


to intimidate the community and extract
suspects from within.
Law officials say that method risks tarring
and alienating entire communities and
is far slower and less practical than focusing
first on behavior.
In the aftermath of a bomb attack in Manhattan and several other aborted attacks in
Seaside Heights and Elizabeth, on Monday
Trump proposed that U.S. law enforcement
adopt what he believes is Israels system of
profiling.
And it wasnt the first time hed made that
suggestion.
You know, our police are amazing, he
said, speaking to the Fox News Channel as
law enforcement closed in on the alleged
perpetrator of the New York attack. Our
local police, they know who a lot of these
people are. Theyre afraid to do anything
about it because they dont want to be

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accused of profiling, and they dont want


to be accused of all sorts of things.
You know, in Israel, they profile.
Theyve done an unbelievable job, as
good as you can do.
Trump did not mention Muslims
in the interview, but he acknowledged
its who he meant the last time he cited
Israel as a positive example: in June,
after the massacre at an LGBT club in
Orlando.
In that instance, CBS interviewer John
Dickerson asked the candidate directly
about whether when Trump said profiling, he meant Muslims in America.
Trump agreed and drew the Israel
comparison.
Well, I think profiling is something
that were going to have to start thinking
about as a country, he said, describing
a security check he witnessed in which
he said it would have made more sense
to scrutinize those who looked like
perpetrators.
Other countries do it, you look at
Israel and you look at others, they do it
and they do it successfully, Trump said.
But they dont do it by scrutinizing
every member of an ethnic religious
group, experts say.
They will tell you they do not do
that, said Steve Pomerantz, a retired
FBI agent who is the counterterrorism
expert at the Jewish Institute for National
Security Affairs, referring to Israels
security establishment. Instead, he said,
they look for behavioral patterns, or
what some call predictive profiling.
In both his professional capacities,
Pomerantz has worked with Israeli law
enforcement. ( JINSA brings together
Israeli and American police for brainstorming.) Focusing on an entire community instead of individual people gets
it backwards, he said.
If I was looking at gathering intelligence on the threat of terrorism, would I
be looking at that community more than
others? You bet, Pomerantz said, referring to Muslims. But treating an individual based solely on their ethnicity is
another issue altogether.
Gathering intelligence on ethnic communities where terrorists might proliferate means cultivating sources within
that community, according to U.S. law
enforcement officials who have tracked
terrorism in recent years. That means
establishing trust with community and
religious leaders.
Identifying an entire community as
suspect, Trumps preferred method,
likely would crush any inclination
toward cooperation.
After a Muslim couple carried out a
massacre in San Bernardino, California,

in December, Trump charged that members of the areas Muslim community


knew the pair were radicals but failed to
notify authorities.
When you look at, when you look at
people within the Muslim community
and where people are living and they
dont report, and a good example of that
would be San Bernardino, he told CBS
in June.
BuzzFeed has debunked the claim
that the Muslim community in San Bernardino was aware of what the couple
were planning.
Speaking later the same month on
conservative talk radio, Trump said he
would pressure entire communities
to hand over those they believed to be
planning nefarious acts.
We have a real problem, and it has
[to] start, and it has to stop with the
Muslim community, turning in the bad
seeds, turning in the bad apples, he said
on The Wayne Dupree Show, captured
by BuzzFeed. And if they dont do that,
then were gonna have to do something
because we cant live like this.
Including ethnicity or religion as a factor makes sense, said Daniel Wagner, a
consultant on risk management who has
praised Israels practice of training airport security personnel to identify suspects through anomalous behavior. He
said that as soon as the bomb went off in
Manhattan on Saturday night, it is likely
that law enforcement focused on white
supremacists as well as Muslim radicals.
Singling out radicals within ethnic or
religious communities makes sense, but
generalizing about broad communities
does not, Wagner said.
The issue here is when people are
scared and fearful, they start to contemplate things they wouldnt otherwise
contemplate, he said of support for
broad ethnic profiling. Trump is playing on peoples deepest darkest fears.
There are differences between how the
United States and Israel pursue terrorists.
Law enforcement agencies in Israel
have means available, including broader
eavesdropping capabilities, that Americans would reject, said Shoshana Bryen,
an analyst at the conservative Jewish Policy Center. I suspect that wouldnt be
highly thought of here, she said.
In both countries, however, the willingness to consider ethnicity and faith
among a range of factors in identifying
threats has led to allegations of excess
and abuse.
The U.S. State Department has decried
the unequal treatment of Arab and
Muslim Americans traveling to Israel,
and Israels civil rights community continues to track employment and housing

Jewish World
discrimination afflicting Israeli minorities.
Civil liberties groups have said that the
New York Police Departments monitoring
of Muslim activities is overly intrusive.
But there is no equivalent to Trumps
proposal that the state presume an entire
community guilty until proven otherwise.
Israel facilitates visits Muslims from overseas make to holy sites and for treatment
in its hospitals, often in the absence of diplomatic relations. Muslims serve in Israels
parliament, on its judicial benches, and
in its diplomatic corps. Similarly, Muslims
enjoy a thriving public profile throughout New Yorks civil society and law
enforcement.
If Muslims are to be singled out in the
United States, it should be for welcome
and accommodation, said Rabbi Jill Jacobs,
who directs Truah, a human rights group.
In the seasons textual readings, Were
deep in a section of the Torah on what
were supposed to do when were in
our own land, she said. Were not supposed to hate the Egyptians or Edomites,
although it might be tempting because of
our history with them. We are responsible
for those who are vulnerable by virtue of
ethnic affiliation, even if they look like a
group we have some bad history with.
JTA WIRE SERVICE

Members of the New York City Police Department stand guard in Herald Square in Manhattan on Sunday. Its near Chelsea,
where a bomb was set off the night before.
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES

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JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 47

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Senators urge Obama to veto


anti-Israel U.N. resolutions
A bipartisan group of 88 U.S. senators sent a letter to
President Barack Obama on Monday urging him to
veto any anti-Israel resolutions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict brought in front of the United Nations
Security Council before his term ends.
The pro-Israel lobby group, the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, initiated and sponsored the
letter; the effort was led by Senators Kristen Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.) and Michael Rounds (R-S.D.).
Hours after the statement was released, Senator Ted
Cruz (R-Texas) said he supported the spirit of the letter but did not sign it because he rejects the idea that a
two-state solution is the only resolution.
The others who did not sign the bipartisan letter are
Harry Reid (D-Nev.), Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.), Dick Durbin
(D-Ill.), Tom Carper (D-Del.), Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.),
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), Marco
Rubio (R-Fla.), Rand Paul (R-Ky.), Tom Cotton (R-Ariz.)
and Ben Sasse (R-Neb.).
The letter reads: We urge you to continue longstanding U.S. policy and make it clear that you will
veto any one-sided UNSC resolution that may be
offered in the coming months. Any such resolution,
whether focused on settlements or other final status
issues, will ultimately make it more difficult for Israelis
and Palestinians to resolve the conflict.
The senators also wrote the only way to resolve the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict is through direct negotiations leading to a two-state solution. 
Jns.org

Fishermans house from


Ottoman era unearthed
on beach in Ashkelon

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A fishermans house from the Ottoman period was


uncovered in an archeological excavation on the beach
in Ashkelon, the Israel Antiquities Authority said.
Two of the newly discovered buildings were used
as a fishermans house and a watch tower on a hilltop
overlooking the beach and Mediterranean Sea.
This is the first time that a building was exposed in
Ashkelon that we can attribute with certainty to the
fishing industry, excavation directors Federico Kobrin
and Haim Mamliya said in a prepared statement.
The excavation was conducted by young residents
of Ashkelon at the initiative of the Ashkelon Economic
Company and led by the Israel Antiquities Authority
as a way to educate local teenagers about their history.
The young people participated in uncovering part
of their citys past; they labored diligently and conscientiously, showed their interest and curiosity regarding the finds, and it was a pleasure to work with them,
Jns.org
Kobrin said. 

Israel seeks tour guides


who can speak Chinese

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48 Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

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With a boom in tourism from China, Israel is looking


to boost the number of Chinese-speaking tour guides,
and officials are hoping university students can fill
the void.
Israels Ministry of Tourism will offer grants for
undergraduate or graduate students of East Asia studies to become licensed tour guides suitable for Chinese groups.
The Tourism Ministry will give nearly $4,000 to

Jewish World
each student who takes the stringent tour guide licensing
course to raise the number Chinese-speaking tour guides.
Israel has made significant investments in encouraging
the trend of increasing tourism from China, including the
approval of multiple entry visas for tourists and the cancellation of group visa fees.
Incoming tourism from China grew 43 percent from
2014 to 2015. The Tourism Ministry estimates 100,000
Jns.org
China residents will visit Israel by 2018. 

Ethiopian Israelis protest


killings in their homeland
Nearly 100 Ethiopian Israelis protested in front of the U.S.
Embassy in Tel Aviv on Monday, urging the U.S. government to stop supporting the Ethiopian government, the
Jerusalem Post reported.
More than 400 Ethiopians have been killed during antigovernment demonstrations that began in November 2015
in the Oromia and Amhara regions, according to the U.S.based Human Rights Watch.
The United States must condemn the murders of Ethiopian citizens, one protester, Endalamaw Hailei, told the
Jerusalem Post. I joined because I care about Ethiopia.
Other protesters said they believe the U.S. can influence Ethiopias government to stop the murders of Ethiopian citizens.
The protests were sparked by the Ethiopian governments plan to expand the capital, Addis Ababa, into

Oromia and displace farmers.


Many in Israels Ethiopian community have family members who still live in the African nation. There are at least
9,000 Ethiopian Jews still waiting to emigrate to Israel,
following Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus approval
to process their immigration through a $1 billion program.


Jns.org

University of the Negev 2020 Vision 50th Anniversary


Campaign, she said. I plan to increase connections
between the American community and BGU, and bring in
new friends and supporters who understand the miracle
we are creating in the Negev desert and how important
BGU is to the success of Israel.


Jns.org

New president selected


to head American Associates
of Ben-Gurion University

Palestinian cleric at Al-Aqsa


prays for destruction of
America and Russia

Toni Young is the new president of American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, an initiative
based in New York City supporting the university and
Negev community.
Young, an author, has served on the national boards
of the Jewish Federations of North America, the Jewish
Agency for Israel, and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee.
Im excited about this new challenge and look forward
to building upon and expanding the initiatives that Lloyd
Goldman and other former AABGU presidents and board
members have developed so successfully, said Young, formerly the first female president of the Jewish Federation
of Delaware.
Young replaces New York real estate mogul Lloyd Goldman, who served as AABGU president for four years.
Im particularly thrilled to serve during the Ben-Gurion

A Palestinian Muslim cleric prayed to Allah to vanquish


American and Russia in an address last week at Jerusalems Al-Aqsa Mosque, the Jerusalem Post reported.
Oh America, let me tell you about the day when the call
to prayer will be heard from atop the White House, from
atop the red palace in the Kremlin in Moscow, Abdallah
Ayed said in a video posted online and translated from
Arabic by the Middle East Media Research Institute.
Ayed said they will shout Allah akbar (Arabic for God
is great) from the top of the White House and Kremlin
because Allah promised us both places, Allah promised the prophet Muhammad that Islam would rule the
entire land.
Ayed ended his prayer asking to bring the caliphate
soon and return to a Muslim religious and governmental rule.


Jns.org

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Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 49

!
n
o
i
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i
d
a
Tr
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Keeping Kosher

Celebrate Rosh Hashanah


with celebratory champagnes
GABRIEL GELLER

he year 5776 is coming to its end, as is the


harvesting seasons for many wineries. The
growth of the kosher wine world in terms
of diversity and availability was simply outstanding this year. We are expecting many interesting
and high-quality wines in 5777 hailing from some of the
worlds most prestigious growing regions.
Rosh Hashanah is a very special time of the year. It is
a time during which we reflect on what we have learned
over the years in general and over the past year in particular. It is also the time of the year to reflect on what
the future may hold. We also contemplate our decisions
for the new year based on the lessons we have learned
from the past.
This mantra holds true for wine as well. The holidays should be celebrated with wines that reflect this
spirit, special bottles that bring up smiles around the
table. Wines that make those who are lucky to sip
them pause, think, and value time and its potential for
great accomplishments.
The best way to start the new year is with a champagne. Bubbly wines encourage a positive mind, and it
is the most well suited beverage for festive meals. It is
refreshing, exciting, and a wonderful accompaniment to

Temima Danzig, LCSW


Adult & Adolescent Psychotherapy

many dishes. There are a handful of kosher champagnes


currently available, and while the selection keeps growing every year, some bottles reputations make them
tower over their peers. Two champagnes in particular
are the Drappier Carte Blanche and Champagne des Barons de Rothschild. These wines carry luxurious labels
and hail from historic big name houses of Champagne.
For well over a century, several branches of the Rothschild dynasty have owned some of the worlds most
famous wineries. Only the mention of the names Chteau Lafite-Rothschild and Chteau Mouton-Rothschild
make the eyes of wine collectors shine in excitement.
The Rothschilds have gathered their common knowledge and experience to craft a kosher version of a beautiful champagne! It is crisp, dry with a sharp mousse,
and sings with mineral notes that immediately upgrade
any meal to first class.
Drappier is a Champagne House with a glorious history. When General Charles de Gaulle became the President of the French Republic, he chose Drappier as the
official champagne of the Elyse Palace. De Gaulle and
his wife Yvonne were quite fond of the elegant and
refined expressions that are common to all the wines
produced by the renowned winery. Drappier Carte
Blanche is not spoke about as often as the Carte dOr.
SEE CELEBRATE PAGE 54

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Wednesday
September 28, 2016

A Story of Courage in Israel

Noam Gershony:

MODERN ISRAELI HERO

For more information and to RSVP, visit


www.FIDF.org/NoamGershonyBergen
or (646) 274-9646

In 2006 during the second Lebanon war,


Noam, an apache helicopter pilot, was
critically injured in a helicopter collision over
Israels northern border. Despite months of grueling
rehabilitation, he triumphed and discovered his love for tennis. He
went on to win Israels first gold medal in the 2012 London Paralympics
Games in quad singles wheelchair tennis.
Their job is to look after Israel. Ours is to look after them.

