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F R O M O U R D EA N
A WORD FROM OUR DEAN
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W E LCO M E N E W
FAC U LTY

This past year has been one of many changes for the School of Education. One of our 4
CI E R A S U M M E R
respected staff members of long standing, Eric Warden, retired after 35 years of service I N ST I T U T E
to the School’s faculty, staff, students, and alumni. Also, we have begun revamping our
communications pieces, including the Innovator, with the addition of Mary Nehls- 5
Frumkin as the Coordinator of Communications. In addition, the University began the A P P LE S U M M E R
process of searching for new leadership. President Bollinger’s imminent departure to I N ST I T U T E
Columbia University and Provost Nancy Cantor’s departure this summer to the
University of Illinois signal a need to reflect on where we have been as an institution,
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C H I N ES E E D U CATO RS
and a school, and where we need to focus for the future. V ISI T
As I sat down to introduce you to the changes, I had originally approached the task 7
with a sense of excitement and expectation. But the events of September 11 intruded. It J OA N STA R K
is clear to me that now more than ever we must focus on the children that our gradu- S O E AWA R DS
ates touch in so many ways as teachers, researchers and administrators. As our country
moves through this crisis our educators will be faced with new questions to answer: 8
C LAS S O F ‘ 5 1
HOW WILL THE STRESSES OF AN ONGOING CONFLICT MANIFEST HONORED
THEMSELVES IN THE CLASSROOM?
Certainly this is one of the first issues to be addressed. How can we as a school of edu-
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N OT E D A LU M N I
cators be proactive in the coming months and years? What do we know already to
begin solving this real issue? What we do know is that tolerance, acceptance, and 12
FAC U LTY ACCO LA D ES
inclusiveness are as important in education as reading, writing and arithmetic. The
School of Education is in a strong position to move forward because these are the very
tenets that form our tradition of learning and teaching. What we must do now is to
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ST U D E N T N OT ES O F
build upon this excellent foundation through our innovative programs and partner- AC H I EV E M E N T
(continued on page 2) CA LE N DA R

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CO M M E N C E M E N T 2 0 0 1

A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE
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D EG R E ES CO N F E R R E D

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O BI T UA R I ES

U N I V E R S I T Y O F M I C H I G A N
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F R O M T H E DI R ECTO R
O F A DVA N C E M E N T
S C H O O L of ED U CAT IO N 
(continued from page 1)
ships, outstanding research, inquisitive themes. The School must continue to
students, and involved alumni. prepare leaders who serve at all levels of
We have begun exploring different education by offering programs that
avenues available to the School of challenge our students to look at all
Education to further promote open and aspects of education with a critical eye
candid discussions of the role of educa- towards improvement.
tion and educators in today's changing The task ahead for educators is not an
world as well as various methods to easy one– it is one from which many
disseminate information to our com- will shy. Those dedicated to education
munity of educators. We hope to must focus on developing and sustain-
“The task develop a program that draws upon the ing reforms that address inequities in
ahead for educators knowledge and experience of the educational opportunities and ensure
is not an easy one– School's faculty and alumni. the future of our educational system
it is one from which In this compelling new century, the and democratic ideals. We can and
many will shy. Those School of Education must continue to should make a world of difference to
offer programs that challenge our stu- the youth of our country.
dedicated to educa-
tion must focus on dents and meet the needs of the chang-
ing world of education. Our students
developing and sus-
must understand the critical role that
taining reforms that education has in the evolution of our Karen Wixson
address inequities in country. This will come through more Dean, School of Education
educational opportu- intense inquiry and scrutiny of our own
nities and ensure the practice and our own efforts in teacher
future of our educa- education, curriculum development,
technology design, leadership develop-
tional system and
ment, instructional intervention, and
democratic ideals.” the multitude of variations on these
W E L C O M E T O N E W FA C U LT Y

This fall semester, the School of Education welcomed four new faculty members. As with all of
the preeminent SOE faculty, we are excited about what they bring as teachers and researchers
to the School. Please welcome:

David E. Harris, Professor of Educational Practice, received his Ph.D. from the University of
Wisconsin. His major research interests are development of reasoning with democratic values
and teacher education based on standards for authentic academic achievement.

Catherine H. Reischl, Visiting Assistant Professor of Education, received her Ph.D. from
Michigan State University. Her areas of concentration include creating contexts for collabora-
tion between beginning and experienced teachers; teacher education in multilingual contexts;
elementary literacy instruction; and, literacy and language development for multilingual stu-
dents.

Shari Saunders, Assistant Professor of Educational Practice, received her Ph.D. from the
University of Virginia and is one of the coordinators of the Secondary Masters and Certification
(MAC) program. Her interests are in social justice education, multicultural education and
teacher education.

