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Consumer Behaviour
Article January 2009
Source: OAI

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David Bednall

University of Tasmania

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Available from: David Bednall


Retrieved on: 26 September 2016

Revised August 7, 2009

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION- HONOURS PROGRAM


DIPLOMA IN BUSINESS ADMINSTATION
FALL 2009
BADM 2020

INSTRUCTOR NAME (First & Last):


INSTRUCTOR EMAIL (Guelph Humber):
PHONE NUMBER:
FAX NUMBER:
MAIN OFFICE:
OFFICE HOURS:
PROGRAM HEAD:
EMAIL AND EXTENSION
PROGRAM ADVISOR:
EMAIL AND EXTENTION
GUELPH HUMBER WEBSITE:

Course Title:
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Credits:
Course Website (If applicable):

Nate Notwell
nate.notwell@guelphhumber.ca
416-798-1331
416-798-2905
GH 208
Tuesdays 3:00pm 4:00pm
George Bragues
george.bragues@guelphhumber.ca; Ext. 6049
Rebecca Johnston
rebecca.johnston@guelphhumber.ca; Ext. 6089
www.guelphhumber.ca

Consumer Behaviour
BADM 1040 Marketing
None
0.50
http://www.onlineguelphhumber.ca/

Calendar Description:
Consumer Behaviour provides an overall examination of the economic, social, cultural and
psychological factors that affect consumers in the marketplace. The course examines the
consumer from two perspectives first, the effects of internal forces on an individual including
perceptions, motivations, lifestyles and attitudes, then second, the effects of external factors as a
group member considering family and group influences, including age, gender, social class,
social, religious, regional, household and other sub-cultural and cultural influences.

Course Learning Outcomes


On completion of this course the student will be able to:
1.

Describe the key elements and responses involved in the interaction between marketing
activities and consumer behaviour.

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Revised August 7, 2009

2.

Analyze target markets to identify how individual consumers will apply perceptions,
memory, motivation, values, sense of self-worth, lifestyle and other attitudes to a
purchasing situation.

3.

Describe and analyze a purchasing situation to forecast likely consumer behaviour.

4.

Investigate and analyze purchase decisions to identify group, opinion leadership, and
family decision making influences affecting the target consumer.

5.

Identify and prioritize the key issues for income, social class, ethnic, regional and age
subcultural groups in target markets.

6.

Define other cultural influences on consumer behaviour.

7.

Add to a personal portfolio by documenting competencies developed throughout this


course

Learning Resources
Required Textbook(s):
Title:
Author:
Edition:
*ISBN:
Publisher:

Consumer Behaviour
Leon G. Schiffman, Leslie Lazar Kanuk, Mallika Das
Canadian Edition
9780131463042
Pearson Prentice Hall

Course Schedule
Week
1

Topic
Introduction

Reading
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3

Research Methods
Motivation And Involvement

Personality, Self-Image And Lifestyle


Quiz #1 Material Chapters 2 & 3

Chapter 4

Consumer Perception

Chapter 5

Consumer Learning
Quiz #2 Material Chapter 5

Chapter 6

4
5
6
7

Midterm Exam
Consumer Attitude and Change

Chapter 7

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Revised August 7, 2009

10

11

12

Influence of Culture
Social Class
Quiz #3 Material Chapter 7

Chapter 9
Chapter 11

Consumer Decision-Making

Chapter 14

Post-purchase Evaluation and


Cognitive Dissonance
Quiz #4 Material Chapter 14

Chapter 15

Reference Group, Influence & Innovation

Chapter 12
Chapter 13

Group Presentations and


Discussion
Written component of Group Project Due

13

Group Presentations and


Discussion

TBA

Final Exam

Evaluation and Due Dates


Students will be evaluated in this course through:

Exams 60%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

30%

In-Class Quizzes & Cases 10%


Group Project 30%

Presentation

15%

Paper

15%
Total 100%

Note: Appropriate medical or compassionate documentation is required to receive academic


consideration for being unable to meet the due dates for the case reports or for being unable to
attend the midterm or the final. Without such documentation, you will be assigned a grade of
zero for the applicable evaluation piece.
Midterm Exam and Final Exam
The midterm exam will include multiple choice questions and short answer questions.
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Revised August 7, 2009

Even though the final exam covers the entire course, major emphasis will be on material since
the mid-term.
Note: Appropriate medical or compassionate documentation is required to receive academic
consideration for being unable to take the mid-term at the designed time, and you must notify the
professor at least one day in advance that you will be unable to attend. Students desiring
consideration for a missed final exam must apply for Academic Consideration with the
Registration Office.
In-Class Quizzes & Cases
There will be a total of four in-class quizzes and case studies undertaken throughout the course
of the semester. Theses activities will consist of both individual and group based tasks.
Group Projects
Students will work in groups to undertake a major integrative project analyzing the consumer
behaviour principles underlying a current product or brand and present their findings in the class.
The Group Presentations will commence in Week 12 and the written component of the
assignment is due that day as well.
Groups of 4 or 5 should be formed by the end of the second week. Groups should schedule a
meeting with the instructor by the 5th week to seek approval for their final presentation project.
Each group is responsible for submitting a formal write-up of their group project, which will be
graded by the instructor. The details of group projects will be provided in class.
** Peer Evaluation
You will have the opportunity to evaluate your group members contribution to the group
work at the end of semester. This also means that your contribution will be evaluated by
your peers. If it turns out that your contribution is substantially lower than your peers,
you may not receive full credit for group work. If you have difficulty working with your
group members during the semester, you are encouraged to meet the instructor in person
in office hours. (Do not use email for this purpose.)
NOTE: The University of Guelph-Humber Undergraduate Calendar states:
Students need to remain aware that instructors have access to and the right to use electronic and
other means of detection
Accordingly, instructors may decide to use originality checking services, such as Turnitin.com,
to ensure that submitted work conforms with the universitys Academic Misconduct policy.
Students will be notified of such a requirement in advance by the instructor. More information on
Academic Misconduct is included below in this outline.