Join us as he shares his inspiring journey with us.

FIDFs mission is to offer educational, cultural, recreational, and social


services programs and facilities that provide hope, purpose, and lifechanging support for the soldiers who protect Israel and Jews worldwide.

Introduced by our very own Sgt. Gideon Drucker


a former Lone Soldier from Woodcliff Lake

Doors open at 7 PM Program to start at 7:30 PM


Hilton Woodcliff Lake, 200 Tice Blvd, Woodcliff Lake, NJ
General Ticket - $18 Student Ticket - $10
VIP Ticket - $72

VALLEY
CHABAD
Ordinary human beings perpetrated the vast darkness of the Holocaust.

Eternal Flame is a movement empowering another set of ordinary human


beings to march forward as mighty torches of light. Presently, anti-Semitism is cloaked in anti-Israel bias. The George and Martha Rich Eternal
Flame empowers young people and the community to combat this new
form of darkness by connecting with the eternal source of light.

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 51

Jewish World

From Woody Allen to Sarah Jessica Parker,


eight Jewish shows to watch this fall
LIOR ZALTZMAN

all is here, and with it comes cooler weather, earlier


sunsets, and an end to whatever magical spell or temporary insanity that possessed us to spend our free
time outdoors rather than in front of our screens.
But now its time to bring out those snuggies, brew those
hot beverages, and binge watch some quality TV. Luckily,
this season has some very exciting, very Jewish shows. From
Woody Allens TV premiere to Sarah Jessica Parkers longawaited return to HBO, here are eight shows you need to
watch this fall.

Better Things (FX, premiered Sept. 8)


Some have already called Pamela Adlons Better Things the
female version of Louie. Its an obvious comparison to make:
The Jewish actress is considered by many to be the secret star of
Louie C.K.s eponymous show, in which she plays his friend and
sometime love interest. Like Louie, Better Things (which
Adlon co-created with C.K.) is also semi-autobiographical: Adlon
plays a divorced mother of three, and in real life has raised her
three daughters as a single mom since 2001.
The first episode is already out and holds to its promise
Better Things is funny, dark, and unflinchingly honest.
Its a complex portrait of a modern-day single Jewish mom

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From left, Sarah Jessica Parker, Woody Allen, Rachel Bloom, and Jeffrey Tambor all star in fall premieres
that Jewish viewers should watch.
LIOR ZALTZMAN

who has to do it all: work, housework, and parenting.


In one scene, Adlons daughter asks mom to get her
some pot.
Dont you want me to have that clean, organic
stuff? the teen asks.
Adlon replies, Honey, these things are normal, but
you should be ashamed of them.

Gotham (Fox, Sept. 19)


Are there synagogues in Gotham City, the home of
Batman? Who knows! But one thing we do know:
The actor who plays this Batman attends synagogue
regularly.
The TV series Gotham, which is about to enter its
third season, takes place in Gotham City right after
the murder of Bruce Waynes parents and before
Wayne become a full-fledged superhero. Young Bruce
is played by David Mazouz, a 15-year-old Sephardic
actor. Mazouz and his family keep kosher and observe
Shabbat.
You may have seen Mazouz before, opposite Kiefer
Sutherland in the show Touch or guest starring in
The Office. Hes formidable as young Bruce Wayne,
channeling all the angst and fearlessness of a character
with very Jewish origins. Jewish illustrator Bob Kane
and Jewish writer Bill Finger created the character
a billionaire turned vigilante superhero following the
murder of his parents way back in 1939.
Gotham is dark and wonderful, with a cast of colorful characters. The best thing about Gotham City,
some would argue, is its eclectic cast of villains, like
Poison Ivy, Catwoman, and the Penguin, all of whom
are featured prominently on the show.

The Big Bang Theory (Fox, Sept. 19)


Remember that time we blinked and The Big Bang
Theory already was in its 10th season? Yeah, its kind
of unbelievable. The beloved show about a group of
nerdy scientists stars Mayim Bialik the star of Blossom, a relative of Israels national poet Haim Nachman Bialik, and a frequent contributor for the parenting site Kveller as Dr. Amy Farrah-Fowler, and Jewish
actor Simon Helberg as Howard Wolowitz, a neurotic
Jewish engineer with an overbearing Jewish mom
(yeah, we know). Its a dorky comedy, full of fun popculture reference and geeky humor, and its characters
share a comfortable chemistry thats certainly fun to
watch. If youre not caught up yet, get going: nine seasons strong, you have a lot of binge watching to do in
the next few days.

Transparent
(Amazon Prime, Sept. 23)
The TV show that has brought us the most eloquent
portrayals of Jewish rituals probably ever is coming back. Created by Jill Soloway, Transparent features intimate scenes from a shiva, a Yom Kippur service, and the chanting of a bat mitzvah Torah portion.
Oh, and theres a female rabbi, too.
Transparent gets up close and personal with modern American Judaism. Part of that also is its unflinching humor and set of deeply conflicted, angst-ridden
characters, at the center of which is Jeffrey Tambor as
Maura Pfefferman, the familys former patriarch, who
comes out as transgender to her family.
The neuroses of Pfefferman family members is

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52 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

SEE SHOWS PAGE 64

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WISHES YOU A

Happy and Healthy

ROSH HASHANAH 5777

2
$
for

49
lb.

Early
Pomegranates

Eastern Apple
Tote Bags

399

299

17 oz.,
plain or raisin

64 fl. oz. btl.


Limit 4

ea.

Round
Challah Bread

299

Kedem
Grape Juice

2$

for

Signature Kitchens
Honey Bear

Signature Kitchens
Egg Noodles

12 oz. btl.

16 oz. pkg.

99

5
$
for

4
$
for

4.2 oz. pkg.

Manischewitz
Matzo Ball Mix
or Soup Mix

Signature Kitchens
Cranberry Sauce

64 fl. oz. btl.

Kedem
Tea Biscuits

899

499

5
$
for

40 oz. btl.

72 ct. pkg.

99

Signature Kitchens
Apple Juice

14 oz. can

4.5-5 oz. pkg.

2$

for

O Organics
Honey

Manischewitz
Snack Crackers
9.6 oz. pkg.

Yehuda
Memorial
Candle

Yehuda Holy Land


Sabbath Candles

1 ct.

dairy & frozen FAVORITES

family favorites and great selection

599

2
$
for

Ungars
Gefilte Fish

Tabatchnick
Soup

Golden
Blintzes

449

999

349

11 oz. pkg.

16 oz. pkg.

22 oz. pkg.

15-15.5 oz. pkg.

Gefen
Puff Pastry
Sheets

MANUFACTURER COUPON

VALID 9/16/16 - 12/31/16

SAVE $1
when you buy 2
bottles of KEDEM
Sparkling Grape Juice

RV0100

redeemable at:

25.4 . oz. btl.

MANUFACTURER COUPON

VALID 9/16/16 - 12/31/16

SAVE $1

10.6 oz. pkg.

13

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Oronoque
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Deep Dish Pie
Shells 16 oz. pkg.

Spring Valley
Frozen
Appetizers

20-32 oz. pkg.

deals on all of your favorites


DO NOT DOUBLE. Void if sold or transferred. Consumer pays CRV and sales
tax. Misuse constitutes fraud. Retailer: We will reimburse the face value
plus $.08 handling provided you comply with our coupon redemption policy,
available upon request. Submission of coupons signifies compliance. Send
to: KAYCO Foods P.O. Box 407 MPS, Dept. 989 Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077

MANUFACTURER COUPON

VALID 9/16/16 - 12/31/16

SAVE 75
when you buy 2
GEFEN Cakes

RV0100

MANUFACTURER COUPON

RV0075

DO NOT DOUBLE. Void if sold or transferred. Consumer pays CRV and sales
tax. Misuse constitutes fraud. Retailer: We will reimburse the face value
plus $.08 handling provided you comply with our coupon redemption policy,
available upon request. Submission of coupons signifies compliance. Send
to: KAYCO Foods P.O. Box 407 MPS, Dept. 989 Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077

75/2

redeemable at:

100/2

VALID 9/16/16 - 12/31/16

SAVE $1

redeemable at:

RV0100

DO NOT DOUBLE. Void if sold or transferred. Consumer pays CRV and sales
tax. Misuse constitutes fraud. Retailer: We will reimburse the face value
plus $.08 handling provided you comply with our coupon redemption policy,
available upon request. Submission of coupons signifies compliance. Send
to: KAYCO Foods P.O. Box 407 MPS, Dept. 989 Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077

when you buy 2 jars of


YEHUDA Gelte Fish

when you buy 2 boxes of


Streits Matzo Ball Soup

DO NOT DOUBLE. Void if sold or transferred. Consumer pays CRV and sales tax. Misuse constitutes
fraud. Retailer: We will reimburse the face value plus $.08 handling provided you comply with our
coupon redemption policy, available upon request. Submission of coupons signifies compliance. Send
to: KAYCO Foods P.O. Box 407 MPS, Dept. 989 Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077

Golden
Potato Pancakes

13 oz. pkg.

Les Petites
Variety Pack
Cheese Slices

clip & save for the HOLIDAY

299

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for

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PRICES VALID THRU SEPTEMBER 29, 2016

Visit www.ACMEmarkets.com or call 1-877-932-7948

Some items not available in all stores.

Rain Check: We strive to have on hand sufficient stock of advertised merchandise. If for any reason we are out of stock, a Rain Check will be issued enabling you to buy the item at the advertised price as soon as it becomes available, Savings may vary. Check price tag for details. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Please, No Sales to Dealers. Availability: Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for sale at or below the advertised
price in each ACME store except where specifically noted in this ad. Customer is responsible for sales taxes on all taxable items. 2016 Albertsons, L.L.C, Albertsons, the ACME logo, the ACME Savon Pharmacy logo The Kosher Marketplace and the 10 for $10 logo are trademarks of New Albertsons, Inc or its subsidiaries and is used under license. We reserve the right to correct printed errors.
JEWISH STANDARD 9/23/16

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 53

Keeping Kosher
Celebrate
FROM PAGE 51

Liver

et

TEANECK
FARMERS
MARKET
ITS
ITS
ITSGOING
GOING
GOINGTO
TO
TO
BE
BE
BEANOTHER
ANOTHER
ANOTHERGREAT
GREAT
GREAT
SEASON
SEASON
SEASONAT
AT
AT

In contrast to the yeasty profile of the


latter, the Carte Blanche showcases
French class at its best, with delightful
fresh fruit aromas, remarkable balance,
and complexity.
One personality trait we should learn
to embrace this year is to have patience.
Being patient with wine can be very
rewarding. Think of these wines that,
when properly stored, can age and
improve in the bottles for years following their release. With time, they get
smoother and gain in complexity, adding
layers of delicious flavors and aromas.
The key to storing and aging wines
properly, is to buy a few bottles (or even
better, a few cases!) of each of those
wines. Start off tasting one on release to
appreciate and evaluate what is called
the cellaring potential. Then, it is possible to decide for how long they should
sit in a wine cooler or a cellar. Every few
years, at special occasions such as Yom
Tov or a family Simcha, open a bottle
and reassess its growth and appreciate
its evolution.
The Yatir Forest and the Carmel Limited Edition, both from Israel, are among
those wines that can age and improve for
a decade past the harvest year, sometimes longer. While the Forest will typically develop a more spicy and juicy
character, the Limited Edition will offer
more restrained, earthy notes that call
to mind the finest wines from Bordeaux.
Speaking of Bordeaux, the kosher
cuvee Les Roches de Yon-Figeac 2014
should be hitting your local wine stores
shelves shortly. This is a second wine in
name only to the well-known Chteau

Yon-Figeac, a Grand Cru from the SaintEmilion appellation. This wine shows in
its youth notes of red berries and stone
fruits with a distinctive austerity. That
austerity evolves with time into mouthwatering, smooth, and intoxicating
scents of forest floor and chocolate.
Spain gratifies wine lovers with some
of the most intriguing and age-worthy
wines. The great wines from the Rioja
region can be stored sometimes for several decades, changing and improving
constantly, gratifying those in the know
with a special experience every time
they open a bottle. The Elvi winery is
world-class and the only fully kosher
winery in Spain. The Herenza Reserva
from Elvi is no exception to this rule.
Each time you taste this wine, you will
unearth different flavors and characteristics, which shows how complex this
wine is. This wine can boast flavors of
blackberries, earth, spices and coffee,
and other times with aromas of herbs,
roasted meat and chocolate. This wine
is a winner with a captivating unique,
velvety texture.
Celebrating Yom Tov by popping the
cork on an aged bottle such as one of
the aforementioned wines will make
any meal special. It is certainly appropriate and encouraged to indulge in an
appropriately aged bottle on the right
occasion. Sipping such wines helps us
reflect on the benefits of patience and
how time can have such an impact on
the intricacies of maturing a wine to its
potential. It reminds us that we mature
and develop by making the right choices
and decisions, it just takes a bit of time
and patience like the wine in our glass.
Shana Tova!