Rodney Williams, Assistant Professor of Educational Practice, received his Ph.D. from
Michigan State University. His areas of concentration are educational technology in teaching
and learning; social studies and history education; and, instructional technology and design.
CI E R A S U M M E R I N ST I T U T E

S U SA N N E U M A N
G O ES TO
WAS H I N GTO N

Former CIERA director Susan B.


Neuman has moved to
Washington, D.C. and assumed her
duties as U.S. Assistant Secretary for
Elementary and Secondary
Education. Her appointment was
confirmed by the U.S. Senate in According to its organizers—and com- equally important outcomes. “There was
August. ments from many of the nearly 400 atten- a lot of community building going on,”
dees—this year’s Summer Institute was a she said. “People from different states
CIERA’s co-director, Steve Stahl and rousing success. The institute, which is were networking and establishing rela-
former director David Pearson, run by the School of Education’s Center tionships that will be tremendously
said, “Dr. Neuman’s appointment is
clear evidence that her research on for the Improvement of Early Reading valuable.”
young children, their families, and Achievement (CIERA), was held at the
their learning environments has Michigan League on July 29-August 1.
In addition to talks by experts from uni-
reached Washington’s policymak-
ing community.” versities and reading programs around
Teams of educators from all over the the country, conference attendees met
Dean Karen Wixson added, “This country (and from Poland and Israel) twice a day in small groups for work
appointment is recognition of the came to Ann Arbor with a common goal: sessions in which they discussed how best
role that researchers and scholars to produce a literacy plan for closing the to apply what they had heard to their own
play in bettering our educational achievement gap in their school, district, situation. Working groups could even
system for our youngest citizens. or state. During the meeting, the group request to have speakers come in and
We at the University of Michigan
take great pride in Dr. Neuman’s addressed the concept of standards and help them work out the practical applica-
appointment.” how to build a program that addresses tion of the theory.
them, as well as issues regarding curric-
Neuman, an expert in early child- ulum development, professional develop-
“This unique approach helped create a
hood and literacy education, ment, and ways to assess progress.
much more intimate environment and
helped to bring CIERA’s message to
educators, government leaders, and really motivated the attendees,”
policymakers. Her areas of focus The last point was stressed by keynote Birdyshaw said. “And the comments on
include beginning reading and speaker Joseph Johnson, Jr., director of the the evaluation forms tell us that we really
writing, family literacy, and parent U.S. Department of Education’s did help bridge the gap between research
involvement. Compensatory Education Program, who and practice in this important area.”
said, “Teachers used to teach and hope
their students learned the material. Today
CIERA, which is directed by Dean Karen
successful schools have learned to use
Wixson, is funded by the Office of
data to verify the teaching was
Educational Research and Improvement
successful.”
(OERI). For more information about
CIERA and the Summer Institute, visit the
Every team made significant progress World Wide Web at:
toward the goal of producing a literacy www.ciera.org
plan, but according to Associate Director
Deanna Birdyshaw, there were other
A P P LE T EAC H E R I N ST I T U T E

T
Teachers from 29 states and one foreign
country converged on the Ann Arbor
campus for a week in August to attend
the Apple Teacher Institute. They came
to Michigan to find out how to use digi-
tal video, audio, and other advanced
multimedia technologies in the
classroom.
laptop to use during the session and set
up a wireless network so that the laptops
could be used anywhere in the School of
Education building. “That was a pretty
bold thing for Apple to do,” said coordi-
nator Ron Miller, the school’s computer
system consultant. “The technology is
still relatively new. Fortunately, it all
worked well with no significant prob-
of Apple Distinguished Educators to do
the teaching and just as important, we
also had great support from the school.”
In addition to the Apple material, four
SOE researchers—Nichole Pinkard,
Steve Best, Jeff Kupperman, and Jeff
Stanzler—presented sessions on their
work. These included research on inter-
active communications and simulations,
The institute was not designed as a lems.” Apple donated the network to the the hi-ce program, and Say, Say, Oh
leisurely summer-time activity. The 107 School after the program. Playmate, software that helps elemen-
participants—even those from Ann tary school teachers develop literacy
Arbor—lived in Mosher-Jordan skills in a computer-based learning envi-
“Ours was one of the best. We
Residence Hall and their activities ran ronment.
had a great team of Apple
from 9 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. The idea, Distinguished Educators to do the
according to Apple, was to immerse the Plans for next year’s Apple Teacher
teaching and just as important,
teachers in the technology and to pack Institutes have not yet been announced.
we also had great support from
as much information as possible into the For more information about the
the school.”
five-day session. program, visit the World Wide Web at:
www.apple.com/education/institutes
Apple developed the program and pro- Michigan was one of seven schools in
vided the instructors, while the university the U.S. and Canada chosen to host the
provided the facilities. In addition, the institute, and according to Miller, “Ours
company gave each participant an iMac was one of the best. We had a great team
C H I N E S E E D U C AT O R S S P E N D T H E S U M M E R I N A N N A R B O R

Like virtually everything else in China, similarities in teaching methods, there nationally organized, and they were
its educational system is undergoing were significant differences in the area of amazed at the many different kinds of

C
major reform. To get ideas for principles
and practices that might be useful in
their own school system, 32 Chinese
educators spent the summer at the
School of Education. For a while last
spring their visit was in doubt, but after
some fancy political maneuvering and a
host of letters from Senator Debbie
Stabenow, Dean Karen Wixson, and a
teaching higher-order thinking skills.
“In fact, some of our visitors were sur-
prised not to get step-by-step answers to
their questions,” he recalled.

