Sie sind auf Seite 1von 67

EstesEstes ParkPark

Estes Estes Park Park Vacation Edition & Dining Guide Inside! Estes Park Estes Park © Copyright
Vacation Edition
Vacation Edition
& Dining Guide Inside!
& Dining Guide
Inside!
Estes Park Estes Park © Copyright 2010 Estes Park Trail-Gazette · Estes Park, Colorado ©
Estes Park
Estes Park
© Copyright 2010 Estes Park Trail-Gazette · Estes Park, Colorado
© C
i
h
E
P
k T
il G
E
P
k
C
l
EsEEEEEEEssssssstettttteeeeesssssss PPPPPPPPaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrkkkkkkkkk Estes Park Vacation DiningGuide
EsEEEEEEEssssssstettttteeeeesssssss PPPPPPPPaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrkkkkkkkkk
Estes Park
Vacation
DiningGuide
Inside! Edition
Vacation Edition
Estes Park
Estes Park
© © Copypyrrightrigght Copyright 202020201010 2010 EsEsEstesEstestestes Estes ParkParkParkParkkk Park TrT Trail-Gazette·Estes ail-Gazettail- azette · Estes Park, Park, ColoradoColorado Colorado
Page
35
In I
this issue:
Page
37
Publisher
Bill Ferguson
Visitor Center
RMNP
Winter Festival
Shuttle Service
Overlook Hike
Rooftop Rodeo
Butterfly
Trail Ridge
Shining Mountains
Mid Summer Festival
Wild Flowers
Wildlife
Marina
Birds
To wn Tr ails
Page
2
Page
38
Page
3
Page
39
Page
7
Page
42
Vacation Edition Editor
John Cordsen
Page
8
Page
43
Page
9
Page
46
Page
10
Page
48
Contributing Writers and
Photographers
Walt Hester
Juley Harvey
Madeline Framson
Lisa Foster
Page
11
Page
50
Page 12
Page
52
Page
14
Page
53
Page
18
Page
19
Page
22
Page
25
Advertising Staff
Mike O'Flaherty
Karen Anderson
Page
27
Golf
Scots Fest
Knapps Knob
Observatory
Dog Park
Place Names
Back Country
Summer Events
Fishing
Climbs
Cub Lake
Planning
Day Trips
In Focus
Horse Shows
Advertising Index
Page
54
Page
56
Page
58
Page
61
Page
64
Pag e
3 0

Bookkeeper

Leslie Dawson

Circulation Manager Debbie Holmes

Press Liaison

Ron McFate

Single Copy Distribution Jerry Kartawidjaja

The Vacation Edition is an annual publication of the Estes Park Trail-Gazette, a twice-weekly newspaper. The Vacation Edition is published in May. Offices: 251 Moraine Ave. Mailing address:

P.O. Box 1707, Estes Park, CO 8051 7. Te lepho ne: (970 ) 5 86- 3356. Fax (970) 586-9532. Web site: www.eptrail.com. (c) 2010

On the Cover: Aspen line Bear Lake. Longs Peak and the Keyboard of Winds can be seen in the background.

Page 1: A sandstone marker on Hwy. 36 welcomes visitors to Estes Park.

Special to the Trail-Gazette

T he majestic scenery of Rocky Mountain National Park combined with the home town

hospitality of Estes Park transforms a trip to the Colorado Rockies into a dream vacation in a corner of paradise. Whether coming for a day, a week, or more, visiting this eastern gateway community to Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, at 7,522 feet above sea level is an experience you'll remember forever. With world class hiking and climb- ing, fishing, golfing, sightseeing, wildlife watching, galleries, unique shopping, an array of dining choic- es, options in lodging to meet every taste, and Rocky Mountain National Park out the back door, there's something in Estes Park just for you.

First Stop

The Estes Park Visitor Center

Special events in Estes Park and summer-long free outdoor enter- tainment are set amidst the back- drop of Rocky Mountain National Park. Hear folk musicians entertain, listen to a string quartet perform, or tap your toes to a big band play- ing favorites. Beginning with Jazz Fest held each May and continuing through the holiday season's "Catch the Glow' Christmas celebration, there are special events in Estes Park that will keep you coming back for more. Here, you can be adventurous all on your own. But when you want advice or assistance, the Estes Park Visitor Center, operated by the Estes Park Convention and Visitors Bureau, is a perfect place to stop.

Located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 34 and 36, the Center provides information about every business in Estes Park and things to do in the area. When it comes to providing com- plete visitor services, the one com- ponent of excellence that sets Estes Park apart from other areas is the contingent of about 65 volunteers who donate their expertise and time to helping visitors have an outstand- ing vacation experience in this area. Individual Ambassadors work on a rotating basis at the informa- tion desk in the Visitor Center daily during the summer season and on weekends from October through late May. Ambassadors answer questions about where to hike, drive, shop,

eat and stay in the Estes Park area. They provide answers to common questions like "where's a good place for me to hike?" to more uncommon questions that deal with everything from genealogy to botanical knowl- edge. Staff provides additional expertise in planning group gather- ings from weddings and reunions to business meetings. The Estes Park Visitor Center is open daily except New Years Day, Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Visitor Center Summer Hours •9a.m. to 8 p.m. daily

• Location: 500 Big Thompson

Ave. at the intersection of U.S. High- ways 34 and 36.

• Telephone: 970-577-9900 or

800-44-ESTES

• Website: www.EstesParkCVB.com

34 and 36. • Telephone: 970-577-9900 or 800-44-ESTES • Website: www.EstesParkCVB.com 2—2 010 Trail Vacation Edition

2—2010 Trail Vacation Edition

The Jewel of the Rockies

Photo by Walt Hester

Longs Peak is an iconic landmark in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Peak is an iconic landmark in Rocky Mountain National Park. GET YO UR PHOTOS PR OCESSED
GET YO UR PHOTOS PR OCESSED BEFORE YO U L EA VE !
GET
YO UR
PHOTOS
PR
OCESSED
BEFORE
YO U
L EA VE !
We are a full- service camera store, and we carry a full line of products
We are a full-
service camera
store, and we
carry a full line
of products for
professional &
amateur
photographers.
101 West

Elkhorn

Avenue

Estes Park

586-8522

PRODUCTS • Digital Cameras • Lenses • Memory Cards • Batteries • Tripods SERVICES
PRODUCTS
• Digital Cameras
• Lenses
• Memory Cards
• Batteries
• Tripods
SERVICES

• C D/DVD Transfers

• Digital Photo Printing

• Enlargements

• Vacation Photo Books

• Souvenir Mats

• Much more

On the corner of Moraine and Elkhorn 9am to 7pm daily • www.western1-hourphoto.com

RMNP's popularity attracts millions

Trail-Gazette

R ocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) offers 415 square miles of dynamic landscape featur-

ing lowland meadows, numerous lakes and rivers, aspen and subalpine forests, (alpine tundra) and towering mountain peaks. Over 250,000 acres of backcoun- try in the park were granted wilderness area status early in 2009 with the passage of the Omnibus Public Land Manage- ment Act of 2009. This culminated a process that began in 1974 when wilder- ness recommendation for the park was made by the National Park Service under President Nixon. All of these aspects of RMNP create an unparalleled outdoor playground where the possibilities are endless. Visitors hike its 360 miles of trails, watch herds of elk, fish for trout in its many streams and lakes, camp underneath its vast starry mountain skies or climb its epic granite rock walls. Nearly three million people visit RMNP each year, making it one of the most popular national parks in the country. Maps and brochures can be

obtained at any of the RMNP visitor cen- ters. For general information call RMNP HQ (the park's Information office) at (970) 586-1206 or visit the park's official website www.nps.gov/romo.

Visitor Centers

RMNP has four visitor centers where guests can see nature exhibits, purchase RMNP books, buy gifts , view topo- graphical maps of the park, and ask the park rangers questions. Restrooms are available at the centers.

Alpine Visitor Center Located at Fall River Pass at the junc- tion of Trail Ridge and Old Fall River roads the Alpine Visitor Center is open depending on weather and Trail Ridge Road conditions. It is closed in the winter.

Beaver Meadows Visitor Center Located on U.S. Hwy. 36, three miles from the town of Estes Park.

Fall River Visitor Center Located on U.S. Hwy. 34, five miles See Rocky: Page 4

CELEBRATINGCELEBRATING Opening Day May 29, 2010 5555 YEARSYEARS AERIALAERIALTRAMWAYTRAMWAY • PICNIC AREAS •
CELEBRATINGCELEBRATING
Opening Day
May 29, 2010
5555 YEARSYEARS
AERIALAERIALTRAMWAYTRAMWAY
• PICNIC AREAS
• HIKING TRAILS
• COFFEE SHOP
• GIFT SHOPS
Open 9 a.m. Daily
Ride to the top of Prospect Mountain
View Rocky Mountain National Park, the Continental Divide and Longs Peak!
420 E. Riverside Dr. • Estes Park • 586-3675
www.estestram.com
(Children under 5 ride FREE with Parent)

Rocky from page 3

Rocky from page 3 The elk her d is a popular tourist draw in Rocky Mountain

The elk herd is a popular tourist draw in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Photo by Walt Hester

The animals that live in RMNP are wild. Park visitors could potentially pose a threat to their natural habitat, and in turn the animals could harm visitors. To avoid conflict, do not feed any wildlife in the park because they can become dependent on human food, lose the ability to hunt, and possibly die.

west of the town of Estes Park, near the Fall River Entrance to the Park.

Kawuneeche Visitor Center Located one mile north of the town of Grand Lake on U.S. Hwy. 34 at the west entrance to the park

Fees and Passes

Automobile: $20 — Valid for seven consecutive days, including date of purchase. Pedestrians, bicycles, motorcycles and mopeds: $10 per person, not to exceed $20 per vehicle. Valid for seven consecu- tive days including date of purchase. Available at all Rocky Mountain National Park entrance stations. Rocky Mountain National Park An- nual Pass —A$40 pass which provides unlimited entry to this park for one year from the date of purchase. Available at all Rocky Mountain National Park entrance stations or with a credit card at

970-586-1438.

Rocky Mountain National Park/ Arapaho National Recreation Area An- nual Pass —A$50 pass which provides unlimited entry to to both areas for one year from the date of purchase. Avail- able at all Rocky Mountain National Park and Arapaho National Recreation Area entrance stations. The National Park Service is a partici- pant in the new Interagency Pass Pro- gram, which was created by the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act and authorized by Congress in December 2004. The America the Beautiful - Na- tional Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass —A$80 pass created by the Federal Lands Recreation Enhance- ment Act provides access to, and use of federal recreation sites managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture — Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Reclama- tion that charge an entrance or standard amenity fee for a year, beginning from the date of sale.

Fishing

Fishing is allowed in designated areas in the Park. A valid fishing license is required. Some areas are catch-and-

See Rocky: Page 6

The Village Goldsmith, Inc.

The Estes Park Bracelet The Estes Park Ring

Exclusive to The Village Goldsmith, Inc.

Exquisite Diamonds Exciting Colored Gems

Exceptional Designs Handcrafted Artistry Since 1976

www.villagegoldsmith.com • 970-586-5659 • 235 West Elkhorn Avenue

4—2010 Trail Vacation Edition

all designs copyrighted

2010 Trail Vacation Edition — 5

Rocky from page 4

Rocky from page 4 Photo by Wa lt Hester Bighor n s heep ar e a

Photo by Walt Hester

Bighorn sheep are among the many species of wildlife to call Rocky Mountain National Park home.

release some are catch-and-keep. Obtain a fishing brochure at any visitor center. however, regulations vary from place to place. Observe postings carefully.

Hunting

Not allowed in RMNP.

Hiking

Getting out of your car and hiking the 360 miles of trails is the best way to explore RMNP. Popular trails range from the easy and handicapped accessible paths around Bear Lake, Lily Lake, and Sprague Lake. More ambitious climbs up

L ily Lake , a nd Sprague Lake . M ore ambitious climb s up Photo

Photo by Walt Hester

A visitor looks for just the right angle for a shot of the Mummy Range from Many Parks Curve on Trail Ridge Road.

the fabled Longs Peak are also available for hikers. For a comprehensive analysis of the many hikes and climbs that RMNP has to offer speak with rangers at any park visitor center to learn more about the park's trails and investigate the numerous hiking guides available in visi- tor center bookstores and retail outlets throughout the area.

Wildlife

The animals that live in RMNP are wild. Park visitors could potentially pose a threat to their natural habitat, and in turn the animals could harm visitors. To

avoid conflict, do not feed any wildlife in the park because they can become de- pendent on human food, lose the ability to hunt, and possibly die. Animals can also kick, bite, or gore you. They can also carry diseases such as rabies and bubonic plague, which can be transmitted to humans. Photograph all wildlife from the safety of your vehicle or from the roadside. Never approach wildlife. Enjoy from a safe distance.

Pets

Pets are not allowed on any trails or

meadow areas.Aleashed pet may be walked in campgrounds, picnic areas, and along roadsides. Never leave your pet unattended inavehicle. Kennels are available in Estes Park and other sur- rounding communities.

Leave No Trace

In order to preserve the pristine beauty of RMNP's natural landscape it is important for visitors to adhere to the Leave No Trace outdoor principles. For more information, contact www.lnt.org.

principles . F or more information, contact www.lnt.org. sw immi ng - t ennis - b

swimming - tennis - boat rentals - bike rentals - 9 hole golf - 18 hole golf - skate park - playgrounds - picnics

- 18 h ole go lf - skate park - p la ygr ounds - p

The Estes Valley Recreation and Park District offers a wide range of activities as well as picnic areas and parks. Come join us for some indoor and outdoor fun!