Royal Wine introduces


Boondocks American Whiskey
into growing spirits category

et

Farm
Farm
FarmFresh
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Fruits
Fruits&&&Vegetables
Vegetables
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54 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

oyal Wine Corporation is


proud to introduce Boondocks American Whiskey, a
creation from Whisky Advocate Lifetime Achievement Award winner Dave Scheurich who has helped to
create some of Americas most recognized whiskeys over the last 40 years.
Available in both 95 Proof and Cask
Strength 127 Proof, the brands entrance
into the rapidly growing spirits category
marks a new level for American whiskey,
introducing a brand that could just be
Mr. Scheurichs crowning achievement.
Royal Wine Corp. has a rich legacy
of producing spirits, dating back to the
early days of Baron Philip Herzog, said
Mordy Herzog, CEO of Royal Wine Corporation. We produced beer, wine,
and spirits in the 1800s and now, nine

generations later, we could think of no


better individual to get back into the
spirits game with than David Scheurich,
a man with similar ethos and perspective
as our organization and family. We are
honored that he agreed to come out of
retirement to oversee the development
of the Boondocks brand as our master distiller.
Boondocks is an exciting project to
be a part of, said Scheurich, Boondocks
master distiller. With the development
of this brand, we wanted to bring a superior product with exceptional taste to
the market, but most importantly we
wanted a whiskey that delivered an ultra
smooth finishsomething easy to enjoy.
Aged for 11 years in American white
oak barrels in Kentucky, Boondocks
SEE BOONDOCKS PAGE 56

upcoming at

Kaplen

JCC on the Palisades

Join now&
*
Save $150

not Just a Gym,


a Family wellness Center
Try us out with a one-week pass for your entire family.
Individual, family, youth & senior membership
options available.
already a member? tell your friends!

When you refer a friend who joins, you both get $50 in
JCC cash. Now, thats a great deal!
*Offer valid now through 10/31.
For details, visit the membership desk, call 201.408.1448,
email join@jccotp.org.

Talent Search: open Call


Showcase your talent to managers and industry
professionals who can recommend you to audition for NY
and NJ talent agents, specializing in theater, film, TV and
modeling. Children ages 7+ can sing a short song and share
a monologue or story. Children age 6 and under can sing
and recite a poem or a joke. Those who are ready will be
invited to agent auditions on Sun, Nov 6.
Sun, Sept 25, 2 pm, $20/$25 in advance, $25/$30 day of
(if time is available)
Agent Audition Fee: $10/$15 (for those who qualify)

Delicious Holiday Challah


a Hands-on baKing class

Start the New Year off right, with your own incredible
homemade challahs. Learn braiding and shaping
techniques and experiment with new, sweet ideas for
flavors and toppings.
Wed, Sept 28, 6:30-8 pm, $15/$18, perfect for all ages!

community

film

Top Films You May Have


Missed: The Bicycle Thieves
Join us for a film/discussion with Andrew Lazarus,
Parsons Film Studies Expert, who will introduce
the film with pointers followed by an optional
discussion. In this Vittorio De Sica masterpiece a
young father searches post WW II Rome for his
stolen bicycle which he desperately needs for the
job that supports his young family. Coffee and
light snacks included.
Mon, Sep 26, 7:30 pm, $7/$10 ($24/$35 series)
Upcoming: Nov 7, Campfire; Nov 28, Bridge of
Spies; Dec 19, Footnote; Jan 23, 400 Blows

Kaplen

Rosh Hashanah Celebration

free and open to tHe community

Get into the holiday spirit with apples and honey


tasting, Rosh Hashanah arts and crafts, information
about the symbols of the holiday to take home,
and an opportunity to meet our new Israeli Shlicha
Shahar Piran. The activity will be held in English
and Hebrew.
Thu, Sep 29, 3- 5 pm, Free

adults

Book Study Group:


lecture & discussion witH prof. ben nelson

Explore both current and classic books as Ben adds


new perspectives and insight to the following books:
Life After Life by Kate Atkinson, The Magic Barrel by
Bernard Malamud, Dont Let My Baby Do Rodeo by Boris
Fishman and Rules of Civility by Amor Towles.
4 Wednesdays, Sep 28, Oct 19, Nov 16 and Dec 14,
1:30-3:30 pm, $60/$75; $16/$20 per session
Call Judy at 201.408.1457.
to register or for more info, visit

jccotp.org or call 201.569.7900.

JCC on the Palisades taub campus | 411 e clinton ave, tenafly, nJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 55

Keeping Kosher
Boondocks
FROM PAGE 54

Ryan Hamilton

Butch Bradley

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, The Late Show with Craig Kilborn,
Conan, Last Comic Standing,
HBO, Comedy Central
Showtime, Comedy Central

Dan Naterman
The Late Show with David Letterman,
The Tonight Show, Conan

WIN TICKETS
COMEDY FOR KOBY
to

with a dessert reception following the show

Saturday, November 12 8 p.m.


Congregation Keter Torah, Teaneck
*The Koby Mandel Foundation is dedicated to helping bereaved familes heal
from terror and other tragedies.

Two pairs of tickets will be given away in a random drawing


from all entries received by October 21, 2016
Name ______________________________________________________
Street ______________________________________________________
City/State/Zip _______________________________________________
Phone ______________________________________________________
Email _______________________________________________________
Mail to: Jewish Standard, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666
or fax to: 201-833-4959 by October 21, 2016.
*By entering this contest you agree to have your
name added to the Jewish Standard e-mail newsletter list.

Challenge 2016.
Boondocks iconic packaging is elegant and timeless, reminiscent of a
pocket flask with a slight indent on the
front and back to allow for easy handling. The brands bold print logo is
front and center, adorning the breast
of every bottle, with Scheurichs signa-

American Whiskey 95 Proof is made


from corn, rye and, malt. Light in color
but rich, nuanced and complex, fruitiness and exotic spices enhance some
of the subtler aromatic characteristics
like the toasted marshmallow oak barrel notes. Mouthfeel
is creamy and buttery
with long pleasant finish. Overall, the whiskey is spicy and warm
but does not burn
and is sweet like cotton candy. Boondocks
American Whiskey 95
Proof has already garnered several accolades including a Gold
Medal /90 Points from
the Los Angeles International Spirits Competition 2016 and was
named a finalist in the
Ultimate Spirits Challenge 2016, receiving
92 Points.
Boondocks AmeriThe new bottles for Royal Wines Boondocks American Whiskey.
can Whiskey Cask
Strength 127 Proof has
distinctive aromas of rich caramel and
ture featured prominently as his seal
vanilla. A robust and pleasantly aggresof approval on every bottle. To round
sive palate is highlighted by fall spices
out the design with a bit of whimsical
and oak that leaves a long-lasting finhumor, consumers are reminded that
ish. This expression received a Gold
no compromises were taken in the proMedal/91 Points in the Los Angeles Interduction of the product with a surprise
national Spirits Competition 2016 and
Compromise is for politicians quote
Best of Category in the Ultimate Spirits
on the back of each bottle.

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56 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

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Rosh Hashanah
celebrate with our selection of Kosher foods

$ 49
/lb.

Empire Kosher
Roasting Chicken
Frozen

$ 99

$ 99
/ea.

Golds
Horse Radish
6 oz. btl.

2/ 6
$

Kedem
Grape Juice
Selected Varieties,
64 fl. oz. btl.

5/ 5
$

Streits
Matzo Ball Mix or
Matzo Ball Soup Mix

/lb.

Empire Fresh Kosher


Boneless, Skinless
Chicken Breasts

3/$5

Kedem
Apple Juice
64 fl. oz. btl.

Lipton Kosher
Noodle Soup
4.09 oz., 2 ct. box

2/$6

Golden Blintzes
or Crepes
13 oz. or 7.5 oz. pkg.

Fresh
Golden Delicious Apples
Crisp and Juicy, Extra Fancy

2/$5

Gunters
Honey Bear
12 oz. btl.

2/$3

Gefen
Chestnuts
5.2 oz. pkg.

2/$5

Season
Skinless & Boneless
Sardines

79

Manischewitz
Egg Noodles
Selected Varieties,
12 oz. pkg.

2/$1

Yehuda Yahrzeit
Memorial Candle
1 ct. glass tumbler

Selected Varieties,
4.37 oz. can

2/ 5
$

Osem Cake
Honey or Marble,
8.8 oz. pkg.

Selected Varieties,
4.5 oz. box

3/$5

A Rosh Hashanah
favorite at our
LOW EVERYDAY PRICE

5/$5

Kedem
Cello Soup Mix
Selected Varieties,
6 oz. pkg.

2/$3

Tabatchnick
Frozen Soup

Selected Varieties,
15 oz. pkg.

2/ 6
$

Kedem
Sparkling Juice
Selected Varieties,
25.4 fl. oz. btl.

2/$5

Golden
Potato Pancakes
Selected Varieties,
10.6 oz. pkg.

2/$6

Manischewitz Tam Tams


Snack Crackers
Selected Varieties,
9.6 oz. box

2/ 1
$

Kedem
Tea Biscuits
Selected Varieties,
4.2 oz. pkg.

5/$5

Tradition
Soup Cup

Selected Varieties,
2.9 oz. cont.

2/$5

Empire Broth
Selected Varieties,
32 oz. cont.

Use your card and save on items on this page. We sell both kosher and non-kosher foods.
Some items not available in some stores. While supplies last. Prices valid September 2October 2, 2016.

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 57

Gallery

5
n 1 Bob Gruen, left, with Leon Wildes, Geraldo Rivera,
and former Englewood mayor Michael Wildes, who is
also Leon Wildes son and law partner, at a recent launch
for Leons new book, John Lennon vs. The USA. Mr.
Rivera, Mr. Gruen, and Carol and Mark Lapidos, founders of Fest for Beatles Fans, were among the guests at
the party, held at the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law
in Manhattan. Yoko Ono was a co-host. Photo provided
n 2 The Wayne YMCAs Togetherhood Committee held
its first meeting, a hike at High Mountain Park Preserve in
Wayne, on September 11. It commemorated the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Participants could see
the New York City skyline and the Freedom Tower when
they reached the summit. The Metro YMCAs of the Oranges
is a partner of the YM-YWHA of North Jersey.Courtesy YMCA

58 Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

6
n 3 Christopher Rodriguez, the director of the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security, left, and Paul Fishman,
the U.S. Attorney for New Jersey, flank Kim Guadagno,
New Jerseys lieutenant governor. The three joined 100
state law enforcement leaders and clergy members at
the Chabad House as Rutgers University. Ms. Guadagno
gave the keynote address. Courtesy Rutgers Chabad

n 5 Bris Avrohom recently held its seventh annual


bar mitzvah celebration in Israel for young people
from Beer Sheva and Sedorot. All have been victims
of terror and all come from the former Soviet Union.
Rabbi Nosson Kanelsky, the father of Rabbi Mordechai Kanelsky, Bris Avrohom Hillsides executive director, is fourth from the left. Courtesy Bris Avrohom

n 4 Lakewood-based Chai4ever recently held a kickoff


party for its new venture, Camp4ever, a travel camp with
a 1:1 specially trained counselor to camper ratio. Chai4ever
works with local New Jersey families to provide help and
support to children with a parent diagnosed with a cancer
or other chronic or life-threatening illness. The bus trip was
to Orlando, Fla.; the first stop was at the Novack family bar
mitzvah in Passaic, pictured, to pick up the bar mitzvah boy
and his two brothers, who joined the trip. Courtesy Chai4ever

n 6 Religious school students from Shomrei Torah in


Wayne packed breakfast bags for CUMAC in Paterson, the largest food distribution program in Passaic
County. The shuls teens will deliver them when they
volunteer there next week. Courtesy Shomrei Torah

Dvar Torah
Selichot: A time to pray

hat does it feel like to partake in an activity that


is normal for you, but to
do it at an unusual time?
The feelings we might experience at these
moments, familiarity mixed with a sense
of something new, is central to the prayers
of Selichot, prayers we engage with as a
community on Saturday night, September 24. We gather to intensify our preparations for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, preparations that began with Rosh
Hodesh Elul.
Throughout the month of Elul, we
have recited Psalm 27 morning and evening, and we have sounded the shofar
each weekday morning. With Selichot,
however, we understand that the Yamim
Noraim (Days of Awe) are not a few weeks
away, but very close at hand. Mahzor
Vitry, an 11th century Ashkenazi siddur,
describes for us that it is a custom to rise

early in the morning on SunSelichot also introduces to


day before Rosh Hashanah
us the musical motifs of the
(this year it is a week earlier
Yamim Noraim, a startling
because Rosh Hashanah is so
reminder of the nusach
early the following week) and
hatefila, the traditional melodies used in prayer, that
beg to God for mercy.
carry us higher and higher,
At least since the 11th century (and probably earlier),
and that, year in and year
we have gathered late at
out, startle us out of our
Rabbi Joel
night following the Shabbat
slumber and tell us that the
Pitkowsky
immediately prior to Rosh
holidays have arrived. When
Temple Beth
Hashanah (or the Shabbat
we sing the 13 attributes that
Sholom, Teaneck,
before that, it depends on
night, reminding us of Gods
Conservative
the calendar for that particumercy, I know that I feel just
lar year), and reminded ouras startled by the music as I
selves of one of the major themes of the
am by the words.
I am not startled in the sense of a real
Yamim Noraim. We supplicate ourselves
surprise, since I have heard these words
and beg God for mercy, because we know
recited many times before. But startled in
that as much as we might have tried this
the sense of wonderment amazed at the
past year, we certainly fell short, more
gift of repentance that Judaism has preoften that we might care to admit.
sented to us and grateful that Gods open
In addition to the theme of mercy,

arms are always available to me and to


all who seek their embrace. The special
Selichot siddur that we use at my synagogue for this service contains the following prayer: This is my prayer to You,
O God: Let me not swerve from my lifes
path, Let not my spirit wither and shrivel
in its thirst for You, and lose the dew with
which You sprinkled it when I was young.
May my heart be open to every broken
soul, to orphaned life, to every stumbler wandering unknown and groping in
the shadow.
I pray that all of us allow our hearts to be
open to the possibility of what could be. I
pray that we all use our eyes to see those
around us. I pray that as we continue our
search for meaning and purpose, we find
Gods presence and guiding hand along
the journey.
Shanah Tovah Umitukah, may each one
of us have a happy and healthy New Year.