China has a national curriculum for all


subjects and grade levels, and there also
are striking differences in funding. In
China, Goddard explained, public
institutions,” she said. They met with
faculty and administrators at a range of
schools, from Michigan State University
to Albion and Washtenaw Community
College and also visited the Great Lakes
College Association and the Society for
College and University Planning, to see
the many different ways in which educa-
tors in this country organize themselves.
number of other top U-M administrators,
schools get much of their money from
the long-delayed visas were finally
private donations and from parents. This The visitors all came from Tianjin, one
approved. The visitors arrived on June 1
means that in China, urban schools tend of China’s largest cities. The exchange
and remained in Ann Arbor until mid-
to be better than those in rural areas, was arranged by Louis Yen, an assistant
August.
because they have access to more research scientist in the Division of
resources. Kinesiology, whose family is from the
Half the group were K-12 administrators area.
and half university administrators, and
Meanwhile, Associate Professor Janet
lectures and outings were scheduled for
Lawrence had organized a full schedule The group was sponsored by the Tianjin
the two groups separately. Assistant
of presentations and visits for the univer- Education Commission and private
Professor Roger Goddard, who coordi-
sity administrators. “This group was very donations.
nated the program for the K-12 adminis-
surprised that our universities are not
trators, said that while there were some
SY M P O S I U M T R I B U T E H O N O R E D
J O A N S TA R K

This past year saw the retire-


ment of Professor Joan Stark,
former dean and long-time
member of the School of
Education faculty. To honor
Dr. Stark’s distinguished career
and contributions, the School
celebrated with a symposium
in April. Alumnae Ann Austin,
associate professor in the
Higher, Adult, and Lifelong
Education (HALE) Program, Michigan State University and Lisa
Lattuca, assistant professor in the Higher Education Program,
Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Counseling Psychology,
Loyola, University of Chicago joined Patrick Terenzini, professor and
senior scientist in the Center for the Study of Higher Education,
Pennsylvania State University in a discussion of Dr. Stark’s distin-
guished career and contributions to the field of higher education.

Some of Dr. Stark’s career milestones include:


• First woman dean of the School of Education
• Director of the National Center for Research to
Improve Postsecondary Teaching and Learning
• Editor of the Review of Higher Education
• Winner of every major award from professional higher
education associations

S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N
S T U D E N T AWA R D S 2 0 0 0
CLASS OF ‘51 HONORED
More than 55 School of Education alumni/ae celebrating their 50th graduation anniversary were
honored at a luncheon June 1 in the School of Education Building. The event was part of a three-
day campus-wide Alumni Association Emeritus Reunion. Those attending enjoyed meeting old
friends and exchanging stories from the past 50 years. The guest speaker at the luncheon was Dean
Karen Wixson who discussed the future direction of the School of Education.
NOTEDF
Alumni
A N U R BA N LEG E N D R ET I R ES : FO ST E R G I B B S
In a time when the average tenure of a program reductions, and staff layoffs, also helped found the Michigan Middle
school superintendent is two to three years, Saginaw not only maintained full programs Cities Education Association and the mid-
Foster Gibbs is truly legendary. When he and services for students, but also added Michigan Minority Pre-Engineering
retired as Saginaw, Michigan’s superintend- new initiatives that served the entire com- Program. In 1989 he was named Michigan
ent of Schools at the end of the 2000-2001 munity. These included two ten-year strate- Superintendent of the year.
school year, he had survived—and gic planning efforts focused on improved
thrived—in the top post for an astounding student achievement, the implementation
In his efforts to build professional organiza-
23 years. of career and technical education, pro-
tions and training opportunities to develop
grams for both gifted and talented students
quality public school teachers and leaders,
Gibbs earned three degrees from U-M, fin- and for high-needs students, the transfor-
Dr. Gibbs often noted the importance of net-
ishing his Ph.D. in 1977 and maintaining a mation of a large retail store into a lifelong
working and maintaining connections. He
close connection with the University learning center, establishment of a staff
observed that “we are all the sum total of
throughout his career. Saginaw Public development center, and offering the first
all our experiences shaped by the people we
Schools enjoyed a number of innovative Birth Through Three parenting program in
meet along life’s journey.” When talking
collaborative programs with the School of Michigan.
about the professors he had and knew at
Education over the years, as a result of that Michigan, he said, “The Michigan experi-
connection, while the school benefited from Gibbs also is involved in educational lead- ence from undergrad through the Ph.D.
his strong leadership and involvement in ership beyond the school district itself. He is program and continuing throughout my 42
the Education Alumni Society. a founding member and long-time presi- year career prepared me to be a life-long
Gibbs’ contributions to the Saginaw school dent of the Urban Education Alliance, com- learner in the service of the greatest profes-
system are legion. While most urban school prised of the Saginaw, Detroit, Flint, sion one could choose– the education of
districts were facing severe budget deficits, Pontiac, and Lansing school districts, and America’s youth.”

