Sie sind auf Seite 1von 31

EUROPEAN COMMISSION

DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR MARITIME AFFAIRS AND FISHERIES


POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND CO-ORDINATION
MARITIME POLICY

OPEN CALL FOR TENDERS


No MARE/2010/01

"Scenarios and drivers for


sustainable growth from
the oceans, seas and coasts"

TENDERING
SPECIFICATIONS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.

INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................... 3
1.1. General information concerning the call for tenders......................................... 3
1.2. General information concerning the contract .................................................... 3

2.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS.............................................................................. 4
2.1. Context ............................................................................................................. 4
2.2. Description of work........................................................................................... 9
2.3. Volume ........................................................................................................... 16

3.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLICABLE TO THE CALL FOR


TENDERS ................................................................................................................. 17
3.1. Tenders ........................................................................................................... 17
3.2. Prices

........................................................................................................... 17

3.3. Joint tenders..................................................................................................... 18


3.4. Subcontractors ................................................................................................. 19
3.5. Contacts ........................................................................................................... 19
4.

EVALUATION AND AWARD OF THE CONTRACT .......................................... 20


4.1. Identification of the tenderers.......................................................................... 20
4.2. Exclusion criteria............................................................................................. 21
4.3. Selection criteria.............................................................................................. 23
4.4. Award criteria.................................................................................................. 26

TECHNICAL ANNEX.30
Maritime sectors as defined in annex III of the study on the Economic Impact of
Maritime Industries in Europe
ANNEXES
- Annex 1: Draft standard service contract
- Annex 2: Tender forms
- Annex 3: Questionnaire and Checklist

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1.

General information concerning the call for tenders


The European Commission, represented for the purposes of this call for
tenders by the Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (DG
MARE), wishes to conclude a service contract for a study on the drivers for
sustainable growth from the oceans, seas, coastal regions and maritime
sectors.
Brief description of the context and purpose of the contract:
The study aims to identify future sources of sustainable1 growth and
employment based on marine resources (living and non-living), scientific or
economic activities in established, emerging or future maritime sectors and in
the coastal regions. It should identify the policy measures necessary to realize
the identified growth potentials as fast as possible and to the fullest extent. It
should focus on economic growth and job creation in a sustainable way,
assess the full spectrum of growth drivers and deterrents, covering for
example technological development, innovation potential, legal barriers or
skills requirements, and make an overview of actions needed to realise this
potential including a list of relevant recommended actions, with regard to all
levels of maritime governance (EU, Member States, regions, stakeholders)
prone to accelerate such growth.
Joint tenders and subcontracting are authorised.
The services required are described in detail in section 2 of these
specifications.

1.2.

General information concerning the contract


The contractual terms are included in the draft contract in Annex 1.
Duration of the contract: 20 months
Delivery of final report: 16 months after start of the contract
Terms of payment:
Pre-financing: 5 %
Interim payment 1: 10 % (following the approval by the Commission of the
1st interim report)
Interim payment 2: 20 % (following the approval by the Commission of the
2nd interim report)

"Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising
the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. (Brundtland Report, 1987). This concept
requires the reconciliation of environmental, social and economic demands.
3

Interim payment 3: 30 % (following the approval by the Commission of the


3rd interim report)
Payment of the balance: following the approval by the Commission of the
final report
2.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

2.1.

Context
Background
Maritime economic activities are important for Europe, notably for its coastal
regions, which are home to about 40% of the EU population. These regions
account for a production value of some 450 billion. In view of the current
economic, financial and social crisis, seriously affecting the maritime sectors,
there is a need to prepare for the post-crisis period and explore new growth
potentials.
In this context, Commission President Barroso called for boosting new
sources of growth, employment and social cohesion in inter alia the maritime
sector2. He stressed that Europe cannot continue to rely on demand-driven
economic growth. New sustainable sources of growth are to be unlocked.
Sustainability not only implies long term economic opportunities, but also
enhancing skills and promoting advanced technologies, whilst ensuring the
protection of Europe's maritime zones, biodiversity and the marine
environment. Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) will be a key instrument for
decision-making in this respect, requiring data management tools and a
variety of IT solutions which can help addressing the complexity of the task
in the European context.
Against this backdrop, the European Commission, under its Integrated
Maritime Policy (IMP)3, intends to identify the future potential of cuttingedge technologies and services for marine and maritime applications and
innovative uses of marine and coastal resources as drivers for innovation,
competitiveness and, ultimately, growth and jobs and social cohesion, in
established, emerging and prospective sectors.
Examples of new technological frontiers
The oceans, seas and coasts bear great promise for new economic activities,
based on exploration, utilization, innovation and technological development
and notably:
Technological developments can foster industrial applications and generate
societal benefit. Examples are: clean and energy-efficient ships including
alternative fuels and shore-side electricity supply; large-scale multifunctional

Political Guidelines for the next Commission:


http://ec.europa.eu/commission_2010-2014/president/pdf/press_20090903_en.pdf
For comprehensive information on the IMP, please refer to
http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/index_en.html
4

offshore platforms for aquaculture, the generation of renewable energy or


cargo transshipment; satellite communication and data acquisition;
surveillance; advanced logistics and e-services for transport; services for
remote areas. The European industry has started to explore future "visions"
which may provide some initial guidance on technological trends and their
possible realisations.4
Technological developments increasingly allow working at greater depth
(e.g. through ROVs and AUVs5). This opens opportunities for e.g. the
exploration of mineral and other resources in difficult locations.
Technologies can help exploiting renewable offshore energy sources such as
wind, waves, currents, thermo-gradient, or in a more distant future methane
hydrates or algae. Exploited former oil and gas deposits could be used for
carbon sequestration.
The deep-sea contains a wealth of largely undiscovered forms of life with so
far unknown genetic composition and functioning (life without
photosynthesis, survival in extreme conditions with regard to temperatures
and pressure) and holds unique biological and chemical processes. Marine
resources could be used for or inspire blue biotech developments with
applications in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, in food production and
processing, in biotechnology (e.g. permeable or adhesive tissues) or in bioengineering/bionics (e.g. sharkskin coating). Assessing the economic value of
biodiversity and realising this value in a sustainable way are among the key
challenges.
In contrast to depleting land-based deposits of minerals, the oceans contain
huge stocks of raw materials and minerals including iron ore, tin, copper,
manganese, gold, diamonds, sulphides, phosphorites, diamonds, lime,
siliceous sand and gravel alongside with energy sources (oil, gas, methane
hydrates). Rare metals such as gallium, neodymium, indium, lithium,
niobium and tantalum may be of particular interest due to their strategic
importance in high-tech applications. Key issues of their future exploitability
pertain to of the increased scarcity and prices of land based resources, to the
concentration, location and cost of commercial exploitation of sea based
resources, and to the ability to manage the environmental impacts to ensure
sustainability.
Technological solutions for coastal defence, flood protection, dike or port
construction or water drainage will become more important as the impacts of
climate change are increasingly felt. An environmentally sustainable coastal
management is required due to population pressure in and increased and
conflicting usage of coastal areas. Dredging for land reclamation for housing
(artificial islands) or port extensions needs to be done in respect of the marine
environment. New approaches to coastal living (e.g. floating houses) are
developing. Technology and process innovation could also help in the
cleaning up of derelict industrial sites, in sustainable waste management or in