Drop Box Policy

If late submissions are permitted by the late policy of this course outline, such
assignments submitted after the due date must be electronically date stamped and placed
in the secure assignment drop box, located on the second floor in the Learning Commons.

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Revised August 7, 2009

Peer Evaluation Form BADM*2020


(Fall 2008)

RATING
Suppose your efforts in the term project are worth 100 points. A colleague of yours
who put in twice as much effort than you should be assigned 200 points. On the
other hand, a colleague who put in only half as much effort as you did would be 50
points. Use other numbers to indicate level of efforts that each group number put in
for the final term project. Please take into account both the quality and quantity of
effort in adjusting marks for yourself and other group members.
GROUP MEMBERS
1

(Yourself)__________________________

POINTS
100

2
3
4
5
6
NOTE:

This evaluation will be held in strictest confidence - only the course


instructor will review it.

COMMENTS: Please explain reasons for any significant differences in marks


given to yourself or other group members in the space below and, if
necessary, on the back of this sheet.

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Revised August 7, 2009

Academic Policies
Important University of Guelph-Humber Academic Regulations
Academic Integrity / Academic Honesty
Academic misconduct is behaviour that erodes the basis of mutual trust on which scholarly
exchanges commonly rest, undermines the University's exercise of its responsibility to evaluate
students' academic achievements, or restricts the University's ability to accomplish its learning
objectives.
The University takes a serious view of academic misconduct and will severely penalize students,
faculty and staff who are found guilty of offences associated with misappropriation of others'
work, misrepresentation of personal performance and fraud, improper access to scholarly
resources, and obstructing others in pursuit of their academic endeavours. In addition to this
policy, the University has adopted a number of policies that govern such offences, including the
policies on Misconduct in Research and Scholarship and the Student Rights and Responsibilities
regulations. These policies will be strictly enforced.
It is the responsibility of the University, its faculty, students and staff to be aware of what
constitutes academic misconduct and to do as much as possible through establishment and use of
policies and preventive procedures to limit the likelihood of offences occurring. Furthermore,
individual members of the University community have the specific responsibility of initiating
appropriate action in all instances where academic misconduct is believed to have taken place.
This responsibility includes reporting such offences when they occur and making one's
disapproval of such behaviour obvious.
University of Guelph-Humber students have the responsibility of abiding by the University's
policy on academic misconduct regardless of their location of study; faculty, staff and students
have the responsibility of supporting an environment that discourages misconduct. Students
should also be aware that if they find their academic performance affected by medical,
psychological or compassionate circumstances, they should inform the appropriate individuals,
(instructors, Program Advisor) and follow the available procedures for academic consideration
outlined in the University's calendar.
Students are encouraged to review the policy in the 2007-2008 Academic Calendar at:
http://www.uoguelph.ca/registrar/calendars/guelphhumber/current/c07/c07-amisconduct.shtml

Grading Procedures
Feedback to students on work completed or in progress is an integral part of teaching and
learning in that it allows students to measure their understanding of material and their progress
toward achieving learning objectives. Feedback often goes beyond grading and should be an
indication of the standard a student has achieved and should to include comments on the
particular strengths and weaknesses of a students performance. While the nature and frequency
of such feedback will vary with the course, the University of Guelph-Humber is committed to
providing students with appropriate and timely feedback on their work. Faculty members are
urged to provide meaningful feedback (approximately 20% of the total course evaluation is the
Page 6 of 8

Revised August 7, 2009

th

standard), prior to the 40 class day. This is the last day that students are permitted to drop classes
without incurring any academic penalties.
Missed Final Exams / Deferred Privileges
When students do not write a required final examination, complete a final assignment, or
complete a work term report prior to the last class date, they must request Academic
Consideration to be considered for a deferred privilege. When granted, a deferred privilege
allows a student the opportunity to complete the final course requirements after the end of the
semester, but during established timelines.
Please note that faculty members do not grant deferred privileges. Faculty can only grant
academic consideration for work that is due during the semester and cannot grant extensions
beyond their deadline for submission of final grades.
The nature of the deferred privilege may take the form of either a deferred condition or a
deferred examination. The Admissions and Academic Review Sub-Committee grants deferred
privileges on the basis of medical, psychological or compassionate consideration. Please see
your Admission and Program advisor for details.
Accommodation Procedures
Students will identify themselves to Services for Students with Disabilities and, where required,
provide appropriate documentation of their need. Where appropriate, students will inform
individual instructors of their disabilities and academic accommodations required, by distributing
the "SSD Memo to Faculty".
When students require test accommodations, they will:
Remind instructors at least one week in advance of each test or as soon as possible, that they
require test accommodations
Book the test date and time in the SSD office or make the appropriate arrangements to write
in the Test Centre at least one week in advance of each test, or as soon as possible.
Students with special needs are accommodated through Humber ITAL Services for Students with
Disabilities. Students should make themselves familiar with the policies relating to special
accommodations by visiting the website at:
http://studentservices.humberc.on.ca/ssd/pnp/fac_resp.htm.
It is the students responsibility to be familiar with the Universitys policies and Academic
Regulations. These policies can be found at:
http://www.guelphhumber.ca/cstudents/policies/index.shtml

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