“Gibbs’ contributions to the Saginaw school system are


legion.”
“Bylsma has established the
school as a ‘safe haven’ where
students are not allowed to
criticize or tease, talk about
race, size or shape.”

Alumni
NOTEDF

MB S H E ’ S M A K I N G A W O R L D O F D I F F E R E N C E : M A R I L E E BY LS M A

Twelve years ago, when Marilee


Bylsma (‘79) took over as principal of
Detroit’s Samuel Gompers Elementary
School, it was an average sort of
school with a 58% mobility rate, in a
neighborhood where 98% of the resi-
dents were at or below poverty level.
Gompers learning community—
teachers, administrators, even the
custodial staff—invest in the achieve-
ment of the students. Everyone shares
the vision for the school and the staff
works together as a team, pitching in
wherever it’s needed—lunchroom
students, “What you learn at Gompers
is very important. But the kind of
children you are is more important to
me. You’re children of character and
I’m proud of you.”

Bylsma graduated from the


This year Gompers received the duty, recess supervisor, mentor or
Educational Administration program.
national Blue Ribbon Exemplary coach. “Parents know that Gompers
She credits her training with giving
School Award, the Michigan Blue is a place where their children are
her the vision to see her school and
Ribbon award, and the Michigan going to be cared for,” Bylsma says,
her students’ potential, and the
Golden Apple for the highest MEAP “and children know that school is a
resources to overcome problems, both
(Michigan Educational Assessment place where they will be loved, safe,
large and small. Now she is using
Program) scores in the Detroit dis- and fed.”
consulting to share some of the
trict. Bylsma herself received the
secrets of her success. Throughout the
RARE Award for excellence in
Students have their own part to play. year, she addresses administrators in
education.
Bylsma has established the school as other districts, to help them create
a “safe haven” where students are not outstanding schools and motivate
How did she do it? In large part, by allowed to criticize or tease, talk their students.
insisting that every member of the about race, size or shape. She tells her
Stephen Raudenbush, David Burkham, adjunct assis- Award by the National Association
Professor of Education, Professor of tant professor and senior research of Student Financial Aid
Statistics and Senior Research associate, was the 2001 recipient of Administrators (NASFAA). The
Scientist, Survey Research Center, the Residential College Excellence award recognizes an exemplary
was elected a in Teaching Award. The selection contribution to the literature on
Fellow in the committee recognized him for his student financial aid.
FA C U LT Y A C C O L A D E S
American ability to bridge the gap between
Academy of Arts mathematics, the social sciences Jana Nidiffer, assistant professor,
and Sciences. Dr. Raudenbush, who and the humanities. received a Faculty Career
was nominated by the SOE Development Fund Award. The
Executive Committee, is one of Carl F. Berger, professor, received award recognizes instructional-
seven U-M faculty elected to the the 2001 EDUCAUSE Award for track faculty who devote an excep-
academy this year and, with Leadership in Information tional amount of time to mentor-
Professor Hyman Bass, the second Technologies. The award honors ing and service.
SOE member. visionary achievements and effec-
tiveness in identifying and advanc- Pamela Trotman Reid,
The Academy, which is in its 221st ing technology directions for the professor, was named Director of
year, “honors distinguished scien- various needs of higher education. the U-M Women’s Studies Program.
tists, scholars and leaders in public
affairs, business, administration Barry Fishman, assistant profes-
and the arts.” Dr. Raudenbush is sor, received the Jan Hawkins
known as “a leading educational Award. Sponsored by the Division C
methodologist recognized national- of the American Educational
ly and internationally as the lead- Research Association (AERA), the
ing scholar in his field, he works award recognizes exceptional work
collaboratively across disciplines.” in the area of technologies and
education.
Other new Academy members
include Madeleine Albright, Riley Roger Goddard, assistant profes-
Bechtel, Vaclav Havel, Rosalyn sor, was this year’s runner-up for
Higgins, Molly Ivins, Quincy Jones, the American Educational Research
Robert Ruben, and Stephen Association (AERA) Division A
Sondheim. Dissertation Award. His dissertation
was entitled Effects of Collective
Deborah Ball, professor, and Teacher Efficacy on Student
Jan Lawrence, associate profes- Achievement in Urban Public
sor, have joined the AERA Board as Elementary Schools.
member-at-large and vice president
for Division J, respectively. They join Donald E. Heller, assistant pro-
current board member Virginia fessor in the Center for the Study of
Richardson, professor and chair Higher and Postsecondary
of the Educational Studies Education (CSHPE), received the
Program. 2001 Robert P. Huff Golden Quill
ST U D E N T N OT ES O F AC H I EV E M E N T