4
5

See http://www. maritime-visions.net


ROV: Remotely Operated Vehicles; AUV: Autonomous Underwater Vehicle
5

helping defining the ecological limits and appropriate concepts for


sustainable tourism. Improved methods for the de-salination of seawater
could help to address water shortages in coastal region and on islands.
The potential of technology and innovation can help reducing the
environmental footprint, through e.g. increased energy-efficiency and the
reduction of GHG emissions. In general, the entire maritime economy must
move to a low-carbon structure. Combining methane hydrate extraction with
carbon capture and storage, growing algae which capture carbon and than can
be used for bio-fuels, or off-shore wind production combined with hydrogen
production are among future potentials raising questions of economic
viability and risk-reward issues for policy making.
Some of the above examples are already applied commercially, albeit at
various stages of development. Some technologies or innovations are
relatively near to the market and the problem lies in the lack of economic
incentives (e.g. clean ship engines), others require significant investments
(offshore energy facilities), whilst other topics are still within the domain of
applied or even basic research without a foreseeable market application yet.
Some technologies have generic applications, for a whole range of activities,
whereas others would be naturally associated to a particular sector or niche.
Definitions
Maritime sectors should be understood as industrial or service-related
activities that either directly or indirectly produce economic or non-economic
value from use of the sea or sea resources.
The maritime sectors for the purpose of this study are to be understood as
follows:
Area 1: Maritime sectors as defined in annex III of the study on the
Economic Impact of Maritime Industries in Europe.6 This list needs to be
updated by the contractor as part of work package 1, in order to include new
and future uses, examples of which have been given above.
Area 2: Activities generated from coast and sea-related recreation and
tourism, including the following types of activities: hotels and restaurants,
tour operators and tourist assistance, real estate, amusement parks, leisure
services (e.g. cruising, boat trips, rental of sports equipment, outdoor
activities and guided visits), museums, preservation of historical sites and
promotion of maritime heritage on land and afloat, and health/well-being.
Area 3: Fisheries exploitation of living sea resources and related activities.
Area 4: Exploitation of living and non-living resources on the basis of
extracting and/or processing natural resources from the sea. Such activities
would include, beyond the scope of the study on Economic Impact of
Maritime Industries in Europe, the extraction, processing or recreation of sea
resources for a variety of uses, such as energy generation, food for human or
6

Attached as a technical annex to the specifications


6

animal consumption, non-food usages in e.g. engineering, cosmetics or


medicinal purposes.
Area 5: Other (economic) activities related to the oceans and seas that can
contribute to sustainable growth and employment in maritime sectors or
coastal regions, or to the well-being of Europeans in coastal regions. This
concerns in particular enabling knowledge and data generation and services.
The above list of areas with maritime activities is not necessarily exhaustive.
If deemed appropriate, in light of future potentials for sustainable jobs and
growth, the contractor should suggest further areas of sea-related activities.
Areas of marine and maritime research relevant for IMP have been
exemplified in the European Strategy for Marine and Maritime Research7 and
should serve as a general reference for enabling technologies. They include:
Climate change and the oceans
Impact of human activities on coastal and marine ecosystems and their
management
Ecosystem approach to resource management and spatial planning
Marine biodiversity and its economic value in the future
Biotechnology
Continental margins and deep sea
Marine and maritime technology
Operational oceanography
Exploration and exploitation of marine traditional and renewable energy
resources
Marine Bionics
Potentials of extreme technologies for use in deep sea or ice, and
technologies covering key future challenges which potentially could find
solutions from the seas or related to the seas, such as mobility, health, food
security, in particular vitamins and proteins, need to be covered.
Documentation available
Information on all activities developed under the IMP can be found via the
weblink: http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/index_en.html
It is advised to study the full scope of activities, including sectoral policies
related to the seas, whether they have a direct economic relevance or not.
Tenderers are notably advised to consult the following reference material
(and updates to and follow-ups of these documents where those have become
available in the meantime):

COM(2008) 534 final of 03.09.2008


7

Policy documents (both specific to maritime affairs and more general):


An Integrated Maritime Policy for the EU ("Blue Paper"), COM(2007)
575 final of 10.10.2007
Progress Report on the EU's Integrated Maritime Policy, COM(2009) 540
final of 15.10.2009 and SEC(2009) 1343
A European Strategy for Marine and Maritime Research - A coherent
European Research Area framework in support of a sustainable use of
oceans and seas, COM(2008) 534 final of 03.09.2008.
Roadmap for Maritime Spatial Planning: Achieving Common Principles
in the EU, COM(2008) 791 final of 25.11.2008
A sustainable future for transport: Towards an integrated, technology-led
and user friendly system, COM(2009) 279 final of 17.6.20098
Sustainable Consumption and Production and Sustainable Industrial
Policy Action Plan, COM(2008) 397 final of 16.7.2008
The Raw Materials Initiative Meeting our critical needs for growth and
jobs in Europe, COM(2008) 699 final of 4.11.2008
The Europe 2020 Strategy9
Studies:10
The role of maritime clusters to enhance the strength and development of
maritime sectors
The economics of climate change adaptation in EU coastal regions
The Impact of tourism on Coastal Areas: Regional Development Aspects
(Study by the European Parliament)
Tourist facilities in ports Growth opportunities for the European
maritime economy: economic and environmentally sustainable
development of tourist facilities in ports
European lifestyles and marine ecosystems
Employment trends in all sectors related to the seas or using sea resources
Other studies:
Study on Competitiveness of the European Shipbuilding Industry,
ECORYS SCS Group for DG Enterprise and Industry, ENTR/06/054,
October 2009
Study on future skill needs in selected sectors11

9
10
11

Concerning transport matters, tenderers should also look at the contributions to the on-going future of
transport debate:
http://ec.europa.eu/transport/strategies/events/2009_11_20_future_of_transport_en.htm
http://ec.europa.eu/europe2020/europe-2020-step-by-step/
Direct link to list of studies at http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/studies_en.html
http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=784&langId=en
8

Tenderers are also advised to look at the Commission's new integrated


innovation strategy and at RTD and innovation activities under other EU
policies, including the Joint Technology Initiative12, the relevant research
chapters under FP713, the European Institute of Technology14, the Lead
Market Initiative15, and the report from the high-level foresight expert group
on "The World in 2025"16.
In addition, the 2005 Marine Industries Global Market Analysis17 by the Irish
Marine Institute, the Irish SmartOcean Innovation Strategy18, as well as the
U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy Report "An Ocean Blueprint for the 21st
Century"19 and works under the US National Ocean Economics Program20
can provide a useful background.
2.2.