WIN TICKETS

Mazel Tov

to performances at

to our friends at

the Jewish standard


~ Jamie Janoff ~
Publisher
and

~ beth Janoff Chananie ~


Guide/Gallery editor
on the reCoGnition of their Parents

RuTh and MoRRis Janoff


of

blessed memory

as Charter members of

ConGreGation b'nai JaCob in Jersey City.

Jamie and beth, in foundinG this newsPaPer,


your father literally set the standard.
your Parents would be so Proud of how
you have followed in their footstePs, and
how you have brouGht their loCal PubliCation
to the international staGe today.

may the memory of ruth and morris Janoff


be a blessinG for you and for us all.

30 N. Van Brunt St. Englewood

A Jew
Grows in
Brooklyn
Sunday,
Nov. 13
3pm

The Maccabeats
Wednesday, Dec. 4
7:30pm

A pair of tickets for each show will be given away in a random


drawing from all entrees received by October 17, 2016.
Name ______________________________________________________
Street ______________________________________________________
City/State/Zip _______________________________________________
Phone ______________________________________________________
Email _______________________________________________________
Mail to: Jewish Standard, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666
or fax to: 201-833-4959 by October 17, 2016.
*By entering this contest you agree to have your
name added to the Jewish Standard e-mail newsletter list.
Jewish Standard SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 59

Calendar
Friday
SEPTEMBER 23

Council on Public Affairs


and president of the
Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey.
558 High Mountain
Road. www.tenjfl.org or
(201) 560-0200.

and Phyllis Cole, as well


as Stuart Skolnick, and
the congregations adult
choirs conducted by
Cantors Mamber and
Romalis, with pianist
Janet Sosinsky, and
Cantor Mamber and
Mark Kantrowitz on
guitars, and percussionist
Jimmy Cohen. Dessert
and coffee. 585 Russell
Ave. (201) 891-4466 or
bethrishon.org.

Selichot in Pearl
River: Beth Am Temple

Dr. Atina Grossmann


Jewish survival: Dr.
Atina Grossmann, history
professor at Cooper
Union in Manhattan,
discusses her recent
work, Remapping
Survival: Jewish Refugees
and Lost Memories of
Displacement, Trauma,
and Rescue in the Soviet
Union, Iran, and India,
in the Robert A. Scott
Student Center (SC
156) at Ramapo College
in Mahwah, 2 p.m.
Sponsored by Ramapos
Gross Center for
Holocaust and Genocide
Studies. 505 Ramapo
Valley Road, Mahwah.
(201) 684-7409.

Shabbat in Jersey
City: Congregation
Bnai Jacob offers a
brief service and dinner,
6:30 p.m. 176 West
Side Ave. Reservations,
(201) 435-5725 or www.
bnaijacobjc.com.

Shabbat in Teaneck:

Dr. Julie Goldstein


Shabbat in Teaneck:
Dr. Julie Goldstein of
Midrasha Amudim
discusses Womens
Leadership in the
Orthodox Community:
The Medieval Model
at Congregation Rinat
Yisrael, 5:15 p.m. She
has taught at NYU,
Maayanot Yeshiva High
School, and UCLA. 389
West Englewood Ave.
(201) 837-2795.

Selichot in Closter:
Temple Beth El of
Northern Valley screens
the David Lynch film
The Straight Story,
starring Richard
Farnsworth and Sissy
Spacek, 7 p.m. A
discussion and Selichot
prayers by candlelight
with shofar blowing
follow. Dessert. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.

Temple Emeth offers


musical services with
the Temple Emeth Band,
Cantor Ellen Tilem, and
Rabbi Steven Sirbu,
8 p.m. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-1322 or
www.Emeth.org.

Saturday
SEPTEMBER 24

Selichot in Park Ridge:


Temple Beth Sholom
offers study and prayer
led by Cantor Joel
Liebowitz, featuring the
award-winning film The
Yankles. Doors open at
7:30 p.m.; movie at 8.
Refreshments. 32 Park
Ave. (201) 391-4620.

Selichot in Teaneck:
Dr. Leonard A. Cole
Shabbat in Franklin
Lakes: Author/
bioterrorism expert
Dr. Leonard A. Cole
discusses Terror
Attack: Being Prepared
and Coping with the
Aftermath during
services at Temple
Emanuel of North
Jersey, 9:30 a.m. Among
his many positions,
Dr. Cole was national
chairman of the Jewish

screens the romantic


comedy God Is Great,
I Am Not, in French
with English subtitles,
8:30 p.m. Service led
by Rabbi Daniel Pernick
and Cantor Marcy
Kadin. 60 East Madison
Ave., Pearl River, N.Y.
(845) 735-5858 or www.
bethamtemple.org.

Temple Emeths
program includes an
introduction to its new
High Holy Day machzor,
Michkan HaNefesh,
dessert, discussion,
7:30 p.m., service at 9.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322 or www.
emeth.org.

Selichot in River Edge:


Temple Avodat Shalom
hosts professional wind
ensemble musicians
and the synagogues
choir, led by its director,

60 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Musicians and friends


of Theodore Bikel
gather on Tuesday,
September 27, at
7:30 p.m. for Remembering
Theo, a memorial concert at Kaye
Playhouse at Hunter College in
Manhattan. Performers include
David Broza, Peter Yarrow, Frank
London, Lorin Sklamberg, Debra
Straus, Jeff Warschauer, Zalmen
Mlotek, and the Fiddler on The
Roof Alumni Ensemble. Speakers
include Sheldon Harnick and
Aimee Ginsburg Bikel. Funds
raised will benefit Theodore Bikel
Fund for Peace and Social Justice.
The playhouse is at 68th Street
between Park and Lexington
avenues. More information is at
www.ProgressiveIsrael.org or (212)
242-4500. COURTESY ESTATE OF THEODORE BIKEL

SEPT.

27

Ken Corneille, for a


program on forgiveness,
7:30 p.m. Highlights
include original work
by Corneille and Trevor
Cramers arrangement
of Kol Nidre as well
as music by Mozart,
Beethoven, and
Faure. Services follow.
385 Howland Ave.
(201) 489-2463.

Theater in Teaneck:
Black Box Performing
Arts Center presents
Bad Jews, by Joshua
Harmon and directed
by Matt Okin, 8 p.m.
200 Walraven Drive.
(201) 530-2211 or www.
blackboxpac.com.

Selichot in Glen Rock:


The Glen Rock Jewish
Center offers a program
with Rabbi Jennifer
Schlosberg and Cantor

Dorothy Goldberg, The


Spoken and Musical
Language of Prayer,
followed by a musical
service and discussion,
8 p.m. 682 Harristown
Road. (201) 652-6624.

Selichot in Paramus:
The JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah invites the
community to its annual
reception and service,
which this year honors
longtime members
Susan and David Spiegel,
9 p.m. Dessert reception
followed by services.
304 East Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691 or www.
jccparamus.org.

Selichot in New City:


The Nanuet Hebrew
Center has a live music
coffee house, 9 p.m.,
followed by services.
411 South Little Tor
Road, New City, N.Y.
(845) 708-9181.

Selichot in Teaneck:
Congregation Beth
Aaron has a pre-Selichot
kumsitz with music,
singing, and divrei Torah,
led by Rabbi Larry
Rothwachs and Rabbi
Dr. Yisrael Rothwachs,
9:15 p.m., Mussar
schmooze at 12:05 a.m.,
Selichot at 12:48. 950
Queen Anne Road.
www.bethaaron.org or
(201) 836-6210.

Selichot in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Tikvah and
Congregation Shomrei
Torah of Wayne join
Temple Beth Rishon
in Wyckoff for a joint
program at Beth Rishon,
8:15 p.m. Rabbis Ken
Emert, Randall Mark,
Ziona Zelazo, Meeka
Simerly, and Lois
Ruderman tackle The
Mystery of the World
Beyond Our Physical
Body Is There Life
After Death in the Jewish
Tradition? Musical
interludes and service
at 10 with Cantors Ilan
Mamber, Charles Romalis,

Selichot in Cliffside
Park: At the annual
William Golub Memorial
Concert, soprano Nicole
Murad and guitarist
Eric Davis present
Soy Sefardi: Music of
the Jews of Spain at
Congregation Beth Israel
of the Palisades, 9:15 p.m.
Dessert, followed by

services at 11. 207


Edgewater Road. Park
in the municipal lot on
Palisade Avenue behind
the synagogue, or on the
street. (201) 945-7310.

Rabbi Yossi Pollak


Selichot in Teaneck:
Congregation Netivot
Shalom hosts a preSelichot kumsitz,
(gathering and singalong) with musician
Rabbi Yossi Pollak,
9:45 p.m., followed by
prayers at 10:30. 811
Palisade Ave. Email
mrogovin118@gmail.com.

Selichot in Montebello:
Congregation Shaarey
Israel screens the film
Remember, followed
by a discussion,
10 p.m. Refreshments
sponsored by Lila and
Jules Stern, dressing of
the Torah, and service
follows. 18 Montebello
Road, Montebello,
N.Y. All welcome.
(845) 369-0300 or www.
congshaareyisrael.org.

Rabbi Aharon Dovid


Gancz
Selichot in Tenafly:
Lubavitch on the
Palisades hosts a preSelichot farbrengen
(chasidic gathering) with
a light dinner, 10 p.m.
Rabbi Aharon Dovid
Gancz will discuss The
Essence of Teshuva Is
it changing your ways
or changing yourself?
Midnight service follows.
11 Harold St. rabbi@
chabadlubavitch.org or
(201) 871-1152, ext. 501.

Calendar
Women, talks on global
tikkun olam at Temple
Israel & JCC, 11 a.m. 475
Grove St. (201) 444-4320
or www.synagogue.org.

Solar Soul Band


Community fall festival:
Zalmen Mlotek
MICHAEL LAVES

Selichot in Teaneck:
The Jewish Center of
Teaneck holds a preSelichot musical program
with Yiddish performers
Zalmen Mlotek and his
sons, Avram and Elisha,
11 p.m., followed by a
talk from the shuls new
rabbi, Daniel Fridman,
12:30 a.m., and services.
70 Sterling Place.
(201) 833-0515, ext. 1.

Sunday

The Academies at
Gerrard Berman Day
School in Oakland holds
a festival with a petting
zoo, face painting,
bounce house, arts and
crafts, and live music by
the Solar Sound Band,
10-11:30 a.m. 45 Spruce
St. (201) 337-1111, ext. 208
or ssnj.org.

SEPTEMBER 25

Soulfarm

Atlantic City trip: Fair

Family program in
New Milford: Solomon

Lawn Hadassah travels


to Tropicana Atlantic
City. Bus leaves the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
CBI at 9 a.m.; be there
by 8:45. Breakfast on
bus. $30 with $25 slotplay money. Checks
payable to Hadassah.
Park in the back by the
nursery. Bring a valid ID.
10-10 Norma Ave. Varda,
(201) 791-0327, or Jean,
(201) 791-5213.

Raising tech-adjusted
kids: Temple EmanuEl of Closters Mens
Club Next Dor offers a
seminar, Generation
Text: Raising Well
Adjusted Kids in an Age
of Instant Everything,
led by Dr. Michael Osit,
9:30 a.m. 180 Piermont
Road. (201) 750-9997.

Schechter Day School


of Bergen County offers
Sundays at Schechter,
a community-wide
interactive family
series, beginning with
the Concert in the
Garden with Soulfarm,
10-11:30 a.m. 295 McKinley
Ave. (201) 262-9898, or
www.ssdsbergen.org/
schechter-rocks.

Challah baking
in Jersey City: In
celebration of Rosh
Hashanah, learn how to
make sweet variations
of challah with Lauren
Siegel at Congregation
Bnai Jacob,
10:30 a.m. 176 West
Side Ave. Reservations,
(201) 435-5725 or www.
bnaijacobjc.com.

Technology and aging


expo: The Gallen Day

Dr. Shoshana Klein


Poupko
Study program in
Teaneck: Maayanot
Yeshiva High School for
Girls holds its annual
yom iyun (study day)
for women and men,
including faculty shiurim,
9:30 a.m. The schools
new dean of students,
Dr. Shoshana Klein
Poupko, is the keynote
speaker. Sponsored by
the Staiman family in
commemoration of the
yahrtzeit of Sholom
Staiman. 1650 Palisade
Ave. (201) 833-4307,
ext. 265, or ennisp@
maayanot.org.