S Stacy Essebaggers, a SOE student who deferred her enrollment until fall 2002,
is the current Miss Michigan 2001 and finished in the top ten in the Miss America
pageant.

Adrienne Gelpi Lomangino, a Combined Program in Education and


Psychology (CPEP) Ph.D. candidate, received the Dimond Award for the
Outstanding Dissertation for 2000-01. Her dissertation is entitled Emergent Self-
Regulatory Activity Among Young Children During Scientific Inquiry: An
Analysis of Six Kindergarten Children.

Bernadette Marten, a Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary


Education (CSHPE) student, was named a member of the All-American Rowing
Team, one of the highest honors in collegiate athletics.

LeeAnn Sutherland, a Literacy, Language and Culture Ph.D. candidate, was


chosen as a Rackham Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor.

CA LE N DA R O F EV E N TS

Wednesday, December 12
Sam Meisel Farewell Reception 4:00 p.m . Tribute Room

Sunday December 16
Winter Commencement Brunch 11:00 a.m. Tribute Room

Friday, April 12
Spring Awards Dinner TBD

Saturday, April 27
Spring Commencement 4:00 p.m. Hill Auditorium
COMMENCEMENT HELD APRIL 28

Maren Christiansen delivers the commencement address on behalf of Bachelor of Arts candidates

The School of Education’s 12th Commencement Ceremony was held Saturday, April 28, in Hill
Auditorium. A reception followed in the Michigan League Ballroom. This year’s speakers included
Maren Christiansen and Aaron Boylan. Maren, a candidate for Bachelor of Arts in Education and ele-
mentary certification, spoke on behalf of the undergraduates and Aaron, a candidate for Master of Arts
with secondary certification, represented the graduate students.

The School’s guest speaker was Wendy A. Gee (B.S. Ed., ‘79), commander in the United States Navy. In
October 2000 she was named Distinguished Alumna of the University of Michigan School of
Education.

This year, the School of Education graduated 222 undergraduate students and 171 graduate students.

Commencemnt Speaker, Wendy A. Gee.

Jin Sook Hong,D.M.A. University of Michigan and member Eric Warden, retiring after 35 years with the School of Education, reluctantly
of the albion college faculty, sang the Laudation for the accepts congratulations from Dean Karen Wixson and commencement
2001 graduates, You’ll Never Walk Alone attendees
Top Left: Aaron Boylan delivers the commencement address
on behalf of advanced degree candidates.

Top Right: Parents, family and friends proudly snap pictures


of SOE graduates.

Middle Right: The Hon. David A. Brandon, A.B.Ed. & Cert.,


University of Michigan Regent, offers congratulations to SOE
2001 graduates.
A D VA N C E D D E G R E E S C O N F E R R E D
The following advanced degrees have been conferred since Fall 1999. Congratulations to these and all of our SOE graduates.
Key: CSHPE: Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education; ES: Educational Studies; FA: Fall; SS: Spring-Summer; WN: Winter