Description of work
Objectives
The study aims to conduct an in-depth analysis and foresight of cutting-edge
knowledge, technology and innovation as a basis for shaping future wealth
from oceans, seas and coasts scenarios (the study has to cover the subject in a
comprehensive and complete fashion, without any significant gaps in relation
to maritime sectors and activities covered, technologies and skills employed
and positive and negative drivers for the roll-out of growth scenarios). On
this basis (i.e. with knowledge, technology and innovation as cross-sectoral
drivers and generic enablers), it should sketch sustainable economic growth
scenarios to guide future policy strategies covering all relevant maritime
policy areas as well as for programming research, technological development
and innovation activities. Policy strategies are understood to cover EU,
Member States and regional levels. In this context, it is of importance for the
tenderer to understand the underlying concepts and the implications of the
Marine Strategy Framework Directive21, the increasing tendency towards an
appropriation of the maritime space and marine resources, and the evolution
of a more integrated understanding of the economic benefits from Exclusive
Economic Zones (EEZs).
The study should develop a set of alternative growth scenarios on the basis of
an assessment of the potential, in economic terms, for innovation and
technology based on marine resources, and maritime and coastal technologies
for the period from 2010 to 2025.

12
13
14
15
16
17

18
19
20
21

http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/tl/research/priv_invest/jti/index_en.htm
http://cordis.europa.eu/
http://eit.europa.eu/
http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/policies/innovation/policy/lead-market-initiative/index_en.htm
http://ec.europa.eu/research/social-sciences/pdf/the-world-in-2025-report_en.pdf
http://www.marine.ie/NR/rdonlyres/B66FBE34-3859-4FA8-9ABF8C8558CDB15E/0/ForesightSeries1_global_market_analysis.pdf
http://www.marine.ie/home/SmartOceanI.htm
http://oceancommission.gov/documents/full_color_rpt/000_ocean_full_report.pdf
http://www.oceaneconomics.org/
Directive 2008/56/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 June 2008 establishing a
framework for community action in the field of marine environmental policy
9

The task is understood to involve a screening of technological (meta-)trends,


and of current activities undertaken by EU Member States and key OECD
countries (US, Norway, Canada, Japan, Australia, South Korea), the OECD
itself and key UN bodies, science, industry, and technology and knowledge
providers.
Description of work and deliverables
Collection and classification of material
The contractor should collect the relevant basic material, facts, prospective
and foresight studies and trend analyses, and expert forecasts through desk
research and a series of explorative interviews with key actors in the field of
innovation and science policy, technology development and applications for
marine and maritime purposes.22 Desk research should be conducted to
provide a comprehensive overview of maritime sectors and activities, marine
resources, knowledge and data sources, innovations and technological
developments that could generate growth and jobs in the future in each of the
research areas to be covered by the study (see under definitions), covering the
full geographic area.
A series of interviews with experts in the field should be conducted,
including

22

Representatives of key maritime industries (engaged in management,


market prospection and research) to be covered by the study;

A representative group of researchers from international research


networks, European leading marine and maritime research institutes and
technology experts covering the research areas identified by the study. It is
expected from the contractor that he can deal with these representatives of
the research community with the appropriate insight into the level of
current academic excellence;

A representative group of public authorities involved in the development


of forward economic strategies and decision-making relevant to future
innovation and growth based on marine resources, maritime and coastal
technology.

Where applicable (e.g. in environmental and labour market matters)


interviews should also be conducted with a selected number of individuals
who have expertise in the application of the concept of sustainability in
the study areas.

Concerning existing or on-going study work particular attention must be given to work undertaken by
other Commission services dealing with maritime matters in order to avoid an unnecessary duplication
of efforts. DG MARE is available for guidance in this respect and expects the contractor to contact
other projects where applicable. The contractor, therefore, needs to understand the full scope of
maritime related activities across the services of the European Commission. In this respect, the
Progress Report on the EU's Integrated Maritime Policy, COM(2009) 540 final of 15.10.2009 and
SEC(2009) 1343 provide the necessary comprehensive set of references.

10

The contractor should present groups of interviewees who are representing


state of the art and cutting edge thinking. Interviews do not need to be
limited to Europe, but the groups should be representative for Europe, e.g.
in terms of weight of economic interests and potentials in Europe, research
areas and geographical balance. The groups are to be presented for
approval to the Commission before proceeding with the surveys. The
interviews should take place on the basis of a proposed methodology (to
be contained in the tender) as regards a significant number and balance of
face-to-face interviews, telephone calls and written survey material.
Questions are to be submitted for approval to the Commission prior to
dispatch.
Based on material in possession or to be gathered, the contractor should
provide a detailed and comprehensive classification of the information in the
following way:

Political relevance: Ranking of the relevance of marine resources,


innovations and maritime and coastal technologies in light of the key
political EU goals in terms of economic growth and jobs, climate change
action, clean and safe energy, sustainable transport and mobility, food
supply, public health and civil protection, security and defence, societal
challenges (including demographic change), and environmental
considerations, including clean water, biodiversity, clean beaches etc.;

Economic relevance: Ranking of resources and technologies in terms of


their current and future market value (expressed in GDP generation, job
creation) and current and potential market penetration, indicating their
application in one or more sectors or across sectors. It should cover the
maritime sectors in each of the economic areas identified under the
definitions and indicate the relative position of the EU as regards
developments worldwide.
When analysing and ranking the technological and innovative potentials,
the study should differentiate between today's 7 biggest sectors in the
maritime and coastal economy in absolute terms, the 7 sectors with the
highest relative growth in the last 5 years before 2008, and 7 sectors that
are most promising to result in genuinely new activities/markets in the
future, thus covering the areas with the absolutely highest growth and jobs
potentials, the areas with proven strongest relative growth potential, and
the inspiring areas on which major future projects could focus.