Contact Info:

Lake Estes Marina - 970.586.2011 Aquatic Center - 970.586.2340 9-hole golf - 970.586.8176 18 hole golf - 970.586.8146 Driving Range/Full Service Restaurant - 970.586.8146 Recreation District Office - 970.586.8191 Visit us online at www.estesvalleyrecreation.com

st rict Of fice - 970.586.8191 Vi si t us o nline at ww w.es tesvalle
st rict Of fice - 970.586.8191 Vi si t us o nline at ww w.es tesvalle

6—2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Visitors pack the Winter Fest tent in Bond Park. Mild weather, flavorful chili and local beer and wine seemed to be the perfect weekend storm for the Winter Fest.

First annual fest held in January By Walt Hester Trail-Gazette E stes Park saw the
First annual fest held in January
By Walt Hester
Trail-Gazette
E stes Park saw the beginning of what should be a long winter
tradition in January 2010. The first Winter Festival kicked off on
a Friday with beer and wine tasting, chili cook-offs and activities
all over town and in the national park.
The center of the weekend fun was the heated big tent in Bond Park.
Saturday saw a crush of chili enthusiasts for the cook-off sanctioned
by the Chili Appreciation Society International. Chili cooks from all
over Colorado came to compete in the red and green chili categories.
On Sunday, local restaurants were invited to show what they could
do with a chili pot. If the chili was too hot, local and regional beer and
wine makers were also on hand. Several acts entertained the crowds, as
they circulated the tent on both Saturday and Sunday. Outside the tent,
children were entertained by snow painting, games, a scavenger hunt
and the whole family had the chance to enjoy carriage rides.
Here is a small sample of images from the first Winter Festival.
Kirsten Greenwalt and
mom, Kelly, pet the
horses of the Te nder
Grass Carriages at the
2010 Winter Fest. The
festival offered carriage
rides, photo tours,
activities at both the
Aquatic Center and the
observatory, on top of
the food and drink in
Bond Park.

Winter Fest: a new tradition

food and drink in Bond Park. Winter Fest: a new tradition 1109 Brook Drive $315,0 00
food and drink in Bond Park. Winter Fest: a new tradition 1109 Brook Drive $315,0 00
food and drink in Bond Park. Winter Fest: a new tradition 1109 Brook Drive $315,0 00
food and drink in Bond Park. Winter Fest: a new tradition 1109 Brook Drive $315,0 00

1109 Brook Drive

$315,000

Remodeled-Move in Ready

1109 Brook Drive $315,0 00 Re modeled-Move in Re ady Wild Basin Area $675,0 00. www.GregFalconer.com

Wild Basin Area

$675,000.

www.GregFalconer.com

in Re ady Wild Basin Area $675,0 00. www.GregFalconer.com 1561 St Moritz Tr ail $625,0 00

1561 St Moritz Trail

$625,000

www.windcliff.com

1561 St Moritz Tr ail $625,0 00 www.windclif f. com 2292 Hwy 34, River Cabin $325,0

2292 Hwy 34, River Cabin

$325,000

www.CabinOnRiver.info

Tour all Estes Park Listings at www.WeSellEstesPark.com 1200 Graves Ave. Estes Park, CO 80517

(970) 586-5324 • 1-800-827-8780 (24 Hours)

Realtors: Peggy Lynch•Helene Ault • Greg Falconer • George Leonard

Estes Park Condos

Grumpy Gringo

Best Western

Stanley Hotel Village

Rodeway Inn

Marina

Budget Host

Campground

Lower Stanley

KOA Estes

Barlow Plaza

Ride-A-Kart

Lake

Boulder Brook

Barlow Plaza

Elk Meadow Lodge & RV Park

Do the Estes Park shuffle use the shopper shuttle

Service begins in June

Fall River Visitor Center

Shuttle leaves the Visitor Center every half hour between 10am and 6:30pm and then again
Shuttle leaves the Visitor Center every half hour between
10am and 6:30pm and then again at 7:30pm and 8:30pm.
National Park Village
Alpine Trail Ridge Inn
Stonebrook Resort
Nicky’s Resort
4 Seasons on Fall River
Worldmark
Mrs. Walsh’s Garden
Grubsteak
Mountain Traders Rocky Mountain TradersRocky
Town Hall
Barlow Plaza
euarSqcadillyPi

McGregor Mountain Lodge

Timber Creek Chalets

McGr egor Mo untain Lo dge Ti mber Cr eek Ch alets Beav er Me ado

Beaver Meadows Visitor Center

Estes Park Campground YMCA
Estes Park Campground
YMCA
Rockmont Cottages Glacier Lodge
Rockmont Cottages
Glacier Lodge

Mary ’s Lake Campground

Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L
Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L
Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L
Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L
Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L
Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L
Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L
Cottages Glacier Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L

Mary ’s Lake Lodge

Lodge Mary ’s Lak e C ampg ro und Mary ’s Lak e L odge Shuttle
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then

Shuttle leaves the Visitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then again at 8pm.

Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then again
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then again
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then again
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then again
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then again
Shuttle leaves the Vi sitor Center every half hour between 10am and 7pm and then again

Shopper shuttles begin their route at the Visitor Center

Trail-Gazette

F ree shuttles from the Estes Park Visitor Center to nearly 40 stops in Estes Park begin operating June

26. Riders may get on or off the shuttles

at any stop designated on the map. Operating times vary for each shuttle

8—2010 Trail Vacation Edition

and by the time of day. Please check connecting times, so you don't miss the bus.

Dates of operation: Daily June 26 through Aug. 29; then Sept. 4-6

Red and Blue Routes: First shuttles

of the day leave the Estes Park Visitor Center at 10 a.m.; shuttles travel each route every half hour until 7 p.m. From 7— 9 p.m., only one shuttle bus will service both routes, alternating between the blue and red routes. The shuttle leaves the Visitor Center to travel the blue route at 7 p.m. and 8 p.m.; the shuttle leaves the Visitor Center to travel the red route at 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.

Brown Route: First shuttle of the day leaves the Estes Park Visitor Center at 10

a.m.; last shuttle leaves the Estes Park Visitors Center at7p.m. and completes the route by 8 p.m.

For more information on Free Visitor Shuttles, call (970) 577-9900.

Hike to Emerald Lake Overlook on the Flattop Mountain Trail
Hike to Emerald Lake Overlook on
the Flattop Mountain Trail

Lisa Foster courtesy photo

Quinn Brett and Karla Mosier Dubois enjoy the far-reaching views from the Emerald Lake Overlook.

By Lisa Foster Trail-Gazette

T he Emerald Lake Overlook is a point on the popular Flattop Mountain Trail that offers a

dizzying view of one of Rocky Mountain National Park's most beautiful alpine tarns. The overlook also provides remarkable vistas of Longs Peak and the other striking mountains that form the central area of RMNP. Emerald Lake lies a stunning 1,250 vertical feet below the overlook, nestled in a rocky amphitheater at the eastern edge of beautiful Tyndall Gorge.

The trailhead

The trailhead at Bear Lake lies at 9,450 feet and provides access to the Flattop Mountain Trail. From the RMNP Beaver Meadows Visitor Center on US 36, drive west for 1.1 miles to the Beaver Meadows Entrance Station. Pass the kiosk and continue for 0.2 mile to Bear Lake Road. Turn south (left) and drive for 9.2 miles to the huge Bear Lake parking lot. Bear Lake and the trailhead lie 100 yards west of the lot.

Grandiose views of the striking north face of Hallett Peak, McHenry's Notch, and Longs Peak, as well as the impressive view of Emerald Lake below highlight this gorgeous spot.

EMERALD LAKE OVERLOOK

Trailhead: Bear Lake

Distance From Trailhead

(One Way): 2.5 Miles

Altitude:11,350 feet

Elevation Gain: 1,900 feet

Rating: Strenuous

The hike

The Flattop Mountain Trail is one of the most popular trails in RMNP. This well-maintained trail leads to both Dream Lake Overlook and Emerald Lake Overlook before continuing on to majestic Flattop Mountain (12,324 feet) and then to the Continental Divide. From Bear Lake, follow the Flattop Mountain Trail for 0.4 mile to the junction with the trail to Bierstadt Lake. Turn west (left) and climb along the Flattop Mountain Trail as it rises above

Bear Lake, offering spectacular views of Glacier Gorge and Longs Peak. Continue west on the Flattop Mountain Trail for 0.5 mile to the junction with the Fern- Odessa Trail. All of these junctions are well marked with National Park Service signs. Turn south (left) at the fork, following the Flattop Mountain Trail as it climbs through the forest at a moderate grade to Dream Lake overlook. Located in the crook of a switchback along the trail, this viewpoint gives a birds-eye view of Dream Lake, hundreds of feet below.

The trail continues and climbs through stunted trees near timberline. Above treeline, the terrain changes to open, rocky tundra. The trail leads along sweeping switchbacks and reaches the northern rim of Tyndall Gorge at the Emerald Lake Overlook. Grandiose views of the striking north face of Hallett Peak, McHenry's Notch, and Longs Peak, as well as the impressive view of Emerald Lake below highlight this gorgeous spot. The steep drop from the trail down to the bottom of Tyndall Gorge lends a sens of vertigo to the scene and illustrates the immensity the surrounding landscape. From this point, the Flattop Mountain Trail continues to zigzag westward through rocky tundra, providing incredible views of the surrounding mountains and valleys, to the relatively flat area of Flattop Mountain's summit.

Lisa is the author of the highly acclaimed book, Rocky Mountain National Park, The Complete Hiking Guide, available at stores throughout Estes Park, and on the internet at Amazon.com. Contact her at lisahikes@ hotmail.com.

Photos by Walt Hester

Rooftop Rodeo: one ofthe best

Photos by Wa lt Hester Rooftop Rodeo: one ofthe best T he 84th edition of the

T he 84th edition of the Rooftop

Park at the newly renovated

Rodeo kicks off July 6-11 in Estes

grandstands. Including the 2009 season, the rodeo has won the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association nod as the best small rodeo of the year four out of the past seven years.

Walt Hester,Trail-Gazette

small rodeo of the year four out of the past seven years. Walt Hester,Trail-G azette 10
small rodeo of the year four out of the past seven years. Walt Hester,Trail-G azette 10

10 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

small rodeo of the year four out of the past seven years. Walt Hester,Trail-G azette 10
small rodeo of the year four out of the past seven years. Walt Hester,Trail-G azette 10
small rodeo of the year four out of the past seven years. Walt Hester,Trail-G azette 10
Butterfly project helps biodiversity Compiled by Juley Harvey and Jan Kilgo re Tr ail-Gazette R

Butterfly project helps biodiversity

Compiled by Juley Harvey and Jan Kilgore Trail-Gazette

R ocky Mountain National Park protects some of Colorado's highest mountains and most

on a weekly basis along transects in various park habitats and has identified 125 butterfly species in the park. Biologists believe that trends in butterfly populations may provide early warning of the impacts of global warming on the park's flora and fauna. The Rocky Mountain National Park Butterfly Project is a biodiversity study designed to provide a baseline of data on butterflies. Butterflies are highly visible, as well as sensitive to ecological changes throughout all stages of their life cycle, from egg, caterpillar and chrysalis to adult. The project began in 1996 and will continue through 2011, providing a 15-year study and database of all the information collected on the butterflies, when they visit the park and weather and environmental conditions during See Butterfly: Page 24

biologically rich mountain forest, meadow and tundra habitats in its more than one-quarter-million acres. Butterflies
biologically rich mountain forest,
meadow and tundra habitats in its
more than one-quarter-million acres.
Butterflies flutter here, among the
pollinating insects found in late June
and on sunny days, feeding from the
many wildflowers, creating a moving
stained-glass-window effect. More than
100 species of butterflies have been
observed in Rocky Mountain National
Park. You don't need a net; they're all
around.
The Rocky Mountain Butterfly Project,
aided by volunteers and field assistants,
has monitored butterfly populations
A
in

swallow tail tigerstripe butterfly lights on flowers in a small, backyard garden

Glen Haven. Butterflies, bees and even small birds help germinate flowers.

Ken Scott Signed Metal Sculptures Stop In Today And Explore! American Art Glass, Craftsman Pottery,
Ken Scott
Signed Metal Sculptures
Stop In Today And Explore!
American Art Glass, Craftsman Pottery, Jewelry
And other accessories for the Home.
239 W. Elkhorn Next to the Waterwheel
970-586-5523
Open Daily 10a.m. to 9p.m.

20-50115

20-18900 Photos by Sandi “You Pick The Spot, I’ll Take The Shot” 304 East Elkhorn
20-18900
Photos by Sandi
“You Pick The Spot, I’ll Take The Shot”
304 East Elkhorn
Behind Range Realty
Certified to photograph
in Rocky Mountain
National Park
FAMILY PORTRAITS
PHOTO TOURS
REUNIONS
PHOTO GALLERY
COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
GRADS & WEDDINGS
Wildlife & Scenic
(Framed and Unframed)
970-577-8187
Nationally Published Photographer
www.photosbysandi.com
Wildlife Gifts
Unique Frames
Large Format Printing
Printing from Digital
Cards - 4x6 & 5x7
Print your own 4x6 &
5x7 photographs
Slide shows created
from your photos

Colorado's 'Highway

Trail Ridge Road map

Trail Ridge Road spans the Divide

hway Tr ail Ridge Road map Trail Ridge Road spans the Divide 12 — 2 010

12 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Bike rs cruis e d own Tr ail Ridg e R

France, a cyclist can easily reach speeds of 50 mph down Trail Ridge Road.