Lea M. Allison, CSHPE, Ph.D., FA 1999, Joseph Loris Hoffman, ES, Ph.D., FA 1999, Julie Marie Nicholson, ES, Ph.D., FA 2000,
Chair: Sylvia Hurtado Chair: Joseph Krajcik Chair: Samuel Meisels
The Impact of Integrative Experiences on Information-Seeking Strategies and Science Content Examining Evidence of the Consequential Aspects of
Persistence: A Study of Nontraditional Students Understandings of Sixth Grade Students Using On- Validity in a Curriculum-Embedded Performance
Barbara Elaine Alpern, CSHPE, Ph.D., WN 2000, Line Learning Environments Assessment
Chair: Janet Lawrence Karen Kurotsuchi Inkelas, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 2000, Daniel Carlton Patton, CSHPE, Ph.D., WN 2001,
Factors that Influence Community College Transfer Chair: Sylvia Hurtado Chair: Janet Lawrence
Students’ Satisfaction with their Baccalaureate Demystifying the Model Minority: The Influences of Examining Perceptions of the Work Environment
Institutions Identity and the College Experience on Asian Pacific and Defining the Concept of Job Satisfaction among
Greta N. Anderson, CSHPE, Ph.D., FA 1999, American Undergraduates’ Racial Attitudes African-American Faculty Members
Chair: Marvin Peterson Patricia P. Jones, ES, Ph.D., WN 2001, Joanne Marttila Pierson, ES, Ph.D., FA 1999,
An Examination of Individual and Organizational Chair: Carl Berger Co-chairs: Jean, McPhail, Annemarie Palincsar
Characteristics Influencing Persistence for Influence of Design Decisions on Student Patterns The Accomplishments of Students with Specific
Community College Transfer Students at the of Use: An Example from Seeing Through Chemistry Learning Disabilities and Language Impairment
University of Michigan-Dearborn Ann Mallatt Killenbeck, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 2000, when Engaged in Interest-Based Apprenticeship
Marie Nadine Majors Canady, ES, Ed.D., WN 2000, Chair: Michael Nettles Learning
Co-Chairs: Carl Berger, Shirley Magnusson Racial Diversity in Legal Education: Do Racially Violet Elizabeth Ponders, CSHPE, Ph.D., WN 2001,
Students’ Use of a Hypermedia Tool for Freshman Diverse Educational Environments Affect Selected Chair: Richard Alfred
Chemistry Attitudes of White First-Year Law Students? The Influence of Teacher Characteristics and
Daniel Matthew Carchidi, CSHPE, Ph.D., FA 1999, Glenn Michael Klipp, ES, Ed.D., WN 2001, Preparation on Student Achievement in Publicly
Chair: Marvin Peterson Chair: Frederick Goodman Funded Detroit Schools
The Virtual Delivery and Virtual Organization of Resallying Qids: Resilience of Queer Youths in School David Jonathan Siegel, CSHPE, Ph.D., FA 1999,
Postsecondary Education Soo-Young Lee, ES, Ph.D., WN 2001, Chair: Marvin Peterson
Gregory Lawrence Cascione, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 2000, Chair: Nancy Songer Organizational Responses to Diversity: The
Chair: Marvin Peterson To What Extent Does Classroom Discourse Interaction of Institutional Environments and
Religion, Motivation and Philanthropy to Higher Synergistically Support Electronic Discourse?: A Organizational Contexts in the Professional School
Education Study of the Kids as Global Scientists Message Board and College Setting
Todd Kalani Chow-Hoy, ES, Ph.D., SS 2000, Ricardo T. Maestas, CSHPE, Ph.D., FA 2000, Neil Martin Skov, ES, Ed.D., FA 1999,
Chair: Gary Fenstermacher Chair: Eric Dey Chair: Carl Berger, Joseph Krajcik
The Influence of a Powerful Principal and Clear Out-of-Class Interactions with Faculty and Selected Assessment of Student Learning with Hypermedia
Mission on the Moral Dimensions of Teaching in Educational Outcomes among Hispanics and Black Tools in First-Year College Chemistry
Two Public Schools Undergraduates Chiu-I Sung, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 2000,
Kathleen Mary Collins, ES, Ph.D., FA 1999, Nancy Laine Marano, ES, Ph.D., SS 2000, Chair: Marvin Peterson
Co-Chairs: Deborah Keller-Cohen, Annemarie Palincsar Chair: Jean McPhail, Annemarie Palincsar Investigating Rounded Academic Success: The
“Do You Think I’m Proper?”: A Case Study of Teacher Learning: Collaborations within and across Influence of English Language Proficiency,
Educational Exclusion and the Social Construction Three Professional Development Activity Settings Academic Performance, and Socio-Academic
of Ability, Achievement, and Identity Michael Kevin Mc Lendon, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 2000, Interaction for Taiwanese Doctoral Students in the
Michael Edward Cross, CSHPE, Ph.D., FA 1999, Chair: Marvin Peterson United States
Chair: Marvin Peterson Setting the Agenda for State Decentralization of Darryl Anselm Wahlstrom, ES, Ph.D., WN 2001,
The Run to Division I: Intercollegiate Athletics and Higher Education: Analyzing the Explanatory Chair: Carl Berger
the Broader Interests of Colleges and Universities Power of Alternative Agenda Models Technology-Mediated Assessment in a Secondary
Karen Lynn de Olivares, ES, Ph.D., SS 2000, Sean E. McCabe, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 2000, Manufacturing Technology Program: A Study of the
Chair: Frederick Goodman Chair: Eric Dey Relationship between Participants’ Goal-Orientation
Nice Girls Do Fight: Situating Female-Female Binge Drinking among Undergraduate Students: and the Calibration of Performance Expectations to
Conflict An Examination of Risk Factors using a Performance Feedback
Elizabeth Marie Dutro, ES, Ph.D., WN 2000, Psychosocial Model Raven McCrory Wallace, ES, Ph.D., FA 2000,
Chair: Pamela Moss Ricardo J. McKinney, ES, Ed.D., WN 2001, Chair: Magdalene Lampert
Reading Gender/Gendered Readers: Girls, Boys and Chair: Percy Bates Teaching with the Internet: A Conceptual
Popular Fiction A Comparison of Employment Personality Framework for Understanding the Teacher’s Work
Danielle Joan Ford, ES, Ph.D., SS 1999, Characteristics among Individuals with and without and an Empirical Study of the Work of Three High
Chair: Annemarie Palincsar Learning Disabilities School Science Teachers
The Role of Text in Supporting and Extending First- Michael Daniel Metzger, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 2000, Jean Ann Waltman, CSHPE, Ph.D., WN 2001,
Hand Investigations in Guided Inquiry Science Chair: Richard Alfred Chair: Joan Stark
Sheryl Jean Grove, ES, Ed.D., WN 2001, University Policies and their Influence on the Mentoring and Academic Success for Women
Chair: Carl Berger Organized Research Unit and Technology Transfer Faculty Members at Research Universities
Comparison and Predictors of Student Satisfaction Marianne Miller, ES, Ph.D., SS 1999, Ethelene Whitmire, CSHPE, Ph.D., WN 2001,
with Their Performance in University Courses Chair: Annemarie Palincsar Chair: Janet Lawrence
Delivered by Point-to-Point and Multipoint The Opportunities and Challenges of Guided Inquiry The Influence of Academic Library Experiences on
Interactive Television Science for Students with Special Needs Undergraduates’ Critical Thinking during Three
Russel Strange Hathaway, CSHPE, Ph.D., SS 1999, James Allen Muchmore, ES, Ph.D., SS 1999, Years of College
Chair: Janet Lawrence Co-chairs: J. Gary Knowles, Pamela Moss Pamela Janette Young, CSHPE, Ph.D., WN 2001,
College Student Definitions of Key Concepts and Knowing Anna, Knowing Myself: Two Teachers’ Chair: Teshome Wagaw
Thinking in a Multicultural Education Course Stories of Professional Development Knowledge, Nation, and the Curriculum: Ottoman
Armenian Education (1853-1915)
R e m e m b e r Michigan.