Center at the Jewish


Home at Rockleigh
offers the Technology
and Aging Expo,
11 a.m.-1 p.m. Displays
show technology
and devices that
make life safer, easier,
healthier, and better for
older adults. Brunch
served. 10 Link Drive.
(201) 750-5337.

Games for the


physically challenged
in Tenafly: The Chuck
Guttenberg Center for
the Physically Challenged
at the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades holds its annual
Special Games Field
Event and Barbecue,
noon2:30 p.m. The
event offers children,
teens, and adults who
are differently abled
the opportunity to
engage in physical
activity and interact
with others in a friendly,
supportive environment.
Volunteers welcome.
Mindy, (201) 408-1490 or
mliebowitz@jccotp.org.

Military bridge in
New City: The West
Clarkstown Jewish
Center hosts military
bridge with lunch,
refreshments, and
prizes, noon. 195 West
Clarkstown Road, New
City, N.Y. (845) 352-0017.

Zydeco festival
in Palisades: The
Esplanade at Palisades
holds a family-friendly
Louisiana-style zydeco
festival, 2 p.m. Live
music by the Zydeco
Revelators, food, and
dance lessons by Fran
Berbette. Proceeds
benefit the Charles G.
Mueller Military Order
of the Purple Heart,
a Rockland County
nonprofit organization
for military veterans
including generations
of combat-wounded
veterans who served in
World War II, Iraq, and
Afghanistan. 640 Oak
Tree Road, Palisades, N.Y.
(845) 359-7870 or www.
esplanadeatpalisades.
com.

Social justice advocate


in Ridgewood: Betsy
Teutsch, eco-activist,
social justice advocate,
and author of 100
Under $100: 100 Tools
for Empowering Global

Adelphi Orchestra opens


its 63rd season with a
chamber concert at the
Fort Lee Public Library,
2 p.m. Reception during
intermission. 320 Main St.
(201) 592-3614, ext. 4010
or Adelphiorchestra.org.

Film in Paramus: JCC of


Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah screens The
Manchurian Candidate
with Frank Sinatra,
3 p.m. Snacks served.
Deli dinner follows;

Monday
SEPTEMBER 26

Teaneck boutique: Sinai


Schools holds its annual
fall yom tov boutique
at the Teaneck Marriott
at Glenpointe, 5-9 p.m.
Refreshments. 100 Frank
W. Burr Boulevard.
(201) 833-1134, ext. 105, or
asiletski@sinaischools.org.

Freddie Roman
Freddie Roman in
Orangeburg: The
Orangetown Jewish
Center hosts Wine,
Cheese, & Comedy,
starring Freddie Roman
and comedian Miguel
Sanchez, 7 p.m. 8
Independence Ave.,
Orangeburg, N.Y.
(845) 359-5920, ext. 2, or
theojc.com.

Film in New Milford:


Solomon Schechter
Day School of Bergen
County hosts an advance
screening of On the
Map, directed by Dani
Menkin and produced
by Nancy Spielberg
and Roberta Grossman,
7 p.m. It will be followed
by a panel discussion
with Bob Griffin, 19721979 Maccabi Tel Aviv
point guard, and Penny
Amodai, NBA manager of
international basketball
and elite development
and former Maccabi
Tel Aviv director of
international operations.
All proceeds benefit
the Stephanie Prezant
zl Israel Scholarship
Fund. 275 McKinley Ave.
(201) 262-9898, ext.
277, or mweinraub@
ssdsbergen.org.

SEPTEMBER 28
Shofar making:

Fair Lawn Jewish Center/


Congregation Bnai Israel
continues its Book and
Lunch program as Edith
Sobel discusses Elie
Wiesels, A Beggar in
Jerusalem, noon. 10-10
Norma Ave. Reservations,
(201) 796-5040 or www.
fljc.com.

Feature film: The Kaplen


JCC on the Palisades
in Tenafly screens
The Bicycle Thieves,
7:30 p.m., as part of a
series, Top Films You
May Have Missed.
Commentary by Andrew
Lazarus, coffee, and
snacks. 411 E. Clinton Ave.
(201) 408-1493 or www.
jccotp.org.

Temple Emanu-El of
Closter offers a shofarmaking workshop for
young children up to
kindergarten age, with
a parent or caregiver,
9:30 a.m. Tammy,
(201) 750-9997 or
ween@templeemanu-el.
com.

Healthy living programs


in Wayne: The Wayne
YMCA and St. Josephs
Regional Medical
Center team up to offer
healthy living programs
at the Y, beginning
with The Importance
of Strength Training
with Diane Bertone
and Carmelyn Tobin
from the Department
of Physical Medicine
and Rehabilitation at
St. Josephs, 1 p.m.
Reducing Your Risk of
Falls on October 19.
The Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey. 1 Pike Drive.
(973) 595-0100.

Hadassah meets:
Fair Lawn Hadassah
meets at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai
Israel to hear journalist
Patricia Lefevere
discuss her interviews
with the late Nobel
Laureate Elie Wiesel,
7:45 p.m. 10-10 Norma
Ave. Refreshments.
Leslie, (201) 873-2476 or
L.Felner@att.net.

Tuesday
SEPTEMBER 27

Ladies cooking
demo in Wayne:
The Jewish Womens
Circle of Chabad of
Passaic County offers
an evening with chef
Shifra Klein to prepare
for Rosh Hashanah,
7 p.m. 194 Ratzer Road.
(973) 694-6274 or
Jewishwayne.com.

Shops of Riverside
in Hackensack, 1 p.m.
Conference Center,
Lower Level. www.
ncjwbcs.org.

Wednesday

Book discussion: The

Zydeco Revelators

Music in Fort Lee: The

Betsy Teutsch

reservations are required.


East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691 or www.
jccparamus.org.

Allan Chernoff
Holocaust author:
Former CNN
correspondent Allan
Chernoff, discusses The
Tailors of Tomaszow,
a book he co-authored
with his mother, Rena
Margulies Chernoff, on
the fate of Jews in the
Polish town of Tomaszow,
in the Robert A. Scott
Student Center (SC
156) at Ramapo College
in Mahwah, 7 p.m.
Sponsored by Ramapos
Gross Center for
Holocaust and Genocide
Studies. 505 Ramapo
Valley Road, Mahwah.
(201) 684-7409.

Thursday
Lois A. Schaffer

SEPTEMBER 29

Gun violence: Lois A.

Book/gift sale: The

Schaffer, who fights


against gun violence,
talks about the pain
of losing a child in her
book, A Mothers Story,
at a study group of
the National Council of
Jewish Women Bergen
County Section at the

Jewish Home at
Rockleigh hosts Books
Are Fun, a book and
gift fair in the social hall,
10 a.m.-4 p.m., and again
on Friday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Enter a raffle to win a
free item. A portion of
the proceeds benefits

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 61

Calendar
the Resident Council
Fund. 10 Link Drive.
(201) 784-1414.

Preparing for the High


Holy Days in Jersey
City: Rabbi Aaron Katz
of Congregation Bnai
Jacob teaches how to
get ready for the Days of
Awe, 7:30 p.m. 176 West
Side Ave. (201) 435-5725
or www.bnaijacobjc.com.

Friday
SEPTEMBER 30
War veterans meet
in Fair Lawn: Jewish
War Veterans Post 651
of Fair Lawn meets for
brunch and a meeting,
at the Land & Sea
Diner, 10 a.m. Wives
and guests welcome.
Edward Rosenblatt,
(201) 797-3190.

Shabbat on the
Palisades: Temple Beth
El of Northern Valley
in Closter invites the
community to its first
informal Prayers on
the Palisades Shabbat
service this fall, led by
Rabbis David Widzer
and Beth Kramer-Mazer
and Cantor Rica Timman
at 5:45 p.m., at the
State Line Lookout off
the Palisades Parkway.
The exit is northbound
on the PIP two miles
north of Exit 2. Bring
a lawn chair and bug
spray. If the weather is
inclement, services will
be held at the shul, 221
Schraalenburgh Road,
Closter. (201) 768-5112 or
www.tbenv.org.

Saturday
OCTOBER 1
Havdalah/Selichot
in Jersey City:
Congregation Bnai
Jacob offers a brief
Havdalah service
followed by a thoughtprovoking live
performance of the play
Who Shall Live by the
Isramerica Company,
7 p.m. 176 West Side Ave.
(201) 435-5725 or www.
bnaijacobjc.com.

Sunday
OCTOBER 2
Erev Rosh Hashanah
in Wyckoff: Temple
Beth Rishon offers short
family services, with
music, 6 p.m. 585 Russell
Ave. Call for free tickets.
(201) 891-4466.

Erev Rosh Hashanah


in Woodcliff Lake:
Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley offers
community services,
6:15 p.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. Call for free tickets.
(201) 391-0801.

Erev Rosh Hashanah in


Closter: Temple Beth El

Rosh Hashanah in
Closter: Temple Beth El

of Northern Valley offers


services, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
Call for free tickets.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.

of Northern Valley offers


family services, 3:15 p.m.
Tashlich at Demarest
Duck Pond at 4:30. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
No tickets required.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.

Erev Rosh Hashanah in


Pearl River: Beth Am
Temple offers services,
8 p.m. 60 East Madison
Ave. Call for free tickets.
(845) 735-5858 or www.
bethamtemple.org.

In New York
Sunday

Monday
OCTOBER 3

American Southern
Jewish cuisine: The

Temple Beth Or has


Shofar Kids services,
9 a.m., and family
services, 2:30 p.m. 56
Ridgewood Road. Call for
tickets. (201) 664-7422.

Rosh Hashanah
in Jersey City:
Congregation Bnai
Jacob has services,
10 a.m., and Tashlich at
the Korean War Memorial
at 1:30 p.m. Services also
Tuesday. 176 West Side
Ave. No tickets required.
(201) 435-5725 or www.
bnaijacobjc.com.

Rosh Hashanah in
Woodcliff Lake: Valley
Chabad has family
services led by Rabbi
Dov Drizin, 10:30 a.m.,
followed at 11 by Rabbi
Yosef Orenstein leading
the Teen Leadership
Initiative service at the
Hilton Woodcliff Lake,
200 Tice Boulevard. Also
Tuesday. Registration,
(201) 476-0157 or
valleychabad.org.

Rosh Hashanah in
Woodcliff Lake:
Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley offers
young family services for
children 8 and younger
with parents, 1 p.m.
Services also Tuesday.
87 Overlook Drive.
Call for free tickets.
(201) 391-0801.

Tashlich in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Rishon
offers a family
service at the pond,
1:15 p.m. 585 Russell Ave.
(201) 891-4466.

Museum of Jewish
Heritage A Living
Memorial to the
Holocaust offers Gefilte
Gumbo, 2 p.m., a
discussion and light
tasting, exploring
African-American and
other influences on
Jewish cuisine in the
American South. Hear
about the evolution of
fusion dishes, including
collards with griebenes,
sweet potato rugelach,
and gumbo with creole
matzah balls. Panelists
are authors Michael
Twitty and Ted Merwin,
Professor Hasia Diner,
Jewish food historian
Katherine Romanow, and
Chicago Reader deputy
editor Robin Amer.
Moderated by author
Jayne Cohen. 36 Battery
Place. (646) 437-4202 or
www.mjhnyc.org.

62 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Singles event in Passaic:


YUConnects holds Lend
a Hand!, a volunteer

Sunday
OCTOBER 9
Seniors meet in West
Nyack: Singles 65+
meets for a social gettogether with music
by DJ Jeff Sherer and
refreshments, at the JCC
Rockland, 11 a.m. All are
welcome, particularly
from Hudson, Passaic,
Bergen, or Rockland
counties. 450 West
Nyack Road. Gene,
(845) 356-5525.

Haworth artist showcased


Colorful oil paintings by Adele Grodstein will be featured in a solo exhibit
at the Piermont Fine Arts Gallery
through October 2.
Ms. Grodstein, who lives in Haworth,
has made many works related to Jewish themes. She was an artist-in-residence in Nahariya, Israel, and has
exhibited at many places including the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly,
the Belskie Museum in Closter, and the
Sid Jacobson JCC in Roslyn, N.Y.
She sits on the JCRC board of the
Jewish Federation of Northern New
Jersey and is a member of Temple Beth
El of Northern Valley in Closter.
The gallery is at 218 Ash St., Piermont, N.Y. Go to www.piermontfinearts.com or call (845) 398-1907.

Fiddler in Yiddish:
The Jewish Peoples
Philharmonic Chorus
performs To Life, To
Laugh, Lchaim! new
choral arrangements
from Fiddler on the
Roof in Yiddish,
at Merkin Concert
Hall, 4:30 p.m. 129
West 67th St. www.
kaufmanmusiccenter.org.

Tuesday
SEPTEMBER 27

Temple offers a short


young childrens service,
2:15 p.m. 60 East Madison
Ave. Call for free tickets.
(845) 735-5858 or www.
bethamtemple.org.

offers family services,


3 p.m. and Tashlich at
4. 1666 Windsor Road.
Call for free tickets.
(201) 833-1322.