W hile not as stee p a s t he desc ents in the To ur de

Trail-Gazette

T rail Ridge Road winds gently through some of the most breathtaking scenery in the state. Visitors to the area who are

interested in taking the drive should set aside

a leisurely day, bringacamera, and hop in the

car for a tour on the highest continuous paved road in North America. The highway to the sky covers the 48 miles between Estes Park on Rocky Mountain National Park's (RMNP) east side, and Grand Lake on the west side. Construction of Trail Ridge Road began in the autumn of 1929 and was finished to Fall River Pass in the summer of 1932. The road was built to make up for the old Fall River route, which was too narrow for increasing

motorized traffic, full of hairpin switchbacks, and prone to snow slides. Engineers of the road were mindful of the magnificence of the surrounding landscape and were cautious that the road wouldn't interfere with the vistas around them. When possible, the rocks that were blasted during the road's construction were used to build retaining walls. The maximum grade on the road does not exceed seven percent, and eight miles of the road is 11,000 feet above sea level. At its highest point, Trail Ridge Road peaks at a dizzying 12,183 feet in elevation. Motorists venturing out from either Estes Park or Grand Lake climb around 4,000 feet in elevation in

a few minutes, beginning in montane forests

of aspen and pine before entering sub alpine

There are around 200 species of fragile, tiny alpine plants that hug the earth beside the road. Their growing season may only last 40 days.

forests of fir and spruce. Motorists tend to try and reach timberline quickly. Slow down and take your time, enjoying all the climate zones along the journey. When you reach timberline, the last of the trees are twisted and stunted against the tundra. Some animals that motorists might encounter along the way include the bighorn sheep, elk, pikas, marmots, moose (mostly on the west side of RMNP), and ptarmigans. Plant life is diverse, despite what appears to be incredibly hostile conditions here for most of the year. There are around 200 species of fragile, tiny alpine plants that hug the earth beside the road. Their growing season may only last 40 days, but the little plants bloom in great sweeps of yellow, red, pink, blue, and violet. The Tundra World Nature Trail is a fantastic place to see these delicate displays without damaging them;ahalf hour walk begins near the parking lot at Rock Cut. The tundra is an important and fragile environment, and it is strongly recommended that you do not step outside of the designated path or pick flowers. The annual spring plowing of Trail Ridge

totheSky'

Did you know: Plowing Trail Ridge can cost in excess of $36,000 and takes an average of 42 days to accomplish.

of $36,000 and takes an average of 42 days to accomplish. Vi sitor s fl ock

Visitors flock to the viewing deck of the Alpine Visitor Center to look down from more than 11,000 feet. The visitor center sits on Trail Ridge Road where it intersects with the park's first vehicle path, the Old Fall River Road at Fall River Pass.

Road is a Herculean undertaking. Crews generally start plowing in mid-April. Plowing Trail Ridge can cost in excess of $36,000 and takes an average of 42 days to accomplish. The National Park Service keeps their plows in top working order during the plowing by fueling, oiling, and greasing them every morning. A rotary plow, called the 'pioneer rotary' clears the centerline of the road all day, whileasecond rotary widens the road.Agrader and bulldozer then pulls the snow towards the side of the road. Runoff from the snow banks is diverted into drains and ditches. At the end of the day, the equipment is parked at Rainbow Curve to avoid the machinery being stranded by passing storms. Trail Ridge Road closes with the first heavy snowfall of the season and remains closed in the winter, generally reopening on Memorial Day weekend. Nature has a great deal to say about the

scheduling of this road, and it is not uncommon for visitors to drive between six-foot walls of snow even at midsummer. Atop Trail Ridge Road is the Alpine Visitor Center, where motorists can stop and have a snack, purchase souvenirs, and browse exhibits that are staffed with park rangers who are happy to answer questions and share information on this spectacular area. Some things to remember while traveling on Trail Ridge Road:

Bringajacket, even if it is a bright warm day. At the high elevations on Trail Ridge Road, it may be 20 to 30 degrees cooler than the temperatures in Estes Park or Grand Lake. The high elevations may cause altitude sickness in some people. Drink plenty of water. The elevation may also aggravate heart or lung

conditions in some people. Afternoon thunderstorms are common in the mountains in the summer months. It is also very important to be aware of lightning at the high elevations found on Trail Ridge Road. If you see a beautiful scene or wildlife that you would like to look more closely at, be sure to pull safely off the road to stop. Many accidents are caused by people stopping in the center of the road to photograph animals or scenery. Be on the lookout for wildlife on the road or on the sides of the road. Deer and elk on the side of the road may startle and leap in the path of vehicles. Warn oncoming vehicles of wildlife in the road by flashing your headlights at them. Trail Ridge Road is not a toll road, but you must pay the entrance fee at RMNP to travel on the road.

Off the beaten path

The Shining Mountains Group of the Colorado Mountain Club offers hundreds of hikes and other outdoor adventures

By Madeline Framson Trail-Gazette

T he Colorado Mountain Club offers a myriad of year-round opportunities for adventure.

There are a multitude of ways to experience the wilderness inhabited by nature's creatures in the ongoing quest to discover a sense of self. Thus, the Shining Mountains Group of the Colorado Mountain Club welcomes everyone to share in the beguiling mystique of the Rockies. The CMC is the largest and oldest mountaineer organization still existing

See Off: Page 16

mountaineer organization still existing See Off: Page 16 A tre kker takes a bre ak at

A trekker takes a break at Lake Bierstadt.

ARTISANS OF COLORADO 26 Years • jewelry •pottery•woodwork • wind chimes • metal art •
ARTISANS OF COLORADO
26
Years
• jewelry •pottery•woodwork
• wind chimes • metal art
• decorator items and much more
Under
the
Same
Ownership
You will love
our prices!
A
Must-See
“Take home a piece of Colorado from our
UNIQUE gallery or art and crafts”
We also carry gifts from around the world
Shop
222 A E. Elkhorn
970-577-1882
(next to Dairy Queen)
P. O. Box 1923 •Este s P ar k, CO 80517
E-mail: alpacco@peakpeak.com • Toll Free 1-866-386-6660

14 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

• s l a S s u o n r i p s o e
s
l
a
S
s
u
o
n
r
i
p
s
o
e
r
P
A
s
n
e
y
i
r
a
S
s
r
p
e
e
v
i
c
n
n
i
A
a
l
cO
ac
is
o
s
n
e
c
r
o
v
i
D
,
s
y
ExperienceExperience ththee
thethe countrcountrysideyside inin anan
magicmagic ofof floatingfloating overover
openopen wickerwicker basketbasket
a
d
11--887777-AIR-AIR-C-COOLLOO
www.aircolorado.com 1-877-247-2656
h
Longmont Hot Balloon
t
r
i
B
s
t
f
i
G
g
n
i
d
d
e
W
e
3
0
c
ey
sra
n
e
E
i
x
e
r
p

20-18829

ESESTETESS PPARKARK

WITHWITH VAVA LLELLEYY PP RICING!RICING!

P ARK ARK WITH WITH VA VA LLE LLE Y Y P P RICING! RICING! SER

SERSERVICEVICE CENTERCENTER

Y Y P P RICING! RICING! SER SER VICE VICE CENTER CENTER 1.1. 2.2. 3.3. Th
1.1. 2.2. 3.3.
1.1.
2.2.
3.3.

ThThee TTiriree GGuyuyss HHavavee DisDiscocoununtetedd TTiriree PPricriceses

SERSERVICEVICE MOMOSTST RVRVss WEWE FREEFREE BrBrakakee CheckCheck
SERSERVICEVICE
MOMOSTST RVRVss WEWE
FREEFREE
BrBrakakee
CheckCheck

AllAll NeNeww BBigig OO BBrarandnd TiTireress IInclude:nclude:

MounMountingting LifLifetetimeime BaBalanclancee LifLifetetimeime PrPro-Ro-Ratateded WaWarrrranantyty

WeWe DoDo BrBrakakeses Plus:Plus:

SeServrvicicee LuLubbee FuFullll ExprExpresesss
SeServrvicicee
LuLubbee FuFullll
ExprExpresesss
STORE HOURS Appointments Available Summer (May-Dec) 8-5pm Mon-Fri Sat 8-5 Winter (Christmas-April) Mon-Fri 8-5; Sat
STORE HOURS
Appointments Available
Summer (May-Dec)
8-5pm Mon-Fri
Sat 8-5
Winter (Christmas-April)
Mon-Fri 8-5; Sat 8-2

Appointments Available

Wheel Alignment • Shocks/Struts Battery Service • Radiator Service Rack & Pinion • Axles • Suspension • Alternators Starters • Transmission Service Headlights • Belts/Hoses

Coupon Lube, Oil, Filter Special $ 31 99 IMPROVES IMPROVES GAS GAS MILEAGE MILEAGE withCoupon
Coupon
Lube, Oil, Filter
Special
$
31 99
IMPROVES IMPROVES
GAS GAS MILEAGE MILEAGE
withCoupon
Reg. $39.99
Includes up to 5 qts. of premium multi-grade motor oil. Most vehicles. Not valid with other offers. One coupon per customer.

ASK ABOUT OUR “FREE REPLACEMENT” WARRANTY OVER 500 GREAT LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE! BIGOTIRES.COM MORE THAN 50 LOCATIONS IN COLORADO TO SERVE YOU

2480 N LINCOLN LOVELAND (970) 667-6074
2480 N LINCOLN
LOVELAND
(970) 667-6074
TO SERVE YOU 2480 N LINCOLN LOVELAND (970) 667-6074 3714 E LINCOLNWAY CHEYENNE, WY (307) 637-4294

3714 E LINCOLNWAY CHEYENNE, WY (307) 637-4294

1633 RAVEN AVE • ESTES PARK

(970) 586-8085

1506 N COLLEGE FT COLLINS (970) 493-3356

WE’LL BEAT ANY COMPETITOR’S TIRE BID! 4245 S MASON FT COLLINS (970) 223-0415
WE’LL BEAT ANY
COMPETITOR’S
TIRE BID!
4245 S MASON
FT COLLINS
(970) 223-0415

Off from page 14

20-19051

in this part of the country. People in all walks of life and from all 50 states and countries abroad are members of the CMC. The members all believe in courtesy toward each other and nature — that's the true mountain club spirit. Members are generally those who plan to visit and revisit the Rockies and want to participate in the mountaineering activities the club offers. It was natural that the lure of the Colorado Rockies would inspire 25 stalwart individuals, who shared a love of the mountains, to band together and charter the CMC in 1912. The group recognized the need to preserve a unique, pristine treasure. Its first goal was to see Rocky Mountain National Park established —ashining achievement in 1915. The club sponsors trips to all sorts of enchanting vistas. They range from leisurely nature walks in the Estes Valley and Rocky Mountain National Park, to expeditions climbing Mount Everest and the highest peaks of the world. The more than 3,000 recreational opportunities sponsored annually offer a kaleidoscope of outings. Each of the adventures is responsibly led along the sound principles of safety. The locations range from plains and foothills to high alpine lakes and peaks towering more than 14,000 feet. The outings scheduled offer opportunities for anyone's interests and capabilities; from easy to moderate to much more challenging adventures. The dimensions of the CMC are manifold. In addition to hiking and backpacking, add bike touring and mountain biking, technical climbing, canoeing, wilderness trekking, horseback trips, birding and nature walks, llama trips, photography hikes, historic hikes, picnics and socials. In the winter there is Nordic and downhill skiing, snowshoeing, ice climbing, ice skating, technical climbing, winter hiking and more backpacking. Many of the activities include

hiking and more backpacking. Many of the activities include Tr ekkers enjoy the views atop Apache

Trekkers enjoy the views atop Apache Peak in the Indian Peaks Wilder ness area.

interpretations by experts on wildlife, biology, geology, history, flora and fauna and ecosystems. Family trips including children and adults of all ages are very popular. Several events even allow sociable dogs to tag along. Within the club's emphasis upon

safety, the CMC sponsors many schools to help members improve their outdoor skills while having a good time doing it. Socials and potlucks are scheduled throughout the year and the annual dinner in November is always a highlight.

While CMC membership is not required to participate in many of the trips, free literature covering CMC membership, details of the outings, degrees of physical demand, conditioning and qualification information is available by calling

586-6623.

qualification information is available by calling 586-6623. Fur Fur Fur & & & L L L

FurFurFur

&&&

LLLeathereathereather

The Most Impressive Collection of Outerwear in Northern Colorado & Much, Much More!