23

An overview of technology hotspots, meaning areas and maritime clusters


with a particular focus and potential, and an assessment of the longer term
potential per sea basin23 (regional relevance);

List and assessment of ongoing relevant private research and publicly


funded research and innovation in EU programmes, Member State's
national programmes and research, innovation and relevant foresight
activities in key OECD countries (esp. in Norway, Canada, Australia,
Japan, South Korea and the USA);

Baltic Sea, North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Atlantic including the English Channel, Arctic
Sea, and Outermost Regions
11

List and assessment of recent and ongoing policy initiatives (including


selection of policy tools) in EU Member States and key OECD countries
with regard to marine resources, knowledge and data generation,
innovations and maritime and coastal technologies (special attention must
be given to marine and maritime foresight activities24);

Overview of essential conditions and skills required for the


commercialisation of identified key technologies and innovations, with
particular attention given to demographic challenges and the quality of life
and employment in coastal regions and maritime sectors.

Conclusions and recommendations


The collected material and the initial rankings and assessments should help
extrapolate the importance of the various marine resources and uses of the
sea, innovations and technology for the EU as the basis for developing
alternative scenarios on the pace and direction of future growth (on the basis
of different economic assumptions including impact on GDP, price of raw
materials, international trade, climate change impacts, social and political
desirability, required research intensity, existing assets and strengths, quality
of life in coastal regions etc.). An analysis is to be made of the relative
existing and possible future strengths of Europes different sea basins with
regard to these scenarios. The analysis must be based on established socioeconomic indicators and knowledge on scientific, industrial and human
competence available. Where these are not sufficient, other indicators should
be suggested.
On this basis, the scenarios should provide clearly formulated conclusions as
regards the recommended actions to be taken by public authorities in the EU
and in Member States, by research entities and by private operators under
each of the scenarios - that would be necessary to unlock and foster
sustainable economic growth and job creation, pointing in a concrete manner
to the bottlenecks and issues for private operators and public policy-makers
to address in the years to come. They should notably cover the following
issues:

24

Areas where more basic or applied research efforts are needed prior to
commercialisation, and which generic innovation trends and technological
developments should be supported;

Marine and maritime knowledge and data needs;

Challenges for industry and public authorities: this could cover steps
needed to set the appropriate framework conditions fostering growth,
including for example overcoming legal and regulatory obstacles,
providing market incentives and triggering "market pull", also through
public procurement, optimising planning, licensing and certification
processes, addressing education and training needs, supporting new
cooperation patterns, including those on international level or through the
promotion of cluster activities, activating financing, enabling risk
mitigation and management, etc..

See for example here: http://www.parliament.uk/documents/upload/postpn288.pdf


12

The scenario-setting should be done in such a way that EU policy


intervention, also in terms of a policy mix, can seamlessly feed into the EU
mainstream policy process (also in respect to EU policy making under the
Treaty of Lisbon and the Europe 2020 Strategy) and can make optimised use
of EU funding instruments. It is expected that the policy outlook for the IMP
contained in the Progress Report on the EU's Integrated Maritime Policy is
fully reflected in the scenarios and in the ranking with regard to political
relevance.
With regard to the future policy strategies in support of the realisation of the
economic growth scenarios the contractor is expected to draw up a high-level
policy paper containing the recommendations for action. A full impact
assessment of all possible EU policy interventions must be provided, in line
with the relevant rules of the Commission25.
The existing or emerging participative structures on the side of stakeholders
(industry, academia, NGOs etc.) in the EU's Integrated Maritime Policy must
be taken into account for both the development and the proposed
implementation of the growth scenarios.
Results should also be presented in a series of matrixes of actors (authorities
[with a distinction between global, EU, national and regional levels],
academia, industry) and measures by technology area.
Intermediate hearing
Given the explorative nature of the study and the relative uncertainty of
findings, the contractor has to organise an intermediate public hearing with
interested parties. During this hearing the contractor should present his
findings from the desk research and the series of interviews as outlined
above.
The presentation must be done in a way that allows stakeholders to form a
first opinion on the feasibility of growth scenarios and provide a concrete
feedback with regard to further potentials as well as to challenges and
limiting factors. In this respect, key questions should be developed and
proposed. Such a meeting should bring together scientists, industry,
economists, market watch, forecasting experts, policy-makers on the level of
Member States and of coastal regions, and NGOs. The contractor is asked to
propose a practical approach to this hearing, e.g. in the form of a workshop
with scenario- or sector-specific breakout sessions as typically used in
foresight related projects. He should also propose a draft list of participants
for approval by the Commission. The hearing should allow the contractor to
refine the scenarios in preparation for the one-day workshop outlined below.
General aspects of the hearing (location in Brussels, number of participants,
preparatory material for the participants) are to be developed by the
contractor, keeping in mind a comprehensive approach with respect to the
25

The Commission's Impact Assessment Guidelines can be found here:


http://ec.europa.eu/governance/impact/commission_guidelines/commission_guidelines_en.htm
13

selection of stakeholders and issues (a indicative total of 20-30


experts/participants is estimated). The hearing should be held in English only
and the intermediate study findings must be made available to the
participants in written form 4 weeks prior to the hearing. The contractor must
cover the entire organisation and implementation of the hearing (including
meeting facilities, catering, travel arrangements for all participants (including
covering the travel costs), etc.). The costs linked to the hearing should be
included in the financial tender accordingly.
One-day presentation
Before finalisation, the contractor should hold a one-day presentation in
Brussels to discuss the draft results. On the basis of a draft list of participants
to be provided by the Commission, the contractor should prepare and
circulate the agenda among the participants. As for the above hearing the
draft results must be made available to the participants in written form 4
weeks in advance. The estimated number of participants will be around 50.
Participants should receive 4 weeks time after the workshop for written
comments, which the contractor should evaluate and decide whether or not to
amend the report accordingly. The contractor must cover the entire
organisation and implementation of the event (including meeting facilities,
catering, travel arrangements for all participants (including covering the
travel costs where applicable), etc.). The costs linked to the event should be
included in the financial tender accordingly.
End report
An executive summary of the study of approximately 15 pages, with
clear and easy to read scenarios, conclusions and recommendations,
also per sea basins, using adequate graphs, tables and maps for the
purpose of clarity;
A full study report including a description of the current situation -in
terms of GDP and employment and a general description of marine
resources use and RTD acquis-, the various growth scenarios, the
outcome of the intermediate hearing, and the recommendations for
future action and conclusions;
A methodology report including full lists of technologies, innovations
and resources assessed, organisations involved in the assessment,
people interviewed and the results of the one-day workshop;
A set of annexes providing key studies used, names and addresses of
interviewees, economic calculations, maps, tables, graphs and all other
relevant material. The annexes should contain summaries of findings
according to the classification of the information, for all items per
country and international organisations, and per technology, as well as
original documents referred to;
A high-level policy paper of 15 pages, based on the study findings, and
drafted along the best practice to be identified by the Contractor among
the Commission documents referred to under 2.1 "Documentation
available";
14