SEPTEMBER 25

program, together with


Yad Leah, the charity that
ships used clothing to
needy people in Israel.
Meet at the central
Passaic warehouse to
sort and pack together,
11 a.m. Buffet dairy
lunch follows. Open
to machmir singles,
21 to 29. Registration,
(516) 603-8141 or
yuconnects@yu.edu.

2016 TINA RAVITZ

Rosh Hashanah in
Pearl River: Beth Am

Rosh Hashanah in
Teaneck: Temple Emeth

Singles
Sunday

SEPTEMBER 25

Rosh Hashanah in
Washington Township:

of the Stanley Rudoff


Memorial High Holy
Day Lecture Series. 37
West 65th St., Fifth floor.
(212) 595-0307 or drisha.
org.

Understanding Yom
Kippur: Miriam Gedwiser
leads At the Fulcrum of
the Universe: Unpacking
the Yom Kippur
Avodah at the Drisha
Institute, 9:30 a.m. Part

Participants in 5 Days/5 Ways, Areyvuts inaugural service camp, pictured with


Dr. Bruce Lish, Areyvut board member and mitzvah clown. 
COURTESY AREYVUT

Learn to be a clown for a cause


This Sunday, September 25, Bergen County
residents will have the opportunity to work
with Areyvut to learn to clown for a cause.
Areyvut is a nonprofit organization dedicated to teaching children and teenagers
about the core Jewish values of chesed,
charity, and social action
This Sundays training will be at the
Jewish Home at Rockleigh from 8:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. The onetime cost of $250
to participate in the program includes a
clown kit, a clown costume, and supplies

for the monthly site visits. Trained mitzvah clowns are encouraged to continue
clowning around with Areyvut and
making friendly visits as often as their
schedule permits. The year of clowning
culminates by marching together in the
Celebrate Israel Parade on June 4. Since
2009, Areyvut has trained more than
500 people.
For information, email info@areyvut.
org, call (201) 244-6702, or go to www.
areyvut.org.

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 63

Jewish World
Shows
FROM PAGE 52

sometimes so dramatic that it is hard to watch, but Transparent is full of deep moments of human vulnerability that
are worth sticking it out for.

New Girl (Fox, Sept. 20)


New Girl, the twee, quirky comedy about a group of
roommates starring fairly new member of the tribe Zooey
Deschanel, is coming back for a sixth season. JTAs own
Gabe Friedman has called the show the anti-Seinfeld for
its sometimes uncomfortably awkward Jewish jokes, mostly
surrounding its one Jewish character, Schmidt, a narcissistic
yet kind of darling marketing associate. Schmidt is played by
Jewish actor Max Greenfield.
Despite its awkwardness or perhaps thanks to it the
show is surprisingly fun to binge watch and has a cozy
heimishe feel. I suppose its the pumpkin spice latte of
fall TV shows.

Divorce (HBO, Oct. 9)


A round of cosmopolitans for everyone! Its finally happening:
Sarah Jessica Parker is returning to HBO. But this time, the
Sex and the City star wont be leading a glamorous quartet
of New York women looking to meet Mr. Big er, we mean,
Mr. Right. Rather, Parkers character, Frances, finds herself
on the other side of the coin: An unhappy mom of two, shes

taking ownership of her life by ending her lackluster marriage.


Dont expect Manolos here, either: Pretty much everything Frances wears is used, whether its from Etsy, vintage,
or thrift shops along the Northeast corridor, Parker has said.
Also starring in the show: Thomas Haden Church and Molly
Shannon. While the trailer is hardly mind-blowing, well have
to wait until October to see if Divorce is destined to be
another cult classic.

Crisis in Six Scenes


(Amazon Prime, Sept. 30)
We have to talk about this: Woody Allen has created and is
starring in his first TV show, and its chock full of Jews. From
young Jewish actor John Magaro, of Big Short fame, who
has taken on the role of a nebbishy young Woody Allen lookalike, to the funny Rebecca Schull (Wings), to Frances favorite Jewish comedian, Gad Elmaleh. Oh, and theres someone
named Miley Cyrus in it, too.
Crisis in Six Scenes, a six-episode miniseries, follows a
suburban American Jewish family in the 1960s. Their lives are
turned upside down by an unexpected, freewheeling guest
(that Cyrus girl). If you ask me, it sounds like a real party in
the U.S.A.
Most significant, Crisis in Six Scenes marks the return to
the screen of one of my favorite Jewish entertainers, Elaine
May, following a decade-long hiatus. A creative, hilarious
actress, comedian, and director, her oeuvre, unlike Allens,
hasnt gotten the recognition it deserves. So if youre feeling

conflicted about watching anything directed by Allen, how


about binge watching some of her old movies, or instead listening to some great Nichols and May?

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend
(The CW, Oct. 21)
If you had said a year ago that the TV show I would be
most excited about would be a TV musical comedy about
a crazy ex-girlfriend, I would have laughed in your face.
I also would have been slightly offended because hey, that
sounds pretty sexist. But its true: Crazy Ex-Girlfriend
is my favorite show right now. And Im not alone: The
shows star, Rachel Bloom, won a Golden Globe last year.
And its not sexist at all. In fact, its frank and delightful. The songs are catchy, delightful, and sometimes tear
inducing.
Bloom, who created the show, doesnt shy away
from her Jewish heritage. In a March interview, Bloom
explained why her character, Rebecca, addresses her Jewish identity so much.
Jews talk about being Jewish a lot, she said. Theyre
very aware of their Jewish identity, so in getting specific
with the character, it was natural to make Rebecca own
that Jewishness.
Last season even featured a JAP Rap Battle in which
Bloom tells her rival shes tripping like Birthright and to
sheket bevakashut the hell up. I cant wait for the Yiddish and Hebrew puns this season.
JTA WIRE SERVICE

Jewish Agencys future in question


with Sharanskys impending departure
SAM SOKOL
JERUSALEM - Announcing his pending
retirement during an interview last week, the
Jewish Agency for Israels outgoing two-term
chairman Natan Sharansky said the venerable Zionist institution needed new people
and new ideas, igniting speculation on the
identity of a possible successor.
The news that the former Soviet refusenik will step down in 2017 also fueled discussion of the continuing relevance of the
quasi-governmental entity, whose role in
the wider Jewish world has come under
fire in some quarters, following a series
of high-profile financial and political setbacks during his tenure.
Since Sharansky took the helm in 2009,
the agency has lost a great deal of funding from the Jewish Federation system,
underwent an organizational and strategic
reorganization, and promoted a massive
diaspora outreach program, the control
of which was subsequently lost to Israels
Ministry of diaspora Affairs.
While many still are confident in the
agencys continuing relevance, some
have begun questioning its role in a
changing Jewish landscape. During a
briefing at a board of governors meeting
last year, agency representatives were
grilled by representatives of American
Jewish institutions on their ability to run
aliyah programs in the face of increasing
competition.

At the heart of the issue was Sharanskys


2009 strategic realignment of the agency,
which merged its aliyah unit with other
departments and saw it gain a revised focus
on fostering Jewish identity abroad.
One board member went so far as to assert
that falling budgets imperiled the organizations ability to continue providing aliyah
services when faced with rising competition.
Another asserted it was not a good strategic
decision to get out of the aliyah business.
While agency representatives countered that they were actually expanding aliyah efforts, it was clear to many
observers that under Sharansky the main
focus had gone from encouraging aliyah
to strengthening identity.
Speaking at a board meeting a year earlier, former board chairman James Tisch was
blunt, saying the organizations reputation
has bottomed. He was pinning his hopes on
the groups new diaspora initiative, which, he
said, will in many ways be our future.
However, in a series of political battles
between Sharansky and diaspora Minister
Naftali Bennet in late 2015, Sharansky was
forced out of the initiative. It was during the
same period that the Jewish Agencys chief
fundraiser, Gisha Halperin, resigned.
Others, however, are more bullish, citing
continuing programs such as campus emissaries, the agencys management of Israel
experience programs, like Masa, and its
continuing role as a convener of Israeli and
diaspora Jewry.

64 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Natan Sharansky

FLASH90

The agency, said former English-language


spokesman Michael Jankelowitz, is the only
organization in the world where all religious
streams and Zionist political movements sit
together as equals, serving as a sort of parliament of the Jewish people.
Citing Sharanskys successful brokering of a deal to provide non-Orthodox
Jews with a prayer space at the Western
Wall, Jankelowitz said the organization is
still the most vital organization for fostering diaspora-Israeli relations.

While Sharanskys departure will leave a


significant void, said World Zionist Organizations Dr. David Breakstone, he has left
sound infrastructure that has brought
over significant numbers of immigrants,
worked hard to close social gaps in Israel,
and increased support for Israel on American campuses.
Asked about the ongoing discussion
regarding its future, a spokesman for the
agency dismissed criticism, citing its involvement in bringing over 30,000 immigrants to
Israel last year.
There is no organization with the infrastructure, experience, and know-how necessary to bring significant numbers of immigrants to Israel aside from the Jewish Agency,
the spokesman said. He added that his organization was actively involved in running
summer camps in the former Soviet Union,
leadership training courses in Latin America
and other similar initiatives.
The Jewish Agency must find a unique
value-added proposition to the very
dynamic relationship between Israel and
the diaspora in order to survive, another
board member, Daniel Goldman, said.
Its for the leadership to decide, but it
can be through education, aliyah, or even
in a more political role. The core questions dominating the debate are complex
and need people who deeply understand
both Israel and the various diaspora communities. If it so chooses, the agency can
JNS.ORG
remain a very relevant player.

Obituaries

Paterson Monument Co.

Arthur Mamber

Arthur Mamber, 102, of Brooklyn, father of Cantor


Ilan Mamber of Temple Beth Rishon in Wyckoff, died
September 9.
Born in Germany, he fled the Nazis and emigrated
to Palestine in 1933. He fought in Israels War of
Independence and came to the U.S in 1959. At age 45,
he became a machinist working as a tool and die maker
for the Swingline Staples Co. in Long Island City, until
retiring. Afterward, he attended computer classes at
Kingsborough Community College. He was a 25-year
member of Temple Beth Rishon and its adult choir.
Predeceased by his wife, Channa, he is survived by his
son, Ilan (Carol) of Franklin Lakes, and grandchildren,
Noah of Washington, D.C., and Aliza of Arlington, Va.
Arrangements were by Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

The Christopher Family


serving the Jewish community
since 1900

In loving memory of

Bambi Fass

MAIN
Paterson, NJ 07502
317 Totowa Ave.
973-942-0727 Fax 973-942-2537

BRANCH
Pompton Plains, NJ 07444
681 Rt. 23 S.
973-835-0394 Fax 973-835-0395

TOLL FREE 800-675-0727


www.patersonmonument.com

our dear Yeshiva of Hudson County

Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Inc

and Rogosin Yeshiva High School

Family Owned & managed

classmate and friend

Baruch Dayan Emet


James Janoff

Schaine Rosner

Schaine Shirley Rosner, ne Salmanowitz, 91, of


North Caldwell, formerly of Hightstown and Bayonne,
died Sept. 21.
Predeceased by her husband of over 66 years,
Seymour, and a son, Stanley, she is survived by
children, Stuart, Susan Zviklin (Ori), Steve (Stefanie),
and Shari-Beth Susskind ( Jeff ); grandchildren, Chava
Shapiro (Michael), Melissa, and Amy Rosner, Jacob,
Ben, and Noah Susskind, and Sarah Rosner; two greatgrandchildren, and nieces, nephews and their families.
Donations can be sent to UJA Federation of
Bayonne. The funeral is at noon on Friday,
September 23, at Temple Emanu-El in Bayonne.
Arrangements were by Gutterman Bros., Funeral
Directors.

Beth Chananie

Obituaries are prepared with


information provided by funeral homes.
Correcting errors is the responsibility
of the funeral home.

Jewish Funeral Directors

Generations of Lasting Service to the Jewish Community


Serving NJ, NY, FL &
Throughout USA
Prepaid & Preneed Planning
Graveside Services

Our Facilities Will Accommodate


Your Familys Needs
Handicap Accessibility From Large
Parking Area

Gary Schoem Manager - NJ Lic. 3811


Conveniently Located
W-150 Route 4 East Paramus, NJ 07652

201.843.9090

1.800.426.5869

201-791-0015

800-525-3834

LOUIS SUBURBAN CHAPEL, INC.


Exclusive Jewish Funeral Chapel

Sensitive to Needs of the Jewish Community for Over 50 Years


Serving NJ, NY, FL & Israel
Graveside services at all NJ & NY cemeteries
Prepaid funerals and all medicaid funeral benefits honored
Always within a familys financial means

13-01 Broadway (Route 4 West) Fair Lawn, NJ


Richard Louis - Manager
George Louis - Founder
NJ Lic. No. 3088
1924-1996

We offer a variety of grief support booklets from


Life LightsTM

series. This

collection is designed to help those who have


experienced the loss of a loved one or are walking
down the path of end-of-life issues.
Please call or visit us to obtain selected booklets
to help you cope with or preempt the complex
emotions that you may be experiencing.

GUTTERMAN AND MUSICANT


JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS
800-522-0588

WIEN & WIEN, INC.


MEMORIAL CHAPELS
800-322-0533

In loving memory of our dear friend

LYDIA RUSSO

Kindhearted, smart, classy, and a role model for all


The staff of the Jewish Standard

402 PARK STREET, HACKENSACK, NJ 07601


ALAN L. MUSICANT, Mgr., N.J. Lic. No. 2890
MARTIN D. KASDAN, N.J. Lic. No. 4482
IRVING KLEINBERG, N.J. Lic. No. 2517
Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
at Our Funeral Home or in Your Own Home
GuttermanMusicantWien.com

JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 65

Classified
Florida Condo To Share
.