Men’s & Ladies’ Apparel

Lone Pine Leather • Scully Leather • Remy Leather Motorcycle Wear • Hats • Lady Brighton Belts & Jewelry Leather & Fleece Coats • Fur & Woven Rugs Native American Home Decor & Jewelry • Hides, Pelts & Taxidermy

450 Moraine Ave. Estes Park, CO

970-586-4539

(1/2 mile west of downtown on Highway 36)

www.TheTwistedPine.com

16 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

On Yo ur Way t o Rocky Mountain

National Park

Open Year Round, Serving Estes Park and Its Many Visitors

Estes Park’s Largest Selection of Gifts, Souvenirs, T-Shirts, Lodge Home Accessories Fine Men’s & Women’s Apparel, Collectible Art

586-2776

Ser ving Meals for All Ta stes & Budgets. Plus, Our Lakeside Setting Lets You Relax & Enjoy the Beauty of the Rockies… For Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

586-2171

Full Service, Locally Owned Grocer Easy Access ~ Picnic Supplies Fresh meats & Produce, Boar’s
Full Service, Locally Owned
Grocer Easy Access ~
Picnic Supplies
Fresh meats & Produce,
Boar’s Head Deli
Schmidt’s Bakery
586-2702
Produce, Boar’s Head Deli Schmidt’s Bakery 586-2702 Located at the Corner of Moraine Avenue at Marys

Located at the Corner of Moraine Avenue at Marys Lake Road

Scandinavian

Midsummer

Festival:

celebrating

heritage

Festival comes to Estes Park the last week of June

The May Pole is placed to mark the start of the Scandinavian Mid-Summer Festival in Bond Park last year. The festival, held close to the Summer Solstice, marks the beginning of the season.

Charlotte Anderson of Lindsborg, Kan. leads the assembled festival-goers around the May Pole under a perfect Colorado sky in a traditional Scandinavian folk dance in which dancers imitate animals. This is one of many dances, both with and without crowd participation during the two-day festival celebrating Scandinavian culture.

18 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Scandinavian culture. 18 — 2 010 Trail Vacation Edition Festival-goers dressed as Vikings set out onto
Scandinavian culture. 18 — 2 010 Trail Vacation Edition Festival-goers dressed as Vikings set out onto

Festival-goers dressed as Vikings set out onto Lake Estes in a detailed replica of a raiding boat during the 2009 festival. The boat, with a square rigging and removable dragon head and tail, weighed about 1,500 pounds.

Trail-Gazette

S tart the summer off right with dancing, a pastry or two and fun with the whole family. The Scandinavian Midsummer Festival will

take place on June 26 and 27, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., in Bond Park, downtown Estes Park. Scandinavians celebrate the summer solstice, the longest day of the year, with a festival of flowers, food, textiles, arts and crafts, music and traditional dance. Musicians and dancers entertain both days at the festival. Children enjoy the festivities around the Midsummer pole decorated with flowers and ribbons. Professional Scandinavian dance instructors assist visitors in traditional movements throughout the festival. Bakers offer delectable treats. The Scandinavian Midsummer Festival brings the traditions of Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland to Estes Park. Festivities begin on Saturday morning in downtown Bond Park with the raising of the Midsummer pole followed by an opening ceremony. Colorfully dressed families enter the park carrying the flags of their native lands. The day continues with entertainment provided by a variety of folk dance groups and Scandinavian musicians. All activities are free and open to the public. Midsummer was originally a fertility festival with customs and rituals associated with nature and the hope for a good autumn harvest. The celebration has its roots in pre-Christian practices and is a day when the nature spirits join humans to rejoice in the long days of summer. For more information, visit www. estesmidsummer.com.

For more information, visit www. estesmidsummer.com. Sam Shoults shows off the coin and its cast at

Sam Shoults shows off the coin and its cast at the Viking Village during the 2009 Scan Fest.

The hills are alive with the color of flowers

Carpets of wildflowers cover the countryside

Columbines bloom near Emerald Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park.

By Juley Harvey Trail-Gazette

I nariotous display, from June through August, wildflowers wildly transform the Estes Park

and Rocky Mountain landscapes from a carpet of muted earth tones to a plush mat of sunshine and aspen meadows. Up to 1,200 species of flowering plants create a dizzying display here for a limited engagement in summer, and the aspen provide golden globes of autumn leaves in early fall. The color almost makes one feel faint — or certainly pale by comparison. The Colorado Rockies are arguably the wildflower wonderland of North America, and Rocky Mountain National Park is the region's high- country garden showcase. From 6,000 to 9,000 feet, grow arnica, sego lilies, blue columbine and meadowrue in the pine and aspen forests. The July breezes blow in bushels of scarlet paintbrush, blue penstemmon, orange sneezeweed and purple

fringed gentian. Elevations around Estes Park generally show pasque flowers on south-facing hillsides about the first three weeks of April. Penstemmons pop up starting in June, along the roadsides. Columbines appear in late June through early August, depending on elevation (the higher the altitude, the later the bloom). Trail Ridge Road is usually open by Memorial Day, but late snows can delay the opening more than a week. Fall River Road opens at the same time or later, again depending on Mother Nature. Follow this guide to find fabulous flowers in the area.

May to June Wildflowers begin to spring up in May in Moraine Park, with large fields of blue irises and yellow goldenbanners. Mid-- to late June brings showy orchids to Wild Basin, Bear Lake and Onahu Trail on the west side of the park. See Flowers: Page 20

Trail on the west side of the park. See Flowers: Page 20 Carpets of wildflowers cover

Carpets of wildflowers cover the mountainsides in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Wild irises reach for the sky in Moraine Park. Flowers from page 19 It's columbine

Wild irises reach for the sky in Moraine Park.

Flowers

from page 19

It's columbine time in July. Colorado's state flower bursts onto the scene in the early part of the month, in Wild Basin and along the Cow Creek Trail. Mid — to late July finds the columbines appearing toward Chasm Lake, and at higher elevations by mid-July and early August. Look for alpine tundra to be wearing its wildflower finery in July, for about six weeks. Alpine forget-me-nots start the root ball rolling, in mid — to late June. By July, you will see moss campion, alpine sandwort, alpine bistorts, wallflowers, phlox, wild iris, alpine sunflower, pale-blue harebell, alpine sunflowers and alpine avens. The appearance of the Arctic gentian, with its white, globular blooms and purple streaks, closes down the season.

Special spots of color Upper Hidden Valley in mid — to late July provides peeps of cow parsnip and larkspur. Also, see little pink elephants (flowers looking like they have a trunk and ears) on the west side of the park, below treeline near Poudre Lake at the same time. For the hardy, a 10-mile hike along the North Fork Trail in mid-July,

20 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Fork Trail in mid-July, 20 — 2 010 Trail Vacation Edition A bee pollinates a flower

A bee pollinates a flower high in the Rocky Mountains.

starting in the Retreat in Glen Haven, offers views of a variety of flowers, including pyrola, orchids, columbines, larkspur and monkshood. Bear Lake to Fern Lake in mid — to late July also offers many bouquets (it is illegal to pick any wildflower within the Park, though). Hiking in the area of Lawn Lake at the end of July or beginning of August promises

glimpses of Indian paintbrush in a canvas of colors. Trio Falls tallies three different waterfalls and a splash of wildflowers in season.

Lily Lake Enos Mills, the "father of Rocky Mountain National Park," enjoyed walking to Lily Lake for the wildflowers, from his nearby cabin. The best times here may be the second through the third week of July.

Dream and Emerald Lakes About 40 kinds of wildflowers greet visitors, including some spring bloomers that come out in summer where snow lingers late. The trail begins between the Bear Lake information booths and rises to Nymph Lake, and then Dream Lake. The last pitch to Emerald Lake provides views of marsh marigolds, globeflowers and pink bog laurel.

Gem Lake Blooming here in July is an extraordinary saxifrage, called "telesonix." This pink flower tucks itself into crevices in the mounded granite surrounding Gem Lake. Arrive early or wait until late in the afternoon — trailhead parking on Devil's Gulch Road accommodates about 20 vehicles.

Tundra World/Toll Memorial Rocky Mountain National Park has

Tundra World/Toll Memorial Rocky Mountain National Park has Alpine sunflowers bloom in a high meadow of

Alpine sunflowers bloom in a high meadow of Rocky Mountain National Park.

been designated an International Biosphere Reserve. Famed Trail Ridge Road, the highest continuous highway in the nation, reaches to 12,183 feet. Six miles east of the Alpine Visitor Center, Tundra World Trail beckons and provides a window into an ecosystem equivalent to visiting the Arctic Circle. A mid-July visit is your best bet, since the growing season above treeline is abbreviated. Watch your step on the tundra — try to stay on the rocks. Some of the small, cushion plants are decades-old and a wrong step might kill them. To protect

all vegetation, stay on trails anywhere in the park. For more information about park wildflowers, call (970) 586-

1206.

Serving the Estes Park Community for 41 Years

Light and Heavy Duty • Tow Trucks • Trailer • Car Carriers

Bob’sTowing&Repair Bob’sTowing&Repair

Carriers Bob’sTowing &Repair Bob’sTowing&Repair 800 Dunraven Estes Park CO Estes Park’s Largest Auto

800 Dunraven Estes Park CO

Estes Park’s Largest Auto Repair Facility 24-Hour Towing and Road Service

Local and Long Distance • Passenger Cars Semis • Motor Homes • Motorcycles • Flat Tires Out of Gas • Jump Starts • Unlock Car Doors

RADIO DISPATCHED- DAMAGE FREE

Complete car care, lube-oil service, tire repairs

ASE Certified Technicians Certified Drivers

(970)586-3122

ASE Certified Technicians Certified Drivers (970)586-3122 24 Hour Emergency Road Service B&B Food Mart Estes
ASE Certified Technicians Certified Drivers (970)586-3122 24 Hour Emergency Road Service B&B Food Mart Estes
ASE Certified Technicians Certified Drivers (970)586-3122 24 Hour Emergency Road Service B&B Food Mart Estes
ASE Certified Technicians Certified Drivers (970)586-3122 24 Hour Emergency Road Service B&B Food Mart Estes

24 Hour Emergency Road Service

B&B Food Mart

Estes Park’s One-Stop Place For:

•Gas

•Sundries

South on Hwy 7 at Woodstock

•Groceries

•Newsstand

•Snacks

•Drinks

•Deli Meals

•ATM

586-5749 •C igarettes •C ar Rental

586-5749

•Cigarettes

•Car Rental

•Gifts

•Film

Onthe wild side

Photos by Walt Hester • Trail-Gazette

O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010
O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010
O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010

22 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010
O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010
O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010
O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010
O nthe wild side Photos by Wa lt Hester • T rail-Gazette 22 — 2 010
30% – 7 0% OFF RET AIL PRICES EVER Y DA Y! OUTLETS AT LOVELAND

30% – 70% OFF RET

AIL PRICES EVER

Y DA Y!

OUTLETS AT LOVELAND FREE $10 Gift Card Name Street City State Zip Te l Email
OUTLETS
AT
LOVELAND
FREE $10 Gift Card
Name
Street
City
State
Zip
Te l
Email
Redeem by May 31, 2011 at Customer Service. One per family. Copies not accepted.

We make it easy to enjoy

GUILT FREE SHOPPING

Wi th GREAT brand name outlets like Tommy Hilfiger, Polo, Coach, Nike, Ann Ta ylor, B ose and many more,

you’re going to say WOW! We ’ll get you star ted with a FREE $10 Gift Card. And with savings of 30 – 70% OFF

without the guilt!

retail, you can enjoy shopping again

Just 33 miles from Estes Park!

Medical Center Of The Rockies Exit 257B Foxtrail Dr McWhinney Blvd Easy Access! Mt n
Medical
Center
Of The
Rockies
Exit
257B
Foxtrail Dr
McWhinney Blvd
Easy
Access!
Mt
n
A
y
v
k
e
c
o
R

Exit I-25 and US 34, Exit 257B • 5661 McWhinney Blvd., Loveland, CO 80538 • (970) 663-1916 • www.outletsatloveland.com

McWhinney Blvd., Loveland, CO 80538 • (970) 663-1916 • www.outletsatloveland.com 2010 Trail Vacation Edition — 23
McWhinney Blvd., Loveland, CO 80538 • (970) 663-1916 • www.outletsatloveland.com 2010 Trail Vacation Edition — 23
McWhinney Blvd., Loveland, CO 80538 • (970) 663-1916 • www.outletsatloveland.com 2010 Trail Vacation Edition — 23

Butterfly

from page 11

the time the route is surveyed. The butterfly routes are surveyed from May 1 to Sept. 17 each year. Of the 140 butterfly species identified in the Park, approximately 100 species are seen each year. The butterflies are here as adults from mid-April through mid-October, depending on the weather conditions during that year. Some butterflies migrate through the area, such as the monarch and the painted lady. Others, like the mourning cloak overwinter as adults and hibernate in logs or other protected areas. Some butterflies have two or three life cycles during the summer, others have just one. Depending on the species, butterflies can live for a few weeks or a few months as adults. As larva, butterflies eat plant vegetation (leaves, grasses, pine and juniper trees). As adults, they eat the nectar of flowers. Some are very specific as to the nectar of which flowers they will eat, others will eat from the nectar of a variety of flowering plants. This project is not open to visitors to the Park who would like to volunteer, although there are other opportunities for volunteering while you visit. It takes approximately four months to learn the scientific names of the butterflies, the protocol for surveying routes and how to identify the butterflies in the field. To learn more about butterflies, visitors may contact the Rocky Mountain Nature Association regarding seminars scheduled

Mountain Nature Association regarding seminars scheduled Not all butterflies ar e c olorful, some look like

Not all butterflies are colorful, some look like dried leaves, a form of camouflage.

each summer. For information on their seminars, see the Web site at www.rmna. org or call (970) 586-3262. Butterflies can be seen anywhere there are flowering plants, especially in meadows and near streams. The book, "Butterflies of Rocky Mountain National Park," by Leslie Angels, suggests walks and spots to view them. Stroll through Beaver Meadows and along Cow Creek, where sparkling streams course through open wildflower meadows and aspen woodlands and look for two-tailed swallowtail butterflies flying over Nelson's larkspur, miner's candle, Colorado columbine, and shooting star. Follow Black Canyon trails through sagebrush and Ponderosa pine habitats to encounter Alexandra's sulphur butterflies, among the wildflower displays featuring puccoon, blanket flower, waxflower and Indian paintbrush. Along the Fern Lake trail, which follows the churning Thompson River, is a place to search for the showy Weidemeyer's

admiral butterfly. Common alpine butterflies may fly the high ways on the Continental Divide, near the Shadow Mountain Dam area, which supports an upper montane/subalpine plant community and a riparian zone along the Colorado River, including chiming bells, jacob's ladder and willow wetlands.