A full impact assessment of the recommended EU policy interventions,


in line with the applicable Commission guidelines and current practice.
All documentation, including annexes, should be provided in three copies in
paper format in English26 as well as in electronic format allowing editing and
formatting by the Commission in MSWord.
Time frame
Work package one: Work plan and data gathering
The contractor should present a refined work plan on the implementation of
the study, based on the initial work plan as set out in the tender, at an
inception meeting within the first month after the signature of the contract,
allowing the Commission to discuss the individual steps in the plan. The
work plan should include a full list of paper and web material to be studied
under a desk research and list of names of organisations to be contacted,
including complete and detailed travel plans. It should also provide a detailed
time planning, including estimated work days, staff involvement and
deadlines for each task in the study, for example in a chart format.
A first interim report has to be submitted three months after the signature of
the contract. It should include a description of the results of desk research (in
terms of economic outlook, the updated list of maritime sectors and activities,
available and missing knowledge and data sources, a first long list of
potentially promising resources, innovation and technology ["scoping"]). An
implementation plan for the interviews with relevant people has to be
provided. The report should set out the work plan for the next phase and also
signal any issues that may affect the smooth execution of work.
Work package two: Analysis and classification of material
The contractor should analyse the material gathered under the first work
package (in terms of pertinence and relevance) and proceed with the
execution of the interviews (based on detailed contacts with individuals),
with summaries for each of the interviews and prepare the results and key
messages per economic sector and research area.
A second interim report has to be submitted eight months after the signature
of the contract. It should include a technology and innovation forecast on the
basis of the desk research and the interviews. It should provide a detailed
report on the interviews conducted, with written summaries for each of the
interview and conclusions per economic sector and research area. The report
should set out the work plan for the next phase and also signal any issues that
may affect the smooth execution of work. The second interim report should
form the basis for the intermediate hearing.

26

The original documents required for the annexes can be provided in the original language, if not
available in a working language of the Commission (English, French, German).
15

Work package three: Qualification of material and definition of scenarios


The contractor should in this phase qualify the material on the basis of
technology assessment and economic forecasting covering all the elements
set out under the heading description of work and deliverables. The
contractor should draw up the various future growth scenarios, taking into
account the result from the intermediate hearing which should be organised
in this work package and should be duly documented.
The contractor should present these draft scenarios to participants selected by
the Commission on proposal of the contractor in a one-day meeting in
Brussels. Based on the outcome of the discussion, the scenarios should be
finalised and the conclusions and recommendations should be drawn up.
A third interim report has to be submitted fourteen months after the signature
of the contract. It should present the final scenarios and draft conclusions and
recommendations as well as a report on the intermediate hearing and the oneday meeting and used to develop and test the initial scenarios. The report
should set out the work plan for the next phase and also signal any issues that
may affect the smooth execution of work.
Work package four: Finalisation of project
Based on the three work packages, the contractor draws up a draft final report
with all the components indicated under the work description "End report" to
be submitted sixteen months after the signature of the contract.
Further to the Commissions comments, the contractor submits a final report,
with all elements set out above. The Commission will make this report
available to selected stakeholders in order to collect further comments. Such
comments will be provided to the contractor within 2 months, after which the
contractor draws up the final versions of all documents making up the final
study report.
General issues
The contractor should indicate one person as contact point for all issues
related to the contract (e.g. the project manager) and schedule five visits to
the Commission in Brussels throughout the duration of the contract. These
management-related visits include the inception meeting, but not the
intermediate hearing and the one-day meeting which relate to the contents of
the study.
2.3.

Volume
The maximum price for the contract (all costs included) amounts to
EUR 1 000 000 (one million euro).

16

3.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLICABLE TO THE CALL FOR TENDERS

3.1.

Tenders
Tenderers must include all the information and documentation required to
enable the authorising department to appraise tenders in accordance with the
criteria set out in section 4.
All documents presented by the tenderers will become the property of the
European Commission and are to be deemed confidential.
The tender must be submitted in triplicate (one copy clearly identified
Original, and two copies marked Copy 1 and Copy 2; Copy 2 should
be unbound), in three sealed envelopes:
1) One sealed envelope containing the documentation for the identification of
the tenderer and exclusion and selection criteria as requested under sections
4.1, 4.2 and 4.3 of the tendering specifications, including the questionnaire in
Annex 3, the legal entity form and the financial identification form.
2) One sealed envelope containing the technical tender according to section
4.4.1 of the tendering specifications, including the technical tender form in
Annex 2, filled in and signed by the tenderer. The technical tender should
contain no financial information.
3) One sealed envelope containing the financial tender, i.e. the financial
tender form in Annex 2, filled in and signed by the tenderer.
Each of these envelopes must clearly indicate the content ("Identification,
Exclusion and Selection Criteria", "Technical" and "Financial").
All tenders will be opened in public at the place, on the date and at the time
specified in the covering letter of this call for tenders. Tenderers or their
authorised representatives are allowed to attend the opening. These persons
will have to sign an attendance list.
For practical reasons, tenderers are requested to inform DG MARE by e-mail
(mare-tenders@ec.europa.eu) of their wish to attend the opening no later than
one week before the meeting.

3.2.

Prices
The Commission enters into contracts and makes payments in Euro.
Prices must be free of all duties, taxes and dues (on the grounds that the
Commission is exempt from such charges under the provisions of Articles 3
and 4 of the Protocol on the Privileges and Immunities of the European
Union).
Prices must be quoted in Euro, exclusive of VAT and all taxes and dues. The
amounts must be quoted to two decimal places.

17

Costs incurred in preparing and submitting tenders are borne by the


tenderers.
All costs linked directly or indirectly with the performance of the contract
shall be incorporated into the financial tender. No additional reimbursement
of costs linked to the performance of the contract like travel and subsistence
expenses will be provided.
Prices shall be fixed and not subject to revision.
In signing and submitting an offer, the tenderer shall certify that:
the prices indicated in the tender have been laid down in full
independence, without consultation or communication on any of the points
concerning the price with another tenderer or competitor;
unless the law stipulates otherwise, the prices indicated in the tender have
not been and will not be voluntarily communicated by the tenderer to
another tenderer or competitor, directly or indirectly, before the offers are
opened;
the tenderer has not attempted and will not attempt to induce other persons
to present a tender or to prevent them from so doing with a view to
restricting competition.
3.3.