Active female senior


looking for same
to share Florida
condo
for winter
973-310-3813

Cemetery Plots For Sale


. Cemetery Plots

Beth El/Cedar Park

Paramus, N. J.
Gravesites Available
$1150 each
Excellent Location
Call Mrs. G 201-429-2585
914-589-4673

Crypts For Sale


SANCTUARY Abraham & Sarah,
2 Crypts in second building, 1st
floor at Cedar Park Cemetery,
Paramus, N.J. 732-477-5862

Crypts For Sale


Abraham & Sarah 3 crypts,

Cedar Park Cemetery, Paramus

2 1st fl. level 2, side by side


1 1st fl., level 3
Listed at $18,000 per crypt
all offers considered
201-218-2173

Help Wanted
.Jewish Historical Society
of North Jersey, Fair Lawn
is seeking
part-time Archivist,
6-8 hrs per week.
Contact 201-300-6590
AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
is looking for an experienced,
reliable, and energetic person
who enjoys working with childdren. Tuesday 3:30PM - 6PM.
Please email your resume to
rsmolen@ssnj.org Experience
working with children a plus.

Antiques

(201) 837-8818

Help Wanted
INSTRUCTIONAL AIDE
for small class of 6th grade
students with varying
academic and emotional
challenges. The position
includes some teaching
and some academic
support for other teachers.
Salary dependent on
degree and experience.
Resume to:
ytraiger@ssnj.org
YBH of Passaic seeking to hire
Morah for the Middle School
Division
Elementary & ECD Assistants
ECD permanent sub
Applicants fax resume to:
973-777-9477
or email to:
ppersin@ybhpassaic.org

Situations Wanted
. Ten years experienced CHHA is
very good with elderly people.
Drives with valid lics. References
upon request. 201-214-7318

Situations Wanted

Situations Wanted

AIDE available to do elder care.


Warm, loving, caring, experienced,
reliable, excellent references. Livein or out. 201-668-7946

DAUGHTER
FOR A DAY, LLC

CHHA Certified Nurses Aide/Long


time care - 15 years experience
caring for the elderly with Alzheimers/dementia. Knowledge of
kosher food preparation, will shop,
clean, administer medication and
drive client to MD appointments.
References upon request. 201310-3149
COMPANION: Experienced, kind,
trustworthy person seeking part
time work. Weekends OK. Meal
preparation, laundry, housekeeping. Will drive for doctors appointments; occasional sleepovers. 973519-4911
VETERAN/COLLEGE graduate
seeks employment in telephone
sales. 25 years experience in purchasing and marketing of diverse
products. Proven success in generating new business through
building strong relationships, senior
buyer of toys, hobbies, hard goods
and bulk toys. Honest, hard worker. email:yendisid@optImum.net

Car Service

NICHOL AS
ANTIQUES
ESTATES
BOUGHT & SOLD

Fine Furniture Antiques Accessories


Cash Paid

201-920-8875

Situations Wanted

LICENSED & INSURED

FOR YOUR
PROTECTION

Handpicked
Certified Home
Health Aides
Hourly - Daily - Live In
NURSE SUPERVISED
Creative
companionship
interactive,
intelligent
conversation &
social outings
Downsize
Coordinator
Assist w/shopping,
errands, Drs, etc.
Organize/process
paperwork,
bal. checkbook,
bookkeeping
Resolve medical
insurance claims

A PLUS

Limo & Car Service

The most reliable and efficient service


at all times for your transporation needs.
Our professional and courteous team works together for you.

Serving the Tri-State Area, New York and Bergen County

EWR $39 LGA $42 JFK $59


Tolls, parking, wlt, stops & tps are not included Extra $7 Airport Pickup
Prices subject to change without prior notice. Price varies by locations.

Fuel surcharge may add up to 10% Additional charge may be applied to credit card payment

201-641-5500 888-990-TAXI (8294)

Visit us online at: www.apluslimo1.com E-mail: apluslimo@earthlink.net

Antiques

Free Consultation

RITA FINE

201-214-1777

www.daughterforaday.com
Established 2001
`CERTIFIED Home Health Aide/
Companion. I take care of elderly
people! Live-In. Experienced!
Good references! Call for more
particulars. 201-313-6956

EXPERIENCED
BABYSITTER
for Teaneck area.
Please call Jenna
201-660-2085
EXPERIENCED Caregiver specializing in care for elderly is available
immediately. Live-in. Own car.
Great references. 201-925-9239
EXPERIENCED CHHA looking for
live-in position to care for sick or
elderly. Will do light housekeeping,
cooking. Drives. 872-800-9591

Cleaning Service
A Team of
Polish Women
Clean

Apartments
Homes Offices

Experienced References

201-679-5081

ARE you looking for a New Housecleaner?? I have more than 10


years experience cleaning homes.
Honest! Reliable! Great Rates! Call
Juliana 201-923-4202

Handyman

Your Neighbor with Tools


Home Improvements & Handyman
Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates
Over 15 Years Experience

Adam 201-675-0816
Lic. & Ins. NJ Lic. #13VH05023300
www.yourneighborwithtoolshandyman.com

Situations Wanted

Antiques Wanted
WE BUY
Oil Paintings

Silver

Bronzes

Porcelain

Oriental Rugs

Furniture

Marble Sculpture

Jewelry

Tiffany Items

Chandeliers

Chinese Art

Bric-A-Brac

Tyler Antiques
Established by Bubbe in 1940!

tylerantiquesny@aol.com

201-894-4770
Shomer Shabbos
66 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

We pay cash for


Modern Furniture & Art
Judaica Art
Oil Paintings
Porcelain
Bronzes Silver
Chinese Porcelain Art
Jewelry & Costume Jewelry
Men & Women Watches
Other Antiques

ANS A

Over 25 years courteous service to tri-state area

We come to you Free Appraisals

Call Us!

Shommer
Shabbas

201-861-7770 201-951-6224
www.aadsa726@yahoo.com

PEACE OF MIND HOME CARE, LLC


Let us put your mind at ease
knowing your loved one is receiving the best care
We offer CHHAS and Companions
We assist with doctor visits, errands,
social gatherings, etc.
We offer to accompany you on vacation.

Live-in - Hourly

Elaine 201-832-0470 Christina 917-543-7077

Antiques

Sterling Associates Auctions


SEEKING CONSIGNMENT AND OUT RIGHT PURCHASES
Sculpture Paintings Porcelain Silver
Jewelry Furniture Etc.

TOP CASH PRICES PAID


201-768-1140 www.antiquenj.com

info@antiquenj.com

70 Herbert Avenue, Closter, N.J. 07642

FREE APPRAISALS TUESDAYS FROM 12-2


IN OUR GALLERY. CALL FOR APPOINTMENT.

.
l

Classified
Cleaning & hauling

home imProvementS

RICKS SAME DAY SERVICE


CLEANOUT, INC.

BESTof the BEST

Solution to last weeks puzzle.


BH

Home Repair Service

RUBBISH REMOVAL

Painting
Carpentry
Kitchens
Decks
Electrical
Locks/Doors
Paving/Masonry
Basements
Drains/Pumps
Bathrooms
Plumbing
Maintenence
Tiles/Grout
Hardwood Floors
General Repairs

201-342-9333

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL

SENIOR CITIZENS 10% OFF

1-201-530-1873

We clean up:
Attics Basements Yards
Garages Apartments
Construction Debris
Residential Dumpster Specials
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PARTY
PLANNER

24 Hour x 5 1/2 Emergency Services


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PlumBing

Get results!
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this page.
201-837-8818

APL Plumbing & Heating LLC

Complete Kitchen &


Bath Remodeling

Boilers Hot Water Heaters Leaks


EMERGENCY SERVICE

Fully Licensed, Bonded and Insured

Jewish Music with an Edge


Ari Greene 201-837-6158
AGreene@BaRockorchestra.com
www.BaRockOrchestra.com

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL!

201-358-1700 Lic. #12285

rooFing
ROOFING SIDING

Free
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HACKENSACK
ROO
FING
OOFING
CO.

201-487-5050

INC.

GUTTERS LEADERS

Roof
Repairs

83 FIRST STREET
HACKENSACK, NJ 07601

Cleaning & hauling

immy
J
the Junk Man

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WE CLEAN OUT:
Basements Attics Garages Fire Damage
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WE REMOVE ANYTHING!

CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

201-661- 4940

Call us.
We are waiting for
your classified ad!
201-837-8818
JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 67

Real Estate & Business

Memphis Jewish
community invites
new families to relocate

FEATURED
PROPERTIES
TEANECK
PREMIER
PROPERTIES
1

Showcase weekend
is scheduled for
November 1113
2

6
410 Churchill Road, Teaneck $1,199,000 6 Bedrooms 3 Bathrooms

Gorgeous Dutch Colonial in very prestigious West Englewood location, beautifully blends contemporary with
gracious old world style . Large marble entry hall, formal dining room with exquisite moldings and archways.
Large formal living room with wood burning fireplace. Double appliance granite kitchen. Second floor has
enormous landing that can be used as an additional play or work area, it is surrounded by five good sized
bedrooms, and overlooks the downstairs family room.

Contact Debra Botwinick at 201.851.1035 for more information.

1181 E Laurelton Parkway, Teaneck $989,000 6 Bedrooms 2 Full & 1 Half Bathrooms

Young Colonial 9 ft ceiling on 1st floor, outstanding Chefs Kitchen, Family Room with Fireplace, Trex Deck.
5 excellent bedrooms on 2nd level including sophisticated Master Bedroom Suite with fireplace, true walk
in closet and full bath. Childrens bath with Tumbled Marble. Hardwood floors throughout, steel beam
construction. Bit on partial, original foundation.

Faced with skyrocketing costs of housing


and education, an increasing number of
young Jewish families are choosing to
move to the affordable and friendly community of Memphis, Tennessee.
More than thirty Jewish families have
relocated to Memphis over the past two
years, moving from cities including
Rochester, Boston, Columbus, Nashville,
New York, and Seattle.
The Memphis Jewish community will
be showcasing itself at a Taste of Jewish Memphis weekend from November
11-13.
Visitors will enjoy the finest in southern home hospitality. They will have
opportunities to interact with engaging
families and speak with employment
and real estate experts.
On Friday, visitors can tour the newly
renovated gym and kitchen at the Margolin Hebrew Academy/Feinstone Yeshiva
of the South (MHA/FYOS; ages 3 through
12th grade), Bornblum Jewish Community School (grades K8), the JCC, and
visit the citys historic sights.
Memphis is well known as a tourist attraction 600,000 people come
yearly to visit Graceland, the home of
Elvis Presley. Sun Studio, the Gibson
Guitar Factory, Beale Street and the
National Civil Rights Museum are popular destinations as well. It is not as well
known, however, that Memphis boasts
an extremely vibrant Jewish community, which includes seven synagogues

(four Orthodox, two Conservative and


one Reform), two Jewish day schools,
the JCC, a kosher bakery and plenty of
kosher food.
Additionally, Memphians enjoy a
relaxed, stress-free lifestyle. Drs. Ari and
Lindi VanderWalde moved to Memphis
three years ago from Los Angeles.
It is the rare city where one can
experience both small-town perks and
an exceptional Jewish community, they
observed. The pace of life is slow and
very family friendly. There is an abundance of outdoor space and the kids are
able to play safely.
Protecting family time is a cultural
value in the city; the workday ends comparatively early for even the busiest professionals. People are friendly, accommodating, and genuinely care about
each other. And traffic is now a thing of
the past!
To encourage Jewish families to
explore life in Memphis, the Jewish
community is offering a generous incentive package. It includes a $250 subsidy
toward a familys flights to visit for a
weekend. New Memphians will receive
three months of free membership at
the JCC and tuition discounts at both
Jewish day schools. And Jewish families
who move to Memphis will receive $500
toward relocation expenses.
Memphis is the ideal destination for a
family looking for a quality of life with
all of the Jewish amenities. Visit the
community on the November weekend
of November 12 and discover this gem
for yourself.
Go to www.100newfamilies.com or
contact us at 100newfamilies@gmail.com
or (901) 352-1776 for more information.

Contact V&N Realty at 201.692.3700 for more information.

127 Highgate Terrace, Bergenfield $839,000 5 Bedrooms 4 Full & 1 Half Bathrooms

Graciously updated five bedroom colonial on Bergenfield/Teaneck border. Living Room, Formal Dining Room,
modern eat in kitchen adjacent to expansive family room overlooking lush back property. Bonus office or den
on first level. Large master suite plus 4 additional bedrooms on second level. Close to all!

Giving voice to seniors

Contact Esther Shayowitz at 201.638.5858 for more information.

Seniors

4 Seniors is a program designed


to empower and teach senior citizens
to be effective advocates with elected
officials and representatives at local,
county, state and federal levels.
Senior advocacy is a process of supporting and enabling seniors to express
their views and concerns, access information and services, defend and promote their rights and responsibilities,
and explore choices and options.
Advocacy graduates acquire and
present facts and research data to influence public policy, laws, and budgets.
After completing a nine-day training program, seniors will have gained

249 Lindbergh Boulevard, Teaneck $340,000 4 Bedrooms 2 Bathrooms

Move-in condition cape cod house in the lovely country club neighborhood. The kitchen has just been
renovated. The main floor has 2 in-wall air conditioners. The attic fan also helps cool the house. The oil tank
is above ground in the unfinished basement where there is also a French drain and a sump pump. Close to
worship, transportation .