Large Marble

Olympia Marble

Southern Rocky Mountain Orange-tip

Sulphurs (several kinds)

 

Mexican yellow

 

Dainty Sulphur

Butterflies that might fly by in the park include:

Lustrous Copper

 

Indra Swallowtail

Cloudless Sulphur

Indra Swallowtail Cloudless Sulphur Edith's Copper Striped Hairstreak

Edith's Copper

Indra Swallowtail Cloudless Sulphur Edith's Copper Striped Hairstreak

Striped Hairstreak

Sulphur Edith's Copper Striped Hairstreak Great-spangled Fritillary Hairstreak (many kinds) Blues

Great-spangled Fritillary

Copper Striped Hairstreak Great-spangled Fritillary Hairstreak (many kinds) Blues (many kinds) Checkerspot (many

Hairstreak (many kinds)

Hairstreak Great-spangled Fritillary Hairstreak (many kinds) Blues (many kinds) Checkerspot (many kinds) Commas (several

Blues (many kinds)

Fritillary Hairstreak (many kinds) Blues (many kinds) Checkerspot (many kinds) Commas (several kinds)

Checkerspot (many kinds)

(many kinds) Blues (many kinds) Checkerspot (many kinds) Commas (several kinds) Milbert's Tortoiseshell Sagebrush

Commas (several kinds)

(many kinds) Checkerspot (many kinds) Commas (several kinds) Milbert's Tortoiseshell Sagebrush Checkerspot Painted

Milbert's Tortoiseshell

kinds) Commas (several kinds) Milbert's Tortoiseshell Sagebrush Checkerspot Painted Lady Compton

Sagebrush Checkerspot

Painted Lady

Compton Tortoiseshell

American Lady

Theano Alpine

Weidemeyer's Admiral

Jutta Arctic

Common Wood-Nymph

Martial Duskywing

Canyonland Satyr

Common Sootywing

Common Alpine

Sachem

Callias Alpine

Rocky Mountain Parnassian

Melissa Arctic

Alpine Rocky Mountain Parnassian Melissa Arctic Whites (several kinds) Margined Mexican Cloudywing Skippers

Whites (several kinds)

Mountain Parnassian Melissa Arctic Whites (several kinds) Margined Mexican Cloudywing Skippers (many kinds). 24 — 2

Margined

Parnassian Melissa Arctic Whites (several kinds) Margined Mexican Cloudywing Skippers (many kinds). 24 — 2 010

Mexican Cloudywing

Arctic Whites (several kinds) Margined Mexican Cloudywing Skippers (many kinds). 24 — 2 010 Trail Vacation

Skippers (many kinds).

Arctic Whites (several kinds) Margined Mexican Cloudywing Skippers (many kinds). 24 — 2 010 Trail Vacation

24 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Boats,bikingandtrails

Lake Estes: a recreational hub

Trail-Gazette

L ake Estes is the hub of a lot of recreation in the Estes Valley. Boating, biking, fishing and just

going for a pleasant stroll are a few of the activities people head down to the lake for. The lake is an impoundment on the Big Thompson River, formed when Olympus Dam was completed in 1948. The lake also receives water from Marys Lake, through the Estes Power Plant, and Fish Creek.

Lake Estes Marina One of the great pleasures of the Estes Valley is being on the water early or late in the day, when the water is glassy and the surrounding mountains are lit by rich light. The Lake Estes Marina at 1770 Big Thompson Ave. (US 34) is the center of action at the lake. The marina has a dock in the water through the summer,aboat launch, and a range of boats for rent, from one-person kayaks to a pontoon, and fishing licenses and tackle are also available, along with snacks, drinks and See Lake Estes: Page 26

along with snacks, drinks and See Lak e E stes: Pag e 26 Boaters prepare to

Boaters prepare to leave the docks at the Lake Estes Marina.

Big Thompson Indian Village VISIT OUR UNIQUE SHOP Collectable Handmade Indian Jewelry Navajo Rugs •
Big Thompson
Indian Village
VISIT OUR UNIQUE SHOP
Collectable Handmade Indian Jewelry
Navajo Rugs • Baskets • Pottery • Sand Paintings
Mill Creek Wildlife Sculptures • Moccasins • T-Shirts
Old West Collectables • Native American Flutes and Flute Music
1348 West Highway 34
Big Thompson Canyon
Loveland, CO 80537
(970) 667-9353
carman1348@aol.com
Halfway between Estes & Loveland on Hwy 34
(at the Tipi)
In Business Since 1971
Same place
Same owners
Rams Ho rn Vi llage …Estes Pa rk’s Fi nest Resort Vacation foraDay or a
Rams Ho rn Vi llage
…Estes Pa rk’s Fi nest Resort
Vacation foraDay
or a Week
at
the Entrance to
Rocky Mountain
National Park.
Luxury Vacation Homes
with Full Kitchens
& Gas Fireplaces.
Mountain Views • Heated Outdoor Pool
Hot Tubs • Fitness Center • Playground
Wildlife Viewing • Free WiFi
…or own forever
Luxury Vacation Home Ownership
at a Fraction of the Cost!
5
@#
T
Alex Gibson, President / Broker Rams Horn Realty, Inc.
1565 CO HWY 66 • www.rhvresort.com
Rams Horn Village Resort: 800 - 229 - 4676
Rams Horn Realty: 800 - 229 - 4598

Lake Estes

from page 25

other items you might need for a day at the lake. If you are headed for the Lake Estes Trail, the marina is a great starting point, and also has a variety of bikes (singles, tandem, and surreys) available for rent, along with child carriers. The marina also has a sand beach, volleyball, horseshoes and picnicking areas, and a pavilion that can be reserved for group get-togethers.

Down at the lake Lake Estesis the hub of many recreational opportunities You can reach the marina at

970-586-2011.

Lake Estes Trail Jogging, skating and biking are allowed on the Lake Estes Trail, along with walking, and the trailis a popular loop for regular exercise walkers. More than likely, you will get a good close look at some elk as you make the roughly four-mile loop, especially as you pass along the edge of the Lake Estes Golf Course or around Cherokee Draw on the opposite side of the lake. Elk like hanging out in both locations. Beside the marina, there are several places to access the trail. From US 36, the main access point is Cherokee Draw, just east of the Estes Power Plant. From US 34, access the trail from the Convention and Visitors Bureau or from Fisherman's Nook at the Lake Front Drive.

Fishing The 148-acre lake has fourmiles of shoreline, much of which attracts anglers. For fisherman, the two most popular places to access the lake are at Cherokee Draw and Fisherman's Cove. From there, good fishing can be found around the inlet of the Big Thompson, along the rocky north shore, and along the rip-rap along US 36 on the lake's south shore. The first Saturday of June, during Colorado's free fishing weekend, sees the annual Lake Estes Fishing Derby, and the Colorado Division ofWildlife typically stocks thousands of 10-inch rainbow trout into the lake for the event and the kick-off of the summer season. Additionally, brown trout have established themselves in the lake,

brown trout have established themselves in the lake, Bikers ride along the paved trail that circles

Bikers ride along the paved trail that circles Lake Estes. Bikes can be rented from the marina store.

yellow perch were stocked surreptitiously, a program of stocking tigermuskies was attempted to control the perch, and carp and native white suckers are also present. Most of the catch is rainbow trout, but you truly never know what you may hook.

Lake Facts Olympus Dam cost $2.4million to build. Construction began in 1947. The lake can hold up to 3,068 acre-feet of water, but is usually topped off just under 2,700 acre-feet. The lake has about fourmiles of shoreline and covers 185 acres when full. The lake rarely freezes over during the winter due to consistent wind action and the slightly warmer water discharged by the Estes Power Plant. Ice that does form does not last long, and the lakeis not a good choice for icefishing.

last long, and the lakeis not a good choice for icefishing. Longs Peak stands over a

Longs Peak stands over a lineup of boats tied to the docks at the Lake Estes Marina

a lineup of boats tied to the docks at the Lake Estes Marina Elk frequent the

Elk frequent the area near the Lake Estes Trail. Visitors are urged to be cautious around the large, fast and unpredictable bulls during the rutting season.

26 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Rockin' robins and other tweeties Meet the birdies flock to the flockers Compiled by Juley
Rockin' robins and other tweeties Meet the birdies flock to the flockers Compiled by Juley
Rockin' robins
and other tweeties
Meet the birdies flock to the flockers
Compiled by Juley Harvey
Trail-Gazette
I
f you're looking for some fine-feathered friends, the Estes Park/Rocky
Mountain National Park area has a flock of them, providing fascinating
watching. You might just find the bluebird of happiness here — or hoot
when you discover an owl's nest. The birds here are busy and offer endless
enjoyment for eyes and ears — from a hum to a hubbub. The bird of paradise
is not just a flower.
Since the designation of Rocky Mountain National Park in 1915, there
have been 280 species of birds reported for this area, including the park,
Arapaho National Recreation Area and the towns of Estes Park and Granby.
So, if you want to see our feathered friends, you've flocked to the right place.
According to Audubon Magazine, Estes Park is a "birder's paradise." National
Geographic says, "There could hardly be a more beautiful spot to see high-
country birds than Rocky Mountain National Park."
In 2000, Rocky Mountain National Park was designated as a Global
Important Bird Area. This designation recognizes the vital role of the park
in the perpetuation of bird species. The Estes Valley and Rocky Mountain
National Park offer the opportunity to view hundreds of species of birds,
ranging from wetland waterfowl to soaring raptors.
You might find the following flighty fauna zipping about the woods or
singing a happy song during your visit here.
See Birds: Page 28
a happy song during your visit here. See Birds: Page 28 20-19009 Downtown, Next to the
20-19009
20-19009

Downtown, Next to the Historic Park Theatre, On the River

email—DeLeosDeliCafe@hotmail.com

website—DeLeosDeli.com

970-577-1134

Mountain bluebirds usually arrive in early March. Birds from page 27 American dipper — A

Mountain bluebirds usually arrive in early March.

Birds

from page 27

American dipper — Also called "water ouzel," these year-round park residents are seen along streams. In shallow water, they appear to water-ski on the surface, but in deeper water they dive in and run along the bottom underwater. Watch for these birds along Ouzel Falls Trail and at the falls, where they dart in and out of the tumbling waterfall.

Broad-tailed hummingbird — These jewel-like little birds hover at flowers to sip nectar, perform aerial mating dances or tail-fan to warn other hummingbirds away. The most common of hummingbird species seen in the Park, the broad-tailed hummer is a summer resident.

Clark's nutcracker — Often seen along Trail Ridge Road and in the Bear Lake area, this year-round park resident is about a foot long, with a long, light- gray hood, a white face, a pointed black bill and black wings.

Dark-eyed junco — is mostly gray, with black-and-white accents. Year-

28 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

accents. Year- 28 — 2 010 Trail Vacation Edition A h awk takes flight. Robins ar

A hawk takes flight.

28 — 2 010 Trail Vacation Edition A h awk takes flight. Robins ar eap opular

Robins areapopular species found in the Estes Valley.

round residents of the park, they eat seeds and berries.

Golden eagle — These large birds, with wingspans of more than six feet, are dark brown and black, with a light-gold

color on the backs of their necks.

Great horned owls — Year-round residents, they establish territories and court during January and February. Young are produced in March.

Jays — Jays are among the noisiest of birds in the forest. Stellar's jays are bright blue on their lower half and black on top, with a prominent crest on the tops of their heads. Gray jays are mostly gray, with white accents.

Mallard — These large ducks like to paddle about on Lake Estes, Sprague Lake and other nearby water bodies. Males have an almost iridescent green head.

Mountain bluebird — arrives early, usually in March. Males have bright-blue backs and tail feathers and lighter blue chests; females are a duller gray-blue.

Mountain chickadee — small — about 5 inches long, with pale-gray backs, jet-black caps and eye bands, and white cheeks, eyebrows and chests.

Northern flicker — These large woodpeckers are mostly brownish gray with a red band across the tips of their tail feathers. Males have a red strip on their lower face.

tail feathers. Males have a r ed strip on their lower face. Bald eagles have been

Bald eagles have been seen around Lake Estes.

Peregrine falcon — One of the world's fastest birds, they are capable of diving at speeds of more than 125 mph. The park closes several rock-climbing areas to humans during the raptors' nesting periods. From early March until the mid- See Birds: Page 29

summer, raptors nest in areas of Lumpy Ridge and Sheep Mountain.

Red-tailed hawk —Acommon sight, gliding over open areas in search of prey. Named for their rust-colored tails, they are stocky, with wingspans of about four feet.