Live Forever.

Introducing the A Gift Annuity To Learn More …


New Charitable Gift Provides You With: Contact the School of Education’s
Annuity Program ✦ An immediate income tax deduc- Development Office at 734-763-4880
tion and capital gains tax savings; or
No matter what your generation, email us at meshe@umich.edu
your days at Michigan helped make ✦ A lifetime stream of fixed income;
or
you who you are today. ✦ Annuity rate yields that may be visit http://www.giving.umich.edu
higher than many investment and select the “How to Make a Gift”
Now you can give something back to returns; and option.
the college that gave you so much —
and give yourself a little something ✦ The means of making a future
too — with the University of significant gift to Michigan for a
Michigan’s new Charitable Gift designated school, unit, or other
Annuity Program. purpose.

How Does it Work?


Here’s an example. A gift of $30,000
from a 75-year old donor nets an
immediate current-year tax
deduction of $13,340, plus a
guaranteed lifetime annual
income of $2,460. (Minimum age
requirement of 50, and minimum
gift amount of $10,000.)

Photos courtesy of Bentley Historical Library,


University of Michigan
OBITUARIES

HEINZ Delmont K. Byrn, professor emeritus, died October 26, 2000. Dr. Byrn was a
P R EC H T E R DI ES member of the School of Education faculty from 1952 until his retirement in 1984.
AT 5 9
Geraldine Flick, was a long-time staff member who retired in the early 1980s.

Lloyd Hughes, professor emeritus, was a member of the School of Education fac-
ulty from 1969 until his retirement in 1979.
Heinz Prechter, industrialist and
prominent Republican party
fundraiser who was a major Hyman Kornbluh, professor emeritus, was a member of the School of Education
donor to the School of faculty from 1972 until 1995.
Education, died at his home in
Grosse Ile, Michigan on July 6.
William G. Merhab, professor emeritus, died January 15, 2001. Dr. Merhab was a
member of the School of Education faculty from 1946 until his retirement in 1985.
Prechter began his career in the
automotive industry as an
apprentice in Germany when he
Max G. Wingo, professor emeritus, died September 14, 2001. Dr. Wingo was a
was 13 years old. At the age of 21 member of the School of Education faculty from 1945 until his retirement in 1978.
he immigrated to the United
States with $11 in his pocket.
Fifteen months later he founded
ASC Inc. in a Los Angeles garage
with just $764. He moved the
company, which supplied sun-
roofs to auto manufacturers, to
Detroit in 1967. Today, Prechter
Holdings employs 5,300 people
in 60 facilities worldwide,
including ASC, Heritage
Newspapers, livestock compa-
nies, and real estate holdings.