Contact Helene Stein at 201.615.5265 for more information.

558 Warwick Avenue, Teaneck $1,485,000 5 Bedrooms 3 Full & 1 Half Bathrooms

One of a Kind Custom Tudor Colonial set on park-like approximately 94 x 146 property. Elegant Entry Hall,
grand living room with fireplace, formal dining room, updated kitchen with large granite island and separate
breakfast/family area. 5 Bedrooms and 3 full baths on 2nd and 3rd level. Spacious finished basement. 2 car
detached garage with loft.

Contact V&N Realty at 201.692.3700 for more information.

770 Hartwell Ave, Teaneck $629,000 4 Bedrooms 2 Full & 2 Half Bathrooms

Beautifully renovated Center Hall Colonial in Country Club Section of Teaneck. Formal living room and dining
room, upscale granite, double appliance kitchen. Magnificent master suite, with spa like bathroom. Open floor
plan with great flow for entertaining. Four bedrooms plus office on second level. Newly carpeted bedrooms.
Close to transportation, schools and shopping.

Contact Debra Botwinick at 201.851.1035 for more information.

vera-nechama.com 201.692.3700
68 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

knowledge to act as an advocate for


change, meet with elected officials
to discuss issues at the federal, state,
county and municipal levels, learn
communication skills for advocacy,
develop team-building skills, and
deliver presentations on key senior
topics.
The fall program is forming now
and classes are offered in the Saddle
Brook offices of the nonprofit Seniors
4 Seniors, 299 Market St. The organization is a subdivision of the Commission
on Accreditation for Health Care.
For more information, call (201)
880-9135.

Let Us Finance Your


House Purchase

Real Estate & Business


Maccabi USA casts
its net for tennis
players to qualify for
Israel games in 2017
Maccabi USA is seeking qualified Jewish tennis
players, ages 14 to 85 and older, to represent Team
USA at the 20th World Maccabiah Games in Israel,
July 4-18, 2017.
Age categories include: Juniors (birth years
1999-2002), Open and Paralympic (ages 18-plus),
Masters, and Grand Masters teams. Both Masters
(35-plus) and Grand Masters (65-plus) will have the
opportunity to participate in these events and will
compete in five-year age divisions.
Tennis players will be part of the overall 1,200member USA Team at the 2017 World Maccabiah
Games, consisting of 9,000 athletes from 80 countries engaging in 42 sports.
The coaches and chairmen joining the U.S. delegation have a combined 12 years of experience
with the organization; Juniors and Open Tennis
chairman is Lisa Chajet from New York City; Masters co-chairmen are Jody Helfend and Doug Pacht
from Calabasas, Calif., and Peter Simel from New
York City; and Grand Masters co-chairmen are
Howard Guggenheim from Boca Raton, Fla., and
Irwin Shorr from Olney, Md.
The opportunity to try out and represent Team
USA, your Jewish heritage, and play tennis in Israel
is an indescribable feeling. The experience of
meeting other talented Jewish athletes, while having the ability to get closer to Israel is life-changing, said open head coach Lonnie Mitchel.
Mitchel has been on a three-year coaching stint
for Team USA from the 2013 Maccabiah Games to
the 2015 European Games in Berlin, and the 2015
Pan American Maccabi Games in Santiago, Chile.
Tryouts for the Juniors and Open Tennis Teams
will be held November 5-6 in North Merrick and
Bethpage, N.Y.
Masters tryouts will be held October 22-23 in
Boca Raton. Grand Masters tryouts will be held
November 14 in Los Angeles. Grand Masters applicants will try out in October in Boca Raton only,
and at this time, only applicants in the 65-69 division will be required to attend the tryout.
All other Grand Masters applicants are welcome, but will not be required to attend the tryout, unless there are enough competitors to warrant a tryout.
Applications for the games must be submitted
before the tryout. Visit www.maccabiusa.com
to apply.
For more information, contact program director
Shane Carr at (215) 561-6900, or by email at scarr@
maccabiusa.com.

Direct lender
2 to 3 day approval
Closings within 30 days
Northern NJ Appraisers
FHA loans w/55% debt ratio
Credit scores as low as 580

Sharpen it up
at the Teaneck
Farmers Market
For customers who want knives and garden tools
sharpened, Neil the Knife Sharpener will return to the
Teaneck Farmers Market on September 29 and October 20. He is also approved for knives and other items
for kosher households. Share this information with
your neighbors too. Check out his website for what
he offers. With the holidays approaching it would be
great to carve your feasts with sharp tools.
For more information: www.cedarlane.net. Call:
(201)907-0493. Check WFDUs 89.1 FM station and
our Facebook page: www.teaneckfarmersmarket.com

Larry DeNike
President

MLO #58058
ladclassic@aol.com
TM

MLO #6706
dshlufman@classicllc.com

Classic Mortgage, LLC


Serving NY, NJ & CT

25 E. Spring Valley Ave., Ste 100, Maywood, NJ

201-368-3140

www.classicmortgagellc.com

MLS
#31149

OPEN HOUSES

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS

$2,595,000

New colonial in North Cliffs w/state of the art amenities, foyer w/11 coffered ceiling
& circular staircase, designer kitchen w/stone island & high-end appliances, family
room w/fireplace opens to patio, 5 bedrooms, 6.5 baths,
finished lower level, heated driveway, 3 car garage.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
t TEANECK t

ALPINE/CLOSTER
TENAFLY
RIVER VALE ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS TENAFLY

894-1234
768-6868

CRESSKILL
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389

666-0777

568-1818

894-1234 871-0800

FORT LEE THE COLONY

1 BR 2 Baths. Updated. Mountain view. $149,900


1 BR 1.5 Bath. Updated. Full river view. $189,900
2 BR 2.5 Baths. Total renovation with laundry. Redesigned.
Full river view. $325,000
Corner 3 BR 3.5 Baths. Total renovation with laundry.
Spectacular in size and layout. Must see! $695,000
Serving Bergen County since 1985.
Thank you for your trust in me.
Allan Dorfman

Broker/Associate

201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 Office
Realtorallan@yahoo.com

More than 385,000 likes.

Like us on Facebook

Daniel M. Shlufman
Managing Director

facebook.com/jewishstandard

704 Sunderland Rd.

$629,000

11 AM 1 PM

923 Perry Ln.

$799,900

1 3 PM

Custom Exp Ranch. 120' Deep Prop. W Eglwd Area. 4 BRs 2.5 Bths.
LR/Fplc, DR, Great Rm/Sldrs/Lg Patio/Fenced Yard. Recrm Bsmt.
C/A/C. Whole House Generator. Gar.
Sprawling Brick Ranch. C Club Area. 3 BRs, 2.5 Baths. Sunken LR
open to Form DR, Fam Rm/Built-ins, Mod Eat In Kit. Full, Semi-fin
Bsmt. Corner Lot, 2 Car Att Gar. Room for Exp.

BY APPOINTMENT
t TEANECK t

Lovely Street. Pretty Colonial. 150' Deep Yard w/ Rm to Expand.


Lg LR/Corner Fplc, Lg Den, Form Din Rm, Updated Kit, 3 BRs +
Study, Mod Bths, Det Gar. Close to Cedar Ln. $389,950
Close to All. Tudor Cape. Ent Foyer, Lg LR/Fplc, Jr Din Rm, Mod Kit,
3 BRs, Vaulted Ceil Sitting Rm/Ofc. Fin Bsmt. Deck. Gar. $425,000
Sparkling, Custom 4 BR, 2.5 Bath. W Englwd Area. Charm LR/Fplc,
Form DR, Newer Kit/Bkfst Rm + Sldrs to Deck. Game Rm Bsmt. Gar.
$499,000

ALL CLOSE TO NY BUS / HOUSES OF WORSHIP /


HIGHWAYS / SHOPPING / SCHOOLS & NY BUS
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com

(201) 837-8800
JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 69

Real Estate & Business

OPEN HOUSE THIS SUNDAY!

Call Susan Laskin Today


To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com

Cell: 201-615-5353

2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.

NVE-3184 3Q Red Door Ad 5x6.5_NVE-3184 3Q Red Door Ad 5x6.5 7/13/16 9:21 AM Page 1

When opportunity knocks,


NVE helps you answer the door.

MORTGAGE
Rates as low as

NVE. Our mortgage team knows


their way around the neighborhood.

%
%
2.500
2.576
Rate
APR*
Rates valid on Loan Amounts
Up To $1,000,000

At NVE, we know the local market inside and out. In addition to offering a full
range of flexible mortgage products, our Mortgage Specialist works closely with
you every step of the way to ensure a smooth process and speedy closing.
Call today at 201-816-2800, ext. 1230, or apply online at nvebank.com

NMLS #733094
*APR = Annual Percentage Rate. APR is accurate as of 7/1/16 and may vary based on loan amounts. Loans are
for 1-4 family New Jersey owner-occupied properties only. Rates and terms are subject to change without
notice. As an example, the 7-year loan at the stated APR would have 84 monthly payments of $12.99 per
thousand borrowed based on a 20% down payment or equity for loan amounts up to $500,000. Payments
do not include amounts for taxes and insurance premiums, if applicable. The actual payment obligation will
be greater. Property insurance is required. Other rates and terms are available. Subject to credit approval.
Bergenfield I Closter I Cresskill I Englewood I Hillsdale I Leonia I New Milford I Teaneck I Tenafly

70 JEWISH STANDARD SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Flu clinics in Teaneck


Teaneck will hold its flu vaccination clinics on October 19 and 26, and November
2 and 9 from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Richard Rodda Community Center, Medical Outreach Room (second floor in the
senior center).
To be eligible for the vaccination,
Teaneck residents must be at least 50
years of age, pregnant, or chronically ill
with a doctors order.
All vaccinations will be administered
by appointment only, and the application will be completed during a residents scheduled appointment.
To make an appointment, call the
Health Department starting Monday,
September 26, at (201) 837-1600, ext.
1500. Each flu clinic session will be limited to 40 pre-registered residents. Walkins will not be accepted.
Also make an appointment at the
service window located at the south

entrance of the Municipal Building (main


level) starting the same date or by e-mail
at health@teanecknj.gov.
Office hours are Monday, Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5:15
p.m. and Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Bring proof of Teaneck residency
and age to your appointment. The flu
shot will be administered at no charge
to those having Medicare Part B. Please
be sure to bring your Medicare Part B
card and photo I.D. to the appointment
as well.
All others will be charged $25 for
the vaccine. The pneumonia vaccine
will not be provided at these clinics.
Payment by check is required for all
persons without proof of Medicare
Part B. Cash or credit card will not be
accepted.
For questions, please call the public
health nurse at (201) 227-6251.

Understanding dental insurance


DR. MOTTY RUBINCHIK
As a dentist I frequently see patients who
dont understand the rules of their dental insurance policy and the coverages it
provides. I will touch on the basics and
try to explain the types of dental insurances and how coverages work.
DHMO - Dental Health Maintenance Organization
Patients with this type of insurance
will be assigned to a specific dental
practice, or will be required to select
a specific dentist, contracted with the
specific DHMO. Usually, there will be no
annual dollar amount limiting the coverages, but you will find fewer dentists
contracted with DHMO due to lower
reimbursement fees. A dental practice
contracted with DHMO will provide a list
of basic services with no charge to the
patient; other services will have a co-pay
according to the policy provisions.
PPO - Participating Provider Network
This type of insurance has more
flexibility, but a bit more complicated
formula of coverages. PPO insurance
allows patients to use their coverages at
participating or nonparticipating providers. If patient elects to see a dentist
who is on the panel with the PPO insurance, the reimbursement will be calculated using the insurance fee schedule.
If patient chooses a nonparticipating
dentist, who will agree to work with the
insurance, reimbursement will be calculated according to UCR (usual customary
rates), which are on average 25 percent
higher than the insurance fee schedule.
The following terminology is commonly used and has to be clarified:
Fee schedule - The list of price/procedure that participating dentists agree

to accept.
Annual coverage - The dollar amount
a policy covers per person each year.
It usually varies from $1,000 to $3,000
a year. Some policies are issued on a
calendar year basis, others on fiscal
year basis.
Annual deductible Will usually be
$50 a year per person (up to $150 per
multi-member family, if covered.)
Percentage based on the type of procedure co-payment Percentage may
vary in accordance to the specific policy.
Most common examples:
- Diagnostic and preventive procedures will usually be covered at 100
percent, no co-pay or deductible. When
basic or major procedures are performed there will be one-time deductible charged to the patient.
- Basic restorative procedures (fillings,
root canal treatments, tooth extractions)
usually covered at 80 percent, with
patient paying 20 percent.
- Major restorative procedures
(crowns, bridges, removable prosthesis) usually covered at 50 percent, with
patient paying 50 percent.
The dental insurance policy might
also have certain restrictions, like waiting periods for major procedures. This
means that a major procedure wont
be covered unless the insurance policy
was effective for certain period (usually
six or 12 months). And a missing-tooth
clause means that no restorative procedure will be covered for teeth lost prior
to getting the insurance coverage.
For additional information or If you
have any questions contact Dr. Motty
Rubinchik at (551) 224-8080, or write
Smiles of Fair Lawn, 13-19A River Road,
Fair Lawn, N.J. 07410.

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