Violet-green swallow — Flocks of swallows soar here from spring through fall. Known for their superb flying grace, violet-green swallows have striking metallic green backs and bright-violet tails.

Warbling vireo — With a slow song that ends on a rising note, the warbling vireo is often heard rather than seen. About five to six inches long and grayish green above and light gray or white below, with white eyebrows, these birds frequent aspen forests and trees along streams in summer.

White-tailed ptarmigan —Ayear- round resident, the ptarmigan likes higher elevations, about 11,000 feet. During summer, this bird, measuring about a foot long, is mostly mottled brown, with white wings, chest, and tail, but during winter, it turns pure white. Favorite spots for bird-watching are Endovalley, Moraine Park, Wild Basin, Trail Ridge Road, Upper Beaver Meadows, Lumpy Ridge, Cow Creek and Bear Lake Road. In Estes Park, walk or ride the Lake Estes pathway along the Big Thompson River and through the lakeside bird sanctuary. Spring bird migration is a particularly popular time to come.

bird migration is a particularly popular time to come. A w oodpecker is looking for insects

A woodpecker is looking for insects in a decaying log.

A w oodpecker is looking for insects in a d ecaying log. 20-50092 Fall River Condos
A w oodpecker is looking for insects in a d ecaying log. 20-50092 Fall River Condos
A w oodpecker is looking for insects in a d ecaying log. 20-50092 Fall River Condos
20-50092
20-50092
is looking for insects in a d ecaying log. 20-50092 Fall River Condos On the River

Fall River Condos

On the River For Sale Excellent Rental Income

Quiet, Completely Remodeled Beetle Kill Tongue & Groove & Trim

Remodeled Beetle Kill To ngue & Groove & T rim Fred Kropp Broker Associate Cell: 970-227-1368
Remodeled Beetle Kill To ngue & Groove & T rim Fred Kropp Broker Associate Cell: 970-227-1368
Remodeled Beetle Kill To ngue & Groove & T rim Fred Kropp Broker Associate Cell: 970-227-1368

Fred Kropp Broker Associate

Cell: 970-227-1368 Office: 970-663-0733

Fax: 970-669-7872

fnpkropp@hotmail.com

www.bluetreerealestate.com

Office: 970-663-0733 Fax: 970-669-7872 fnpkropp@hotmail.com www.bluetreerealestate.com 2010 Trail Vacation Edition — 29

Alongthetrail

Trail system a good way to see Estes Park

Trail-Gazette

P ark the car and take a stroll. Enjoy the view from Lake Estes, the wildlife or the sound of the rolling water along the Riverwalk. Trails, winding around and through Estes Park, makes the town a pedestrian's delight.

Lake Estes Trail Park at the Visitors Center (500 Big Thompson Avenue) and follow the Riverwalk east to Lake Estes. Go the distance around the lake (3.75 miles) or just enjoy a short stroll. Wildlife and magnificent views of Rocky Mountain National Park are the main attractions of the Lake Estes Trail.

Riverwalk From the Visitors Center, walk through the underpass and hike west into town along the Riverwalk. Take a seat on the outdoor patio of an Estes Park restaurant or coffee shop. Enter shops from the back door along the Riverwalk and enjoy Estes Park shopping and nature along the way. The Riverwalk Wiest Plaza expansion, starts at Moraine Avenue and winds up to West Elkhorn Avenue. Catch the trail across the street where it turns into Fall River Trail. (The downtown Riverwalk is a pedestrian-only trail.)

Fall River Trail Fall River Trail starts at West Elkhorn Avenue, behind the waterwheel. Walk west to Performance Park outdoor amphitheater where visitors enjoy music performances all summer long. Stroll into the West Park Center and check out the Cultural Arts Council Fine Art Gallery. The trail continues west along the Fall River and will eventually link to Rocky Mountain National Park.

Knoll-Willows Trail From Bond Park, in the center of downtown, enter the Knoll-Willows Trail from the north side of the Municipal Building. The trail winds up to the historic Birch Cabin and the ruins, which feature excellent views of Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park. Another trailhead starts at the top of Wonderview Drive, across from the Stanley Hotel, and leads to the ruins.

Fish Creek Trail Enter Fish Creek Trail on the southeast end of Lake Estes. Go south along Fish Creek Road past the high school and the Estes Park Golf Course. Enjoy the view of Longs Peak along the way.

30 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

The Riverwalk along the Big Thompson River provides an idyllic respite from the hustle and bustle of Elkhorn Ave.

re spite from the hustle and bustle of Elkho rn Av e. Th e F all

The Fall River Trail

extends westward from downtown Estes Park.

(it is beautiful)
(it is beautiful)
This is a place unlike any other, just ask anyone who has ever been here.
This is a place unlike any other, just ask anyone who
has ever been here. A place with walls that whisper,
floors that creak underfoot, a place with a rare
history, a patina left by time and an endless parade of
characters…
Adapted from a Vacation Edition story by Valerie Pehrson
The sky was heavy with impending snow and Eagle Plume’s was warm and
welcoming.
There was the smell of a fire in the grate, and lunch cooking.
Ann Strange Owl, her husband Dayton Raben, their daughter Nico Strange
Owl, and Nico’s son, Dah’som are all fixtures in the shop.
Creaking floorboards added to the rustic atmosphere as Ann and Nico
explained how they came to the area, and how they came to be the
caretakers and owners of this unique and historical shop.
“Ann is from Montana originally, our reservation is in Southwest
Montana, and Dayton, is from Wyoming. They married in the late 50s
in Wyoming when interracial marriages were still illegal,” said Nico.
“Shortly after that they moved to California where there was more
tolerance at the time. After I was born, they moved to Colorado to be
closer to family again.”
She continues, “Ann eventually became lonesome for her family
and culture, and someone suggested that we visit an Indian man by
the name of Charles Eagle Plume. That was in the 60s. We became
fast friends with Charles, and like so many families, fell in love with
the Estes area.”.
She carries on, “Charles had always wanted my mother to help
him at the shop, and she finally did take him up on that. Eventually Dayton
was coaxed into helping out, then I finally came to work here in the summers
while at CSU.”
“I had a shop of my own in Ft Collins then, and he would come have coffee
with me and we would visit, since he closed the shop in the wintertime,”
interjected Strange Owl.
The two women fall into reminisces of Charles Eagle Plume, telling stories
about how he loved to tell stories. One in particular brings laughter bubbling
up between the two of them, the question of Charles’s age.
“He always claimed to be 105, right mom?” Asked Nico. Ann nodded with a
slow smile spreading across her face as she stirred
a pot of stew.
Nico continued. “Every spring we would have
to figure out how many years ago he would have
to have been born to be 105 that year.”
“I remember he always had a note behind the desk,” added
Ann. “A cheat sheet.”
Ann and Charles mutually adopted each other after years of
fielding questions about whether they were related.

continued on next page.

Lakota Shirt, circa 1875, Charles Eagle Plume Collection

Charles Eagle Plume,

1939

Eagle Plume’s

Circa 1934

Charles Eagle Plume with young visitors

Lakota Quilled Moccasins, C. 1870, Charles Eagle Plume Collection AnnAnn StrangeStrange OwlOwl andand DaytonDayton
Lakota Quilled
Moccasins, C. 1870,
Charles Eagle Plume
Collection
AnnAnn StrangeStrange OwlOwl andand
DaytonDayton RabenRaben
“People would ask if he was my father and I always had this long story
“People would ask if he was my father and I always had this long story
to tell them, or people would ask him if I was his daughter,” explained
Ann. “One afternoon he said, ‘just tell them we are father and daughter.’
And things changed after that. People would come and say ‘how is your
father,’ or ‘where is your daughter?’”
Family isn’t always about who you are born to, and Nico echoed that
sentiment.
“He took care of us like family. He was really generous with all of us,
and we took care of him as he got older, too.”
“He was a nice person,” agreed Ann. “He was so good to all the people
here. We still miss him a lot.”
Blue jays and chickadees hopped around the feeder while the women
prepared lunch.
Estes Park has thousands of items that are Native American themed,
but not necessarily made by Native Americans themselves, and
supporting indigenous artists is important to the family, obviously.
“We belong to the Indian Arts and Crafts Association, or IACA,”
explained Nico. “And they are part of this whole movement to police
that kind of thing. They work to enforce laws that aim to stop people
from marketing things as being Native American made when they really
aren’t. That’s why we try to work with the artists directly when we can,
otherwise it is taking money out of Indian artist’s pockets and that’s just
not right.”
The family has had some experience in this particular area, when
several years ago someone tried to sell them some questionable
merchandise.
“We were looking at beadwork that a fellow we had known for many
years was showing us,” said Nico. “It looked kind of funny, it was sewn
with fishing line instead of thread and the way that the beads were laid
down just wasn’t quite right.”
“So we started looking in to it, and we discovered this man had gotten
these things from another dealer who was outsourcing to China. They
were marketing it as Native American made, and selling it dirt-cheap.
The bizarre thing was, he was claiming that the beadworker that made
these pieces was my aunt. He was just using her name because she had
worked for him 20 or 30 years earlier. He had started out working with
Indian people and then found a cheaper way to make money.”
The wind picked up, the snow started blowing in, and we sat down to
lunch.
Charles Eagle Plume Charles Eagle Plume claimed to have been born on the Montana-Canadian border.
Charles Eagle Plume
Charles Eagle Plume claimed to have been born on the Montana-Canadian border. He
was Blackfeet Indian, French and German, and grew up in poverty.
Because he was a storyteller, the time frame in which he came to Colorado is shrouded
in mystery. While studying English at CU he met Katherine Lindsay, proprietress of the
Whatnot Inn and he began working for her in the 1930s.
Katherine eventually married and changed the focus of the business to Indian arts
and crafts, renaming it Perkins Trading Post. When times were slow, Charles, who was
known to dress in full regalia and with bow and arrow in hand, would ambush carloads of
tourists on the road and sell them moccasins or point them towards the trading post.
Over the decades Katherine and Charles collected historic and prehistoric Indian
artifacts, many of which still remain at the Eagle Plume’s. Over one thousand of these
treasures adorn their beloved trading post today, comprising the Charles Eagle Plume
Collection. Bead and quillwork from the Plains, ceramics and kachina dolls from the
Southwest, and many fine baskets beckon the eye throughout the post.
When Katherine died, Eagle Plume took over the shop. To get through the winter
season, he would travel the country as a paid lecturer at supper clubs and other venues
speaking about the benefits of a college education and civil rights for all people.
In the 1980s some young Lakota men robbed the Eagle Plume shop. They were
prosecuted and convicted in Boulder County, and Eagle Plume offered to pay for the
young men to go to college when they got out of prison. None of them took him up on the
offer.
In the late 1980s he received an honorary doctorate from his alma mater for his lifetime
achievements of championing civil rights and awareness and advocacy for the Native
American.
Eagle Plume loved children, and very young visitors to his shop would receive a
feather from him as a present. He would say that there was a method to his madness, as
young children want to touch everything. With feather in hand, they would gently dust
everything in sight!
Children who were a little older would be offered a trade. Eagle Plume would hold
out an arrowhead, and offer to trade the young person for the most valuable thing they
possessed. The children would offer their mothers or diamonds, but Eagle Plume would
correct them, saying that their friendship was the most valuable thing they possessed.
Although this dynamic man is no longer at the trading post, he remains so in spirit. His
collection of arrowheads and feathers remain at his desk amid cigarette burns and old
“cheat sheets”, where they are still gifted to children that wander in the door, wide-eyed
at all there is to see at Eagle Plume’s Trading Post.
The Charles Eagle Plume Collection
The Charles Eagle Plume Collection has grown and
changed since its beginnings in the late 1800s, but its
focus on the art of Native America has been steady.
Arapaho Doll
Pair c. 1875
With Cheyenne tribal members at the helm though,
most of the new additions hail from the Northern
Plains – specifically from the Cheyenne, Arapaho, and
Ute tribes. Some of these pieces can be viewed on display
at the Estes Park Museum, but mostly the collection remains at
the trading post.
We are grateful to John Skelly of Cincinnati for his donation to our
expanding historic firearms collection – a beautiful Colt Lightning from the
late 1880s. We did some horse trading with a couple of fellows and came up with
a Cheyenne Coin Dress and a Springfield 45 70 Trapdoor Carbine – the type of rifle
Ann’s grandfather carried with him in service of Casey’s Scouts. And we are proud to
have acquired a pair of beaded Arapaho dolls that nicely round out the doll collection.
Colt Lightning 32 20, c.
1885; Donated by John
Skelly Springfield 45 70
Trapdoor Carbine c. 1890
-type used by U.S. Calvary
and Indian Scouts

Ann Strange Owl

Eagle Plume’s Today

Nico Strange Owl

The Whatnot Inn c. 1935

Golfing at altitude with an attitude

Estes Park boasts 27 holes on two courses

A golfer enjoys a postcard-perfect morning on the Lake Estes nine-hole golf course.

Trail-Gazette

A round of golf in Estes Park

comes in two flavors: the

nine-hole variety, as played

at the Lake Estes Golf Course, a comfortable nine-hole that hugs Lake Estes and is cut by the Big Thompson River, and the 18-hole variety available at the Estes Park Golf Course. There are likely to be elk on the side at either course to share your round with you, not to mention the sort of scenery every course this side of Pebble Beach would kill for. And if your tee shot seems to travel a little farther than usual, chalk it up to the thinner air at 7,500 feet.