"Heinz Prechter was a great


CREDITS
Innovator is published by the School of Education
friend to the School of
Education especially through his
Editor: Mary Nehls-Frumkin
support for the Prechter
Laboratory," said Marilyn Writers: Lesley Harding
Sheperd, SOE Director of Judy Steeh
Advancement. "He and his
family truly embrace and Photography: Jay Asquini
promote the conviction that Gregory Fox
education is the primary University of Michigan Photo Services
stepping stone to a productive Mike Gould
future."
Design: Liz Cheng
Osborn & Delong

Copy Editors: Marti Dalley


Mary DeLano
Laura Roop
F R O M T H E D I R E C T O R O F A D VA N C E M E N T

As you read this latest edition of the that are making a world of difference need. If we could provide assistance to
Innovator I hope that you share my in the community, the classroom, col- just one more of the eligible students
excitement and enthusiasm about what leges and universities, foundations and who need it, think of the difference that
is going on in the School of Education. government agencies. On all fronts we would make…if we could provide
The School is actively involved in all are leading the way! assistance to ALL of the eligible students
aspects of education through the teach- think of the difference THAT would
ers, administrators and policy makers For millennia, education has been rec- make!
who have graduated from our pro- ognized as a powerful force—capable
grams; through our current students of shaping human lives and determin- Alumni and friends of Michigan are a
who will join the ranks of our remark- ing the course of entire nations. Your special breed. They not only love this
able alumni; and through our continued support of the School of University with a ferocity that defies
renowned faculty. And of course what Education is more critical and neces- description, but they support it with the
you are reading in this issue is only the sary than ever. The School continues to same passion. They know that making
tip of the iceberg of the work that is be challenged to provide scholarship a world of difference requires support
being done! assistance to the many fine students on all fronts. The School of Education
needing our support. It is our greatest has been blessed with generous alumni
The School of Education has a story to who understand how important it is to
tell. It's a story about becoming and “ FO R M I LLE N N I A , support what goes on here. Your gifts
remaining one of the nation's top E D U C AT I O N H A S B E E N have changed the face of this School,
schools of education; a story about a R ECO G N I Z E D AS A but it's a continuing and ever-growing
seriousness of purpose that dates back P OW E R F U L FO R C E — need. We need to hear from more of
more than 80 years. And the story is not C A PA B L E O F S H A P I N G you. I invite you to not only support the
only about what is going on inside the HUMAN LIVES AND School, but to spread the word about
School of Education building, it's also DETERMINING THE the good things that are happening
about what is going on with all of you. COURSE OF ENTIRE here. It’s quite a place!
Our alumni are doing extraordinary N AT I O N S . ”
things in the field of education–things Marilyn Sheperd

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY


The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination and
affimative action, including Title IX of the Education amendments of 1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The University of Michigan is committed
to a policy of non-discrimitation and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, sex, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, sex-
ual orientation, disability or Vietnam-era veteran status in employment, educational programs and activites, and admissions. Inquiries or complaints may be
addressed to the University’s Director of Affirmative Action and Title IX/Section 504 Coordinator, 4005 Wolverine Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1281, (734) 763-
0235; TYY (734) 647-1388. For other University of Michigan information call: (734) 764-1817. AAO 4/28/98

©2001 The Regents of the University: David A. Brandon, Ann Arbor; Laurence B. Deitch, Bloomfield Hills; Daniel D. Horning, Grand Haven; Olivia P. Maynard,
Goodrich; Rebecca McGowan, Ann Arbor; andrea Fischer Newman, ann Arbor; S. Martin Taylor, Grosse Pointe Farms; Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor; Lee C. Bollinger
(ex officio)
C LAS S N OT ES

In August when you received information about the School of Education’s Alumni Fall Gathering, we also included a Classnotes form
and requested that you send them back with any data you would like to share with your classmates. It was our intent to include this
information in this issue of the Innovator. Wow! Did we ever underestimate the response!
Because of the tremendous response, we have decided to print a separate publication for this batch of Classnotes. Currently, we are
busy entering the information and hope to have it ready to mail in January 2002. Starting with the next issue of the Innovator, we
will include Classnotes as a regular feature in the publication. If you have any achievements, life changes, etc., that you would like to
share with other SOE Alumni/ae, please send it to:

Mary Nehls-Frumkin
Communications Coordinator
School of Education
University of Michigan
1123B School of Education Building
610 E. University Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1259

Or, send it via email to: soeinnovator@umich.edu

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Non-Profit
The University of Michigan Organization
610 East University Avenue U.S. Postage
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1259 PAID
www.soe.umich.edu Ann Arbor, MI
Permit No. 144
Volume 32, No. 1 / Fall 2001

Recipients making address changes:


please send new address and old
mailing label if available