Joint tenders
A joint tender is a situation where an offer is submitted by a group of service
providers. Partners in a joint tender assume joint and several liability
towards the Commission for the performance of the contract as a whole.
Statements, saying for instance:
- that one of the partners of the joint tender will be responsible for part of
the contract and another one for the rest, or
- that more than one contract should be signed if the joint tender is
successful
are thus incompatible with the principle of joint and several liability. The
Commission will disregard any such statement contained in a joint tender,
and reserves the right to reject such a tender without further evaluation, on
the grounds that it does not comply with the tendering specifications.
A joint tender has to be signed by all members of the group, or by one of the
members, which has been duly authorised by the other members.
A joint tender must specify the role of each of the members involved.
If awarded the contract, each member of the group assumes a joint and
several liability towards the Commission. The contract will have to be
signed by all members of the group, or by one of the members, which has
been duly authorised by the other members.
18

3.4.

Subcontractors
Subcontracting is the situation where a contract is to be established between
the Commission and a contractor and where the contractor, in order to carry
out that contract, enters into legal commitments with other legal entities for
performing part of the service. However, the Commission has no direct legal
commitment with the subcontractor(s).
The contractor retains full liability towards the Commission for performance
of the contract as a whole. Accordingly:
- the Commission will treat all contractual matters (e.g. payments)
exclusively with the contractor, whether or not the tasks are performed by
a subcontractor;
- under no circumstances can the contractor avoid liability towards the
Commission on the grounds that the subcontractor is at fault.
Any intention to subcontract part of the contract must be clearly stated in the
tender.
Tenderers should provide:
- a document stating clearly the identity, roles, activities and responsibilities
of subcontractor(s) and specifying the volume/proportion for each
subcontractor;
- a letter of intent by each subcontractor stating its unambiguous
undertaking to collaborate with the tenderer if he wins the contract and the
extent of the resources that it will put at the tenderers disposal for the
performance of the contract.
If the above-mentioned documents are not provided, the Commission shall
assume that the tenderer does not intend subcontracting.

3.5.

Contacts
The contact point indicated in the covering letter of this call for tenders is the
only one allowed. Tenderers are requested to put any questions in writing
and to send them to the e-mail address indicated. Queries by telephone will
not be considered.
Questions concerning the administrative procedures will be treated
individually. If the reply to a question is of general interest, it will be made
available on DG MARE website at the following address:
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/maritimeaffairs_fisheries/contracts_and_funding/calls
_for_tender/index_en.htm
The site will be updated regularly and it is tenderers' responsibility to check
for updates and modifications during the tendering period.

19

4. EVALUATION AND AWARD OF THE CONTRACT


The evaluation will be based on the information provided by the tenderer in the
tender submitted in reply to this call for tenders.
In addition, the Commission reserves the right to use any other information from
public or specialist sources. All the information will be assessed in the light of the
criteria set out in these specifications.
The evaluation will proceed in stages, as described below. Only the tenders meeting
the requirements of each stage will pass on to the next stage of the evaluation. The
final stage involves the award of the contract.
The stages of the evaluation procedure will be as follows:
1)

Identification of the tenderer.

2)

Exclusion criteria: the purpose of these criteria is to determine whether the


tenderer is authorised to participate in the procurement procedure.

3)

Selection criteria: the purpose of these criteria is to determine whether the


tenderer has the necessary financial, economic, technical and professional
capacity to carry out the contract.

4)

Award criteria: the purpose of these criteria is to choose between the tenders
which have been submitted by the tenderers not subject to exclusion and
which meet the selection criteria.

4.1.

Identification of the tenderers


Tenderers must complete the questionnaire in Annex 3.
In addition, tenderers must fill in the "Legal entity form" (if they are not
already registered as service providers of the Commission) and the "Financial
identification form" available at the following addresses:
Legal entity form:
http://ec.europa.eu/budget/execution/legal_entities_en.htm
Financial information form:
http://ec.europa.eu/budget/execution/ftiers_en.htm
These forms should be attached to the identification questionnaire in
Annex 3.
In the case of a joint tender, the questionnaire and forms must be completed
by one of the members, which has been duly authorised by the other
members.

20

4.2.

Exclusion criteria
In the case of a joint tender and/or subcontracting, information on exclusion
criteria must be provided by each member of the group and/or
subcontractor27.
The exclusion criteria will be assessed in relation to each member of the
group and subcontractor individually. If a member of the group or a
subcontractor is subject to exclusion, the tenderer shall be excluded.
By providing the declaration on their honour in relation to the exclusion
criteria as required under sections 4.2.1 and 4.2.2 below, tenderers
acknowledge that they have been acquainted with the administrative and
financial penalties described under art 133 and 134 b of Commission
Regulation 2342/2002 of 23 December 2002 laying down detailed rules for
the implementation of the Financial Regulation applicable to the general
budget of the European Communities, which may be applied if any of the
declarations or information provided prove to be false.
4.2.1. Exclusion from participation in the procurement procedure
Tenderers must provide a declaration on their honour, duly signed and dated,
stating that they are not in any of the situations described hereafter.
Tenderers will be disqualified from taking part in the procurement procedure
if they:
(a) are bankrupt or being wound up, are having their affairs being
administered by the courts, have entered into an arrangement with
creditors, have suspended business activities, are the subject of
proceedings concerning those matters, or are in any analogous situation
arising from a similar procedure provided for in national legislation or
regulations;
(b) have been convicted of an offence concerning their professional conduct
by a judgment which has the force of res judicata;
(c) have been guilty of grave professional misconduct proven by any means
which the contracting authority can justify;
(d) have not fulfilled obligations relating to the payment of social security
contributions or the payment of taxes in accordance with the legal
provisions of the country in which they are established or with those of
the country of the contracting authority or those of the country where the
contract is to be performed;

27

This requirement does not apply to subcontractors whose individual share in subcontracting is less
than 5 % of the total value of the contract.