Estes Park Golf Course The Estes Park Golf Course, located at 1080 S. St. Vrain Avenue (Colorado Highway 7), has been

ranked among the most scenic sets of links in the country. The season begins in mid-April, when the play is punctuated by the spring snows that bring moisture to the course and kick-start the green-up when the sun hits the fairways, and a wet April should give the courses everything they need to get the grass growing this year. By mid-June, the 6,400- yard (from the blue tees), par 71 is hitting peak condition, which it maintains well into September. The second hole, a 143-yard par three, has a new tee box this season. The course has a Pro Shop and driving range, and a restaurant, and hosts about 30,000 rounds a season, including numerous tournaments. Tee times are recommended, especially for a morning round during the peak summer months. Call 866-586-8146 ext. 0 for tee See Golf: Page 36

Call 866-586-8146 ext. 0 for tee See Golf: Page 36 555 Prospect Ave. Estes Park Monday-Friday,
555 Prospect Ave. Estes Park Monday-Friday, 8 to 5; Saturday, 9 to 12 (970) 586-2200
555 Prospect Ave. Estes Park
Monday-Friday, 8 to 5; Saturday, 9 to 12
(970) 586-2200
ProvidingExcellent
PersonalizedMedical Care
Back row:
Bridget Dunn, MD, Martin Koschnitzke, MD, Guy Van der Werf, MD
Front row:
Rick Beesley, MD, Amanda Luchsinger, MD,
Scott Woodard, MD, Frank Dumont, MD
Joining the FMC
family of care providers
August 9, 2010
Aaron Florence, D.O.
General Orthopaedics
& Sports Medicine
The Family Medical Clinic, at Estes Park Medical Center, offers the most
complete scope of health care services available in the Estes Valley
Scott D. Woodard, M.D.
Board Certified
General Surgery
Martin Koschnitzke, M.D.
Board Certified
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Richard Beesley, M.D.
Board Certified
Pediatrics
Guy P. Van der Werf, M.D.
Board Certified
Family Medicine
Frank Dumont, M.D.
Board Certified
Internal Medicine
Amanda Luchsinger, M.D.
Board Certified
Internal Medicine
Bridget Dunn, M.D.
Board Certified
Family Medicine
20-18891

Golf

from page 35

times. Electric carts, pull carts and clubs are available for rental.

Lake Estes Golf Course The Lake Estes Golf Course, located at 690 Big Thompson Avenue (US 34), plays at 2,209 yards from the men's tees, and par is 31. As at the 18-hole course, tee times are recommended during the summer season — call 970-586-8176. Pull carts and clubs are available for rental. Some water makes a round on the Lake Estes Golf Course interesting, and there are almost always a few elk around — it's a favorite wintering spot for them, and the spring green- up is their salad bar. All told, about 20,000 nine-hole rounds are played at the course annually. Tee times at both courses can be made up to seven days in advance for weekdays, and on the Friday of the previous weekend for weekend reservations.

Winter Golf From November through March, the Lake Estes Golf Course is open for winter golf play, and there are plenty of pleasant and playable days over the course of the winter. The seasonal rate of $7 for unlimited, all- day play, no tee times required.

of $7 for unlimited, all- day play, no tee times required. Golfers have a v iew

Golfers have a v iew of Tw in Sisters Peaks while playing the sixth hole at the 18-hole course.

Rocky Ridge Announces Summer 2010 Concert Season Sunday, June 13 3 pm Adult Piano and
Rocky Ridge Announces Summer 2010 Concert Season
Sunday, June 13
3 pm Adult Piano and Guitar Faculty Concert
Sunday, June 20
Sunday, July 11
Beth Miller Harrod Centennial Celebration Day 2
Sunday, July 18
Schumann Festival Day 3
3 pm Young Artist Seminar Faculty Concert
3 pm Junior Student Seminar Faculty
Wednesday, July 7
8 pm Concert with Guest Artist Parry Karp, cello
Friday, July 16
3 pm Young Artist Seminar Faculty Concert
Sunday, July 25
3 pm Young Artist Seminar Faculty Concert
6 pm Queen City Jazz Band Concert and BBQ
Dinner Fundraiser
Sunday, July 4
Schumann Festival Day 1
Concerts all day and evening. Please visit our
website or call for details.
Saturday, July 17
Schumann Festival Day 2
Saturday, July 31
3 pm Young Artist Orchestra Student Concert
Sunday, August 8
3 pm Young Artist Seminar Faculty Concert
Saturday, July 10
3 pm Junior Student Seminar Faculty Concert
Sunday, August 22
Beth Miller Harrod Centennial Celebration Day 1
3
pm Young Artist Orchestra Student Concert
3
pm Chamberre in the Rockies Concert
3
pm Alumni Concert
7
pm Young Artist Seminar Faculty Concert
For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit our website www.rockyridge.org or call our office (970) 586-4031.
Rocky Ridge Music Center, 465 Longs Peak Road, Estes Park

36 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Trail-Gazette

A highland festival

T he largest Scottish Festival in the West takes place in Estes Park with the annual Scottish/Irish Highland

Festival held in September each year. Bagpipes and drums, Highland and Irish dancing, music, jousting, athletic and dog competitions take place at the festival. Massed bands compete and delight crowds on the festival field. The 2010 festival takes place Sept. 9 through 12, on the Festival Grounds, Fairgrounds at Stanley Park. The gates are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday through Sunday. Tattoo Estes opens the festival on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Concerts fill the nights with revelry, featuring Colorado Celtic Rock Concerts, Folk Concerts and evening Tattoos. The highlight of the festival is the free, hour-long parade of bands along Elkhorn Avenue, downtown, beginning at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 11. Dogs, indigenous to the British Isles, compete and entertain festival guests. The merchant tents offer crafts and Celtic merchandise. The Clan tents contain representatives displaying tartans and family crests. The aroma of American and Celtic food fills the air, along side the famous Scotch and beer tents. Singers, storytellers and Celtic rock bands entertain in tents found in numerous locations on the festival grounds. Young dancers execute Highland, folk and Irish dances. The arena hosts medieval jousters in combat, and the athletic field showcases caber, stone and hammer throwing by well-accomplished women and men. The festival field is filled with massive bands, performing traditional drum routines and ceremonial anthems. Military and Scottish Bands perform in competition, with awards announced at the end of the festival. For more information, call 800-90-Estes or e-mail info@scotfest.com.

Walt Hester,Trail-Gazette

Pipes and drums sound throughout Estes Park during the annual parade.

s s ound throughout Estes Park during the annua l p arade. Mode rn knights test

Modern knights test their skills during the festival.

Mode rn knights test their skills during the festival. Not all the competition at the highland

Not all the competition at the highland games is traditional.

all the competition at the highland games is traditional. The Cross of St. Andrew. Dancing is

The Cross of St. Andrew.

the highland games is traditional. The Cross of St. Andrew. Dancing is a b ig part

Dancing is a big part of the annual festival.

Andrew. Dancing is a b ig part of the annua l f estival. Strongman Rob Lewis

Strongman Rob Lewis hefts a 350-pound stone over a 3-foot-high caber during the highland games.

Hike to Glen Haven's historical hilltop
Hike to Glen Haven's historical hilltop

Site bears the name of early settlers

Lisa Foster courtesy photo

Bob Chase, Estelle Purvis (with her rescue dog Thunder), and Michelle Chase descend from the hilltop of Knapp's Knob near Glen Haven.

By Lisa Foster Trail-Gazette

K napp's Knob is a pretty little rounded hilltop that lies along the trail to Piper Meadows

and Crosier Mountain, near the town of Glen Haven. It was named for the Knapp family, who settled in the Glen Haven area in 1893. Joseph (Joe) Knapp wrote a wonderful account of the area's Presbyterian pioneers in his book, "Glen Haven Story," which is available through the Glen Haven Historical Society. According to Joe, "Knapp" is a Saxon word meaning hilltop. He relates a story about how he and his Uncle Ira burned their name into a wooden box top and fixed it to a stake, planting it on the summit of Knapp's Knob in 1941. The original sign is long gone, but four subsequent signs have replaced it, including the most recent one, posted by Duke Sumonia at the foot of the hill in 2005. Duke is a Glen Haven resident and an avid historian. The current sign is visible from the Crosier Mountain Trail (Trail 931). Ira Knapp is considered to be

38 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Ira Knapp is considered to be one of the founding fathers of Glen Haven, and he and his family established a sawmill in the town in 1896.

KNAPPS KNOB

Trailhead: Glen Haven

Distance from Trailhead (One Way):

0.6 Miles

Altitude: 7,790 feet

Elevation Gain: 550 feet

Rating: Easy

one of the founding fathers of Glen Haven, and he and his family established a sawmill in the town in 1896. Additionally, Ira built what is now the Inn of Glen Haven. Joseph Knapp was Ira Knapp's nephew.

The trailhead

The Glen Haven Trailhead lies at 7,240 feet and provides access to Crosier Mountain Trail (Forest Service Trail #931), which leads to

Knapp's Knob, Piper Meadows and Crosier Mountain. It is located in Glen Haven just east of the post office near the livery stable, marked by a brown forest service sign. A dirt road winds past the stables and private residences to a narrow path that marks the start of the trail.

The hike

Park along County Road 43, near the trailhead sign in Glen Haven. Hike

south along the dirt road that climbs past houses to a single-track trail with a forest service sign urging users to "Pack it In and Pack it Out." From here, the Crosier Mountain Trail climbs up the hillside along a deeply rutted trail, weaving through the forest. Hike for a half-mile to a trail junction, where the sign announcing Knapp's Knob is clearly visible. From here, strike out to the east on a very faint path that climbs steeply to the summit of Knapp's Knob, about 0.1 mile from the trail junction. The forested hilltop is pleasant and inviting, though the views are limited to those of the surrounding canyons and forest.

Lisa is the author of the highly acclaimed book, Rocky Mountain National Park, The Complete Hiking Guide, available at stores throughout Estes Park, and on the internet at Amazon.com. Contact her at lisahikes@hotmail.com

Astronomy teacher To dd Burke takes the cover of f o f t he telescope

Astronomy teacher To dd Burke takes the cover off o f t he telescope at the Estes Park Memorial Observatory.

Star-date 2010 Captain's log: heavenly sights at the Estes Park Memorial Observatory
Star-date 2010
Captain's log:
heavenly sights
at the Estes
Park Memorial
Observatory
By Juley Harvey Trail-Gazette I f you're looking to catch some star power, mosey on
By Juley Harvey
Trail-Gazette
I
f you're looking to catch some star
power, mosey on over to Estes
Park's star attraction, the Estes Park
Memorial Observatory, located on the
grounds of Estes Park High School.
children to visit the Little Thompson
Observatory, where they developed a
passion for astronomy.
Connolly calls the observatory a
great way to excite kids, providing them
with hands-on experience of science,
showing them through a telescope
galaxies and stars that are 15 million
A
little more than three years in
the making (hardly a nano-blink in
star-time), the observatory celebrated
its grand opening last April. Mike
Connolly, the patriarch of the project,
began the starquest in January of 2006.
He wanted to build an observatory
in memory of two of his star-struck
children, killed in a motorcycle
accident. Plaques with pictures of his
children are in the lobby. Mike and
Carole Connolly and Michele Johnson
hope to honor the memory of Mike
and Carole's children and Michele's
siblings, Thomas and Christian
Connolly, who died July 2, 2005. The
Connollys all have backgrounds in
science, math and astronomy. Mike,
a retired engineer from Lockheed
Martin Corporation, spent many nights
viewing stars and planets with his
children.
light-years away. That light left its
location in space before the dinosaurs
died, he said.
"Kids get excited. It's a way of
making hard sciences amenable and
hands-on. They like the idea of doing it
themselves," Connolly said.
Four years ago, Connolly started
working on the legalities with the
school district, started the 501(c)
nonprofit and signed a lease with the
school, under which the nonprofit
would build the observatory and the
school would take back the lease for $1,
after the construction was approved.
The Angels Above Foundation
maintains the telescopes and programs.
The school district is responsible for the
building, maintenance and insurance.
"We've already started two
astronomy classes and built the Star
Wall, a poor man's planetarium," he
"I
think my kids would like it," he
said.
His son was helping him to build a
back-yard observatory at the time of
the accident. Connolly had taken his
said.
Students helped build the Star Wall,
for which a projector shone images on
the wall. Students taped fluorescent
stars of different sizes and colors on the
wall.
"Under dark light, the stars fluoresce.
It's really cool. The kids love it,"
Connolly said.
In 2007, construction of the
observatory began.
"The building went up quickly,"
he said. "Roy Johnson of Johnson
Construction did a great job."
The dome was provided by a
specialty manufacturer in Loveland.
They brought it up in a truck.
Volunteers placed an aluminum skin
on the dome and mechanized it.
Those processes took from six to eight
months.
Meinte Veldhuis was the main
consultant.
"He's the president of the Little
Thompson Observatory. He knows how
to make it go. We depended on him and
his connections," Connolly said.
In November of 2008, the dome was
completed and then placed on the
roof. Volunteers finished the inside of
the building. In January of 2009, they
installed the school telescope.
Astronomers saw the first light
through the telescope the following
month. Since then, there have been
star parties with both middle and
high school students, as well as
Outreach classes on astronomy for the
community, taught by astronomers.
See Observatory: Page 40
Observatory from page 39 Looking to the heavens through the telescope at the observatory. "Kids
Observatory
from page 39
Looking to the heavens through the telescope at the observatory.
"Kids love it," Connolly said. "There's
more enthusiasm with the dome than
with the scope — it echoes. They get
a kick out of it, and the shutter and
movement of the dome."
Several people have donated old
telescopes to the observatory. Eight
telescopes have been donated, "nice
scopes," he said, some worth $1,000.
"We want to have enough so that kids
can take them out and set them up on
their own. That will give them a hands-
on appreciation. They will learn how to
find stars," he said.
The main telescope is computerized
and there's "no difficulty in finding
stars," he said.
The installation of a sun dial was
the next project. The human sundial
project consists of the construction of
an oval sundial approximately 25 feet
by 18 feet in front of the Estes Park
Memorial Observatory. The sundial
gnomon (the part that casts the shadow)
is a person. "A person can stand in the
center and his shadow casts the right
time," Connolly said. Concrete pavers
BETTER HEARING IS Knocking CAN YOU HEAR IT? CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE HEARING SCREENING
BETTER HEARING IS
Knocking
CAN YOU HEAR IT?
CALL TODAY FOR YOUR
FREE HEARING SCREENING
AND UP TO $500 OFF
SELECT AGX TECHNOLOGY!
• CONSISTENTLY providing advanced
technology and superior service to the
community
• CONVENIENT house calls available
• PROVIDERS for most insurance
970.480.2952
541 Big Thompson Ave, Unit E
Estes Park, CO 80517
Lafayette 303.665.0454
Boulder 303.443.5085
Broomfield 303.465.4327
View our educational video at
www.familyhearingco.com