21

(e) have been the subject of a judgment which has the force of res judicata
for fraud, corruption, involvement in a criminal organisation or any other
illegal activity detrimental to the Union's financial interests;
(f) are currently subject to an administrative penalty imposed by the
contracting authority as a consequence of having been guilty of
misrepresentation in supplying the information required by the
contracting authority as a condition of participation in a procurement
procedure or as a consequence of having been declared to be in serious
breach of their obligations under contracts covered by the Union's
budget.
Tenderers are informed that the tenderer to whom the contract is to be
awarded will be requested to furnish, within a time limit defined by the
contracting authority and preceding the signature of the contract, evidence
confirming his declaration with regard to the situations of exclusion
described in point (a), (b), (d) and (e).
In the case of a joint tender and/or subcontracting, evidence will have to be
furnished by each member of the group and/or subcontractor28.
The contracting authority shall accept, as satisfactory evidence that the
tenderer to whom the contract is to be awarded is not in one of the situations
described in point (a), (b) or (e), a recent extract from the judicial record or,
failing that, an equivalent document recently issued by a judicial or
administrative authority in the country of origin or provenance showing that
those requirements are satisfied.
The contracting authority shall accept, as satisfactory evidence that the
tenderer is not in the situation described in point (d), a recent certificate
issued by the competent authority of the State concerned.
For any of the situations (a), (b), (d) or (e) above, where any document or
certificate referred to above is not issued in the country concerned, it may be
replaced by a sworn or, failing that, a solemn statement made by the
interested party before a judicial or administrative authority, a notary or a
qualified professional body in his country of origin or provenance.
The contracting authority may waive the obligation of the tenderer to whom
the contract is to be awarded to submit the documentary evidence if such
evidence has already been submitted to it for the purposes of another
procurement procedure and provided that the issuing date of the documents
does not exceed one year and that they are still valid.
In such a case, the tenderer to whom the contract is to be awarded shall
declare on his honour that the documentary evidence has already been
provided in a previous procurement procedure and confirm that no changes in
his situation have occurred.
28

This requirement does not apply to subcontractors whose individual share in subcontracting is less
than 5 % of the total value of the contract.
22

4.2.2. Exclusion from award of the contract


A contract shall not be awarded to tenderers who, during the procurement
procedure for this contract:
(a) are subject to a conflict of interest;
(b) are guilty of misrepresentation in supplying the information required by
the contracting authority as a condition of participation in the procurement
procedure or fail to supply this information;
(c) find themselves in one of the situations of exclusion from participation in
the procurement procedure.
Tenderers must declare on their honour:
- that on the date of submission of the tender, the company or organisation
they represent and the staff proposed for this tender are not subject to a
conflict of interests in the context of this call for tenders and that they
undertake to inform the Commission without delay of any change to this
situation after the date of submission of the tender;
- that they will carry out the study and/or provide services to the highest
professional standards, in particular in terms of objectiveness and
impartiality and exclusively in the best interests of the contracting
authority with no consideration linked to any possibility of a future
contract;
- that they guarantee that there is no conflict of interests with other
commitments or contracts recently concluded or to be concluded them
either individually or through any consortium to which they might belong
or through any subsidiary or related company.
- that they have not made and will not make any offer of any type
whatsoever from which an advantage can be derived under the contract;
- that they have not granted and will not grant, have not sought and will not
seek, have not attempted and will not attempt to obtain, and have not
accepted and will not accept, any advantage, financial or in kind, to or
from any party whatsoever, constituting an illegal practice or involving
corruption, either directly or indirectly, as an incentive or reward relating
to the award of the contract;
- that the information provided to the Commission within the context of this
call for tenders is accurate, sincere and complete;
- that in case of award of the contract, they shall provide the evidence that
they are not in any of the situations described in section 4.2.1 under (a),
(b), (d), (e).
4.3.

Selection criteria
4.3.1. Economic and financial capacity
23

In the case of a joint tender and/or subcontracting, information on economic


and financial capacity must be provided by each member of the group and/or
subcontractor29.
The selection criteria for economic and financial capacity set as minimum
standards on financial and economic standing will be assessed in relation to
each member of the group and subcontractor individually. If a member of the
group or a subcontractor does not fulfil these selection criteria, the tenderer
shall not be selected.
For selection criteria for economic and financial capacity that are deemed to
be achieved above a certain level, a consolidated assessment shall be made
(all members of the grouping together plus subcontractor(s)).
Tenderers must furnish the following supporting documents for verification
of their economic and financial capacity:
- Copy of the balance sheets for the last two years for which accounts have
been closed, showing the annual pre-tax profit. If, for a valid reason,
tenderers are unable to provide them, they must enclose a statement as to
annual pre-tax profits for the last two years.
If the balance sheets or the statement show an average loss, then tenderers
must furnish another document as proof of their financial and economic
capacity, such as appropriate bank references or proof of professional risk
insurance cover.
- Statement as to overall annual turnover realised during the last two years.
Minimum level demanded: tenderers must provide evidence of an average
overall annual turnover of at least EUR 1 000 000.
Tenderers may, where appropriate, rely on the capacities of other entities,
regardless of the legal nature of the links which they have with them. They
must in this case prove to the contracting authority that they will have at their
disposal the resources necessary for performance of the contract, for example
by producing an undertaking on the part of those entities to place those
resources at their disposal.
Under the same conditions, a group of service providers may rely on the
capacities of the members of the group or of other entities.
4.3.2. Technical and professional capacity
In the case of a joint tender and/or subcontracting the selection criteria for
technical and professional capacity will be assessed in relation to the
combined capacities of all members of the group and/or subcontractors, as a

29

This requirement does not apply to subcontractors whose individual share in subcontracting is less
than 5 % of the total value of the contract.
24

whole, to the extent that subcontractors put their resources at the disposal of
the tenderer for the performance of the contract.
Tenderers must furnish the following supporting documents for verification
of their technical and professional capacity:
- Statement of the average annual manpower and the number of managerial
staff in the last three years. Minimum level demanded: tenderers must
provide evidence of having employed at least three managerial staff with
academic education and fifteen annual manpower in total.
- The educational and professional qualifications and language skills of the
tenderer's managerial staff and, in particular, those of the person or
persons responsible for providing the services (Curriculum vitae).
Specifically, the minimum number of CVs is

2 for Category I (management staff with > 10 years experience, 1 for


the project director, with an alternate person of the same qualification
to be named). The project director must have experience in foresight
study work;

3 for Category II (senior staff with academic qualifications and 5


years experience;

4 for Category III (junior staff with academic qualifications and < 5
years experience;

2 for Category IV (administrative staff).

Minimum level demanded: tenderers must provide evidence of their


ability to rely on staff with academic qualifications in economic/social
sciences, natural sciences and engineering with a specialisation relevant to
the tasks covered by the contract (i.e. foresight study work and economic
scenario development). At least eight persons involved in the contract
should have academic qualifications; these eight people should have
relevant work experience of at least three years in the following fields:

Economics, statistical analysis, prospection, trend analysis or


economic forecasting

Technology screening and technological forecasting

Marine research (e.g. oceanography, marine biology, geology or


ocean-related climate research)

Maritime engineering (e.g. shipbuilding, equipment, oil and gas,


renewables, mining or coastal works)

Economic and innovation policy on EU or Member State level

- A description of the measures to ensure the quality of services. Minimum


level demanded: tenderers must provide evidence of the use of a quality
control system.
- A list of the principal services provided in the past three years with the
sums, dates and recipients, public or private. Minimum level demanded:
tenderers must provide evidence of having done relevant work in the field
25

of maritime economic and technology forecasting, including at least three


earlier studies covering at least two technology fields relevant for the
purpose of this study.
Tenderers may, where appropriate, rely on the capacities of other entities,
regardless of the legal nature of the links which they have with them. They
must in this case prove to the contracting authority that they will have at their
disposal the resources necessary for performance of the contract, for example
by producing an undertaking on the part of those entities to place those
resources at their disposal.
Under the same conditions, a group of service providers may rely on the
capacities of the members of the group or of other entities.
4.4.

Award criteria
The contract will be awarded to the tenderer offering the best value for
money having regard to quality and price. To determine which tender offers
the best value for money, the following evaluation method will be used:
4.4.1. Technical evaluation
A maximum of 100 points will be awarded for the quality of the tender.
The criteria for the assessment of the quality are:
(1)

Understanding of the objectives (maximum 10 points; minimum


required: 5 points)
To this end, the tenderers should present a 3-4 pages summary
assessment of the current economic challenges for the maritime
economic sectors, a description of their understanding of relevant
research and technology activities and a description of the potential
role of RTD, innovation and new resources or uses of the sea in 15-20
years.

(2)

Quality of the proposed methodology and quality of the data sets,


study material and material to be gathered from interviews (maximum
points 60; minimum required: 40 points)
To this end, the tenderers should provide their approach to the "work
description and deliverables" as described under heading 2.2. and a
practical, detailed description of the services proposed for the
performance of the contract under each work package.
Tenderers should provide a work plan for collecting studies and data
through desk research and indicate the methodology for gathering
inputs from industry, experts, scientists and public authorities (i.e.
including quality of the data sets, study material and material to be
gathered for interviews, including the methodology to be used for the
intermediate hearing). They should describe the areas and
organisations to be covered by desk research in a considerable level
26

of detail, and what the research will look for; present the parameters
for the size and the composition of the sample for the interviews.
Tenderers also need to describe the methodology for forecasting the
development of economic and technological trends and for defining
scenarios (including a forecast as to the planned number of alternative
scenarios needed and the level of detail to be covered).
(3)

Project management, work organisation and time schedule (maximum


30 points; minimum required: 15 points)
To this end, the tenderers should describe their approach to project
management, contract follow-up (including contacts and 5 meetings
with the Commission) and organisation of work and quality assurance
under "General issues".
They should also provide a work scheme, including a detailed
implementation plan on each of the work packages as described under
heading 2.2, with estimated timing per task. This should also include
the allocation of staff and expected days per task and a full overview
of scheduled trips connected to the contract. Tenderers can make use
of workflow charts as they consider appropriate.
Note: The technical tender should contain no financial information
but the man-days per work package and the travel plan. Both should
be fully consistent with the volumes and corresponding costs quoted
in the financial tender form.

Only the tenders having reached the minimum number of points required for
each of the criteria for the assessment of the quality and a minimum score of
60 out of 100 will be considered for the financial evaluation.
4.4.2.

Financial evaluation

The financial value of the tenders that pass the quality examination will be
determined by calculating the price index as follows:
(Lowest price tender / Price of the tender in question) X 100.
4.4.3. Award of the contract
The contract shall be awarded to the tender offering the best quality/price
ratio, with a 70/30 weighting between technical quality and financial value.
This will be achieved by multiplying:
the result of the technical evaluation (number of points) by 0,7
the result of the financial evaluation (price index) by 0,3
The two results will be added together and the contract will be awarded to the
tender obtaining the highest score at the end of this process.
27

28

OPEN CALL FOR TENDERS


No MARE/2010/01
TECHNICAL ANNEX
Maritime sectors as defined in annex III
of the study on the Economic Impact of
Maritime Industries in Europe

29

No. Sector

Shipping

Shipbuilding

Subsector

Definition
Merchant shipping & ship management; Short-sea
shipping; Chartering-out; Cruise & ferry services;
Ocean towage

Seagoing vessels

Merchant ships; Fishing boats; Ocean-going tugs,


workboats, supply ships etc. ; Floating sections
Repair & Conversion of seagoing vessels
Newbuilding & repair of naval ships
Inland barges; Inland & harbour tugs; Inland
workboats, supply ships etc.; Repair; Floating
sections; Dry docks
All shipscrapping (and recycling)

Repair & conversion


Naval ships
Inland vessels

Scrapping
3

Offshore supply

Seismic research; Construction, installation and


conversion of platforms, storage vessels & equipment;
Drilling; Offshore-related transport, engineering,
communication, consultancy & other support

Inland shipping

Inland shipping & ship management; Chartering-out;


Inland cruises & ferries; Harbour & river towage;
Freighting ( Note: no inland terminals )

Maritime works

Cables & pipelines

Nautical cable & pipeline works for offshore,


telecommunications etc.
Dredging; River works; Construction of dykes,
harbours & canals; Support vessels; Sand transport

Dredging & other works


6

Seaports & related services

Cargo-handling ; Shipping related storage, agency,


maritime logistics & expedition; Port authorities;
Pilotage

Fishing

Maritime fishing; Professional inland fishing;


Shellfish production

Recreation

Recreational vessels

Yacht construction; Sporting, sailing & rowing boats;


Canoes; Inflatable boats; Repair; Floating sections
Yacht chartering & renting; Marinas; Inland yachtbasins; Supporting services concerning the
construction of & trade in recreational vessels;
Yachting-related training & trade

Recreational services

Maritime services

R&D & Education


Classification & inspection
Support services

10 Maritime equipment

Research & development; Consultancy;


Nautical training & education
Classification societies; Sampling; Laboratories
Bunkering; Ship supply; Rescue; Diving; Maritime
insurance, financing, brokerage, law & medical
services; Crewing; Maritime associations;
Maritime government services
Manufacturing of & wholesale trade in maritime
equipment

30

31