40 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

Come Come “Home” “Home” Af Af te te raDay in raDay in the the RoRockckieies!s!
Come Come “Home” “Home”
Af
Af
te
te
raDay in
raDay in
the
the
RoRockckieies!s!
20-16945
(bricks) are used to fill in and surround the sundial. The pavers are engraved with
(bricks) are used to fill in and surround
the sundial. The pavers are engraved
with individual messages and sold to
the public to support the observatory
and its programs. The Community
Service Committee of the Rotary Club
undertook a cooperative venture with
the observatory to build the sundial as
part of their annual community service
project. The Rotary's symbol is in the
center. Bricks are $100 each, with all
profits going to support the observatory
and school astronomy projects.
"There are very few communities
that have an observatory to use in this
way," Connolly said. "I just wanted
to do something good. It's having an
impact. Local communities — Boulder,
Longmont, Loveland — can come up
and bring their kids. I've been very lucky
in finding the Little Thompson people.
Without them, we'd have had to do it not
very well. I've learned quite a bit, but it's
a one-time thing. I want to get this one
going, so I can turn it over to a group
of enthusiasts with the same ideals. It's
been pretty consuming for my wife and
me. We'll get into the astronomy finally.
The good stuff is coming."
For more information, see the Web
site at www.angelsabove.org.
The observatory brings the stars down to earth for younger observers.
The observatory brings the stars down to earth for younger observers. 2010 Trail Vacation Edition —
The observatory brings the stars down to earth for younger observers. 2010 Trail Vacation Edition —

It's a dog's life

at the Dog Park

It's a d og 's life at th e D og Park A c ouple of

A couple of canines play fetch at the dog park.

Canine cutups can roam off-leash near Lake Estes

Trail-Gazette

D o you want to bring your dog? Before you decide, consider the facts of wilderness life that face

dogs who visit our mountains. Estes Park has a fenced dog park where you can exercise your canine companion. Otherwise, plan to stay connected with your dog via a leash. There are new and wonderful scents that may cause your perfectly behaved town dog to bolt into the forest unexpectedly. The call of the wild may overpower your call to your pet to come back. Dogs caught chasing wildlife may be shot by

42 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

the wildlife officer as predators. You can hike with your leashed dog in Roosevelt National Forest, but dogs are not allowed on the Rocky Mountain National Park trails. Shady parking spots are non-existent in the summer, so your park visits may be limited to developed picnic areas or parking spots. On walks, human companions are needed to help their visiting canines handle encounters with the residents. Deer, elk, bighorn sheep, marmots, chipmunks, raccoons and squirrels may consider them to be strange, unwelcome intruders; mountain lion, bear and coyote may see them as a tasty meal.

If your canine companion is a full- fledged family member, these issues won't be a problem and you will have a lovely time. Together, you can all go hiking in the national forest, window shopping in town, picnicking in the park and driving along scenic byways.

Dog Park Visit the Dog Park, off US 36, east of town, just east of the Stanley Park Fairgrounds. If you are coming into Estes Park on US 36 from Boulder, Longmont or Lyons, turn left onto Community Drive just before you get to the fairgrounds.

You'll see big Estes Lake on your right and a smaller lake on your left. That's when you need to slow down and get ready to turn left immediately into the parking lot. Dog park amenities: Benches, poop bags, no drinking water. Opened in the autumn of 2002, this park has proved to be very popular. It's divided into two sections, one of which has access to the lake. It is very windy and can get really cold, so bring warm clothing, and maybe a peacoat for your pooch.

The Keyhole got its name from its unique shape - r esembling an old fashioned

The Keyhole got its name from its unique shape - resembling an old fashioned keyhole.

What's in a name

From the simple to the obvious: many names tell a tale

Trail-Gazette

R ocky Mountain National Park is a fascinating place - and some of the names of places in the Park

are just as intriguing. Some names have simple meanings, such as The Keyhole. The Keyhole is a rock jutting from the northern ridge of Longs Peak. The hole is shaped like an oval open at the top, so it looks like a keyhole. Some names are based on what a place sounds like. The Keyboard of the Winds, for example, is a series of jagged cliffs in which the wind, howling around Longs Peak, seems to play mournful tunes. Names of places may be associated with sound in a different way. Roger Toll, a former park superintendent, named Knobtop Mountain to harmonize with Flattop and Notchtop. Some names are derived from sources See Name: Page 44

OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEK 1010%% OFOFFF AUTO PARTS ON ALL BATTERIES Mention this Ad You’ll Find
OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEK
1010%%
OFOFFF
AUTO PARTS
ON ALL
BATTERIES
Mention this Ad
You’ll Find It At Carquest
• Carquest Coast to Coast
Guarantee
• Domestic and Import
• Flywheel Turning
• Alternator and Battery Testing
• Custom Made Hydraulic Hoses
• Next Day Service on Most
Special Orders
Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30-5:30
Sat 8:00-4:30
Sun 9:00-3:00
433433 S.S. St.St. VrVrainain AvAvee
433433 S.S. St.St. VrVrainain AvAvee
970-586-6300970-586-6300
970-586-6300970-586-6300
GoingGoing OutOut OfOf BusinessBusiness SSaleale MovingMoving hohomeme toto carecare forfor familyfamily 221221 E.E.
GoingGoing OutOut OfOf BusinessBusiness SSaleale
MovingMoving hohomeme toto carecare forfor familyfamily
221221 E.E. RiversidRiversidee DDrivrivee

Name

from page 43

one might not expect. Hanging Valley for example is not a place where people were lynched; it refers to valleys carved by a thousand- feet deep glacier during the Ice Age. The valleys are suspended a thousand feet above the glacial floor, and their streams have since cut their way downward to form sheer falls like Thousand Falls and Horseshoe Falls. Horseshoe Park, one of the park's more popular spots, especially for viewing elk during their fall rut, may have been named for the horseshoe- shaped curves Fall River makes as it meanders down the valley. Or, it might come from the horseshoe shape of the valley. Countless places have been named in honor of early settlers or businessmen in

the Estes Valley. Hondius Park was named for Peter Hondius, an immigrant from Holland who came to the area for his health and lived on a two thousand acre homestead in what is now Rocky Mountain National Park. A group of photographers named Peck Glacier for Allen Steele Peck, the former regional director for the Rocky Mountain region of the U.S. Forest Service. Numerous places were named for the Native Americans that frequented and lived in the area prior to white settlement. Apiatan Mountain, located six miles west of Grand Lake, was named for a Kiowa chief who had earned the right to carry the feathered wooden ceremonial lance called an apiatan. Arapaho Bay on Lake Granby was named for the Arapaho, a plains tribe that considered the eastern slope of the northern Colorado Rockies their

the eastern slope of the northern Colorado Rockies their Devil's Gulch Road, northeast of Estes Park,

Devil's Gulch Road, northeast of Estes Park, is another potentially dangerous place because it is a difficult road with a precipitous hairpin curves.

personal hunting ground. Sometimes they crossed the Continental Divide into Middle Park for better hunting or to make war with the Utes who lived in the western mountains of Colorado. The Arapaho named Haynach Lakes. The Arapaho word haa'nach means, "snow water." They used the words haa konon, meaning "the lungs" for the mesa now known as Ta ble Mountain . T he color of jasper, an agate found here, resembled the color of animal lungs freshly drawn from a carcass. Native Americans sat in the sun on top of Table Mountain, which is located in the Shadow Mountain Recreation Area, to make arrowheads and ax heads. Archaeologists consider this one of the most important sites in northern Colorado. The Colorado Geographic Board may have named Ute Trail in 1915. It was the standard trail from Estes Park to the North Fork of the Colorado River. It had historically been known as Child's Trail because the Utes, who were reportedly short like children, often used it.

Pawnee Peak was named for another tribe in the area. The Pawnee, who now live in Oklahoma, roamed between the Platte and Arkansas rivers in eastern Colorado. The name Pawnee is derived from the word "parika," which means "horn." The Pawnees stiffened their scalp lock with paint and grease to make it stand up like a horn, daring their enemies to remove it. Hiamovi Mountain may have been named for a Cheyenne chief or for God. "Hiamovi" is a Native American word that means "God." Ellsworth Bethel proposed this name for the mountain that stand between Paradise Park and Hell Canyon. Surveyors for the Union Pacific

Railroad named Hell Canyon, located in the Indian Peaks area, in 1882. They almost died in the canyon when a fierce storm hit, and its name reflects their feelings about the place. Devils Gulch Road, northeast of Estes Park, is another potentially dangerous place because it is a difficult road with a precipitous hairpin curves. Devils Ladder is a very steep, rocky portion of trail just west of the east Portal of the Alva B. Adams Tunnel. Paradise Park, in the Grand Lake area, shows no sign of man's presence. Growth is undisturbed, perhaps because fallen logs and rotting timber make it almost impassable. Even elk and deer stay out of the area. It was once called Hell Canyon, which goes to show that "paradise" is in the eye of the beholder. Many places were also named for wildlife in the area. Bear Lake was named by Horace Ferguson, an early rancher, who saw a bear, an infrequent presence in the park, at the lake. Trap Creek appears on early maps of the area. At least six pit-type bear traps were dug along this lake up to the 1930s, when bear trapping was still legal in Colorado. Elk To oth ,ar ock on Ogallala Peak , was named for the large elk herds that roamed the Park in its early days. Elk were hunted for food and their carcasses were hauled to Denver and sold for three to four cents a pound. The large herds diminished and elk herds were reintroduced into the park in 1913. Not all animal place names are named for Park wildlife. Elephant Island, near Lake Granby, was most likely named for the little red elephant flowers that grow there. The flowers have blossoms on their upright stems that have an elephant -like trunk

on their upright stems that have an elephant -like trunk RestaurantRestaurantRestaurant AllAll thethe AllAll thethe
RestaurantRestaurantRestaurant AllAll thethe AllAll thethe tatastesstes ofof home.home. tatastesstes ofof home.home.
RestaurantRestaurantRestaurant
AllAll thethe
AllAll thethe tatastesstes ofof home.home.
tatastesstes ofof
home.home.
JustJust
JustJust likelike youyou rememberremember them.them.
likelike
youyou rememberremember
them.them.
BBBrrreakfasteakfasteakfast ServedServedServed AllAllAll DayDayDay DailyDailyDaily SpecialsSpecialsSpecials
361 S. St. Vrain Hwy 7•586-9001 • Open Daily at 7:00 a.m.
20-08604
Tues-Sat 10 -5 Sun 11-5 The Unique && The P.O. Box 347 418 High St.
Tues-Sat 10 -5 Sun 11-5
The
Unique
&&
The
P.O. Box 347
418 High St.
Lyons, CO
Unusual!
80540-0347
TheWhiteLionShop.com
303-823-9567
Fax 303-823-0995
20-18952
Unusual! 80540-0347 TheWhiteLionShop.com 303-823-9567 Fax 303-823-0995 20-18952 44 — 2 010 Trail Vacation Edition

44 — 2010 Trail Vacation Edition

The columbine, Colorado's state flower since 1899, has its name on several places, including Columbine

The columbine, Colorado's state flower since 1899, has its name on several places, including Columbine Bay, Columbine Creek and Columbine Lake. But there are no mountains with the name columbine.

growing from them. The columbine, Colorado's state flower since 1899, has its name on several places, including Columbine Bay, Columbine Creek and Columbine Lake. But there are no mountains with the name "columbine," which is odd since the intensely blue, rare dwarf columbine flourishes on mountain summits. Some place names have an especially interesting story behind them. Ta hosa Va lley in the Wild Basin area was almost named Elkanah Valley, but Enos Mills adamantly objected. Parson Elkanah Lamb was a member of the Front Range Settlers League, with which Mills had many disputes over the establishment of Rocky Mountain National Park, so Mills

the establishment of Rocky Mountain National Park, so Mills Blue sky and fall color create a

Blue sky and fall color create a classic look at Bear Lake, named such by an early settler who saw a b